<%BANNER%>

SPOHP




PAGE 1

UFLC 75 Interviewee: Fredric G. Levin Interviewer: Samuel Proctor Date: July 1, 2002 P: I’m doing an Oral History interview this morning, July 1, 2002 with Fredric G. Levin, and we’re doing it here in his office in Pensacola. The address is 316 South Baylen Street, Suite 600, Pensacol a 32501. Fred, the first thing I’d like you to do, if you will, is to give me your full name. L: It’s Fredric Gerson Levin. P: Was it always spelled Fredric that way? Never with a “K”? L: Never with a “K.” P: Where does the Gerson come from? L: I’m really not sure. P: Family? L: I’m really not sure. It was always a funny name to me, and back early, I think even when I did my Social Security [car d], I was so embarrassed by the Gerson name [that] I put on my Social Security card “Fred George Levin.” P: You gave yourself a new middle name. L: A new middle name, but then eventually it got straightened out. The “Fredric” was spelled the way Fredric March, my mo ther told me that she liked that way. P: I like saying him, too. What’s your birth date? L: March 29, 1937. P: March 29 is my birthday. I didn’t realize that you and I had something we could celebrate together. Where were you born? L: I was born in Pensacola. P: Tell me your parents’ names. L: They were Rose Lefkowitz Levin and Abraham Ivan Levin. P: Where was your mother born?

PAGE 2

UFLC 75 Page 2 L: At some points I hear it’s Danville, Virg inia or High Point, North Carolina. It’s right in that area, the furniture area. P: How about your dad? L: He was born in Butte, Montana. His father was a trader, pushcart type trader, and just happened to park his wife there in Butte, Montana. I’ve always heard that he left them there and went up to Al aska for the Gold Rush, but the timing wasn’t there. I think daddy was born in 1906, so that wouldn’t have been the Gold Rush timing. I really don’t k now, but I know daddy was born in Butte, Montana. P: The family came over from Europe from where? Russia? L: Latvia and Lithuania. P: Into where? L: They came into, I think, Ellis Island. It’s very unfortunate that none of us ever really got much information. In fact, I didn’t realize that my grandfather had been married a couple or three times, my grandmother had been married – this is on my father’s side – that by the time we got interested in genealogy and all of that it was gone. The Levin side of the family, that was not their name apparently when they landed. P: I was going to ask you about that, the change. L: My father told me he thought it was something like Webber, and somehow or another the name Levin got t here, and there’s a videotape of my father doing one of these interviews, and unfortunately he di ed before we ever completed it, but I think it does give as much of the history as he knows. P: So they came in, you think, into New York. How did they then move south into Virginia you think? L: I’m not sure. I know that somehow or another they ended up in Norfolk, Virginia, and my father was a twin. I’m really horrible when it comes to... P: I think the most interesting part is how they got to Butte, Montana. L: Yeah. He was one of the, I’m sure, few Jews that was born in Butte, Montana, but apparently he was like a pushcart peddler. P: Your father or your grandfather?

PAGE 3

UFLC 75 Page 3 L: I’m talking about my grandfather, and then my father was born in Butte and lived there about a year. My brother Allen went back, and I can’t even remember what Allen said. I think he went to the archives, and there was nothing showing that they were born there. P: The question is how did they get to P ensacola? That’s really where the story begins. L: Yes. My mother was one of, I think, eight or nine children, all [of them] boys except for her. They moved to Fort Lauderdale. P: From Montana? L: No, my mother was born in Danville. The Lefkowitzes were in the furniture business in the High Point, Winston [-Sa lem], all that area there, and fairly well-to-do and had moved to Fort Lauderdale. The story is that my dad grew up in Norfolk, and he graduated high school and my mother did also. My father, his father, my grandfather, they had a little gr ocery store on Church Street, I don’t know why I always remember that, in Norfolk. Anyhow, my dad said he graduated high school and heard about the big boom in Florida. P: Land boom. L: Yeah, this would have been in the 1920s, 1924 probably. 1923, 1924, somewhere in there. He told my grandf ather that he was going to South Florida to get involved in this great explosion of wealth that was occurring down there. My grandfather said, this is according to my father, that he didn’t expect my daddy to last very long, so he bought him a train ticket round trip. My father said when they got into Fort Lauderdale he cashed in the back end of the ticket; he wasn’t coming home. He said there had been no failure there. He started working in a grocery store [and] eventua lly took over the produce department. He was living in something like a YMCA with a bunch of guys and started saving his money. He said that time, he was making [$200], $300 a week. P: That was big money. L: Yeah, of course. He said it was onl y costing $6 to room and board, $6 or $8, and he was saving a lot of money. [He] was going to the synagogue in Fort Lauderdale and saw my mother, and he kept coming around, and my mother’s father didn’t think much of him. This was the only daughter, and they wanted her to marry a doctor. P: He was Jewish, but he was also a produce man.

PAGE 4

UFLC 75 Page 4 L: Produce man, manager of a little produce st and. My mother was very attractive and had a lot of suitors. My daddy said he always realized at the synagogue that... Anyhow, he left a major contribution in order to win the heart of his father-in-law to be. It was something lik e $20 for some different thing back then. This would have been in the mid-1920s, and he had saved up several thousands of dollars that [he] married my mother in Fort Lauderdale. They honeymooned in Havana. P: That was big living. L: Yeah. The little things you remem ber, the National Hotel was where their honeymoon was. [They] came back to Fort Lauderdale. About that time, the boom busted, and he always laughs because there must have been a major hurricane down there. P: September, 1926. L: All right. And my father’s fat her became deeply concerned and had heard that there was no water supply, so he either tried to send bottled water down there or was attempting to. My father used to laugh about his father was going to send water on [a] train. Anyhow, my father, there was the bust, and started looking for something else to do. P: In Fort Lauderdale still? L: Except there was not much in Fort Lauderdal e. I think by that time the hurricane had occurred, the bust had occurred, so he and one of my uncles, I believe it was my uncle Morris, my mother’s brother, decided to go look and somehow or another ended up in Pensacola. P: No relatives here, no family here. L: Nothing, nothing. But they saw the naval air station here, and it looked like a great opportunity for a pawnshop. My dad didn’t really know anything about jewelry, but he was a good businessman. T hey went into partners in something called the L&L Pawnshop, Levin and Lef kowitz or Lefkowitz and Levin. That apparently didn’t last long and my uncle Morris went back to, I guess it was, Miami or somewhere and got into the hotel business. Now, daddy and momma are here in Pensacola, and my brother David must have been born about, either, we can look it up, but I think, 1928, 1929, 1930, something like that. The pawnshop started to do better and better. P: Wasn’t there a question about the lo cation of the pawnshop to begin with? The original site was Ordons?

PAGE 5

UFLC 75 Page 5 L: There was, and then he moved... P: The woman didn’t want to after she lear ned that it wasn’t going to have clothing there too, the Ordons... L: Yeah. Ordons yeah, who were dear, dear friends. Ordons Men Store was the men’s store in town, and Jewish. P: The one that just closed on that site? L: The one that just closed on the same site, not near as nice. Mr. Ordon, Harry Ordon had just tremendous talent in architec tural type, art type things, and you’d even see the store that he built, which is still there today, was built in the early 1950s, and it was so far ahead of its time. Even to when they closed it last year in the year 2000 or 2001. They have not really changed it much, it was like for fifty years the same. P: But Ordon’s sister owned the property next door? L: I’m not sure [about] the relationshi ps, but apparently somebody got concerned about my father was going to sell used clothes in the pawnshop, and they somehow or another worked it out. P: And they went to another site? L: Went to another site, and I think that’s where it remained until when it closed at 108 South Palafox, which was right across, I’m not sure... P: Near the San Carlos Hotel? L: No. This was closer to the Saenger T heater and on that side of the street there was Walgreens across the street, Tom Ma can on the corner, then next to that was Joe Williams, then Silvermans, then, I think, Singer sewing, then daddy, and then next to that was Maxie Lipschitz’s bar called Sir Richards or Sir something. P: Anyway, the family opened a pawnshop, and it prospered? L: Opened a pawn[shop], and it prospered. A lot of military people would come in and pawn, and daddy learned the jewelry business and started to become a fixture in the Jewish community here. P: Was there a Jewish community?

PAGE 6

UFLC 75 Page 6 L: Yeah. The oldest temple, a reformed temp le in Florida, is the Temple Bethel, still in the same location. I noticed driving on Chase Street, there’s a sign “Oldest Jewish Synagogue”. I never knew t hat because of an historical sign on the way home. P: I wrote that historical sign. L: Really? P: Yeah. The plaque. L: Yeah, the plaque. P: The state put it up. L: I didn’t even realize there was a sy nagogue there. Anyhow, there was a very strong Jewish community there. P: And your family moved right into the community? L: Moved into what they thought was Or thodox, but you know, they had the women in the back, the men up front, and the tota l service was in Hebrew. Everybody would go home and eat. We kept kosher in our home, but out everybody would eat shrimp, my mother used to love sh rimp. So my brother David was born. P: All your family, all of the brothers were born in Pensacola? L: Yeah. P: David’s the oldest. L: David’s the oldest. Then Herman, He rman would have been three or four years behind that. Then, daddy built a home on 15 West Blount Street, and that was like [$5,000] or $6,000, and that was right about the time I was born. P: Are you number three? L: I’m number three. So I grew up on 15 West Blount, which is about a half a block off of Palafox, north of town, a block from P.K. Yonge School, which is now the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, a very small area. Then, you move a couple of blocks away I remember Dr. Ames lived there. Then, on one block was Silberman. Then, next to the S ilbermans were the Goldenbergs, Mr. and Mrs. Goldenberg were my godparents. Then, next to them were the Danheisers. Next to them were the Ros enthals. That whole block was Jewish.

PAGE 7

UFLC 75 Page 7 P: A little ghetto. L: Little ghetto. But it was North Hill in Pensacola. P: Was it a close-knit Jewish community? L: Yes. I think the proudest my daddy was, I think he went for either twelve or sixteen years as president of the synagogue year after year. P: It’s a reformed temple when they get here. Do they stay in that? L: No. We had both a reform and Orthodox group. P: So when your daddy came, the Orthodox community was already established? L: Sure. P: So they went right into that. L: They went right into that. P: I wondered if your father was one of the founders of it. L: No. That had been the Lischkoffs and... It was the congregation B’nai Israel, and I’m not sure whether that sign that you put up is for the synagogue or for the temple. P: Only for the temple. L: So that was the location of the temple then they moved to Cervantes. When daddy got here, it was on Belmont Str eet, the synagogue. I remember right across the street, the Greenhuts lived, and he had been mayor of Pensacola, or the father had been mayor, and they were in the candy business. Then, right down the street was a kosher butcher shop. P: A kosher butcher shop in little Pensacola? L: Oh yeah. Mrs. Kalishman, Millie Kalishm an. That was a pretty reasonable size. I think the Orthodox Jewish community probabl y is almost as big as what is now the conservative [Jewish community]. Ba ck then, I’m sure there were at least fifty [or] sixty families, and maybe there’s no more than one hundred today. The temple, the Reformed, they’ve gotten pretty big. A lot of doctors moved in, things like that.

PAGE 8

UFLC 75 Page 8 P: You named two of your brothers, Davi d and Herman are older than you. Who else are your siblings? L: Shortly after me, I was born in March, Stanley was born about a year and a half later in November. Then, my brother Martin would have been – he died in... P: That’s the one that died? L: In October, 1958. He was just about to turn seventeen, I think. P: He was the youngest of the children. L: No. Seventeen, so he was born in 1941. Then Allen, Allen was born, I think, in 1944 or 1945. P: Allen is the youngest? L: Allen’s the youngest. P: What did your brother die of? L: Martin died of leukemia. P: And your son Martin obviously is named for him. L: Yeah. I named my first child Marci rea lly for Martin, my brother. Then, along came Debbie, and then Martin. I was going to name him Martin Lewis Levin, which my brother’s name is Martin Lewis Levin, and my mother said “No, you don’t,” because she was superstitious that Ma rtin died at such a young age. So, I changed it to Martin Howard Levin, and the “Howard” was for somebody on my wife’s side. 1937 is when I was born. The family had been here for seven or eight years, whatever, 1928. P: Is your father already becoming part of the business community in Pensacola? L: Yes. I was getting ready to tell you. I grew up on 15 West Blount Street. We had sort of like a chauffeur, handyman, yard man named Willy, I think it was Willy Davis. We had at least one maid and maybe two maids, black women. We lived pretty high on the hog. P: I was going to say, you didn’t grow up poor. L: I did not grow up poor. I never wanted for anything. As I grew up, my father not only had the pawnshop, which was doing well, but he was in the jewelry

PAGE 9

UFLC 75 Page 9 business in Tallahassee, Rays Jewelers, I believe, on College Street. Then he got involved at Pensacola Beach when it started to go and allow motels to be built there. He and Mr. Silverman and Mr. Goldenberg put up one of the first motels on Pensacola Beach. Daddy got into the concession business on Pensacola Beach. Then, in the early 1950s he took over the concessions at the Pensacola dog track. My father was very well liked by the non-Jewish community as well as the Jewish community. They thought of him as being extremely bright, and I always felt like he k new his place. In other words, he was a good Jew. We never were “country club” or anything like that. My parents social life was strictly in the Jewish community. Daddy worked an awful lot, as you can imagine between all these different things. He got into the bowling alley business, he got into a bunch. P: He was a real entrepreneur. L: Entrepreneur. I was just amazed, I t hought he was the most brilliant person I’d ever seen. P: Your father was a smart man. L: Most of the community felt that way, too. I think they probably, looking back, gave him a hell of a lot more credit than maybe he deserved. I used to couldn’t wait to come down to the pawnshop. I was always working. P: I was going to ask if you worked at all. L: Oh yeah. I worked at the Pensacola B each in the snowball stand. I worked in the pawnshop. You learn a lot about people by doing that. I used to come down to the pawnshop, and my daddy loved to play gin rummy, and they used to have a place in back, and they’d play gin rummy. I loved to watch him play, and he had a couple of helpers in the pawnshop, and I’d run back and forth between watching the card game, when he’d let me, and working in the pawnshop. [I] grew up there on Blount Stree t, went to P.K. Yonge. P: Tell me about your education now. P.K. Yonge was an elementary school? L: Elementary school. P: Named for P.K. Yonge from Pensacola? L: Yes, from Pensacola. As I grew up, I’m surprised I was really not a good student, but I was more social. P: You go through elementary sc hool at P.K. and then what?

PAGE 10

UFLC 75 Page 10 L: About the time I get through the sixth grade, my father and mother buy a home on the east side of town on 18th and Larua Street, which was the Garmondy home. I remember looking at it and th inking it was the biggest house I’d ever seen. The Garmondys, they had a big room upstairs. My uncle Bennie, my daddy’s brother, had come to live with us. Uncle Bennie worked in the store, but he also drank a lot. We all moved over, and my father’s mother had come to live with us. We all moved to 18th and Larua [Street] big family here the Laruas and all of that, back from an old Spanish thing. This was in the high rent district. When I say that, it’s not far from the wa ter, and some of the major families lived on that side. So we moved with all of t he boys. There were six boys, but David had gone off to Duke University at that time. Herman may have gone to Emory [University] or something, no Herman would be going to high school or something. I moved from elementary school to junior high at the same time that we moved to Larua Street, it was over that side. P: What was the name of the junior high? L: Clubbs Junior High School. P: What years are we talking about now? L: I graduated high school in 1954, so seventh grade around 1948, I guess. I remember my daddy used to take me and drop me off at junior high, and I started meeting people. I was somewhat embarrass ed either by the car or whatever it might have been, but he would drop me off at school, and I made friends easily, and a lot of times, playing the fool. Ne ver really saw any real anti-Semitism. P: You’re still in junior high going on to senior now. L: I’m in junior high and spent seventh, eighth, and ninth grade in junior high. [I] developed some relationships. I was a fairly good athlete. I was not real good, but see, I started school at the age of fi ve so everybody was basically a year ahead of me. But I was a pretty good basketball player, played with the YMCA, a pretty good baseball player. My problem was I was slow, had good coordination. I won the – somebody ju st brought me a copy of the junior ping-pong championship for the city. So I had good hand-eye coordination, I just didn’t have any speed. Anyhow, I loved to gamble. P: You didn’t start gambling in junior high school did you? L: I would play gin rummy. You have to understand, all these years I’ve been watching my daddy play gin rummy. P: During the seventh, eighth, and ninth grade?

PAGE 11

UFLC 75 Page 11 L: It was not for money, it may have been over at my house. P: You’re supposed to be practicing for your bar mitzvah, not playing gin rummy. L: Oh, I was doing that. P: What about senior high now? L: The bar mitzvah was interesting. P: Yeah, I want to hear about that. L: I [was] scared to death, absolutely scared to death. My speech may have been two paragraphs, but you had to memorize it. I had to have the maftir, the haftora, and the speech. P: You remember the rabbi? L: I practiced with Rabbi Holzman. He lived on top of the synagogue. I remember [being] scared to death and may have been, but I had to go ahead and do it, and I remember there was a Jewish progressive club that was maybe four or five blocks from there, and that was a social place. We had my bar mitzvah party afterwards, and momma made all the food, the chopped liver, she was a great, great, great cook. It’s funny, because years and years later, Roy Jones, Jr. [Boxer managed by Levin], buys the place t hat was the Jewish Progressive Club. So, [ I was] scared to death to stand up in front of people. The bar mitzvah which usually works in the exact opposite way, [to] give you confidence, I was absolutely scared to death. I remember I fumbled on my speech. You have to understand, I studied for the bar mitzvah for like five years, six years. Nowadays, they do it in five months or six months or a year. I go off to Pensacola High School and somehow or another, my friends start to expand into the, socially, country club set. P: This is the affluent gentile community. L: Gentile community, but I was still t he Jew and they would call me the “Happy Hebrew” or something like that. I started to pull away from the Jewish community. Then, we would drink, and we would gamble over on Pensacola Beach, blackjack and poker and all kinds of things. P: Where did you get your m oney from working? Allowance?

PAGE 12

UFLC 75 Page 12 L: Yeah. It really wasn’t a lot of money. Two dollars or four dollars, and we would go out to the dog track. P: You were kids. L: Yeah, but it was a different time and a different place. It was the 1950s. It was just good times, everybody was happy. P: Doesn’t sound like you were a great student. L: I was not, I thought I was a lot better student than I was until I just went back and saw my high school report cards. I was a “B” student. A few “A”s, very little studying. P: Did you get along with the teachers? L: Got along with most of the teachers, but I started smoking in high school, drinking. I was an excellent dancer. Th is all goes back to the coordination, I always had great coordination. Betw een me and a guy named Eddie Gebara, we were the two great dancers at the high school, and Eddie was a big star football player. Somehow or another, I got in with a group. This has a lot of significance in regard to my life, someth ing I regretted, and something that made a big difference to me. There were two high school fraternities. I had two very close non-Jewish friends in high school. Gene Rosenbaum and Maurice Shams, the Jewish guys, I was pulling away from as I became more social. David Cobb, who was later killed in an automobile accident and Ronnie Williams, who was later killed by the police, these were my two big buddies. The social fraternity called the Rebels was the only fr aternity that would accept Jews. The social fraternity called Travares never had accepted a Jew, and they’d been there for years and years. David Cobb was in the Rebels. Ronnie Williams, who was one of the best looking men you’ve ever seen in your life, and all of the big football stars and everybody else was in Travares. P: All non-Jews? L: All non-Jews. Two groups in there. One were the star athletes and the very wealthy country club group, and the other wa s just sort of regular old guys. David Cobb, my dear, dear friend, said I had been invited to join the Rebels, which I agreed to do. About a week befor e the initiation, Ronnie comes to me and tells me that Travares wants me. P: Even though they knew you [were] Jewish?

PAGE 13

UFLC 75 Page 13 L: Yeah. I regret because I said, “ God k nows, what a great opportunity to be with the elite,” and after having accepted, and I felt so bad, but I had to do it because this was the greatest thing that ever happened. I still maintained somewhat of a relationship with David Cobb. All of this makes a lot of difference a couple of years later when I go to the University of Florida. I become [a member of] Travares, and I start dating Anne Stevens, non-Jewish girls, I’m really “it” now, and all kind of things, just wonderful, w hat a great life. It was probably the happiest times in my life from a standpoint, socially. It was every night. P: I can see why you didn’t have a chance to study. L: Yeah. P: Weren’t you folks concerned about that? L: I think in a way, but my daddy – [unc lear] all these guys started coming. You have to understand, Pensacola High School was “the place.” Pensacola High School played football, it was front page new s. Here I was, his son Fredric, he was big time. I think that probably made him feel good. You have to recognize the times. This was 1953 and 1954. Abe Levin, they called him the Prince of Palafox, everybody was accepted, the Levin’s were no longer the little Jewish merchant. P: You weren’t an outsider... L: Not an outsider anymore. John Pace would say nice things about my daddy and he was the big wealthy people, MacHenry J ones – all of the elite, the “power struck,” everybody. So I go ahead and graduate in 1954. Back then, anybody could go off to college, the University of Florida. P: Where’d you stand in the graduating class? L: I would’ve probably been about the middle of the class, something like that. P: In other words, you didn’t get any great academic honors? L: No. P: When did you get a car? L: Never. I always used a car. I think the first car that I ever actually got was a hand-me-down station wagon once I went into law school and had gotten married.

PAGE 14

UFLC 75 Page 14 P: So as a high school student you didn’t have a car? L: I had the use of a car. I had my brot her’s and my mother’s and my father’s, there were all kinds of cars around, I just never had one. P: What kind of a home life did you have? Was it a religious home life? Did you go to service? L: For them, yeah. Momma and daddy went to every Friday night service. P: And you say your mother kept a kosher kitchen? L: Kosher home all the way through until s he died. Daddy did all the way till he died in 1995. He maintained the kosher home. P: So they kept all the holidays? L: Oh, yeah. Pretty much, it was getting to a point as I got into high school that the Friday evening services went by the wayside, and I would do the bar mitzvahs and kept Rosh Hashana and the high holidays. P: Your family were strong financial supporters of the synagogue? L: Yes, and United Jewish Appeal. Even though he was certainly far from the wealthiest Jew in town, he was the biggest contributor to the synagogue and to United Jewish Appeal. P: So the Levin family was recognized both within the Jewish community and the non-Jewish community. L: Yes. P: Why did David go to Duke? L: Mr. Harden, who was his Algebra teac her (and David was a good trumpet player too), he loved David and he wanted David to go off to a good school. David went off to college at fifteen, and went to Duke and hated it. P: David was a good student? L: Yes. Mr. Harden was a high school teac her that David loved. Anyhow, he got him to go to Duke. P: So he goes to Duke for his undergraduate work.

PAGE 15

UFLC 75 Page 15 L: He said it was the most anti-Semi tic place he had ever been in his life. P: At Duke? L: Yeah, this was in the 1940s right after t he war. There was a quota, either 1 or 2 percent Jews could go to...[he] just found it to be just miserable. P: So he was not happy at Duke? L: No. Then he decided to go to law school at the University of Florida. P: So he graduated from Duke, he took a Duke degree? L: Yes. Three years, and then went to t he University of Florida law school and did very well and loved that. Became a Gator. He may have given $10 to Duke, but he hated Duke. P: I know he was a great philanthropist of the University of Florida. L: Yes. So it was the summer of 1954. P: Are you back to you now? L: Yeah. P: Because I was going to ask you, your brother Herman is older than you and he goes where? L: Emory and was going to be a dentist, but he couldn’t handle the dentistry and goes into psychology. P: And that’s what he is today, a psychologist? L: Yes. He got his doctorate I think at the University of Florida. All of the brothers got a degree at the University of Florida, all five. P: So everybody in the family are Gators. L: Stanley got two degrees there, Davi d got his law degree, Herman got his PhD there, I got both of my degrees there, Allen got one degree there in business. P: Why did you select Gainesville?

PAGE 16

UFLC 75 Page 16 L: I guess in the meantime, David had gone to Gainesville, and this is where all of the Pensacola boys went. P: There was a school in Tallahassee, they didn’t have a law school there. L: Well, I wasn’t even concerned with law sc hool. I didn’t know law school, it didn’t make any difference to me. At that poi nt, all of my buddies, Y.B. Patterson and Ed Sears, big football heroes, [ther e] may have been others, going to the University of Florida. They were Tr avares. Then, I was going to room with Winston Bailey, we got an apartment dow n there, who was Travares. Jack Gardener, now Jack was not, we used to call him Alibi. There were four of us. Was David Cobb? I don’t know. Anyhow, t here were four of us that went, and we roomed right off of University [Avenue in] an upstairs apartment. P: I’m surprised they weren’t pledged to fraternities. L: This is how the story goes. So here I am the football players, everybody, all the social elite, we’re all down in Gainesville I was so naive, I didn’t know anything about Jewish fraternities, non-Jewish fraternities. It’s rush week, and everywhere these guys went, I went. S.A. E., Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Pike, all of this. P: You didn’t get to the Tep house or the Pi Lam house? L: I didn’t know anything about Tep or Pi Lam or anything like that. S.A.E.’s, I was going to go S.A.E.. Either way, all t he Pensacola boys did. It was either Thursday night or Friday night before the bi ds came out, or it was the last night of the parties, the evening parties. All the guys came in to see me. Bill Cobb, David Cobb’s older brother, was a big S.A. E. All Pensacola [boys] always went S.A.E. on the corner of University and 13th, with the lion. They came into the room where I was, and they said they were all going S.A.E., and I said that’s great, I will too. I noticed the look on their face, and they said “Fred,” and they went on to explain that I could not. A nd I said, “Why?” And they said, “ Well you’re Jewish. But, that’s not bad bec ause, you see, the S.A.E.’s sister fraternity are the Teps, and they are the c oolest Jews you ever met. I know it’s wrong, Jews just, you know how it is, they just can’t belong to this fraternity, but we have the greatest parties together and we adore each other, and the Teps are it, and I have already made arrangements wit h whoever the rush chairman was. Tomorrow at 2:00, they can’t wait to meet you, the cool Jews. I’ve told them all about you, and they just absolutely, they can’ t wait to meet you. You’re going to be like a star there.” P: Must have hit you like cold water.

PAGE 17

UFLC 75 Page 17 L: Oh, God. The first thing that went th rough my mind was, I said, “I don’t believe I could do this if I were them. I believe I would take a stand.” But then I thought back, I didn’t take [a stand] on the Rebel and Travares thing, I jumped [ship]. All this has a great effect on me throughout life, and has a lot of effect just how things went as to how my life could have changed completely by going into the Tep house that next day. I think it was a Friday at 2:00 or noon, and I remember they were having hamburgers. I got dre ssed up, and I went down, and I walked in. Nobody came up to me, they didn’t know who the hell I was. I kept looking around for the guy I was supposed to meet, and he was there in like a corner, and there were four or five of the top re cruits. I remember, later, it was Norman Lipoff and a couple of other guys. So I wa lk up and I stand there, it’s as vivid as if it were yesterday really, and I stand there, and I stand t here until there’s a break. I introduce myself, “I’m Fred Levin ,” expecting Bill Cobb has just really set this thing up. “Oh it’s nice to meet you, why don’t you go over there and have a hamburger?” I went through the li ne, took a left, and got this hamburger and potato chips or something, Coca Cola. I went and sat at the table, by myself, nobody ever came up, nobody said a word. I’m sitting at a four person table by myself. I don’t know a soul. I saw Gene Rosenbaum off to the side. Gene had been my buddy all the way through until I went into high school. I saw maybe another person I knew, but they were all covered up with Teps rushing. I had my hamburger, I looked around, nobody seemed to give a crap one way or the other about me. Had somebody walked up to me and said, “Welcome, heard a lot about you, or something like that, can we talk to you,” I would have ended up being a Tep, and there could’ve been big changes in my life for a lot of things. I walked out of the house, I remember I walked out of the Tep house. P: This was in 1954 you said? L: 1954, August, September. P: They were still down on the Avenue, they haven’t moved to the new house yet. L: [No], they were down. My house would have been across 13th and to the right, but I walked by the S.A.E. house... P: ...which was right on the corner. L: I walked by the S.A.E. house and every body was out partying, they were having their party, and I looked over and really, oh God, you can’t imagine how it felt. Now I was not only not an S.A.E., I was nobody. I wasn’t even with the cool Jews. So I go back to the apartment, and Alibi Jack Gardener comes [by]. I was really feeling bad, I’m talking about t eary bad. He said, “Come on with me.” He had been one of the Rebels, he had not been accepted by S.A.E. either, and he was going Sigma Chi. He said, “I want you to come along with me,” he said,

PAGE 18

UFLC 75 Page 18 “I met some great, great Jewish people over at this Pi Lam house, and they really want to meet you.” At that point, I thought my whole career at Florida had gone down the drain. So I go over to the Pi Lam house... P: ...which was on University Avenue. L: Right next to the Sigma Chi house. I get there, and you would have thought that Yetsky [Yiddish for “Jesus”] had walked in the door. Alibi was a real personal kind of guy, and he had gone over and he had told them all about me. I walked in the door, and they grabbed hold of me. I remember Fernando Storch, just made me really, really feel very, very comfortable. So I end up being a Pi Lam. There I met Jack Graff and Fred Vigodsky, we were all in the same pledge class. P: You and Fred, is that your first meeting or you knew Fred? L: No, I didn’t know any of these people. This was Miami High as compared to Miami Beach High. So I, then, become a Pi Lam. P: Both of my two brothers, George and S aul were both Pi Lams. They were before you, though. L: Yeah. So I become a Pi Lam, and it was amazing because Sam Goldenberg, who was my god-brother, had been a Pi Lam, Norman Williewzik, in fact all the Jews from Pensacola... P: I knew Sam well when he was a student. L: Yeah, Sam’s still living, isn’t he? P: Yeah. L: Nobody ever rushed me. Honest to God, I went off to college, I had no idea there was such a thing as a Jewish fraterni ty here, that I could not belong. It did have an impact on me because as I went through college, I began to realize, these guys that I had become associated wit h were really a lot sharper than my buddies who had gone on to S.A.E., Dick Massington, Stanley Rosencrantz. Then I would go over to the Tep house, and we’d play cards over there, Stan Greenberg, and I began to realize these people just – Pi Lams had won the scholastic thing like twenty straight years. And they’d just all moved into... P: Both Jewish fraternities were very smart.

PAGE 19

UFLC 75 Page 19 L: And they moved into the Orange League or whatever it is, and they had done very well athletically, and they went politically, and I began for the first time to realize.... P: To what degree were you scarred by the anti-Semitism? L: At the University of Florida? P: At the University of Flori da. You ran into some of it, obviously, in Pensacola, but not to the degree... L: Not to the degree it was there. I saw it as my buddies didn’t stand up when they should have and said “Hey guys, if you can’t do this . .” This actually, in law school, did occur with my brother Stanley where the whole fiddley-fi group stood up and said if Stanley Levin is either coming or you got to break this Jewish bit and bang, they did. Otherwise they were all going to go . P: But it’s a different kind of a world. You leave your gentile friends now in many ways and move into a Jewish crowd. L: Yes, and became good friends with Ja ck Graff and Fred Vigodsky. These are guys who later moved to Pensacola. Jack became my law partner. P: And became life-long friends. L: Life-long friends. The other guys, Davi d Cobb, Bailey, Alibi, I’m still somewhat friends with Alibi Gardner. P: Did you still live in the apartment? L: Still lived in the apartment, and, then, mo ved into the fraternity house when they moved over. They were Number One, Fraternity Row. P: Dean Weil was... L: Yeah. When that opened, I moved in the new house. P: What kind of a student were y ou at the beginning in Gainesville? L: Nothing. Just played. P: You took university college courses. L: Sam, I took your course.

PAGE 20

UFLC 75 Page 20 P: You were never in my class. L: Yeah I was, somehow or another. I re member in a big room. I must have taken Florida History. P: I taught the C1 class, American Instit utions is probably what you took, second floor of Peabody Hall. L: I took something. Yeah, it was a big room. P: A big room, elevated. L: Yes, elevated room. P: I hope I gave you a decent grade. L: It didn’t make any difference to me. At that point, if I didn’t know what I was going to do, I was going to go back into business and be a pawn broker or something. P: In other words, you were looking for four years of good times. L: Four years of good times. We w ould go, Fred Vigodsky and I, there was a professor, I can’t remember his name, we’d all go over to the dog track a lot of nights. I had pretty good money to spend at the time, I think like $120 a month. P: Where’d that come from? L: My daddy. We used to go to the dog track, Fred had a car, I didn’t have a car. P: You went to the Jai Alai Fronton? L: No, in Ocala? That wasn’t anywhere near... P: Where’d you go to the dog track? L: Orange Park or Jacksonville Kennel Club. They had a whorehouse down by a place called South of the Border, across the border, we’d go there every once in awhile. It was just party, party, party. Grades didn’t really make much of a difference. P: I can see that you weren’t setting any great academic records.

PAGE 21

UFLC 75 Page 21 L: No. Then, the years I really enjoyed myself I met Marilyn who was later to become my wife, Marilyn Kapner. Her cousins were Teps, Norman and Lewis Kapner. Her sister had been a D Phi E, Marilyn was an A E Phi. She had dated Lenny Golden who had been Fred Vigodsky’s roommate his freshman year. She was still in high school. Fred Vigodsky introduced me to her, and I remember Freddy told me, “She’s the most beautiful Jewish girl you’ll ever meet.” When I met her, I may have been certainly either a sophomore or a junior. I remember going to the dorm with Fred Vigodsky, and I walk up, and there’s Marilyn sitting on this couch with about sev en or eight Teps around her. Again, I’m waiting my turn to be introduced. Unbeknownst to me, she’s engaged to a non-Jewish boy back in West Palm. I’m introduced, and, then, I call her. Back then, I get a date for like seven weeks, eight weeks off. Jack Graff and Cissy Holly, we double date. Jack had a car, and we’d go to the Alamar Bar. I’m drinking, and I remember the first date she says, “Don’t you think you’ve had enough?” I say, “No”. I’d ordered a V.O and Seven or something like that. I call the waitress back, it was just embarra ssing that here she had put me in this situation, and I said, “Make that a double.” To make a long story short, as I walked her back to the dorm that night fr om the car to her dorm, she said she was not really turned on by me. I reached over, and I grabbed a newspaper, and I said, “Tomorrow when you get up, put a nickel in there for me.” It was a five cent Gainesville Sun or something. I walk off, and she was just stunned that anybody could be such an asshole. Anyhow, I called, and every Jewish guy in both fraternities were trying to date her. Then, I’d get another date, eight weeks off, ten weeks off. So I’d met Marilyn, and I was having a great time. I loved the University of Florida. P: It sounds to me like you were even more of a social animal in Gainesville than you were in Pensacola. L: We’d go out a lot. P: Did you ever go to class? L: McHouston was his name, was our buddy who’d go gambling with us, and he’d taught business, letter writing, a couple of business courses. I went to his class, and he gave me a couple of “A”s. Fred Vigodsky got “B”s and had never been to class, and he got all upset at him. The guy would just give you the grades. It was just fun times. We get into 1957... P: By this time you did have a car. L: No. Fred Vigodsky... P: It was his car.

PAGE 22

UFLC 75 Page 22 L: Yeah. By the way, he and I, then, move out of the fraternity house, and we room together. We originally move up way near where the airport is. Nice home, we had a maid. Eddie Heller was going to move in with us. Eddie was the drum major, Eddie was big politically at the University of Florida. Fred Vigodsky and myself and Chuck Ruffner were going to room together. I think Stanley may have been involved. Anyhow, Eddie Heller got all upset because there was a disciplinary action against all of us in that apartment for gambling. A guy named Harvey Ward had been arrested, I remember him, with a bunch of student cards. By the way, a week ago Friday, I was having drinks at a place called Lou Michaels here in Pensacola. Jackie Simpson introduced himself to me, and a guy named Dick Hobin, who had been a basketball player, all of them were there about the same time, and I was mentioning to Dick about this guy who had gotten me into so much trouble and was a great dancer and he said,” Harvey Ward.” He had remembered Harvey. Harvey, years later called me from Eglin, he had been arrested for bookmaking or something. P: He was still booking. L: Yeah. We got picked up by the disci plinary committee, and Stanley, who didn’t want to stay in school anyhow, took the blame for everything. He got suspended. P: When you were in school, which of your brothers were there? Stanley was there later, Stanley’s much younger. L: No, Stanley’s just a year and a half [younger]. Stanley was two years behind me. P: David’s not there? L: David’s gone and was practicing law at the time. P: Had David made a good reputation at school? L: Yeah, David did well in law school. Herman came back during some of this time when I was in law school, I believe, to get his PhD. at Florida. P: Where was this place that became the gambling house, again? L: Two things. One is downstairs at the fr aternity house we’d built this thing and, we had a dice table. P: This is the new fraternity house now?

PAGE 23

UFLC 75 Page 23 L: On One Fraternity Row. Used to have Saul Fruchman come over. P: You had Teps over there a lot. L: Yeah. We’d gamble and stuff like that. This apartment that we were in, Stanley and myself. P: You knew what happened to Saul Fruchman? L: No. P: He committed suicide. His mother and father were both dead by that time. L: He was in the shoe business or something? P: His father was in the shirt business selling Manhattan shirts. Saul worked with him, and, then, he hung himself. L: He was a miserable [person]. P: Lost a lot of money. L: Gambling? P: Gambling. L: Yeah, he did. Is that why he killed himself? P: I don’t know. I think he was just depressed. I remember the house on University Avenue next to the Sigma Chi house, the Pi Lambdas, and in back of it was a one car garage. L: Two story garage. P: A cottage. L: Yeah. There was something on top, you had to go upstairs. P: And that was not the gambling house? L: Oh, no.

PAGE 24

UFLC 75 Page 24 P: We went into that place once. My son Alan was in there then. There must have been 2,000 used condoms lying around on the floor and mattresses everywhere. L: I never stayed in the fraternity house, there. First place I stayed, I roomed with Stanley Hammerschmidt. Stanley was the dumbest guy I’ve ever met in my life, but was very, very wealthy. The family had some kind of potato chip deal in Miami. Miami exploded, and he was the Wise potato or whatever the hell it was, but they had done extremely well. So our gambling was going on in our apartment, and we had Jimmy Dunn and Joe Hergert, a lot of the football players coming over. Harvey Ward gets arrested. P: How did he get arrested? L: Got arrested for stealing student cards and cashing checks, and, then, blamed it on us that he’d lost all his money gambling. P: That’s how the universit y became involved with you. L: Yes. And Stanley copped a plea for a one semester suspension. P: Did they interview each one of you separately? L: Yes. I basically told them, along [wit h] Fred Vigodsky, “Listen, it was a lot of playing bridge and things. If I go, we’re all going.“ That was Hergert and Dunn, that was the football team. This w ould have been 1957, so I was put on a oneyear probation. So all of a sudden, I hav e to figure out what in the world am I going to do. P: I was going to say, you were building up a great record to get into law school. L: It didn’t make any difference back then. What in the world am I going to do for a living? I was having such a good time, I needed to stay in college. My brother had become a lawyer, David, and had been a lawyer for a lot of years, five or six years, whatever. He said, “Why don’t you go to law school.” I’m getting out in spring of 1958, June, I’m going to graduat e, except Dr. Ring who had this German accent, he flunks me. P: I want you to know, he’s still around. L: I know. The Alfred Ring Tennis Center is right across from the Levin College of Law. So all of a sudden, here I am, I have to go to summer school and, then, go to law school. I go to summer school and take the course over again, transportation. I enter law school. In the mean time, I was home in the spring.

PAGE 25

UFLC 75 Page 25 P: Once again, I want to make sure. To get yourself into law school, because you had such a poor academic record.... L: It didn’t make any difference then. Anybody could join, anybody could go. P: Fenn was the dean at that time? Henry Fenn? L: Yes. So I’m home for the Easter holidays, 1958, and we’re living on 18th and Larua [Streets], and my brother David and his wife are across the street. My brother Martin was being checked, he’ d been feeling real, real bad, and this again goes back to something that you’ll remind me of later. Martin had been treated by Dr. Charles Kahn and had a bad case of acne – Chuck Kahn who’s a district court of appeal judge is his son – that during, probably the fall of 1957 or early 1958, she goes to Dr. Kahn, he gives Martin a prescription for Chloromycetin, it had to be Chloromycetin, I didn’t know at the time, which was an antibiotic. Martin immediately star ted getting blotches, and my mother said, “I knew something was wrong, and I knew he shouldn’t have taken that.” Anyhow, he took it. I’m home for the Spring and Marilyn’s with me, we are engaged at the time. P: So Marilyn’s broken off with the guy in West Palm Beach. L: Oh, yeah. We got engaged I think maybe.... P: You’re both students when you got engaged? L: Yeah, and she’s in nursing. Momma comes in, and she’s crying. “David,” she said, “I think Dr. Ames thinks that Martin has leukemia” and Marilyn gets out the book and starts reading that, back then, it ’s fatal and everything. I remember David walking across, he grabbed the book and threw it across the room, and I don’t know what in the world is going on. Keep in mind, Dr. Ames is the family doctor who lived around from 15 West Bl ount Street. His wife and daughter, very, very big Catholics. His wife and only daughter were killed in an automobile accident in North Carolina when she was on her way to Duke or somewhere and left his whole estate and everything to the Catholic church, and today it’s still a home for nuns, a big beautiful home across from P.K. Yonge Anyhow, it becomes apparent sometime during that weekend that I’m there, that my brother Martin had leuk emia. Everybody up until this point, you have to understand, [was] just a happy, happy family. From that point, to the day she died, I don’t think my mother ever really had any happiness. Martin lived maybe six months. He died. It was a miserable disease back then. I remember they went to City of Hope in California. Nothing worked. They had some remission, and everybody was so happy, and, then, three weeks later, he

PAGE 26

UFLC 75 Page 26 went. I was home with Martin a couple of weeks before I was to go to law school. I think Martin knew he was dying. I took him to the firehouse drive-in, I remember he caused a big scene there, mean. The last words we had, I remember he threw a plate across the room at me as I was walking out to go to law school. So I get to law school.... P: Had it already moved down to the new area or was it still in Bryan Hall? L: It’s on University and 13th. At that time I’m rooming with David Levy and somebody. We’re up in a loft somewhere. I go to my first day of law school, and I’m sitting on one side of the room, and the other side of the room, the auditorium, nobody’s in it. Dean Fenn stands up look to your right, look to your left, neither one of them are going to be here. We graduated about 20 percent of those that started wit h us, it ended up being. About that time, back of the auditorium opens up and here comes George Star k, first black student to enter a public institution in the State of Florida. P: You’re in the room the day George appears first? L: Yes. I’m in the auditorium, all the white guys on one side, and, then, George comes in. I didn’t understand a lot of what was going on. I remember looking at him, he was dressed in a suit, and all the rest of us were dressed like a bunch of bums. We have two sections in law school, George ends up being in my section. I am slap scared to death. I rea lize, they’re going to flunk two-thirds of these people out, then what am I going to do? For the first time in my life, I start a program that even to today, some fortyfour years later, I still do, and that is from the moment I get [up], I am cons tantly working on something, a case, whatever it is. I get my books in law school and fell in love with law. It just made sense. P: Let’s get back to the segregation and George Stark. Had you been following that, because there was a lot in the newspapers at the time, and Judge Devane is the one who issued the order. The S upreme Court was turning it down, the Board of Control was turning it down, and they were trying to organize a new law school at Florida A&M. L: I really wasn’t into the politics of i t. We go to our sections, and they ask people to give a little something about themselves. Hell, I had to go to summer school to get out. All the rest of them were magna cum laude from here and all that. I start studying my butt off, I mean day and night, and this stuff starts to make sense to me, it’s so logical. In the mean time, poor old George Stark, wherever he went, they would shuffle him with a law school prison type shuffle. We’d go into the library, and everybody had study groups except me because I was so

PAGE 27

UFLC 75 Page 27 dumb and George because he was black. I worked so hard at it, I really did. I worked day and night. P: What brought this turn around with you? L: Hell, I didn’t know what I was going to do in life. P: And you finally thought you found it. L: I didn’t know. I knew I had to get out of law school, and they’re going to flunk two-thirds of these people out. P: Didn’t Fenn once advise you not to come back? L: Yeah. I’m there in September, and towa rd the end of September I get a call. “You need to come home, Martin’s dying. ” Fred Vigodsky, Marilyn, Stanley, and myself drive – I think Stanley had a car, somebody had a car – we drive back. Martin died before I could get there. I go in to see Dean Fenn, and I said, “My brother’s dying,” and he pulls up my name and everything, and he tells me, I mean just cold [ly], “You know, really with your grades and everything, you [might] just as well stay home.” My brother’s dying, I’ve been told I have no chance at all. I remember it was the firs t time I’d ever seen my dad crying. Just a real sad situation. Back to Gainesv ille, and I’m working my butt off. I see all of the things that are happening with G eorge Stark, and I don’t do anything. Some of the most prominent, later prominent lawyers – at that time Phi Delta Phi, a legal fraternity, would not accept Jews I became a Phi Alpha Delta. All of those guys in fiddle-d-fi, they called them they were the same as the society group all the way through. George would walk into the library, they’d start that shuffling, he’d sit down by himself, scared to death in class, and the same thing, I started thinking “God, I really know this stuff,” and I would start asking questions in class, and they’d shuffle me. So we basically were shuffled. George had enough sense to stop. I really wanted some answers to some things to fill in the gap. Along come midterms, and I remember I walk out of an exam, and there is Normal Lipoff, Strawn ,who became a circuit judge, another guy, and they were all post-morteming the exam. I remember I walked up, and I sort of felt like I did when I went to the Tep house. They were talking about what they had done on the exam. I said I had this answer. It’s amazing some things that stay with you. I remember Normal Lipoff saying, “Levin wait till the grades come out.” Oh, hell, here I go again. I knew that all these guys were so bright, and I.... Thanksgiving break took place, I think I went home to Miami, I got married in 1959, yeah, I went home Thanksgiving. The only break I had out of law school I went home with her, and I don’t think her dad really ever cared a lot for me. [I] came back, and at some point, when I came back, they gave you the grades by

PAGE 28

UFLC 75 Page 28 your student number, and I remember l ooking down and figuring mine was going to be low. I’m leading the class. I didn’t go home for Christmas holidays, studied throughout Christmas holidays, [I] co me back, and I’m clearly leading the class. In the meantime, the next semester, we had to do something called case comments or something. Dean Fenn is my tutor. Future interest is the toughest course in law school. That’s where they all flunked out. Dean Fenn gives me a future interest case to writ e a case comment on. I hit on something that nobody else had ever thought about. It’s insignificant now, but it was how the market – there’s something called a rule against perpetuities and options. This would have blown a senior law student out at Yale, it wouldn’t have made any difference. I really think that Fenn was really trying to embarrass me. I’ve always had a good economic background or understanding of money and the marketplace, and I realized that for hundreds of years the rule against perpetuities was supposed to be an economic tool to keep people from going from generation to generation, keeping it within the family. Anyhow, I came up with some theory on options and why it worked in reverse. It blew Fenn out of the water. P: Fenn remembered the advice he’d given you? L: I don’t remember whether he ever remem bered that, but many times, for the next two years, he would call me down to the office and say, “Such and such from Wall Street is on the phone, and they’re very interested in this option theory, and I told him you’d talk to them. “ So I w on [End of Tape A, side 2] ...Her name was Gertrude Brick. P: That was a different one, then. Gert rude Block became the wr iter person there. L: This was the Brick Award which is still being given today. I won everything, absolutely everything. All of a sudden, as Fred Levin spoke, there wasn’t anymore shuffling. There was nothing but writing. I’m trying to remember, maybe it was the fall of next year, but whatever it was, keep in mind that everybody would join in on this shuffling of George Stark, and I think it was either the start of the next year, start of 1959, fall, or it may have been January 1959. Anyhow, George Stark walks into the libra ry, and they start shuffling. He goes, and he sits down by himself. I do know, that when I stood up and walked, I was the star at the law school. There wasn ’t any question about that. I stood up, and I walked over, and I sat down next to him, and I said, “George, you need any help?” He says, “ I sure do.” I said, “ Why don’t you and I study together.” I had been rejected by all the others. So we became... P: The Jew defends the black.

PAGE 29

UFLC 75 Page 29 L: But the interesting thing was, all of a sudden, over the next several days, I would be sitting in the library with George and more and more joined. Pretty soon, the great, great majority of that law school we re with us, and it was six or eight races by themselves other than the professors George Stark got three “A”s in law school, all by a professor named Josh Okun. I heard that Josh had died ten or fifteen years ago. I heard that for the first time when my ex-roommate Dave Levy came through. I had gotten married June 14, 1959, got married in Pensacola. I must have had fifteen ushers, all my non-Jewish buddies and just a very few Jewish friends, Fred Vigodsky, Gene Rosenbaum. It was a big wedding for Pensacola, it was in the synagogue. Then, momma did all the cooking. P: Why in Pensacola and not West Palm? L: Because we were going to live there, and Marilyn’s folks were not well-to-do, and there had been some problems in the meantim e in the Kapner family, I think. There were five or six brothers t ogether, and one of them had formed his own company and pulled a lot of the business away. They were not doing good. P: So an internal family problem. L: Yeah. They were not doing well. P: So your folks were happy to have it in Pensacola. L: Yeah. I’m married, we move into an apartment. P: Let’s finish the George Stark story. L: This gets back to the George Stark st ory. We’re living in the apartment and George and I study at the law school. P: Are you pretty much the only one befriending him? The only white person befriending him? L: I think there were others that came along. P: Began to join in. L: Yeah. It’s getting close to the end of the semester. I had befriended him and helped him, but as far as really studyi ng, I had never done that with him. We were going to study for the exam the nex t day, I told him to meet me at my apartment. I was running a little late, and I got there, and he’s sitting on the steps, we were an upstairs apartment. I said, “Why didn’t you go on in?” He

PAGE 30

UFLC 75 Page 30 said,” You don’t understand, a colored m an doesn’t go into an apartment where a white woman is.” I said, “ Oh the hell with it, come on.” So we came in, Marilyn cooked supper for us, and we studied all night long. I had these little flip cards that worked real well. All night long. He goes home, and I clean up and go to the exam, and he never shows up. He had gone home just to lay down for a second [snap of fingers], slept through t he exam. They wouldn’t give him another exam, they flunked him. He was getting “D”s and everything else other than [in] Josh Okun’s class. They flunked him out. P: He withdrew himself. He sa id it was too competitive. L: Whatever it was, he was gone. I nev er saw him again until back when he came for my... P: I wondered if you had maintained a relationship. L: I tried to find him. I finally called Willie George Allen, who gave me an address. I wrote him a letter, and he eventually wrote me back. P: He comes to Gainesville on occasion, and I’ve done an Oral History interview with him. L: I don’t know if he remembers it the way I do. P: He remembers you in a very positive, friendly way. L: I continued to do very well in law school and, then, nine and a half months later, my first born Marci... P: You graduate law school at the top of your class. L: No, this is now, I’m into my junior year. I remember when Marci was born at Alachua General [Hospital], and I’m studyi ng, holding Marilyn’s hand, while she’s screaming. I go home that summer, and I worked for David. I’d fallen in love with the law. The next semester two people kept me from high honors. I actually graduated number one with t he three hundred and some students I started with, but two students came in from the Spring class and graduated with me that were ahead of me, J.M. Starling and Park Hill Hayes. With the class I started with I graduated number one, but there were two professors that kept me from getting high honors. If either one of them had given me an “A” instead of a “B” – one was Judge Crosby who taught appellate practice. P: Who later becomes part of your friends out here in West Florida.

PAGE 31

UFLC 75 Page 31 L: Yeah, and partner here in the firm. I wrote the brief, I argued the case, and George Dunlap was with me. He gives George an “A” and me a “B” obviously because of the personal relationship, he didn’ t want to look too obvious. Then, Professor Day, our property law profe ssor, adored me. Wanted me to teach property law, he was going to be retiring. T he grades were like, in his class, I’ll give you an example, would have been out of fifty points, a forty-nine, a couple of forty-eights, a forty-seven, a fort y-six – I had missed one question – then it dropped down to thirty-nine and I had the fort y-six. He draws the line between forty-six and forty-seven and gives me a “B.” It was just unheard of. The line was clear where it should have been drawn. I take trial practice. Jack Graff and I were a team, and Professor Enwall was a trial practice professor. I don’t know why I took that because I was going to be a tax lawyer. We’re having coffee or something down in a restaurant on 13th and somehow or another, Enwall was there, and he says to Jack Graff, “Where are you all going to practice?” I said, “Back in Pensacola wit h my brother, both of us.” He makes a comment, he says, “ Well, I’ll tell you one thing. I am glad I’m not still prosecuting there, you two gu ys are great at trial practice.” Keep in mind now, I had never stood up in front of anybody up until this point and said anything. So I have one more year of law school, and I go through that and graduate number three in the class. P: You’re not working, your father’s still supporting you? L: Yes. During the summer I work at the dog track as a bartender and make some money, but daddy’s supporting me. I don’t work. Marilyn’s father sends, I think, $50 a month. We have the baby, I’m usi ng an old station wagon that daddy had let me have, and I graduate and come back to Pensacola. P: You graduated well? Your grades and all were good? L: Oh, yeah, I graduated number three. I had a 3.48. Like I said, either one of those two-hour “B”s had been an “A,” I would have graduated with high honors. P: I just wanted to have it on the record. L: Yeah. I would have had high honors. I come back to Pensacola. I adored the law. I understood more about the logic behind it than anybody I’d ever met. I understood it. [For] everybody else it was rote, this is the law and things like that. I understood why things were the way they were. P: You had by this time given up the idea of being a tax lawyer? L: No. Reubin Askew had become David’s partner, it was Levin and Askew. I was getting $400 a month, which was big money back then. Jack Graff

PAGE 32

UFLC 75 Page 32 graduated in the summer in August and came with us. I was going to do tax law. P: Did you have to take a special course for tax law? L: Yeah, there were some tax courses, but I was going to go to NYU tax school. P: Yeah, which had the program. L: Then, another great event takes place in my life. P: When did you take the Bar exam? L: Took the Bar exam, I guess, August. P: No problem? L: No. And then I get sworn in October, October 27. I’m back in Pensacola doing the research. P: With one child, Marci. L: One child. Doing the research for David and Reubin, and we’re over on Government Street. P: That’s the office? L: The office, Levin and Askew. P: I want you to stop for just a minute, and tell me the origins of the firm and the relationship between David and Askew. L: David went off, became a lawyer, started working for the county solicitor’s office. Worked awhile, and, then, it was Korea, and he joined the Air Force. Got a commission as a lawyer, went to Korea, ca me back, and went to work with J.B. Hopkins and George Roark, whose son la ter becomes a judge. He practices law, and he’s a good lawyer. P: By himself? L: Goes off by himself, and he’s an excellent lawyer. P: Doing all kinds of cases.

PAGE 33

UFLC 75 Page 33 L: All kinds of cases. DUIs, divorce, a li ttle bit of personal injury, I guess. Then, a guy named Henry Barksdale, who had come to work with him, it was Levin and Barksdale. Henry got elected, I be lieve, county solicitor and, then, Reubin Askew and David had a number of cases together. Reubin was working for the state attorney’s office. P: Where did Reubin Askew come from? L: Pensacola. P: But originally he was from Oklahoma, I think. L: Yeah. P: He came here with his mother. L: And she was a maid at the San Carlos Hotel. P: No father. L: No father. P: So it was just Reubin and his mother came here from Oklahoma. L: He had a father, but either the father le ft, divorced, died, something. I remember his father’s name was Goldberg, something Goldberg Askew. P: Almost sounds Jewish. L: She was. His father had been dear, dear friends with a Jewish guy named Reubin Goldberg I believe. P: But Reubin Askew had no Jewish ancestry at all on either side. L: No. P: What’s his background, Reubin Askew? Does he go to the University of Florida? L: Goes to FSU and becomes president of the student body there. Then, he moves over to the University of Florida law school and, politically, was always involved, Blue Key and all of that. P: Did he and David know each other in Gainesville?

PAGE 34

UFLC 75 Page 34 L: No. David graduated before Reubin and went into the service. P: What brought those two together? L: Reubin was with the state attorney’s office, and David was defending cases. They would come up against each other, and when they would do this, they had mutual respect, and, then, David, when Henry Barksdale got elected county solicitor, David asked Reubin to come in with him, and they became partners, became Levin and Askew. That would have been, maybe, a couple of years before I graduated. P: That really became the beginnings of a legendary firm. L: Yeah, that would have been in the late 1950s. You haven’t done Reubin Askew in Oral History yet? P: Not yet, no. It’s a natural that needs to be... L: Oh, God, yes. Levin and Askew... P: And that’s the name of the firm, Levin and Askew? L: Yes. Then, I get in. P: You’re the third person in the firm? L: Levin, Askew, Levin, and Graff. My number is four, so it must have been Henry Barksdale had a number, Reubin had two, I don’t know. P: Where was the office then? L: It’s over on Government Street, 120 West Government or something, upstairs of the building. So I’m waiting around for my Bar and waiting around a year to go to NYU Tax Law School, and I’m doing research. I passed the Bar, and David tells me about doing divorce cases. I’m doing uncontested divorce cases, and then, one day, a lady comes in, and secretary Dorothy Steinseck, it may have been Bonnie Anderson, I think there wa s one receptionist and one secretary [who] took care of Reubin, David, and myse lf. The lady came in, was a walk-in, she needed a lawyer on a contested divorce case, and I was listening to the lady, and I was taking the information down. You get $50 for an uncontested divorce and $170 for a contested divorce. She m entioned that her husband said he was going to kill her lawyer. That ended my divorce career. I went in and told David I’m going to be a tax lawyer. The story of how I ended up as a trial lawyer was about that time, it was probably right around Christmas time, a lady named Angeliki Theodore [was]

PAGE 35

UFLC 75 Page 35 living out on Scenic Highway at this bri ck home that had some fire damage. She had Traveler’s Insurance Company. Tr aveler’s had offered her like $17,000 to settle for the fire loss. She came in to see me, and she said she would pay me a percentage of anything over $17,000. I ca lled Traveler’s, and they said that was it, $17,000 was it. My typical way of doing things, I start working and working, and finally I filed a law suit, Theodore v. Traveler’s They move it to the federal court. P: Why the federal court? L: Because there was diversity of citizenship and Judge Arnow.. P: Who was originally from Gainesville. L: Yeah. Had he already become feder al judge in 1960, 1962, 1963? Maybe it was Judge Carswell. Whatever. I filed a lawsuit, and I don’t ask for a jury trial. P: Why did this become a federal case? L: It’s called diversity of citizenship. W hen a local resident sues a corporation, they removed me. At this point, the lawyer [for Traveler’s Insurance Company], what they used to say about Bert Lane of Beggs and Lane, they would ask, “Who’s the best lawyer in Northwest Florida?” “Bert Lane when he’s sober.” “ Who’s the second best lawyer?” “Bert Lane when he’s drunk,” and that was the story. He represented the L&N Railroad, he represented a telephone company, he represented all the insurance companies. Bert Lane was a great, great lawyer. I filed a lawsuit, and Bert Lane calls up and says, “Fred?” I says, “Yes.” “Bert Lane.” “ Yes sir, Mr. Lane.” “Listen, this case against Traveler’s . .” and he goes on and on, “We’ll pay you $18,000, but if you don’t take it, Fred, I’ve got to ask for a jury trial.” So I call Miss Theodore and beg her to take the $18,000, no fee, no nothing. She just says “No.” She wanted $20,000 or something. I’m sitting there, I don’t know what to do. For the next seven or eight days I can’t sleep, I’m scared to death. Finally, I just couldn’t take it anymore. I went ahead and amended the complaint and asked for a jury trial. I start working, and I work, and I work, and I learn everything about that case, everything. Then, we go to trial. P: With the jury. L: With the jury in federal court. Be rt Lane, the bailiffs, the court reporters, everybody’s laughing, “Are you crazy? You’re going up against Bert Lane? It’s your first case,” and all this kind of stuff. I’m just scared to death. But I was so well prepared, I knew everything about the case, I had every witness, so wellprepared, jury verdict comes back, and it’s a $45,000 verdict. The judge gives

PAGE 36

UFLC 75 Page 36 me a $5,000 fee on top of it. Here’s a guy making $400 a month, and I decide, “Heck, I like this game.” P: You’re in high cotton. L: I like this game, and that’s how I became a trial lawyer. P: And that woman was thrilled to death. L: Oh, God. [She] was a friend for life, her son, the whole Greek community. No matter what I did, whether it was a motion hearing or it was a jury trial, no matter what it was, I would overwork it to the point where... P: But you also had the golden touch. It s eems to me that everything you turned to... I understand it was backed up by hard work, it just didn’t happen. L: Hard work. I became more and more comfortable standing in front of people talking. Keep in mind, the first time I had done anything had been in law school. I had never made a speech. Never in all the classes. I always avoided it in some way. If it was required like at the University of Florida.... P: Except your bar mitzvah. L: Except for my bar mitzvah, but I blew that. P: That’s right, that reading, speaking, and writing course you’re supposed to give a little talk. L: Yeah, never did. P: For freshman. L: Never did. I was absolutely scared to death. P: But now you’ve become a master. L: Well, I was still well prepared. I’m still well prepared, but I can ad lib, I can handle it when it gets rolling. I always have my comfort level of having everything prepared. Anyhow, that st arted a career. I began doing personal injury cases. P: Talk about the expansion of the firm and the move from place to place. You started a small little office over here with two or three people and one secretary.

PAGE 37

UFLC 75 Page 37 L: Then Dick Warfield came in. He mov ed in front of Levin, Askew, Warfield, Levin, and Graff. P: Graff was a full-time partner? L: Yeah. He came up in August. P: At some point, Reubin, Dick Warfield, Jack Graff, David and myself meet with the guy who had just bought First National Bank building, which is Seville Tower. Very funny story about that, J.B. Hopkins is his lawyer, and we all go to lunch at Carpenters, which was a very nice restaurant. They’re inviting us to lunch, Jack Graff [was there]. Anyhow, they invite us to lunch to pitch us on renting some space in Seville Tower. The greatest line in the world, he said,” Oh, this fish is so good.” He orders another fish. The check comes, and he says, “I don’t know who to thank for this meal, but it was one of the greatest meals I’ve ever had.” Here’s the guy who invited us to lunch, and he walks out, he and J.B. Hopkins walk out, and we start laughing that this was the best line. Here’s a guy who invites you to lunch and [says], “I don’t know who to thank.” After that, Reubin and David and I really used to laugh about the thing. We ended up moving into those offices. In the meantime, I think Stanley comes with us... Reubin, in the meantime, runs for state representative, and, then, he runs for state senate... No, no, no. Because we’re still in those offices on Government Street when.... Alright, t he story I say about the Seville Tower takes place later, because when Reubin ran for governor, we were still over on Government Street. P: That’s not the First National Bank building is it? L: No, we didn’t move over there until later. It was in the late 1960s when the guy did bring us all together for lunch, but we didn’t buy into it until after Reubin got to be governor. At that point, Reubin becam e governor, W.D. Childers ran for his seat and got elected. P: In the legislature. L: State senate, and, all of a sudden, we’d become like the political geniuses having taken this guy, David and myself. Everybody says, “Oh my God, these guys from Pensacola have gotten this guy elected.” P: Is this a preeminent law firm by that time in Pensacola? L: No. Reubin had some anti-Semitic campaigns run against him for being with Jews, and we still don’t represent anybody of any significance. In the meantime, I have kicked butt in personal injury cases. David’s handling divorce cases, Jack Graff and I are

PAGE 38

UFLC 75 Page 38 handling personal injury cases, but I’m really starting to get the reputation, winning, winning, winning. P: Did you also have a reputation of being mean? L: No. P: You hadn’t turned people off from that point of view. L: No. What was happening was I was getting such great verdicts, winning so many cases, but from hard work, I mean really hard work, I’m talking about every little thing. I’ve never been surprised in a court room until last week, but that was just a cheap shot by the state attorney’s office. I was good, really good. I felt I was as good as any lawyer in the country in trial. The reputation of, “He’s got to be doing something bad to get these results.” I fed that idea. I’d always laugh or something and fed the idea that I was cheating, which I wasn’t. Never did anything, as far as I was concerned, unethical or in that way. P: Were you then developing a reputation of being slick? L: I was developing a reputation of getting great results. Among the community, “He’s good, he’s real good.” Among the lawyers, the jealously factor was starting to come in, “he can’t be that good.” Buddy Caro had gone for years and never lost a case, and, I think, I beat him seven times in a row. Bert Lane, as I told you, was thought to be the greatest trial lawyer in Northwest Florida, I beat him in the Traveler’s case... P: Inebriated or otherwise. L: Yes. I beat him in another major case against Pensacola Restaurant Supply, and I beat him in the case that made my reputation, the Thorshov case. I had kicked butt of all the great defense lawyers. I don’t think they reacted so badly as did the other plaintiffs’ lawyers. I think they felt, “God knows, Buddy Caro never lost a case, Fred Levin beat him seven times in a row.” There had to be something going on. Plaintiffs lawyers themselves, my competitors, and I started to develop... there’s a lot of animosity. After John Kennedy had been killed in the 1960s, 1963, there came up a few months before that, there were no blacks and members of the Society of the Bar in the First Judicial Circuit. I had recommended either Charlie Wilson or Nathaniel Dedmond. Charlie may have already gone by then. Whatever it was, I recommended him for the Bar membership. P: What is this Society of the Bar?

PAGE 39

UFLC 75 Page 39 L: That’s the Bar Association for Northwest Florida. I remember the meeting, Bert Lane stood up, D.L. Middlebrooks stood up, Pat Emmanuel stood up, Rollin Davis, T.A. Shell, everyone. P: All in opposition? L: All in opposition to this. They had called my wife, and I was more proud of Marilyn – and actually, I know in the book it says Charles Wilson, but it was Nathaniel Dedmond. There were two black lawyers in Pensacola. I know it’s Nathaniel Dedmond because they called Marilyn and they said, “Marilyn, in the Bar Auxiliary, how would you like to be sitting next to Nathaniel Dedmond’s wife,” whatever her name is. She said, “Oh, yes, that will be fine.” That wasn’t the answer they were expecting. They were expecting to get back to me, to tell me to withdraw this thing. But these were every prominent lawyer, every major firm. P: Including Middlebrooks? L: Including D.L. Middlebrooks that was with Beggs and Lane at the time. Everybody. So they had the big vote, the big meeting, and I think Nathaniel got five votes and about 100 against him. I just couldn’t believe it. Then, John Kennedy got killed thereafter, I believe, and I said, “You know, it’s the same kind of people. This could not be.” Election time came for the Bar Association, it was around Christmas time. We were at Mustin Beach Officers Club. They had the nominating committee, and this must have been 1963 or 1964, and they had for president, vicepresident, secretary, treasurer and all this stuff. The Board of Directors for the Bar Association and one member for the Bar Association had to be less than five years in practice. Fred Levin was nominated. It was at Mustin Beach Officers Club. The president moved for acclamation, this, this, and this. The Board of Directors bang, bang, bang A member less than five years, I was sitting there. Somebody said, “I’d like to nominate Frank Bozeman.” They wanted us to go outside. So the two of us sitting out there, I remember Frank sitting out there,” I don’t know why I would even think about doing this. Nobody has ever run against anybody who’s been nominated.” We come back in the room, and there’s all this clapping, “Congratula tions Frank.” I’m just floored. It was the last time I ever ran for anything by the way, the first and last time. I did not get the votes of all of the members of my firm. I really believed Dick Warfield voted with them. I got beat by about the same score that Nathaniel Dedmond had gotten beat by. That was another of the [events] that engendered in me this competitive, which even to this day that I relish the idea of somebody taking cheap shots at me. Like I say, I work off that, and I become a much, much better lawyer, and I take it and usually am able to turn it around and shove it up their.... P: How serious was the defeat? L: It was embarrassing, it was really embarrassing.

PAGE 40

UFLC 75 Page 40 P: Particularly if members of your own firm voted against you. L: I may be wrong, I think I may have gotten six votes, and there were six of them there, but I always... P: Was this because of the stand that you had taken on segregation? L: Sure. P: They were getting back at you. L: Sure. I didn’t believe that it would happen like that. I really thought these people... P: From there on in, what happened to integrati on? This is the beginning of it, but whether they are resisting or not. L: Yeah. And eventually it came about. P: Soon or later? L: I don’t remember, but I remember all of these guys had stood up. They were all the preeminent members of not just this Bar, but the Florida Bar. These guys went on to become federal judges, President of the State Bar, all of them had been president of the local Bar. P: It was a turning point, obviously, in history. L: Yeah. It was, again, the same thing that I had done a few years before with George Stark. P: I want to ask you something before we leave it. This organization, Society of the Bar, was that a social organization? L: No. It would be something like the Alachua County Bar Association. P: How could they keep even a black [pers on] out who had gotten his law degree and got his... L: 1963. Blacks were members of the Florida Bar. P: Of course it came later in West Florida than it did elsewhere, but by the 1960s the universities were integrated.

PAGE 41

UFLC 75 Page 41 L: They did it. Legally, of course not, they could not do it. That’s what I argued to them. These were the prominent members. Judge Mason was there, here are your judges, your leaders of the Bar, everything. But it was a different time. If these same people were living today.... People remember things a lot differently. I’m sure the guys who went to law school with me all saw themselves in never having participated in that shuffling and all of that. A lot of them went on to become judges, justices, friends of black lawyers. It developed, and I’m glad that happened. I recall both of the instances very well, and some day, 100 years from now, people listening to this, I guess they’ll be able to listen to the tapes? P: Of course. L: They’ll never be able to understand. That would have been 1963. About the same time, Fred Vigodsky calls me, Jack Graff’s already moved to Pensacola, practicing law. P: Fred is originally from South Carolina? L: Newberry, South Carolina. His daughter has just been born, his daughter Holly, and he’s married to a Brenda Cousins. He said he really wanted some Jewish life for them. He was in the Jewish store in every little southern town. Their family had that. Slowly but surely the big boys were coming in. So he called and wanted to know what was going on. I told him my brother David and Bill McAbee and I had just bought in to a barbeque joint, and it looked like it was going to do well. He wanted to get out of Newberry, so he went to FSU restaurant school for one semester, and then moved over to Pensacola. We were the closest of friends and we’ve been that for the last almost forty years, since they moved to Pensacola. P: He’s one of your very best friends. L: Yes, and business partners. He got into Chicks Barbeque with me, and this began a business career. We got into the restaurant business. P: Explain all this getting into the restaurant business. It seems kind of strange from your career point of view. L: I’ve always been like a closet entrepreneur, I love business. A lot of this has to do with the understanding of business, how people react, dollars, how supply and demand works. This all came very natural to me, it wasn’t anything I studied. It had a lot to do, going back to that law school, rule against perpetuities and options. It’s how the economy works. I guess if I have anything that I’ve got great ability with it’s the understanding of business, the understanding of marketing, and how people react; whether it be on a jury to a set of circumstances or it be to a business situation. [End of Tape B, side 3] ...The first one was. They were in trouble, and we helped bail them out.

PAGE 42

UFLC 75 Page 42 P: What was the name of it? L: Chicks Barbeque. P: It was at the beach? L: No. Eventually we had a place at the beach. This was out on the intersection of Pace and Palafox, and, then eventually, we had one in Fort Walton, we had one on Gregory Street in Pensacola, we had one in Mobile. Then, we got into the night club business, we had a night club in Pensacola, one on Pensacola Beach. P: I don’t know how you had time to be a lawyer. L: I loved it. I would work the law practice and, then at night, sit down with Fred and have a few drinks and discuss the business. In the meantime, I’ll get into Poppa Don and that story and the business. I’m kicking butt in lawsuits, really doing well. P: Was the barbeque business a lucrative business? L: It ends up being, yes. It’s making enough money to pay Fred and his wife a salary. [She’s] working in it. I eat free, travel on it, things of that nature. Reubin Askew becomes governor, and I want Fred Vigodsky to get into the food and beverage [industry], and Reubin remembered Fred from doing a lot of drinking, and he didn’t want that. About this time, a dress store called Sam’s Style Shop, which was owned by Sam Rosenblum, became available here in downtown Pensacola. We were wanting to get out of the restaurant business, so we sold... P: Why did you want to get out of the restaurant business? L: It was just a pain. It’s a horrible, horrible business. They call you all hours of the night, tell you they got a bad barbeque sandwich. It finally got to a point where we sold the building that we had in Fort Walton, we sold the building on Gregory Street. We sold the restaurant to some doctors who had opened up a restaurant. In Mobile, I think we just sold the building. Anyhow, and made a little money. The dress store came open, which was Fred Vigodsky’s original background, ladies apparel, so we then bought Sam’s Style Shop. P: The “we” is you and Fred? L: Fred and myself. David...I think we took the money from Chicks Barbeque and moved it into that. What started as one dress store, in the meantime, my brother Allen had gone

PAGE 43

UFLC 75 Page 43 to work for the State of Florida. He had been a teacher, and he goes to work in the business regulation, which included the tracks. P: Allen never gets a law degree, he goes for business. L: Right, he goes from business school to a c ouple of months of law school, realized he didn’t like it, goes to teaching, and, then, goes to work for the Department of Business Regulation in the parimutuel end of it working for a guy named Richie Pallot who was a good friend of Reubin Askew. Eventually, Allen needs to get out of that, and he comes in to the dress business with Fred Vigodsky. From one Sam’s Style Shop, we end up with fifty-two apparel stores around the Southeast. P: All with the same name? L: No. Some of them were David Fredric’ s, which was my brother David and myself; Brenda Allen’s, which was Fred Vigodsky’s wi fe, Brenda, and my brother Allen. Then, we had some warehouse sales. One year, I remember we actually, on an audited statement, made $1 million, but we were in the discount business, and interest rates started skyrocketing towards the end of the 1970s, and, by the early 1980s, we were basically bankrupt. Allen and Fred Vigodsky came and talked to me and told me that it was not good. I was on a bunch of notes. We filed for bankruptcy on December 31, 1978 or 1979, somewhere around there, maybe 1980. Within three months, we’d come out of bankruptcy, we paid our creditors, ended up using the bankruptcy court to be able to sell out of the dress business. From Chicks Barbeque, all the way through the bankruptcy and the sales and all of that which would have been the early 1980s, we actually netted out almost $5 million, which, back then, and still is, a lot of money. This is just hard work, not giving up, drive, drive, drive when things look horrible. P: Does this leave Fred without anything? L: Yes, except he, then, goes off into the carpet business, and I’m out of the businesses for a few years. P: You’re back to becoming a lawyer. L: Well, I was a lawyer all the time. Some great cases, I had some million dollar verdicts, which was unheard of. In the meantime, politically, people think that I’m an absolute genius. I’ve gotten Reubin Askew electe d, everybody who wants to run for anything kind of spread.... P: I’m looking for you.

PAGE 44

UFLC 75 Page 44 L: Yeah. 1977 or 1978, a doctor and his wife and two children living on the bluffs on Scenic Highway, a train overturns, there was ammonia emission. The doctor dies that night, the wife dies ninety days later, and the family comes to see me. I had had a $2 million verdict against K-Mart for a pharmacy case, I think I tried it in the mid-1970s, 1976, 1977. Let me back up. The pharmacy case came in as a result of my returning a telephone call. I always returned my telephone calls. They had called two or three other lawyers and had not gotten a return call. A couple of years later, after the case, I tried the case and won the case. The client told me the reason I got the case was because I had returned the telephone call, which I still, to this day, always return a telephone call. It goes back to my days at the University of Florida when Marci got sick, and I called a pediatrician and called him and called him, never could get a return call. This had an effect on me, and, then, as a professional, it’s so mething that I realized that if they feel strong enough to call me, then I can at least return the call. So I end up taking this case against the L&N Railroad. They start, Bert Lane’s on the other side. P: Bert Lane continues to be one of your opponents. L: Right. This is the third of the three big cases: that Theodore case, and, then, the case against the Pensacola Restaurant Supply, and, then, the case against the L&N Railroad. I end up getting an $18 million verdict, and there’s a whole story about that. Bert dies not long after that. It just blew him away. He turned out to be rather anti-Semitic. He was “country club,” however, he had never been to college. He studied to become a lawyer. He was a big name all over the South. He represented all the big time companies. I remember, I was getting ready to go do the closing argument, and I had a Countess Me..., and he looked over there at it and saw the c.m., he says, “What does that say in Yiddish? Is that in Yiddish?” I said, “Yeah.” I said, “It says I’m going to kick your fucking ass in a few minutes in this courtroom.” So we go in there and I did. I destroyed him. It was not long thereafter, Be rt, he got drunk a couple of days later, and they hit a car, and, then, within a few months, he died. Not as a result of the accident, just as a result, I guess, of a broken heart. So that was 1980, 1981, 1982. In the meantime, back in the 1970s, Reubin gets elected, and Broward Williams, I believe, was the treasurer and insurance commissioner, and I wanted to get into the insurance business. P: I want to ask you something, though. Did you elect Reubin Askew? What role did you play in his campaign? L: Worked like heck. Reubin got elected, he just happened to be in the right place at the right time from Northwest Florida. P: He was an able man. L: He was very able. Raised money for him and things like that.

PAGE 45

UFLC 75 Page 45 P: Were you part of an inner circle? L: Oh yeah. I was part of an inner circle of advisors with Tom Adams [lieutenant governor under Askew, 1971-75] who was there. P: I knew Tom. L: And all of these things. Had it not been that Jack Matthews was running and everything that gave Reubin just enough [votes] to get into the run-off against Earl Faircloth [Florida Attorney General, 1965-1971] that’s what did it. Had it been. . same way Bob Graham, everyone of them, always, they were able just to get into that run-off. In the early 1970s, Reubin is Governor... P: Reubin never forgot his Pensacola friends and associates. L: No. P: His mother no longer had to be the maid at San Carlos. L: Right. David really was Reubin’s closest friend in life. Reubin didn’t have a lot of really good friends, but David was. P: David supported that Askew Institute. L: No, I did. I put the half a million dollars into it. So, I got with Broward Williams, and he got me with this idiot who had a company called Orange State Life Insurance Company. Charlie Ruttenberg of U.S. Homes was part of it, Fred Fisher who went on to become the Fisher School of Accounting. P: I was amazed when I read about Ruttenberg and Fisher being involved. L: They had a big blow up. Anyhow, as a result of this, I was chairman of the board of the company. I didn’t know what the hell I was doing, and it was going down the drain, and, thankfully, Charlie Ruttenberg had a good friend named Barry Alpert. Barry was a banker in Chicago, he came to Florida. Barry pulled the company out, and we sold it to Home Life, and I did better than I would have done had I been in the stock market. It wasn’t worth all the pain and aggravation and everything else. P: Were you close personal friends with Ruttenberg and Fisher? L: Yeah.

PAGE 46

UFLC 75 Page 46 P: Are you still good friends with them? L: No. Both of them would certainly know who I am. Fred Fisher was Ruttenberg’s accountant. P: But they split, didn’t they? L: They split at U.S. Homes. Charlie Ruttenberg was a very strong willed person. Arthur Ruttenberg, of course, still has the home business, but Charlie Ruttenberg had the U.S. Homes. P: Barry Ruttenberg lives in Gainesville and builds homes. L: Really? P: Arthur’s son. L: Fred Fisher got together with the rest of the U.S. Home board, and they got rid of Charlie Ruttenberg and Fred Fisher got a lot of stock in U.S. Home for having masterminded this. But Fred Fisher was an accountant. He and Charlie Ruttenberg were the closest of friends. P: We’ve been very good friends of Fred and his girlfriend over the years. L: Fred did him in. It was wrong, it really was. He masterminded this takeover. I’m now out of the Orange State Life Insurance business. I’m out of the Chick’s Barbeque, Sams Style Shop business. P: You’re no longer a restaurant man. L: No, I’m practicing law. P: Have you ever gone back into business? L: Oh, yeah. So I’m back up again. W.D. Childers had got elected to the state senate. P: Who was W.D. Childers? L: He was just a teacher who became a little businessman here who ran against Gordon Wells or somebody to become state senator. P: He was in the right place at the right time?

PAGE 47

UFLC 75 Page 47 L: Walks into Dempsey Barron and becomes... P: He was not a particularly... L: No, never had run for anything. P: Anything on the local scene. L: Became the “hey boy” for Dempsey Barron, and, slowly but surely, becomes the president of the Florida senate. I was against him in every race he ever had until in the late 1970s, they were trying to pass “no fault,” and I was the only person against him who donated money to his opponent. The Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers, W.D. was the chairman of commerce or something and asked me to go speak. He was given five minutes. W.D. allowed me to get behind Bill Gunter [Florida insurance commissioner, 1976-1989], who was the insurance commissioner who was pushing this, and, then, allowed me to talk for almost an hour. Modestly, I did a magnificent job. The commerce committee voted down Gunter’s “no fault” proposal. I went back and sat down, and I got this note that said, “Senator Childers would like to see you.” I thought he had forgotten all about the fact that I had been the person who had been against him. We go, and I thank him for allowing me do this, for putting me in position and all that. I started to walk out, and he said, “Do you think,” whatever this guy’s name is, his opponent was, “you think he could have done that for you?” I said, “No, sir, Senator.” We became fairly good friends, and, then, he gets involved with this waterfront property here and the state buying it, and there’s a statewide grand jury. He’s the incoming President of the Florida Senate. Dempsey Barron tells him to come get me, to use me as his lawyer, and I’m not sure whether Dempsey was doing it because W.D. was getting too big for his britches, and he figured this would be perfect because I never had handled a criminal case. P: Had you worked with Barron before? L: I knew Barron, and I’d always been on the opposite sides of him. He was a big insurance company guy. Never had tried a case with him. Anyhow, they come get me, and I represent W.D., and it’s really bad. They’re out to bust his behind, the statewide grand jury. I talk him into taking a lie detector test, I believed him. He takes a lie detector, he passes it. Instead of the statewid e grand jury indicting him, they give him a presentment in which they say just the most fabulous things about him. What a great guy he was, open and honest and all of this, and everybody who runs for elections should use W.D. Childers as the example. So we become friends. Here, back in Pensacola, cable television is just being started. For the last many years, I had been trying to talk our law firm, which is now David Levin, D.L. Middlebrooks, Leff Mabie, all these guys, I wanted to talk them into advertising. I saw what was happening in the late 1970s. All of the law firms started advertising, and they were taking business like crazy, and our firm ke pt saying, “We are the firm for plaintiff’s

PAGE 48

UFLC 75 Page 48 law,” nobody would go anywhere else. That ’s not so. People didn’t... what you thought they thought, advertising worked. It got into about 1983, 1984, and W.D. had a dear, dear friend who was working for Cox Cable. They needed local programming, so I came up with the idea for something called BLAB television, and that we would start, and we would do call in talk, legal, call law line, people would call in and we would answer questions. This was 1984, 1985. From there we had a sports show, and to this day, now it starts to move along, and toward the end of the 1980s, I get Fred Vigodsky to come back into it. Today it’s twenty-four hours a day, it’s billings are over $2 million. P: You own the station? L: A big chunk, 40 percent of it. P: But you do it personally, it’s not the firm’s. L: Not the firm’s, no. Nobody wanted to be a part of it. My family controls [it], between the kids and everything and Marilyn. P: So it’s more than just a couple of three hours that Mark is involved with? L: Yeah. At one point, we were in New Orlean s, we were in Mobile, Tampa, Clearwater. Now we have a little one in Clearwater that does maybe twelve hours a week. P: Does the firm lease three hours? L: Yes. P: And that’s where Mark is... L: Yes. In other words, what happens is it’s an infomercial station. You can buy an hour of time, and you can sell commercials if you want to on your time. P: So the firm has bought three hours, is that right? L: Yes, that’s right. And some reruns. But it’s twenty-four hours a day, and like I said, the billings are pretty strong. It’s also been great for trade-outs. P: What channel is it on in Pensacola? L: On channel 6 in Pensacola, channel 2 and channel 38 in Gulf Breeze, we’ve got two channels. P: So you think it’s paid off?

PAGE 49

UFLC 75 Page 49 L: Oh sure, sure. I’ve got nothing in it and I’ve been drawing.... P: You said you have a 40 percent interest. L: Yeah, I mean I have no money in it. It’s paid for almost anything I do, food.... P: The lawyers from the firm, they just volunteer their time and effort. L: Yeah, but they build themselves up in doing it. P: I forgot to ask Mark how he became a television star. L: Yeah, and you become comfortable, and it’s fun for awhile. I did it for fifteen years. P: So far we’ve got you as a lawyer, a businessman, a restaurant man, in the dress business, and, now, we get you in television. L: All of this time, I’m doing all of these things. P: Not much sleeping it sounds like. You take it in stride? L: Take it in stride. Debbie was born about the time Holly Vigodsky and then Martin was born. P: You have four children? L: Four children, and, then, Kimberly. I guess we’ll get back to family. P: Oh, yeah, I’m going to get family at the end. L: In the meantime, I’ve become a big shot in politics with the Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers, they give me the Perry Nichols Award. I’ve passed the Wrongful Death Bill. When I got him [W.D.] out of that grand jury mess, he said he would pass the new Florida Wrongful Death Act, which has been fa bulous for plaintiff’s lawyers. It was the best in the country, it allowed so many great things. That caused the falling out between W.D. and Dempsey. That was a big war, but W.D. came down on my side, he had promised. So the Academy gave me the Perry Nichols Award, and I became known all over as being this guy who got the new Wrongful Death Bill, the guy who got Reubin Askew elected. P: Could do no wrong. L: Could do no wrong. I built a penthouse down in Destin.

PAGE 50

UFLC 75 Page 50 P: You were jumping around a little bit too much. L: No, this gets it back. P: Because I want to get into a little bit more detail about some of these things. L: In the penthouse in Destin, which was beautiful and gorgeous, we used that for political fund-raising. P: We were there once. L: As a result of that, Ed Addison, who went on to become President of Southern Company, had me go to work for Gulf Power, and I became, probably, the only plaintiff’s lawyer in the country that was representing the power company, all kind of things. Everything good was happening. All of these things were taking place in the 1980s, the BLAB T.V., the representation of the power company, the great politician. I had just everything. Everybody running for anything, I don’t care if it was Bob Graham. P: The politicians still cling to you, don’t they? L: Yeah, but I’m a has-been. Anyhow, in 1988, and then we’ll back up, 1988 Roy Jones, Jr. is in the Olympics, from Pensacola, and beats the hell out of the Korean and has the Gold medal stolen. P: Let me take over a little bit now. When did people like Mabie come into the firm, and Middlebrooks. L: Nixon appointed D.L. to be a judge. Before that, we had tried to get D.L. D.L. was upset at Beggs and Lane, he didn’t like the situation. We wanted him to come with us, but he decided to go with Harold, Caro and Wiltshire, which was Buddy Caro and Joe Harrold. Then, he went on the bench. Then, about maybe 1974, 1975, 1976, he left the bench, I think he was the first federal judge to ever resign, and he was the same D.L. Middlebrooks who was against Nathaniel Dedmond. The reason he did not like the federal bench, it was in Tallahassee, and he was getting all the civil rights cases, and it was about to drive him crazy. He went back to Pensacola, joined our firm. P: To get somebody like him, you have to make an offer or he comes seeking you? L: He came and we talked. Warfield had been there. Warfield was a mistake. He looked good. He had the big hat and no cattle. He looked good, but he wasn’t that good a lawyer.

