Title: Rod Beck
CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00007406/00001
 Material Information
Title: Rod Beck
Series Title: Rod Beck
Physical Description: Book
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00007406
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

CAT195 ( PDF )


Full Text







CAT177A

INTERVIEWEE:BUCK GEORGE

INTERVIEWER:EMMA ECHOLS

DATE:OCTOBER 3,1992



E:This is Emma Echols, from Charlotte, North Carolina, 5150

Sharon Road. I am working on the oral history of the

Catawba Indians, with the University of Florida [through]

Dr. Samuel Proctor. I am visiting in the home of Buck

George. Some years ago I was teaching school at Northside,

and I had quite a number of Indian children in my class.

They could not wait for the bell to ring, so they would go

out on the bleachers, at Northside school, and see Buck

George play football. So here, I am interviewing today,

Buck George. And I am going to let you tell about yourself;

give us your full name, and your address.

B:My real name is Evans M. George, Evans McLure George. My

nickname is "Buck", so everybody goes by Buck, they do not

really know me by my real name.

E:And your address?

B:1119 McDowell Drive, Rock Hill, South Carolina.

E:Where are you working now?

B:I am working at [Hearst Selanies] Corporation, and I have been

there thirty-four years, and in about another month, I am

going to retire, on December the first.











E:I cannot imagine you retiring, you are going to find something

else to do, I know that.

B:Yes, I think that there are plenty of things coming up now,

that I will be able to do.

E:Now let us go back to your early days, when you were a little

boy, where did you go to school, and what do you remember

about the Reservation?

B:Well, I went to school at the Northside school, it was right

near the Industrial Mill Village, and I was raised up on the

Industrial Mill Village, I live at 23 Barrel Street, and I

went to Northside School all the way through elementary

school, and then to Rock Hill High School. And when I

finished Rock Hill High School, I went over to Clempson

University.

E:Who do you remember of your teachers at Northside?

B:[Laughs] Oh, I remember alot of them; Mrs. Saunders, and I

remember you, Miss Echols, and I remember Mr. Reiser, and I

remember Mrs. Wilkinson, and . .

E:And Miss Sue Wayne, did you go to school to her?

B:I do not remember Miss Wayne.

E:You had some others. You remember Mrs. Parker, I suppose?

B:Oh, yes.

E;And Miss Leslie, maybe?

B:Miss Leslie taught me in the seventh grade. I came out of her

class one day, and she was always standing at the top of the











big fire escape at the end of the building, and the children

marched down those fire escapes to go home. So one day I

came out of that room, the first person out of the room, and

I was in a hurry to get home so I could come back to the

playground, and play. When I was the first one out of the

room, instead of walking down the flight of stairs, I

grabbed the bannisters and slid down, all the way down to

the ground, and it was about thirty feet or more down to the

ground, and I took off running, and I was almost to the edge

of the school grounds when I heard all these people

hollering at me, and I looked around to see who they were

hollering at, and it was me, and I looked back up there and

standing at the top of the fire escape was Miss Leslie,

motioning for me to come back. So I came back, and she made

me walk up and down those steps five times, and every step I

would say "haste makes waste". "An ounce of prevention is

worth a pound of cure", so I alwaCAT177A

INTERVIEWEE:BUCK GEORGE

INTERVIEWER:EMMA ECHOLS

DATE:OCTOBER 3,1992



E:This is Emma Echols, from Charlotte, North Carolina, 5150

Sharon Road. I am working on the oral history of the

Catawba Indians, with the University of Florida [through]

Dr. Samuel Proctor. I am visiting in the home of Buck











George. Some years ago I was teaching school at Northside,

and I had quite a number of Indian children in my class.

They could not wait for the bell to ring, so they would go

out on the bleachers, at Northside school, and see Buck

George play football. So here, I am interviewing today,

Buck George. And I am going to let you tell about yourself;

give us your full name, and your address.

B:My real name is Evans M. George, Evans McLure George. My

nickname is "Buck", so everybody goes by Buck, they do not

really know me by my real name.

E:And your address?

B:1119 McDowell Drive, Rock Hill, South Carolina.

E:Where are you working now?

B:I am working at [Hearst Selanies] Corporation, and I have been

there thirty-four years, and in about another month, I am

going to retire, on December the first.

E:I cannot imagine you retiring, you are going to find something

else to do, I know that.

B:Yes, I think that there are plenty of things coming up now,

that I will be able to do.

E:Now let us go back to your early days, when you were a little

boy, where did you go to school, and what do you remember

about the Reservation?

B:Well, I went to school at the Northside school, it was right

near the Industrial Mill Village, and I was raised up on the











Industrial Mill Village, I live at 23 Barrel Street, and I

went to Northside School all the way through elementary

school, and then to Rock Hill High School. And when I

finished Rock Hill High School, I went over to Clempson

University.

E:Who do you remember of your teachers at Northside?

B:[Laughs] Oh, I remember alot of them; Mrs. Saunders, and I

remember you, Miss Echols, and I remember Mr. Reiser, and I

remember Mrs. Wilkinson, and . .

E:And Miss Sue Wayne, did you go to school to her?

B:I do not remember Miss Wayne.

E:You had some others. You remember Mrs. Parker, I suppose?

B:Oh, yes.

E;And Miss Leslie, maybe?

B:Miss Leslie taught me in the seventh grade. I came out of her

class one day, and she was always standing at the top of the

big fire escape at the end of the building, and the children

marched down those fire escapes to go home. So one day I

came out of that room, the first person out of the room, and

I was in a hurry to get home so I could come back to the

playground, and play. When I was the first one out of the

room, instead of walking down the flight of stairs, I

grabbed the bannisters and slid down, all the way down to

the ground, and it was about thirty feet or more down to the

ground, and I took off running, and I was almost to the edge











of the school grounds when I heard all these people

hollering at me, and I looked around to see who they were

hollering at, and it was me, and I looked back up there and

standing at the top of the fire escape was Miss Leslie,

motioning for me to come back. So I came back, and she made

me walk up and down those steps five times, and every step I

would say "haste makes waste". "An ounce of prevention is

worth a pound of cure", so I always remember that. ys

remember that.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs