Title: Arthur Forster [ESC 10]
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U.S.S. MASSACHUSETTS


During the first world war, that was 1917-1918, the Navy

acquired six one-thousand ton tug boats. They were built for
use on the Great Lakes; that is for fresh water, not salt water
such as we have in the oceans and the Gulf of Mexico. These
tugs all had Indian names.
One of these tugs was named Allegheny and it was stationed

at the Pensacola Naval Air Station. The dock where she tied up
to got the name of the Allegheny Dock.
Another one of these six one-thousand ton tugs was the

Algonquin and I will speak more about that tug boat later.
During the war we had on our side as our allies the British

and Japanese. With other nations and our Navy, with its aviation,
helped to shorten that war. After that war the British, Japanese

and the United States came to an agreement to limit their navies

and agreed to a five, five, three agreement of some kind. That
is the British and the United States navy's were to have a ratio

of five battle ships each and the Japanese navy was to have three
battle ships.
I don't know what the other nations did about scrapping any

of their battle ships, but I know that our navy had one of their

battle ships in the Atlantic Ocean off Virginia and it was used
as a target for airplanes to drop bombs on. I don't know the
name of that ship.
We were surprised one morning to find a sister ship of the

Allegheny tug by the name of the Algonquin tied up near what is

called the Wet Basin.






U.S.S. MASSACHUSETTS (#2)

During the night before, after towing the USS MASSACHUSETTS

to a location south of Fort Pickens and east of the channel,
pulling the sea valves and sinking the MASSACHUSETTS, this tug
went to the Naval Air Station and tied up there.

The men on the tug Algonquin that towed the USS MASSACHUSETTS

to Pensacola spent some time ripping out brass and copper piping,
clocks and all kinds of instruments and made a large box that
could float with all this material. They took it to Pensacola

some way to sell to a dealer there but the man they went to had

been in the Navy and was in charge of all the junk on the station,
that was lead, copper, brass, iron, aluminum or in other words, he

was a junk dealer before he went in the Navy and the Navy put him
in charge of all this junk or scrap metal. When the material came

to him, he would not touch it. I guess he thought it was too hot

to handle.
I never did hear how it got to town but during the day it

appeared in the Wet Basin in a big floating box with a Marine on
guard. I did get close enough to the box to see what was in it.

It was rumored on the station that the Captain and probably other
members of the tug boat would be court marshalled but I never did

hear the last of it as the tug left in a few days. In a way, it

seemed rather foolish to hold men for a court marshall when the
Navy's orders were to sink the ship and nobody would gain anything
when it was sunk in the Gulf.
But, that is not what I am going to talk about.






U..SS. MASSACHUSETTS (#3)


I was holding the rate of Master Mechanic in the Structural
Division and also was the Master Mechanic of the Hull Division,
Bureau of Construction and Repair. It became the job of the Hull
Division to raise the battleship USS MASSACHUSETTS. The officer,
LT. Tucker, the Master Mechanic and about four good mechanics made,
I think, the first trip to the sunken ship by way of the tug
Allegheny.
In order to sink this battleship it was necessary to open the
sea valves on the bottom of the ship in order to let in the water
to fill up the compartments of the ship. In doing that, a lot of
sand came in with the water. The first thing we tried to do was
close these sea valves but we couldn't do it because of all the
sand in the way of closing the valves. It was decided to get from
the Bureau of Construction and Repair as many of these large pumps
that are electrically driven as were available. They sent us three
with the necessary suction hoses. These pumps were known as sub-
mersible pumps. That was the first time I had anything to do with
that kind of equipment but not necessarily the last.
We were a couple of weeks getting this equipment and it was
winter time so we were not in a hurry to go to work in the cold
out there. At that time all we knew was that we had to get the
ship afloat. Where it was supposed to go when we got it afloat
was anybody's guess at that time.
In order to do the necessary work on this ship we had the
Maryann, that is the barge with a house on it, and with the





U.S.S. MASSACHUSETTS (#4)

necessary hoisting gear to take wrecked seaplanes out of the water
and do any other work assigned to it. It had a large electrical

plant on board.

After quite some time, I had about four of my men working on
this ship and an officer with quite a few sailors and chief petty
officers. Two men that I remember by name, one was J. A. Winter,
he was a welder and his job was to cut holes with an oxyacetylene

gas torch. He worked cutting holes in bulkheads so the water
could run from one section to another. The enlisted men who were

handling the pumps would try to have the water run continually
because if a section was pumped off all of its water, the pump

would lose its suction and it was quite a job to get these big
twelve inch pumps primed again to work satisfactorily.
The crews would work all the time the weather would permit.
Being late in the winter, we would have a stretch of bad weather
and have to tie up and leave there for as long as a week at a
time. Then we would go back and start from scratch again. Ohat
had to be done several times until we had a stretch of good weather

and a lot ot good luck.

The ship was towed by the tug Allegheny and I think the Army
had a tug to help with the towing. I had an organization of people

at the Naval Air Station and I could not put all my time on this
ship so 'I was not on board when it was moved to the other side or
west side of the channel, that is to its permanent location.






U.S.S. MASSACHUSETTS (#5)


I am now going to tell you why this ship, that is the USS

MASSACHUSETTS, was moved to its present location.
When it was sunk to the bottom, there was enough free board

to walk all over the deck of the ship. A flat car came to Pensacola,
that is up on the hill before you actually get into Pensacola, in

fact at Brent in the freight yards there, and on this flat car

(it probably was built for this purpose) it had on it a large

gun, probably one of the type used on battleships. It was placed
in such a position that the people in charge of this gun were able
to shoot this gun and have the shell go up in the air and come
down on the deck of the MASSACHUSETTS, go through the deck and

on down further. I don't know how many shots were fired but there
were several.
The next work day a couple of Army officers, Navy LT. Albert

Tucker, Mr. Weston, a draftsman, the Master Mechanic and two

mechanics went over to the MASSACHUSETTS in a fifty foot motor
sailor. We took with us some pieces of half-inch galvinized pipe
about ten feet long, some pipe wrenches, a can of paint and a

small paint brush. We went to the shell holes in the deck, put
together the half-inch pipe and put it down the hole as far as

possible. Mr. Weston made notes, circles were painted around
these holes in the deck and each hole was given a number for
identification and reference.
A few days later there was another flat car, probably made

special, and it had a type of gun which was short barrel and

stubby. I think it was known as a mortar-type of gun.






U.S.S. MASSACHUSETTS (#6)


I live at what is known as Pou Station and this interbay
station is the next stop on the street car line. The street car:
company had switching tracks at that station so they could bring
down the freight cars anytime of the day or night and park them
on these tracks. The Naval Air Station personnel would move these
freight cars in the morning and get them into the Naval Air Station.
These switching tracks were where this freight car with the stubby-

type short barrell gun was stationed. MTat was known as the Interbay
Station on the street car line.
The men in charge of this gun shot the gun quite a few times

causing a large flash of fire followed by a lot of black smoke.
Then in the midst of that you could see the shell or ball traveling
up in the air and out of sight. There was a loud sound and a lot
of windows in the neighborhood were shattered; some of mine were.

I happened to be home that day, my wife was in bed with the measles.
After the shooting was over, the next work day the something
had to be done to get the information from the MASSACHUSETTS.
Some of the same people made the trip but I did not go.
I speak of a Mr. J. A. Winter, a welder. I talked over the
phone to him yesterday. He was retired from the Naval Air Station
as a Master Mechanic. If you go back to the 1920's, there was not
too much known about safety, that is inhaling smoke. This Mr.
Winter, the welder who was cutting holes through the bulkheads
to try to get a continuous flow of water to pump, was doing a
good job of cutting holes but paid but little attention to the
smoke. He finally took sick and was off the job a week or so






U.S.S. MASSACHUSETTS (#7)

but it happened during a time the Gulf got rough and no work
could be done in the Gulf. He got back on the job but he used
safety precautions from then on.
Some time later LT. Tucker sent for the Structural Officer

and the Master Mechanic. He wanted us to go over to the MASSACHUSETTS
with him but he did not tell us until we were all on one of the
fifty foot motor sailors. Wheix we got near the ship, we could
see smoke coming up from one of the gun turrets and he asked me
if I knew what it was and I told him no. He said I think I do.
But when we got aboard the ship and saw where the smoke was coming
from, he went over to see the men there and they were using a gas
torch and they had a gas and an oxygen tank that was checked out
of one of our shops about a week before. He had signed the request
for all that equipment and the men went directly to the shop con-
cerned and got it all. I did not know the equipment was out of
the shop.
I don't know what LT. Tucker said to these fellows but that
was the last of these two fellows burning out lead on that ship.

3Te tanks and gas torch were put on the fifty foot motor sailor
and taken back to the shop.
What these men were doing was burning out lead that was used
to balance the turrets that held the large guns on these battle-
ships and there was a lot of this lead all over the section of
the deck. I don't think these men left any laying around when
they left the ship. They could have even taken more of this
safely because they did not have to take the two tanks which
weighed quite some pounds that they could have taken in lead.







U.S.9. MASSACHUSETTS (#8)


Naturally where fishing has been so good, most everybody
had some kind of fishing gear and it takes a lot of lead to
satisfy all of these fishermen. It takes quite a lot of it

and it is used locally by fishermen to make sinkersfor deep
sea fishing and making sinker leads for cast nets and gill
nets. A cast net and gill net lead are about the same; they

are about one half inch in diameter with about three-sixteenth
inch hole in it running length ways and from three to four inches

long. A cast net has these lead weights strung around the outside
of a twenty-five foot diameter net, made more or less to that
size and it is thrown in the air to come down in a circle and
pulled up to catch the fish.
I am going to make a statement now that when the USS MASSA-

CHUSETTS was sunk, that was before the Army did any shooting at
that battleship, there was no question about it being sunk. The
ship was sunk before any shooting took place. The Army with its

guns or the Navy with its bombs DID NOT sink the USS MASSACHUSETTS

and I will repeat, DID NOT.
A lot of material above the water line was moved and used in

the scrap drive conducted during WVW II. The hull is gradually
sinking and it is about out of sight. That is a very small part
of the once proud USS MASSACHUSETTS. I guess that is where our
battleship is going, the same as the fort, that is the brick fort
known as Port McRay.






U.S.S. MASSACHUSETTS (#9)

Prom time to time the question of who owned this old sunken
hull, the remains of the proud USS MASSACHUSETTS, has come up
and the Navy tried to sell it for junk. The Navy owned it, then
the War Department, again the Navy, then the State of Florida,

and I think the Federal Park Service owns it now. Some day a
boat may ram into it as it is about submerged and it may be a
liability to the present owners. This is only a thought and
it should be considered.








Have you ever been sued in the Courts for "mental anguish"?

Well, I have.

The dictionary describes mental anguish, and I quote, as."intense pain

or grief, acute suffering bodily or mental" unquote.
In December 1925 business in and around Pensacola was not very good. On

the east side of 10th Avenue, just south of Gregory Street, was what you would

call a row of cheap shotgun houses and a woman by the name of Fannie Collins

lived in one of these houses.

She had two sons that were not living at home. They were in an automobile

some place in Indiana and they ran in front of a railroad train and the automobile

was smashed and both sons were killed instantly. The undertaker in Indiana was

unable to embalm the bodies as they were too mutilated so he put the bodies in

the caskets and had somebody in the town make air tight linings out of roofing

sheet metal and they were put inside the shipping boxes before the caskets were

placed in them. All the joints on the sheet metal were soldered, including the

top, making an air tight metal box. The wooden top was then put on over the metal

top and secured.

The undertaker in Indiana put instructions on both of these boxes stating

that these boxes were not to be opened.

Now as it was the custom in what is known as country funerals, that is

funerals not conducted in the city of Pensacola, the family or friends of the

family or members of the church would generally stop by at the funeral home

for the box that was to go into the ground to have the casket put in during

the funeral services. The funeral director would generally have somebody

from the company go to see that everything would be in order to conduct the

funeral.









For information, these burial boxes were the same boxes that the casket

manufacturer would furnish to ship the new caskets to the funeral homes.

Sunday morning members of the Collins family came by the funeral home

to pick up the two burial boxes and they put them in the ground. That was

Sunday morning. Late Sunday afternoon the L&N Railroad baggage car came to

the railroad station and the Pou Funeral Home had two hearses waiting there

to receive the two Collins boy's bodies.

My man, the funeral director, saw the two notices on the shipping boxes

warning the undertaker that received these boxes that they were not to be

opened due to the condition of the bodies and they had not been embalmed.

That information was passed on to the Collins family and that should have

been final. But the Collins family insisted the shipping boxes be opened.

My funeral director knew what he would find but to satisfy the family he

opened the boxes. What he should have done was refuse to open these boxes

and let the family get another funeral director if they were not satisfied

with the way we were handling the situation.

The funeral director had to get a mechanic with a blow torch and soldering

iron and take off the metal top to get to the caskets. Conditions were so bad

in and around the funeral home that it was necessary to put the caskets in the

hearses until it was time to put them in the ground at the cemetery. The

caskets were not taken into the church for the services, which were held the

next day which was Monday.

There was a man by the name of B. A. Davis, he had a marble yard or

monument company in Pensacola and he had on the side, he was some kind of

a preacher. He was the preacher at this Collins funeral out in the country

that.day. A few days later or a few days after the funeral I was hearing

on the street that I switched the caskets that the boys came in. They were








bronze caskets and I switched to cheap cloth caskets and Mrs. Fannie Collins

was going to sue me.

I thought that being I was doing business with this Mr. B. A. Davis,
the preacher, that is buying all the concrete burial vaults that I sold, that

he would be a good go-between for me and Mrs. Collins to get her off our backs.

I took him out to my garage and showed him the metal lined boxes the company

had to hire a man with a blow torch and soldering iron to open them and the

boxes were no good to us with the sheet metal lining in them.

This Mr. B. A. Davis, the preacher, went around to see Mrs. Collins
and later in the day he came to the funeral home and about the first thing

he did was to shake my hand and he said let's sit down. He said he believed

he had satisfied Mrs. Collins. Now this is the way he believed he had satisfied

Mrs. Collins. He started by saying that the poor old lady lost two fine sons

and you have to feel sorry for her. She doesn't know which way to turn, that
she depended on those boys and they were not there to comfort her. He said,

I have made an agreement with her to put a monument on the boys' graves. Then

he started to tell me about a base about four feet square, about ten or twelve
inches thick with a shaft in the middle about probably twelve or fourteen inches

square at the bottom and probably eight or ten inches square at the top and five
or six feet high, polished and the names of the family carved on it. I finally

had to stop him to get in my two cents.

I said I don't intend to pay her a bribe to shut her up. That was what
I expected you to do, not sell her a monument and expect me to pay for it. By

the way, how much will this monument cost. He said oh, it will not cost you

much with what you are worth but look how it will hurt your business if you

don't settle with her. I said, HOW MUCH? He said it will be a nice monument








and you will be proud of it. The lowest price I could possibly charge would be

about $750. I said, $750 to you and as a bribe to shut her up hell no, not

a damn cent and that's for you and this Mrs. Collins also.

Now here is a letter I received about six weeks later.

FORSYTH CARO
Attorney at Law
American National Bank Bldg.
Pensacola, FLA.

January 18, 1926

Pou Funeral Service,
City,

Gentlemen:

Mrs. Collins, the mother of the two boys, who were
shipped here from Indiana, and who were buried by you,
informs me that you exchanged the boxes in which the
bodies were enclosed, substituting cheaper and inferior
boxes. She has placed her claim for damages with me.

If you care to settle the same without suit, please
take the matter up with me.

Yours very truly,

(signed) Forsyth Caro


No reply was made to his letter.

R. P. Reese

Attorney at Law

Pensacola, Florida

June 24, 1926

The Pou Funeral Service,
Pensacola, Florida

Gentlemen:

Mrs. Fannie Collins, North 10th Avenue, City, has placed
in my hands for adjustment her claim against your company for









substituting other boxes and enclosing the caskets containing
her two boys, shipped from La Porte, Indianna, in November last.
She tells me that you have had the matter up with her for adjust-
ment, and that you have never reached any conclusion. It appears
to me that it would be to your interest to conclude this matter,
and I will be very glad to discuss it with you, looking to an
adjustment without suit.

Yours very truly,

(signed) R. P. REESE

Attorney for Fannie Collins


RPR:H


About a week later or on June 30, 1926 I received a second letter
Reese.


R. P. Reese

Attorney At Law

Pensacola, Florida

June 30, 1926
Pou Funeral Service,
27 East Wright Street,
Pensacola, Florida.

IN RE: Mrs. Fannie Collins' Claim.
Gentlemen:


Please give me
several days ago,


from R. P.


reply to the letter I wrote you
with reference to the above claim.


Yours very truly,

(signed) R. P. REESE

RPR:H

Up to this time I had received about half a dozen crank letters, that is letters

unsigned and some of them threatening. As I received them, I read them then tore

them up. But I have one letter that I received after the letters from R. P. Reese

and it was somewhat like the others. I received it in July and it is as follows.








Pou Undertaking Parlors:


The writer of this is interested in both sides of this
Collins case. It would be unfortunate to have this thing
come to a law-suit. But that is what it is coming to unless
it is financially compromised with Mrs. Collins. This will
mean the ruination of your business and cost you a great
deal more than a compromise would. This lawsuit will be
the most sensational court affair that ever happened in
Pensacola. It will involve the digging up of these brothers
to confirm the charges against you. It will mean the bringing
of the undertakers who put them away at first coming to
Pensacola and a lot of other sensational stuff that will
mean your ruination. Take the advice of a friend and
compromise this matter just as soon as.you can.

I have here some newspaper clippings. I got Wm. Fisher to defend me because

we were personal friends and I thought he was the best lawyer in the city of

Pensacola and I always thought so. This clipping is from June or July 1927.

-UNUSUAL SUIT
SET FOR TRIAL
IN COURT HERE

Alleged Switching of
Coffins is Basis
of Action

Two civil cases have been set for trial next week in
circuit court, one involving the alleged "switching" of
coffins by an undertaking company that formerly operated
in Pensacola.

Mrs. Fannie Collins is suing the original operators
of Pou Funeral company, which since that time has changed
hands and is now known as Pou Funeral service.

Mrs. Collins, who seeks $25,000 for mental anguish
occasioned in the case, claims that the company "switched"
the coffins containing the bodies of her two sons who
were killed in an accident in Indiana and which were
brought here for burial.

The bodies left Indiana in copper-lined coffins and
were buried in cheaper coffins, it is claimed by the
plaintiff..

J. Pope Reese represents the plaintiff and William
Fisher the defendant.







My lawyer,.William Fisher, wanted to go into court properly prepared so

I had to get John Page, who was my licensed undertaker at the time of this case

but he no longer worked for me (he lived in DeFuniak running his own business,

probably with some of my money, I don't know, but it's too late now), but I had

to get John Page to come to Pensacola. I had to get a truck and put the two

boxes on the truck. I also had to have a stenographer to take the testimony.

All of that cost money.

I am going to read another newspaper clipping. I believe this was November,
1927.

COFFIN CASE
IS UP AGAIN
Judge Campbell Presides in
Circuit Court
The oft-tried damage suit of Mrs. Fannie Collins against
Arthur E. Forster was back in circuit court today, with
Judge A. G. Campbell, of DeFuniak Springs, presiding.

Mrs. Collins claims damages of $2,000 from Forster. She
claims that he changed the coffins in which the bodies of
her two sons were shipped here from Indiana two years ago.
He then was manager of the Pou Funeral service.

D. W. Berry is attorney for Mrs. Collins. William
Fisher represents the defendant.

Jurors hearing the case are B. A. Coleman, W. W. Alford,
W. H. Godwin, J. G. McNeir, C. C. Miller and H. D. Williams

Here's another news item.

COFFIN CASE IS
NON SUIT AGAIN
Third Trial in Two Years
Makes No Progress
Escambia county's celebrated coffin substitution case
failed to make progress in circuit court again yesterday
when it came up for the third time in about two years.