PAGE 51

UFLC 75 Page 51 P: What about Crosby? As I remember, he was on the faculty at the law school in Gainesville. L: When I went through. Then he came up, and he became president of the UWF [University of West Florida], circuit judge. Then, in the mid 1980s, he came with us, he came with the firm. Leff Mabie was already here, D.L. Middlebrooks – all of this occurred in ten, twelve years. Leo Thomas came, Stanley had already been there. P: So the firm is growing in size and in prestige? L: Yeah. And in the meantime, we move over to Seville Tower. P: I want to ask you about the moves. The original office was in the Florida National Bank building? L: That was before I came. P: That’s before you joined up. Where was it again when you joined? L: On Government Street, 120 West Government, I think. P: Then you moved to where? L: To Seville Tower, which is the old bank building tower. P: Did you own that? Did the firm own that? L: No. This guy, I can’t remember his name, the one who said, “ I don’t know who to thank for this meal,” but it [was his]. P: You could afford to buy a building then if you didn’t have to pay for food. L: Yeah. At that time, when we moved over there, that’s when we started doing food everyday, we’d have breakfast on Monday morning, Saturday morning, and lunch everyday. Then eventually went into haircuts. P: A lot of perks. L: A lot of perks. Then, we moved over to this location that we’re in now. P: The building over here, the one with all that, you didn’t own that building, you say? L: No.

PAGE 52

UFLC 75 Page 52 P: You leased floors there? L: Leased floors. P: Then, you came here. Do you own this building? L: Actually, my children own 40 percent of it. P: But I mean it’s family owned? L: Yeah. The majority of this business is owned by the Levin family. P: And the firm leases space here? L: Yes. P: Are these floors the choice floors? L: Oh, yes. P: And yours is a choice office? L: I would think so. P: I think so, too. L: The firm grew, and they would have lawyers and get rid of...lawyers would quit. A lot of the lawyers went in on their own. Jim McKenzie, actually Dick Warfield left, George Estess, Bill Rankin, Mike Griffith. P: You were going to get a list of those so you remember. L: We’ll get those. P: What is the relationship with the firm and what was the relationship of the firm in Gulf Power? Was it the firm or was it... L: It was me, actually. P: Tell us for the tape what Gulf Power is. L: Gulf Power is the power company for Northwest Florida. The same as Florida Power and Light.

PAGE 53

UFLC 75 Page 53 P: It’s mainly based where? L: Based in Pensacola, but it goes all the way through to, I guess, certainly Destin, Panama City. The president of the company is a guy named Ed Addison. P: The president now or then? L: The president then of Gulf Power. Jake Horton was vice-president, and Jake was a dear friend of W.D.’s. W.D. and I in the meantime had become close friends after I saved him. Jake and W.D. and I, pretty much, had a threesome. Then, I was winning cases right and left, and Ed Addison wanted me to become their counsel, litigation lawyer. His board, here in Gulf Power, said we’re not going to have a plaintiff’s lawyer do this. In the meantime, Reubin Askew had become governor, and he was already out at that point. As things would have it, Ed Addison gets the presidency of the Southern Company, which controls Georgia Power, Mississippi Power, Alabama Gulf Power, Savannah Power – it’s the largest publicly held utility company in the world. He becomes president, and one of his first orders of business is to call down to Pensacola and say, “Fred Levin’s going to do the legal work.” His board had stopped it here, locally. So I started representing them and did really a magnificent job for them defending cases. P When you defend a case like that, are you on a fee basis or are you on the payroll? L: Actually, I would be on an hourly basis, but they bonused me a couple of times back in the 1980s, $100,000. Just flat bonused me. Just did, like I said, a great job for them. Also the penthouse, I was using it for politics. They would bring in, Alabama Power would entertain, you’ve been there, fabulous, fabulous place. Remind me, and we’ll get a brochure to take to put in the thing, because it was incredible. We’re doing all kinds of politics, and, as things would have it, the local IRS felt that they were using power company money to promote politicians. Actually, it exploded way out of what it should have been. My law firm was contributing more money to politicians each year than all of Gulf Power put together. They blew this thing out. Jake Horton became the scapegoat. On April 10, 1989, which I believe was a Monday, W.D. is in Tallahassee, Jake Horton calls and says “I need to see you,” comes in to see me. He said, “ I think I’m going to get fired.” I said, “Jake, you’re crazy.” I called Ed Addison in Atlanta, and I could tell Ed was a little funny about things. They had worked it out, Jake was going to be the scapegoat. It’d been going on for months and months, these investigations, grand jury, IRS, and all of that. We’re in my old office, and Jake’s on the other side of the room, he said, “I need to use the telephone.” He calls for a power company plane to come pick him up from Mi ssissippi Power, pick him up, and take him to Atlanta. As he walks out, he tells me, “Fred, if anything were to happen to me, you make sure they take care of Francis.” I said, “Oh, what are you talking about?” He

PAGE 54

UFLC 75 Page 54 said, “ I’m going to the power company, and, then, I’ll meet you back here at 1:00.” Jack Graff had retired in 1976, but Jack was doing some work also for Gulf Power. I said, “ I’ll have Jack here, and we’ll meet again.” Jake gets on the plane, and the plane blows up between Pensacola and into Escambia County. Catches fire and crashes. P: They never recovered the body, I don’t think. L: No, they got all three bodies. Two pilots and.... That evening I called W.D. immediately, and W.D. comes back to Pensacola, and he and I go over to the Horton’s home. We see Jake’s ring, Auburn ring, which he never took off, and his watch. W.D. had to go to the bathroom, and there they were. What had happened without a question was Jake had decided to commit suicide. That went on for a couple of years [unclear]. P: I remember there was a lot in the papers. L: Magazines, Wall Street Journal everything. That was on a Monday. On Wednesday, I went to [interruption]. P: Did they ever solve the Jake Horton mystery? L: Not really, but I knew. P: Why would he commit suicide? L: Everything, his whole life – he had no childre n, he had girlfriends, and his wife was very demanding. He just.... P: Just got tired of it all? L: Yeah. P: That left you out in the cold as far as that firm was concerned. L: No. That Monday afternoon, after he killed himself, I went and saw the President of Gulf Power, and I said, “Listen, there’s no need to put Jake Horten through all this, his memory and all of this. Let’s just let it be.” That wasn’t to be, they blamed everything, all of the problems on Jake. I resigned, I told them I wasn’t going to be a.... P: So that ended your relationship? L: Yeah, I told them I wasn’t going to represent them anymore. P: And it has never been resumed?

PAGE 55

UFLC 75 Page 55 L: No. I stopped representing them. P: Another Pensacola firm represents them now? L: Beggs and Lane always had represented them. They’re back to representing them full time now. P: What is it you started talking about before of the train wreck? That was the Louisville and Nashville freight trains and that happened in 1977? L: Yes, November of 1977. P: Why was it called the “Great Florida Train Fight”? L: That’s just what the American Lawyer called it. At the time, it was the largest verdict for the death of a wage earner, largest verd ict for the death of a housewife. In the meantime, all during this time, I also got the first $1 million verdict for the death of a child, and it was a black child, got $3.6 million, which was unheard of. P: I found here listing $10 million punitive damages in the train wreck. L: Yes, it was. P: And $8 million compensatory. L: Right. P: Do you get 25 percent of that? Is that a general figure, not necessarily in just this one case? L: In that case, we actually ended up settling it for, I think, the fee was one-third. We settled it for a present value fee of $13 million. P: Really want I to get is not necessarily just this case, but you ranged from 25 to 35 percent or something like that? L: Yeah, that would be fair. P: Were there children involved in this train wreck? The father and mother died. L: Yeah, the two children, but they’re well today. Both of them are married, they live in Colorado.

PAGE 56

UFLC 75 Page 56 P: I have the estate of the black women, Pamela Denise Williams, what is that case? The Allstate Insurance? L: That was the black... P: Was that the child? L: That was one of them that got a $1 million verdict. P: What was the basis of that case? L: She was a University of Florida student on her way home in a rental car, a passenger, wonderful young lady. P: What happened? L: They ran off the interstate, her driver did, and she got killed. P: Was it the car malfunctioned? L: No. P: Who were they suing? L: Suing the driver and the owner, which was whatever the name of the rental car, Hertz or Avis or something. P: I’ve got All-State Insurance. L: Yeah. P: And they got $1.2 million? L: Yeah. P: Who was killed in that? L: Pamela Williams. P: Pamela Denise Williams v. National [Rent A Car] Why were they suing a rental [company]? L: The owner of the car is responsible for the driver. National Car Rental owned it.

PAGE 57

UFLC 75 Page 57 P: So there wasn’t anything wrong with the car, there was something wrong with the driver. L: The driver. P: Was the driver killed? L: No. P: And who pays this million dollars, the insurance company? L: Yes, for National Car Rental. P: Is this an unusual type of thing? L: No. Now it is, because the laws have been changed, but, back then, rental car companies, the Gillette case also back then I got $13 million, about. P: I have another case I want to ask you about that’s similar to that. February 1983, David Gillette with the University of West Florida, student, and there was also National Car Rental. L: Yes. That was somebody up here working at the News Journal and drove his car, actually, he was on a through road, David was a passenger that pulled out, and they hit. David was a quadriplegic, and we ended up getting a verdict of $13 [million], $14 million. Eventually, it was paid after years of appeals and everything else. P: David still lives here in... L: In Pensacola. David still lives here, has got children. P: He’s the [quadriplegic]. L: But he had children thereafter, married this girl, and, apparently, is doing very well. P: Who are Terry and Joyce [Darangelo]? Auto injuries also. L: He broke both his heels in an automobile accident, this was an uninsured motorists case, got $1.1 million or something. He’s still around. P: You sound like the battering warrior, staying up there, beating these insurance companies to their feet. L: I did a good job against them.

PAGE 58

UFLC 75 Page 58 P: Both for them and for everybody concerned. Who is Helen Caldwell? L: I represented her... it was down near Destin. She was just a real estate agent, and a tractor trailer crossed over on her, and she got a $1 million verdict. P: A $1 million verdict, that’s right. [End of Tape B, side 4] ...tell your other case. L: I’ll get into that. You wanted to ask me, though, about the Neese case. Her husband, she had just gotten married to him, and her husband touched the fence, a power line had fallen and he got electrocuted. We got a [$3.3] million verdict. P: Then the parents also got $1 million. L: Yeah, so it was four point something against the Rural Electrical Coop. P: But that’s kind of an accident that happens. L: I was kicking butt back then. Southeast Toyota... P: Jim Moran? L: Jim Moran. My son-in-law, Ross Goodman, had come with the firm, and somebody had come to him about suing Southeast Toyota for a Toyota dealer, and I told him he was crazy. We later found out that that Toyota dealer had settled for like $4 million. All of a sudden, Doc Hollinsworth who owns Quality Imports in Fort Walton came to see me to represent him in a similar case against Southeast Toyota, and it had to do with tie-in. They wouldn’t sell him the good cars unless he took the bad cars, and it was a whole bunch of things. P: And Moran was the southeastern [dealer]. L: Jim Moran was Southeast Toyota, the wealthiest, billionaire, wealthiest person in Florida at the time. He had been an automobile dealer and Ford dealer in Chicago. P: He was a Gator you know, Moran, I think. L: I think his children, I don’t think Jim Moran would have gone to college. P: I thought I met him at the.... He’s the southeastern dealer. As I understand it, from what you’re saying now, in order to get good cars you had to buy bad cars. L: You had to buy some of his bad cars. I sued him. On the other side was Williams and Connoly, a guy named Ray Bergan who was the head of their civil department, great law

PAGE 59

UFLC 75 Page 59 firm. We go to trial in Crestview. Before that I took the deposition of Mr. Moran, and he and I got into it. Somehow or another at break, I saw his big boats, he said, “If you win this case, you got a week on my boat called the Gallant Lady ,” which was the finest boat on the East coast of the United States. We go to trial and I do, I got a forty-some million dollar verdict. We had a high-low, which meant that we couldn’t get less than $4 million or more than $22 million. We ended up settling for about $15 [million], $18 million or something. P: Who gets that money? L: Doc Hollinsworth. We got about $4 million, but the time and effort and everything we put into it, it wasn’t really worth it. About a year later, I get a call from Southeast Toyota wanting to know when I would like to use the boat. We went down, a friend of mine name Max Seelig from Atlantic City and his son, Fred Vigodsky and myself, and my brother Allen, brother Herman, and I think that was it. We go into Fort Lauderdale, we fly in one of his many jets to the Abacos [Bahamas Island] where the big Gallant Lady is, we spend three or four days, come back. The following year I get a call, “When would you like do it again?” We go down to Fort Lauderdale, we get on one of his big jets and we fly to Martinique or somewhere down there, we’re on his new Gallant Lady Then, just recently, I called and Roy Jones, Jr. was fighting in Miami in January of 2002. He was at the American Airlines arena which is right next to the water, I’d like to rent his boat for a cocktail party. They refused to rent it to me, but they sent it over there, fabulous cocktail party, food, everything in the damn world. I ended up sending him a check for $25,000 as a contribution to his foundation, but the party would have cost $50,000. It was just unbelievable. So we became fairly good friends. P: I was going to say, he loses a case to you and then he makes his boat available to you. Where does he live? L: In Deerfield Beach, I believe. P: He’s still a rich man, obviously. L: Yes. P: Still in the Toyota business? L: Toyota business, yes. P: And he’s still dealing? L: Oh yeah. P: You’re looking at your watch.

PAGE 60

UFLC 75 Page 60 L: I’m going to leave here in about five minutes. P: Tell me about the Orange State Life Insurance Company in Largo, Florida. L: That was the insurance company that Broward Williams got me into that I was with Ruttenberg. P: I want to hold that because that’s a story I think that’s going to be bigger than we can cover, so let’s leave that for just a moment and come back to that. Also, I know the tobacco settlement, I have a huge number. L: Yeah, that goes years later. P: One of the ones that intrigues me tremendously was the Howard Hughes business. L: Leff Mabie had a friend in Alabama, a lawyer. At the time, Norton Bond was a lawyer in our office, and this guy was sort of like just a mentor to Norton, a friend of Leff’s, and he came up with the idea that Howard Hughes had these children, a boy and a girl... P: Adopted children. L: I’m not sure how that worked, but yeah, it was some type of adoption called common law adoption that’s available in certain states. P: Adopted children in Alabama. L: Yeah. So Alabama has a common law adoption. Anyhow, he got us to work on the case with him. It ends up settling and the whole group gets 9.5 percent. P: Of the entire estate? L: Of the entire estate. P: Which was a multimillion dollar thing. L: Yeah. I ended up owning a quarter of 1 percent, I think Leff had a half of 1 percent. I’m not sure how that darn thing worked. I’m still getting a little bit from here and a little bit from there. Anyhow, they settled it. P: But the court settlement was that these were adopted children, they were Howard Hughes’ children.

PAGE 61

UFLC 75 Page 61 L: Right, but they only settled for, I’m not sure if it was a total of 9.5 percent that went to the children and the lawyers. P: If the estate was $1 billion, it was still a lot of money. L: Yeah. P: Howard Hughes left a lot of money. L: Yeah, but they sold out way too soon. They sold all that Las Vegas stuff, the Howard Hughes medical thing is worth billions. The whole estate ended up being worth about $1 billion back in the 1970s. P: You’re representing the two children at the time. L: Yeah. We’re representing a piece of the two children. I think between Leff and myself and the firm, we got 1 percent of the estate. P: I don’t know what the means in terms of dollars, it may be a substantial amount. L: I’d say well over a period of time it’s about... I’m not sure how that ended up being. I think it was like several millions of dollars, less than ten. P: On the basis of just the amount of the cases that you and I have gone over so far for the tape, do you have some special person in here to just count the money as it rolls in? L: No, it’s not quite that easy. It doesn’t come that quick. P: It doesn’t come morning, noon, and night? L: No. P: You have to wait your turn a little bit. L: Yeah. P: But this was Leff’s case to begin with, wasn’t it? L: Yes. P: And it was 9.5 percent of the estate? L: [Yes].

PAGE 62

UFLC 75 Page 62 P: Who was Larry Lewis, the local manager of the estate? L: That was Cox Cable, that was W.D. Childers’ buddy who was Cox Cable, got us into BLAB T.V. He allowed us to take over that channel for nothing, and that’s developed into BLAB television. P: I want to ask you about the Orange State Life Insurance Company in Largo Florida. What was that case? L: It wasn’t a case. When Reubin Askew became Governor, Broward Williams was the insurance commissioner and I had told Broward – we had become acquaintances, close to being friends – that if there were an opportunity in the insurance industry, I thought that I and some of my friends would be interested. Then, he introduced me to this guy who turned out to be a drunk who had Orange State Life Insurance Company, Bill Whalen. Bill Whalen had this insurance company, and I bought into it, and I got some friends of mine in Pensacola to buy into it. I became chairman of the board, the board included Charlie Ruttenberg and Fred Fisher and some others. P: How’d you get involved with those two? L: Apparently, Fred Fisher was a friend of Whalen’s, and Ruttenberg was a friend of Fisher’s. We got involved in the business. Whalen had a real drinking problem, and we were in big trouble when Ruttenberg realized this and brought in a guy named Barry Alpert to take over the company. Barry was with a company in Chicago, today he works with Raymond James, very prominent citizen in St. Petersburg. Barry helped make the company into something. We ended up selling it to Home Life. I probably did better than if I had been in the market, but it was an experience. P: But Orange State spread around. You have thirty-five states that had offices? L: It was selling insurance in thirty-five states. P: Is it still in operation today? L: I think Home Life spun it off. It’s not called Orange State anymore. P: It’s acquired by a New York state buyer, state firm. L: I’m not sure what ever happened to it. P: What’s happened to Charles Ruttenberg?