Twice before yesterday the case has been called in
circuit court, each time ending in a plea of non-suit
which was based on some technical objection of William
Fisher, attorney for the defendant.








The same objection was raised yesterday and Berry and
Zachary, attorneys for Mrs. Collins obtained the usual
non-suit ruling.
Now I'm not sure of the date of this last news item, but I'll read it all,

it's very small.


JUDGE CLOSES
"COFFIN ACTION"
Directs Verdict In Favor Of
Undertaking Concern

The $2,000 damage suit by Mrs. Fannie Collins against
Arthur E. Forster was finally disposed of yesterday when
Circuit Judge A. G. Campbell directed the jury to return
a verdict for the defendant and Mrs. Collins' attorney
failed to take a new suit.

The well-known "coffin case" Mrs. Collins vs. Forster,
is nearly two years old. Mrs. Collins charged that Forster,
when he was manager of Pou's Undertaking parlors, changed
coffins in which the bodies of her two sons were shipped
from Indiana two years ago.

Going on with this Mrs. Collins case, I understand the railroad company
paid all the expenses in Indiana, also shipping bodies to Pensacola and Mrs.

Collins did not pay the expenses in Pensacola. She still owes the Pou Funeral

Service $60.28 since December 1925, which was her total expense in Pensacola.

It cost me personally, about $500.00 for lawyer fees, witnesses and
recording and that was when I was administrator of an estate and holding an

important job at the Naval Air Station. Running a private business, where

you had to depend on strangers with a license to keep the business going and

kin folks working for you that thought more of women and whiskey than trying
to get a license was more trouble to me than running the job I had at the Naval

kir Station, where I was responsible to the Navy for the production and repair

Df naval aircraft to train naval aviators and any other jobs the Navy wanted to

assign me to.









If you don't think that was a job in itself, try attending to a business
that you cannot completely oversee and depending on other people's license to
keep your front door open to do business and having a nephew who you could not

fire because it might hurt his family's feelings even though he did think more

of women and whiskey!!








FORSYTH CARO
ATTORNEY AT LAW
AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK BLDG.
PENSACOLA, FLA.

January 18, 1926



Pou Funeral Service,
City,

Gentlemen:

lirs. Collins, the mother of the two boys, who were

shipped here from Indiana, and who were buried by you, informs

me that you exchanged the boxes in which the bodies were

enclosed, substituting cheaper and inferior boxes. She has

placed her claim for damages with me.

If you care to settle the same:without suit,

please take the matter up ,vith me.
Yours ver," .tru,.,
Yours very ...truly.,


^ -//7^








P. Reese
(ffaDfttt at trato
'e)soc4la, 'loriba






June 24, 1926*



The Pou Funeral Service,
Pensacola, Florida.

Gentlemen:

Mrs. Fannie Collins, North 10th Avenue, City, has placed
in my hands for adjustment her claim against your company for
substituting other boxes and enclosing the caskets containing
her two boys, shipped from La Porte, Indianna, in November last.
She tells me that you have had the matter up with her for adjust-
ment, and that you have never reached any conclusion. It appears
to me that it would be to your interest to conclude this matter,
and I will be very glad to discuss it with you, looking to an
adjustment without suit.
Yours very truly


Attorney for Fannie Collins.


RPR:H






S. csc
,Mflornrg at T-aln
nsacola, nloriba








June 30, 1926.

Pou Funeral Service,
27 East Wright Street,
Pensacola, Florida.

IN RE: Mrs. Fannie Collins' Claim.

Gentlemen:
I
Please give me reply to the letter I wrote you
Several days ago, with reference to the above claim.

Yours very ty-


RPR:R











#Pou Undertaking Parlors:


The writer of this is interested in both sides of this Oollins
case. It would be unfortunate to have this thing come to a law-suit.
But that is what it is coming to unless'it is financially compromised
with Lxrs.Collins. This will mean the ruination of your business and
cost you a great deal more than a compromise would, This lawsuit will
be the =ost sensational court affair that eve? happened in Pensacola.
It will involve the digging up of these brothers to confirm the charges
against you. It will mean the bringing of the undertakers who put them
away at first coming to Pensacola and a lot of other sensational stuff
that will mean your ruination. Take the advice of a friend and compro-
mise this matter just as soon as you can.






