PAGE 63

UFLC 75 Page 63 L: Charles Ruttenberg lost a great deal of money in U.S. Homes. Fred Fisher had some problems and he put together a group of the board to get rid of Charlie Ruttenberg. P: He maneuvered him out of... L: Out of the company, and they were dear, dear friends. P: But no longer, obviously. L: No. P: Ruttenberg lost money as a result of the maneuver by Fred Fisher. L: Ruttenberg, certainly, at one point, was an extremely wealthy man. He’s not in that position anymore. P: Fred Fisher, though, hasn’t suffered? L: Fred Fisher hadn’t. Fred, I think, got a ll kinds of stock deals and, of course, made a wonderful contribution to the University of Florida School of Accounting where they named it the Fred Fisher School of Accounting. P: Ruttenberg was chairman of the board of U.S. Homes. Is that what brought him and Fisher together? L: Somehow or another, Fisher was Ruttenberg’s personal accountant also I think, and close friend. P: Do you see either one of those? L: No, it’s funny. I really need to see both of them, but I have not. P: Let’s talk about the tobacco settlement, that’s a major, major activity. Go back to the very beginning. L: In August of 1993, I’m a member of a group called the Inner Circle of Advocates. P: What is that? L: It’s a group of no more than one hundred lawyers who have made a name for themselves in the plaintiff’s personal injury field. P: Only personal injury?

PAGE 64

UFLC 75 Page 64 L: Basically. Civil type cases from around the country. P: Are there others from Florida in that? L: Yes. Bob Montgomery, J.B. Spence. P: All of those are names that are connected with the tobacco settlement. L: J.B. wasn’t. Bill Colson, Bill Hicks. They both died. Mike Maher, Booty Nance. Florida has a number of guys who were either in or are still in or died off. P: Go back to 1993, the very beginning. L: I’m at their conference in Whistler, British Columbia. P: Whistler, is that a resort? L: Whistler is a resort like north of Vancouver. P: When do you all meet, once a year? L: Once a year for a week and we exchange views and brag on each other. P: But it’s a social kind of a... L: And an educational type thing. And it’s a good referral source. Anything happens, they just send cases... P: Are you active in it still? L: Yes. So I was in British Columbia at this resort called Whistler. It’s a big winter resort, but it’s reasonably cool during the summer. I’m sitting at the bar waiting on my wife, as usual, and having a drink and a ci garette. A friend of mine named Ron Motley walks up from South Carolina, he’s a member of the group, and starts talking about smoking. Ron drinks a lot, too. He said that they had been doing some focus groups about suing the tobacco industry for the state of Mississippi, would I be interested in doing that in Florida? P: When he said, “we are,” because he’s from South Carolina? L: But he’s got friends in Mississippi, a guy na med Dickie Scruggs. Dickie was a friend of Michael Moore who is state attorney in Mississippi. Legally, I basically said, “No.”

PAGE 65

UFLC 75 Page 65 Nobody’s ever collected a nickel from the tobacco industry, and if the state sued for Medicaid damages, in other words the money that the state had to pay for illnesses caused by smoking to indigents in Florida, that you’d, number one, have to identify who the person was. You’d have to prove that cigarettes caused the condition; you’d have to prove what cigarettes caused it, and a lot of people smoked different brands. And that you then were faced with the assumption of ris k, I should know if I smoke that I’m assuming the risk. I said, “I wouldn’t be interested.” That was in August of 1993. P: Let me ask you something. There had been cases in Florida, so there was already a history of it? L: Yeah, there had been cases all over the country. Nobody’s ever collected, at that point, one cent, none by the state against tobacco. I came back to Pensacola, and, either by chance or something, I’m looking at a statute called Florida’s Third Party Medicaid Recovery Act, which basically says the State of Florida – I’ll give you an example. In an automobile accident, if a guy negligently causes injury to an indigent in Florida and the state had to pay for the medical bills, the state would have a claim against the negligent third party, but you have to do it in the name of the person who was injured, you have to prove that it was negligence, you have to prove that the negligence caused the injury, and you’d be subject to any defenses that they may have against the indigents such as he’d been drinking and walking across the street and all of that. I saw the statute and I realized that with a few punctuations, a few added words, a few removal of words, I could remove everyone of those problems so that the state could sue the negligent third party without having to identify the person. They could use statistics, if necessary, to prove causation, such as: “Center for Disease Control says 8.9 percent of the illnesses for which there are Medicaid damages are caused by cigarettes.” That you could use market share so that if Philip Morris had 62 percent of the business, they’d be responsible for 62 percent of the total damages, and that no defenses would be available against the state other than if the state did it. I saw that I could do this so I called my friend, W.D. Childers, who at that time he was the dean of the Florida Senate, and I told him about it. This would have been fall of 1993. I asked him, I said,” I think the Governor would like this.” I said, “I’d like to go to Lawton about this.” W.D. being the way he is said, “Okay.” So we called and Lawton said, “Come on over,” and we had breakfast. P: Childers understood what you were talk ing about, what you were trying to do? L: Reasonably. Lawton picked it up immediatel y. He said, “You know,” I think his words were, “those bastards hooked me” – talking about the cigarette company –“ when I was a kid.” P: And now he’s going to get even.

PAGE 66

UFLC 75 Page 66 L: Yeah. He said, “I like it, let’s go with it,” and I remember saying, “Alright, great, why don’t we have a press conference” and he said, “Let me tell you something, if they find out about it, it will never see the light of day.” He said, “ Fred, I can’t get a five cent tax on tobacco, they are that strong. What I want you to do is go to the attorney general and ask [Bob] Butterworth [Attorney General of Florida, 1986-present], will this meet constitutional requirements.” I think later that afternoon, W.D. and I went to see Butterworth, but he turned us over to, I can’t remember the guy’s name, I think his chief assistant, he said, “You’ll never get this through.” I said, “Okay.” “But if you do, we’ll....” P: What would have been the opposition? L: Tobacco. They had forty lobbyist. P: They had big lobbyist in Tallahassee? [interruption] L: That was the fall. P: The assistant to the attorney general thinks you could not get it through? L: He said, “Tobacco’s just too strong.” Apparently it remained quiet, and I’m not sure who they let know about the bill. P: The bill would have to go through the legislature. L: It had to go through the legislature, and W.D., I think, added it onto some attorney general stuff, liberalizing the Medicaid Recovery. P: It got hidden a little bit. L: Got hidden all the way, and, then, they cleared it on a voice vote. It passed the Senate 39-0, I believe in the House 120-0. P: And the lobbyists never heard about it? L: Never realized it until afterwards. Then, either I announced or somebody.... P: Did they try to put pressure on Askew to veto it? L: You mean on Chiles? P: I mean Chiles. I kept saying Askew, but we’re really talking about Chiles.

PAGE 67

UFLC 75 Page 67 L: The governor had a health insurance thing that he wanted, and I thought he would give that up if they’d give him his health insurance for indigents and for poor people and things, but he stuck to his guns, he said, “No, he wasn’t going to agree to veto the bill.” He signed the bill into law, and a tremendous amount of publicity. “This was a payoff to Fred Levin because of his relationship with Childers and with Chiles.” I got it. P: Why did the press think it was a payoff to you? L: Keep in mind, tobacco, this was the spin they wanted to put on it. They controlled the press, too, so they’re getting their spin out. P: I can see why they’re saying it, but I was just wondering what the justification for it was. L: This is all over the papers. Everything is going on. I still never dreamed there was going to be any money out of this thing for the lawyers. I got everything I wanted which was the great publicity. I did this, Fred Levin and his buddy Lawton, all that. So I told W.D. that he had to go to Lawton and get me out of this thing. Lawton said, “I’m his lawyer.” The Attorney General said he couldn’t handle it, it was going to be too expensive and too time consuming to handle it for the state. I said I would go and call and select the dream team of lawyers. So I started calling lawyers around the state. I got about one out of every three that agreed to get involved. Then, I had W.D. come and talk to them as a group and explain to them why I could not be part of this. P: Where were they meeting? L: Somewhere in Tallahassee. I could not be part of this because of my relationship and that this... I’d love to do it, but I would not be part of this. P: I still am not quite sure in my mind [interruption] L: I didn’t, I didn’t want to get involved. I got what I wanted out of it, and that was publicity. I never dreamed that this thing was going to end up with money. P: A lot of money. L: A lot of money. I knew it was going to take several million dollars a year in out of pocket costs to fight these people. It was going to take twenty-five to thirty lawyers. I was happy. So I got W.D. to go talk to the group. P: And you didn’t want to be on the dream team, then. L: No, I got everything I wanted. In the midst of all of this, I brought in Ron Motley and his group who started, and they were going to get 46 percent of the fee. I told Ron, “If

PAGE 68

UFLC 75 Page 68 you ever get anything out of it, you can take care of me.” Basically, that was the extent of it, never dreaming anything would ever be anything. P: Why were you bringing out of state people into it if this was a Florida... L: This was his idea. Remember this is the guy who told me about Mississippi. P: I know he told you about Mississippi, but the law that you are passing, the bill that passes is only in fact for Florida. L: It’s just a relationship. So then, it gets on into the State hires the dream team. I guess that was in early 1995, the bill was passed in 1994. Early 1995, they hire them and they enter into a contract. Now, tobacco has gone in full force, put a lot of money and a lot of people. P: When you say the state entered into a contract, did they specify in the contract what the cut would be for the legal [team]? L: Twenty-five percent. Tobacco has put a lot of money in lobbying, and the legislature repeals the act with W.D. Childers leading the way. P: Why? L: I never said anything to him that I recall. He took lobbying money like the rest of them. They repealed it big time. The governor vetoed the repeal. P: Lawton Chiles is still the governor? L: Yes. We now go into 1996, and they’re going to override the veto. Some lady senator who they expected to be on tobacco woke up the morning of the repeal, and in debate changed her vote, said her daddy died from smoking, she just could not bring herself [to override] regardless of everything. So they withdrew, they knew they’d lost it, the repeal was lost. The tobacco team went on, and Florida led the way. Had it not been for the Florida statute, none of this would have ever taken place because the cases without the statute in any state subjects them all to the same questions I had from before. P: Had other states by this time began to pick up the ball? L: Mississippi and Texas had brought... but it wa s on what was called a common law theory. They didn’t have all the defenses of [the] Florida statute. Once the Florida statute was in, and Florida was going to win based on the st atute, if Florida wins, no other state – I mean they could stop it in other states with lobbying, but not if Florida gets $13 billion. It’s too late. So it was this little statute that Lawton Chiles passes at a suggestion by me that made for the whole tobacco industry that they say will save in thirty years 100,000

PAGE 69

UFLC 75 Page 69 American lives a year. 450,000 Americans a year die from tobacco, and they think they can save a minimum of 20 percent of those people by new smokers that they’re preventing, and it is. It’s dropped [the death rate for smokers] more than 20 percent. So we run through 1996, and, I believe in 1997, the Florida Supreme Court rules 4-3 that it’s constitutional. 1998 rolls around, we’re ready to go to trial in August. The case is settled with tobacco, it becomes a national settlement, and part of the national settlement is an attorney’s fee provision of $500 million a year maximum to be divided among all the states. They’ll keep paying it until such time as.... P: Did this wipe out the 25 percent for the Florida dream team? L: There was a big fight that went on, but in e ffect, they ended up getting an arbitration of at least 25 percent, but to pay that over years and years. P: Where does this leave Fred Levin? L: One guy on the dream team, a lawyer named Bob Kerrigan from Pensacola, voluntarily told me all the way that when I brought him in that it’s a 25 percent referral for me. I never thought anything about it, and I ended up getting 8 percent from the law firms out of state, South Carolina and Mississippi firm s that were handling it. I, individually, because the firm was so kind, get the 1.5 percent, personally, directly, from Kerrigan to me. P: So you get 1.5 percent. L: Of the Florida fee directly, and the firm gets 8 percent. P: And that amounts to what? L: 1.5 percent of $3.43 billion or something like that, it will end up being, I guess, $50 million over a... P: Fifteen year period. L: Yeah. P: And what is the firm’s amount over the period? L: Almost $300 million. P: And that’s divided up. Does everybody in the firm get a piece of it? L: Everybody who was in the firm at the time got a piece of it.

PAGE 70

UFLC 75 Page 70 P: I know Mark was involved. L: Yeah. Everybody’s got a nice little nest egg coming in for the next.... P: How has the tobacco industry reacted to all of this? Are they still fighting it? Are they taking it? L: No, they went ahead and settled everything around the country. P: How many of the states have [settled], every state? L: All the states have come in. Now they got individual cases that still are.... P: Have you handled any individual cases? L: No. P: Would you turn them down if they came to you? L: Yeah. Just that they’re tough cases. P: You’re smiling. L: I’m just looking at all the names of the guys who came in the firm. What I’ll do is give you this list. Seems like they either skip number twenty-nine or they forgot who number twenty-nine was. I’ll let you go through this, and when you come back tomorrow, you may ask me specifics about individuals, and this is the order they came in with the exception of Dick Warfield and myself. I came and Jack Graff came before Dick Warfield did, but when Dick Warfield came with the firm, they gave him number three. P: So you end up on the tobacco case a settlement... L: A very wealthy man. P: And you’re a satisfied person. L: Very satisfied person. All this took place in 1998, which leads to the University of Florida if you want to get into that now. P: I’m going to get into that in a minute. You found that this was obviously a happy ending. Have you had a lot of criticism since?

PAGE 71

UFLC 75 Page 71 L: Yeah, there [were] a lot of different things that smokers, the amount of the fee, a lot of things occurred that were not, you know...I guess a lot of jealously, an awful lot of jealously among other lawyers. P: Some of them who had the opportunity to turn in and didn’t. L: Yeah, turned it down. P: Before we get into the university thing, I want to ask you about the fen-phen case. I think that kind of fits in. L: Those things lead into the mass tort field. I’d never been a mass tort lawyer, I’ve shared in the benefits. That all gets into Mark Proctor and Mike Papantonio and all those guys. That’s more into the business of the law firm where I used to run the law firm until Martin got here and realized just how little I knew about running a law firm until he got here. Then he and Mark started working together, and then when Martin left, Mark took over and helped. Both of them have done more towards organizing the law firm business-wise, ethics-wise, and have built this really major law firm, not so much by numbers, but by influence. It’s one of the r eal influential plaintiff firms in the country, in the mass tort field, and I’m still totally removed from that. I still do the individual cases. P: Mark plays an influential role in this firm? L: Yes, very much so. Mark and Mike Papa ntonio would be the two people that would be the most difficult to replace. P: Neither one of them are going anywhere. L: No, they’re not going anywhere. I’m still the rainmaker, even though I.... P: The firm and you are one and the same. L: ...never touched a mass tort, but they think I do. In other words, it’s Fred Levin and everybody does a wonderful job of promoting that. There are things that have happened in the Roy Jones arena, you have to understand that a chief in the country of Ghana, all of these things built the... we’re not just a law firm. We’ve become somewhat above it and it’s hard to explain, but it’s really worked out well. They’ve done a great job. Mark in organizing, Mike in going out and shaking hands, rainmaking, using me as the rainmaker. I’m never there, but he’s always saying man, Fred. Have you ever met him? He’s so great, he’s this, he’s that. P: It’s your reputation.

PAGE 72

UFLC 75 Page 72 L: Yeah. P: We were getting into the fen-phen case. L: Fen-phen would not be anything that I had anything to do with. P: But it was a firm case. L: Firm case and they did extremely well. P: How did it come to the firm? L: It was just part of Mike Papantonio’s mass tort thing. P: I’m a lay person, what do you mean by mass tort? L: Where they go out and advertise to get a bunch of cases where a lot of people were hurt by the act of a company. P: A huge number of people. L: Yeah. P: But somebody has to come to the firm and say we want you to represent us. L: They advertise and they’ve networked. They’ve got firms all over the country that network with Levin Papantonio. P: What was the final settlement on the fen-phen case? L: I don’t know. These were well in excess of $100 million. P: Is that paid over a period of time too? L: That’s paid. P: Do you get any of that? L: Oh, yeah. P: Fred Levin, plus the firm. L: Yes.