Pou Underai~i Parlors,
bright street,
Pensacola, Florida.







UNUSUAL SUIT

SET FOR TRIAL

IN COURT HERE

Alleged Switching of
.Coffins Is Basis
of Action
Two civil cases have been set for
trial next week in circuit court, one
*involving the alleged "switching" of
-roffins by an undertaking company 1
that formerly operated in Pensaccla.
Mrs. Fannie Collins is suing -the
,original operators of Pcu Funeral
'company, which since that time has I
-changed hands and is now knov.wn
'as Pou Funeral service. .
I Mrs. Collins, who seeks $25,0,!i for
-mental anguish occasioned in the
case, claims that the company
-"switched" the coffins containing
'the bodies of her two sons who were
Killed in an accident in Indiana and
.lhich were brought here for buriaL
t The bodies left Indiana in copper-
lined coffins and were buried in
cheaper coffins, it is claimed by the
plaintiff.
J j..Pope Reese represents the
plaintiff and William Fisher the
defendant. _.. -:







--N----- AS E


iS UP : AGA1N

Judge Campbell Presides In
S:." : Circuit Court
.... .. .. ... .
"-The oft-tried damage suit of Mrs.
TFannle Collins against Arthr- E.
Toaster was back in circuit court to-
,iday, with Judge A. G. Campbell. of
DeFunlak Springs, presiding.
Mrs. .Collins claims damages of
$2,000 from Foster. She claims that
.'e changed the coffins In which the I
:-'odles of her two sons were shipped
*here from Indiana two years ago.
He then was manager of the Pou
FFuneral service.
; D. W. Berry is attorney for Mrs.'
Collins. William Fisher represents
the :cfcndant.
Jurors lihcring the case are B. A.
Coleman, W. W. Allord, W. II. God-
win, J. G. McNeir, C. C. Miller and
"p. D. Williams. ,


COFFIN CASE IS

NON SUIT AGAIN

.Third Trial In Two Years'
M .'lakes No Progrcss
I ... ---
1 Escambla county's celebrated cof-:
jin substitution case failed to make
progress In circuit court again yes-
Aerday when it came up for tin
Third time in about two years.
( Once more the defendant, Norf 31
Potu. formerly connected with Pol's
undertaking service, objected to the,
4orm In which Mrs. Fannie Collins;
.had brought suit for $5.000 damages,.
,and once more Mrs. Collins had heri
plea for non-suit accepted by the
.court.
This procedure has marked the'
case each time it has come up for-
trial since it was filed in 1925. 5
SAt that time Mrs. Collins filed'
suit for dameses based on the cornm
-Plaint that the undertakers had:
Substituted coffin boxes during ship-,
jinent of the bodies of her two sons:
Irpm the scene of their death in an!
Industrial accident in Ohio. She!
-claimed that the boxes which cn-I
Jeased -the coffins as they were
finally buried were not those shei
bad selected, and for which she,
.,aid.
| Twice before yesterday the case
-3as.been called in circuit court, each,
time ending in a plea of non-suit
w'hlch was based on some technicalJ
-bjection of William Fisher, attor-
ey for Mrs. Pou. i
The same objection was raised]
yesterday, and Berry and Zachary,,
attorneys for Mrs. Collins obtained:
h_-m ual non-suit ruling. ..--




IJUDGE CLOSES

CQFFrIN ACTION'
_.
.jDirects Verdict In Favor Of
.---Undertaking Concern

- The $2,000 damage suit by Mrs.
Fpannie Collins against Arthur E.
,Foster was fiially disposed of yes-
-terday whcn Circuit Judge A. G.
Campbcll directed the' Jury to return
ia verdict for the defendant and Mrs.
--Collins' attorney failed to take a
Inew suit.
The well-known "coffin case" hAlM
Collins vs. Foster. Is nearly two
years old. Mrs. Collins charged that
Foster, when he was manager of
Pou's Undertaking parlors,, changed'
coffins in which the bodies of her
two sons were shipped from Indiana.
two years ago.




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