PAGE 73

UFLC 75 Page 73 P: Is it similar to the... L: No, I won’t get as much as that because the percentages change each year, and fees that come in during that year are determined by the percentages. It’s a big formula that goes into it. P: None of them get poor as a result of this. L: No. All of the guys have done extremely well. P: You think Mark can afford to take us to New York? L: I hope so. P: I hope so, too. What are these peopl e suffering from that took fen-phen? L: I have no idea. P: All you’re doing is just cashing the check. L: I’m cashing the check and I’m building a reputation in other arenas, in other cases. P: The only other case I want to ask you about is you’ve really mentioned this before is that drug that Parke-Davis... L: Chloromycetin. That goes way back. About mid 1960s, a lady came in too see me. Her son had acne, sixteen years old, only child, and had gone to see a Dr. Holmes, Grant Holmes, a dermatologist in Pensacola. Dr. Holmes gave a prescription for chloromycetin to her son and his name was Jim Cosper. Jim had taken the drug, had come down with aplastic anemia, leukemia type condition. I think when she came in to see me, he had already died. She had remarried a guy named Ira Heinberg, who was a friend of the family’s. She came in to see me and she said she’d been listening on the radio and she heard that there was a causal connection between chloromycetin and the condition her son died from. I didn’t have an awful lot to be doing, this was mid 1960s. I then went down and started doing some research and found out that chloromycetin was an antibiotic developed by Parke-Davis in I think the early 1950s. It was described as a miracle antibody that by 1960, they were spending $6 million a year advertising this drug, a prescription drug. Back then, they didn’t advertise prescription drugs in Life magazine or Look or things like that. They were advertised only in medical journals. There were two factories doing nothing but going twenty-four hours a day manufacturing chloromycetin. Every time a doctor turned a page in a medical journal they would see: Does your patient have urinary tract infection? Prescribe

PAGE 74

UFLC 75 Page 74 chloromycetin, the miracle antibody. Does he have acne? Prescribe Chloromycetin. I got into it and I realized that this was the drug of choice in only one condition and that’s something called Rocky Mountain spotted fever, yet they were selling – I think 5 million Americans each year were getting a course of treatment with this drug. I got to researching it, and I found out about an advance man for the drug [End of Tape C, side 5] ...He told me I’m not going to go through this whole thing with you, but this is my whole file you can go through it, boxes. I started to go through it and I found a little memo and the memo said that one in every sixty people who took this drug are going to develop a blood dyscrasia, which is a condition, it’s usually reversible, just some kind of disease of the blood. One in 1,000 they estimated would die from aplastic anemia/leukemia. If 5 million Americans a year were taking it, that means 5,000 were dying each year. It was a drug of choice in only Rocky Mountain spotted fever and I don’t know, about a handful of those people. I file a lawsuit toward the end of the 1960s, maybe early 1970s. Went to trial and asked for punitive damages. For the first time that we know of, the court allowed punitive damages to go to a jury against a drug company. Park-Davis said that if they did this, they would probably have to withdraw the drug from the market because there were other cases around the county, they told the judge this. The judge said that might be a good idea. Unfortunately, the case went to the jury, the jury did not return punitive damages. The verdict for the death, they found the death was caused by chloromycetin, but the verdict was less than what I’d settled with the doctor for. In effect, I lost. But not long thereafter, the drug company withdrew this drug from the market and it’s only available today in a hospital setting in a very specialized situation. The drug is still being sold almost everywhere else in the world, except in this country. The effect of this was, although I really lost the case, that over the last more than thirty years, you look at 5,000 people a year, 150,000 lives, that are still living. The 150,000 lives, to put it in it’s proper perspective, to bring it home are three times the number of American lives than were lost in Vietnam all because of Fred Levin having discovered this and having got punitive damages charged even though we never collected them. Never did anything, I lost the case, yet saved three times more lives than were lost [in Vietnam]. P: Is Fred Levin’s reputation...does the world know about these things? Or is it just the money they know about. L: The money basically. But not only is that three times the number of American lives that were lost in Vietnam, you go back and look at tobacco, all that tobacco settlement included a monstrous tobacco campaign against teenage smoking. If you look at 100,000 lives a year that are going to be saved, and you say God knows both of those are directly the result of something I did and you begin to realize the number of lives and that maybe it’s not so bad that the law school has that name on it. That makes me feel good that in one situation like I said, I really lost the case and saved [lives]. This whole country went crazy over the loss of lives in Vietnam and I saved three times that many.

PAGE 75

UFLC 75 Page 75 P: I think tobacco settlement case in Florida, wasn’t there a stipulation that there had to be a certain amount used for education of young people? L: Yeah, and there’s a big battle going on about that. There is more than a 20 percent drop in young people starting to smoke in Florida. A lot of lives saved because of that. Does anybody know that about Fred Levin? No. Not really. P: Everything gets covered up by the money part without seeing the more positive results. L: Yeah. I guess all of that came to a head in the law school naming. I’ve had a career that I can’t imagine that there are, I imagine maybe Dr. Jonas Salk [developed the polio vaccine], he saved a ton of lives. P: This is a continuation of the Oral History interview that I’m doing with Fred Levin at his office here in Pensacola. This is now July 2, [2002]. Fred, I want to talk to you about your giving now. Enough of the business of the firm’s cases and so on. When did you start making contributions to the University of Florida? Was David the first? L: Not really, I’m trying to think what I did at the University of Florida. I know I gave some property. My brother David and our la w partner Leff Mabie and myself had some property south of Tallahassee, some waterfront property. We gave it to the University of Florida College of Law and they sold it for $1.2 million or $1.3 million. It’s the Levin, Mabie, Levin chair and the first recipient of that was Dean Rick Matasar. When he became dean, he also became Levin, Mabie, Levin professor, I’m sorry. P: I’ve heard long before Matasar arrived on the scene. L: Yes, and it took that long for them to sell it and everything else. At the same time, we gave some property to Florida State University, or I did, and became a member of their president’s council. At the same time, I gave property to the University of West Florida for their first professorship. They sold it and I think that professorship is several hundred thousand dollars, named that for my daddy, the Abe Levin professorship at the University of West Florida. That was the first major giving and I think that was back in the late 1970s probably. P: I remember at the beginning of the 1980s when we were reorganizing the Center for Jewish Studies, and I was writing a solicitation letter to lots of people around the state and to you. I remember that you wrote back and said that you had recently given or was giving some land in Franklin County to the University of Florida, and if it was ever sold, something off the top of that could go for the Center for Jewish Studies which didn’t happen, but I was just wondering if you’re thinking about the early 1980s. L: It could have been the early 1980s, late 1970s.

PAGE 76

UFLC 75 Page 76 P: Was this the land then that created the chair? L: Yes. P: Levin, Mabie, Levin. L: Yeah, I think they made it a professorship. It got $1.2 million, $1.3 million. It wasn’t quite enough for...or maybe they weren’t matching back then or whatever. P: Had David given money before that time? L: Mainly athletic type things. Nothing this size. P: But he had been giving support to the athletic department? L: Yes. P: Anything to the medical school? L: I think maybe we gave part of that land to the medical school too, but no major cash contribution. Of course over the years just having been raised in the kind of family, I gave to everything, nothing major. I was always the largest contributor to United Jewish Appeal. P: Don’t get into that yet. I want to stick first to the University of Florida. L: Then, the situation with tobacco in 1998, and in December of 1998 we were about to receive a major payment from tobacco, the state of Florida was. I had 1.5 percent individually and the firm had 8 percent. I was sitting in my office when Rick Matasar who was dean of the University of Florida College of Law and Jeff Ulmer was marketing or whatever it is for the University of Florida law school fund raiser. They came into my office... P: Unannounced? L: I’m sure they called. They were sitting there and I had over a period of time, for whatever reason – I hope it was jealousy, but there may be some other reasons – the organized Bar had jumped me about so many things and even the courts had taken away two major verdicts because they said I was unethical in my closing arguments, the most ridiculous things in the world. Anyhow, they had done this and the organized Bar, and I guess it has a lot to do with – if I can go to an aside for a second because this had to do with the giving. Instead of acknowledging whether it be in a lawsuit or anything else,

PAGE 77

UFLC 75 Page 77 instead of acknowledging that I am that good at what I do, I give the impression that I’ve cheap shot it or cheated or took advantage of the other side. Instead of just being honest and saying listen, I really am that good at what I do. My daddy and my brother David used to say why you’d rather climb a tree and make somebody think you’re a crook than to stay on the ground, he said it’s just unbelievable, and this is so. I had gotten some amazing verdicts. You get a great verdict against somebody and he thinks you cheated him and it just drives him... I don’t know. Whatever it is, the organized Bar was very much against [naming the law school Levin College of Law]. P: The organized Bar in Florida or in this area? L: In Florida and the area. Reputation-wise, you have to realize I passed basically the wrongful death bill, I passed the cigarette bill, I had received as a result of this the highest award from the trial lawyers of Florida, the Perry Nichols Award. All of a sudden, I’m sitting in the office and Jeff and Rick are there and we’re talking about trying to get a major gift from Bob M ontgomery who’s a good friend, philanthropist, down in West Palm Beach. P: So they came to talk to you about somebody else. L: How to get Bob Montgomery to do this. In the midst of the conversation, they said what we’d like to do is try to get about $6 million from him to build this big, beautiful new building and to be called the Robert and Mary Montgomery building at the Spessard Holland College of Law or whatever the heck. In one or the other, Rick said heck, tell him $10 million, we’ll name the law school for him. P: This just came out of the blue? L: I had just received notice that the checks had come in from tobacco. I was going to do something for the law school anyhow and within about five minutes, my mind was going through this mind game of what a great way to number one, spend the money, number two, I was financially in great shape, the kids were all in great shape.... P: You didn’t need the money. L: I didn’t need the money and this was sort of payback. At the same time, I’ve always been one, in fact I told David, David when he died last January left a nice sum of money to the University of Florida. They’ll come to it over a period of years. I always told David, David get the enjoyment of giving while you’re living. I don’t want to leave anything in my will for all right. I really feel that way and I said God knows, and it’s proven to be true. Within about no more than fifteen minutes, I told them, I said I might give the $10 million. I want to check with my tax lawyer and it was as if I’d shot both of them right between the eyes, like oh my God. I said we’ll meet later today, which we

PAGE 78

UFLC 75 Page 78 did, we went to Skopelo’s restaurant that evening for cocktails. They had called John Lombardi [president, of the University of Florida, 1990-1999] and gotten permission. I had called Bob Kramer, my tax lawyer, and he said it could be done. My son Martin, myself, Bob Kramer the lawyer, Rick, and Jeff went and had dinner Skopelo’s and shook hands on my doing this. P: You had not been approached by Paul Robell at all earlier for a big gift? Not necessarily this, but... L: I don’t believe so, no. P: This kind of just came out of the blue. L: I doubt if there’s ever been anybody who contributed this amount of money in this short of period of time. P: Not in this kind of short period. They didn’t have to woo you at all. L: In fact, I think it’s probably the largest cash contribution the university’s received. P: What happened to your friend down in Palm Beach? L: Bob Montgomery? We went back recen tly. There was a big war over the gift obviously, but this past year, 2001, they decided to raise – they used this $10 million to hire professors, discretionary funds, which has really done a lot toward bringing the law school [to national prominence]. Now they needed a new facility, they went out and raised $5 [million] or $6 million last year. P: But not from Bob Montgomery? L: Bob Montgomery gave $250,000. P: That’s a long way from your $10 million. L: I know. I gave $250,000 more. They raised the money, it’s going to be matched, and we’re going to do over a $20 million facility. P: Why did Montgomery give such a small amount? L: At that point, that’s what we asked for. P: But originally, you all were talking about $5 [million] or $6 million.

PAGE 79

UFLC 75 Page 79 L: They were talking. Bob’s got a lot of other interests. He’s very much into the cultural things. He’s got museums named for him down in West Palm, a lot of other things. P: He’s not a graduate of the university... L: He is a graduate of the University [of Florida] Law School, and mentioned then that when things get straightened out, he would give more money to the university, and I’m sure he will. P: How did they justify naming the school for you when it was already named for Spessard Holland? L: It was the Spessard Holland Law Center. P: Did they know that at the time? Did that come up in the negotiations? L: It’s called the Fredric G. Levin College of Law. P: I know what’s it’s called now, but I thought that during the negotiations... L: And then it’s the Spessard Holland Law Center at the University of Florida. P: But that’s true now. At the time of the negotiations, did that come up in conversation? L: It was always called the University of Florida College of Law. There was the law center there, the Holland Law Center, but it was always called the University of Florida College of Law and they changed that to the Fredric G. Levin College of Law at the University of Florida. P: What would have happened if they had asked you for more money? L: I don’t know. I don’t know what to tell you. P: The $10 million just kind of came out of the blue. L: Came out of the blue. P: It was later suggested that they sold it too cheap. L: I paid more for that than they paid for the school of accounting, the school of business. P: I understand what you’re saying and I agree with you completely, but I’m just saying, later when the criticism began to evolve.

PAGE 80

UFLC 75 Page 80 L: And the criticism immediately started. P: Where was Lombardi in all of this? L: He came down on my side and that added to his troubles. In the meantime now, Jeb Bush goes in 1999, in January. P: You had not supported him? L: No, I supported Buddy MacKay. But Jeb Bush goes in. The dean of the law school gets a letter signed by a number of former presidents of the Florida Bar complaining that here is somebody, why would name your school for somebody like this? P: This letter came where, to Lombardi? L: I know it went to Rick Matasar. P: And to Jeb Bush? L: I’m sure it ended up there. There was a movement afoot in the legislature to give me back my money in 1999 and rename it the University of Florida College of Law. There were a lot of people that were upset. P: For the record, tell me what the two instances were of censure from the Bar or whoever it was that they handed that out in condemnation. L: I guess it was in the early 1980s, a guy named Dean Baird who was actually a friend of my family’s, he turned out to be a bookie, booking football. I would bet on football with him or his group. Dean gets arrested for bookmaking, and this is a big deal in Pensacola. If it happened in Miami, Jacksonville – they slap his wrist and let him go. But in the state attorney’s office here, they charged him with racketeering and all of this stuff. P: They charged you with racketeering? L: No, Dean Baird. At that time I was doing my BLAB television show. I made some comments that the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and all of this, there a lot better things they can be doing than picking up bookies and charging them with racketeering. At the same time, the Bar Association was notified that there were a number of lawyers, judges in Dean Baird’s little black book as betters. This again is a situation where my mouth got myself in trouble. They sent a notice to all of us, everybody in the book, to come take a private reprimand. I went down to the Bar Association grievance committee and made the statement that it is inconceivable to me that Reubin Askew and the governor of Massachusetts bet a

PAGE 81

UFLC 75 Page 81 box of oranges against Maine lobster when Miami played Boston College, that that is a crime, the same crime that basically we all, we bettors, are charged with. I said when two judges are out of the golf course and bet a dollar on a hole, that’s the same crime that they allege I did. It’s nothing but a third degree misdemeanor. I said there are five lawyers in this town practicing law right now who have been charged with stealing from their clients, and they’re still practicing law. I said you bring me down here to give me a private reprimand over betting on a football game, I said it’s absolutely insanity. Take care of these guys who don’t care whether they win or lose, I mean I went into a real tirade. I was upset and told them that I was at a bar having a drink the other night and I was watching two lawyers laughing about having lost a case, a criminal case, a murder case. I said this is just...anyhow. The Bar gave everybody else private reprimands and then they brought charges against me wanting to make a public reprimand. I demanded that the trial go on in public. It was headlines every day in the local section. I did repeat my speech that I thought it was absolutely ridiculous what had happened. The case, the judge found, that I should have a public reprimand. I went to the Florida Supreme Court which affirmed on a different ground than the betting, they affirmed on the ground that I had brought the Bar into disrepute because of my comments about why in the hell aren’t you worrying about these damn things, here you are running around getting somebody betting on a football game. I also had pointed out that Justice Rehnquist had his regular Wednesday night poker game in Washington. They took the supreme court decision from Florida and petitioned for certiorari to the United States Supreme Court where they held it for about a year and a half and finally they turned it down. Came back to Jacksonville for the Board of Governors meeting and stood there in the middle of the room of the Board of Governors while they chewed me out and all that. Then it was a few years later where I kicked butt in a case of Stone v. Sacred Heart Hospital and the jury awarded almost $5 million. In the midst of the closing argument, I said the defense in this case is ridiculous. These doctors acted like, you know... in that case all I said was the defense in the case is ridiculous. It was an automobile accident. They didn’t object. There was a motion for a new trial, they never mentioned this in the motion for a new trial. Then on the appeal, they said that this was an unethical comment because I had put my opinion into the case. The district court of appeal reversed the case, said the conduct was unethical and sent it back for a new trial that we later settled reasonably, probably somewhere between $3 million and $4 million. When this decision was coming down, it came down the day that I was getting ready to make a closing argument in the case of Rawson v. Baptist Hospital It came here and they didn’t want to tell me that the case had been reversed on this. Anyhow, in the Rawson case, I again said the defense in this case is absolutely ridiculous. This is a medical practice, Rawson v. Baptist Hospital These doctors were idiots. They were sitting there fooling around while this guy who had had a diving accident and had the bends, they needed to get him to a hyperbaric chamber. That case goes up and they reverse that, an $8 million verdict, send it back for a new trial saying this conduct is the

PAGE 82

UFLC 75 Page 82 second time Mr. Levin has made unethical remarks. I’m notified by the Bar Association they’re bringing charges. By the way, the $8 million verdict ended up being $31 million the last time it was tried. They bring these charges, again I’ve demanded a public trial and I had testifying for me J.B. Spence from Miami said it was absolute insanity that they would object. I had Morris Dees [Director of the Southern Poverty Law Center] from Montgomery, a dear friend, testify for me that what a great lawyer I was and this is absurd. I had the chairman of the American Bar Association Grievance Committee state that he had looked through a million possible [unfinished thought]. Anyhow, this was the first time anybody had ever been charged with a closing argument as a violation. The judge found in my favor, the supreme court affirmed that there was nothing unethical about it. P: So these are the two cases in which they, the critics... L: The critics said Mr. Levin had been charged with. A lot of people say it’s just an absolute factor that these guys, they’re country club elite, and here Fred Levin is doing all of the things that I’m sure they would lik e to have done, all of them would love their name on a law school. We’re going to go into another arena when we start talking about the Roy Jones situation and how all of that, I think, probably led to a lot of the jealously. The political connections with Reubin Askew and W.D. [Childers] and becoming the trial counsel for the power company. Then the Roy Jones situation, being the chief in the country of Ghana, just everything. The children have turned out so well, I could not ask for more in life. A lot of the things that ups et other attorneys, upset a lot of the social elite, that here’s a guy who just didn’t care to be with them. P: A lot of the criticism comes out of a group of lawyers, mainly out of Jacksonville. L: A lot of it out of Jacksonville. P: Who are these people? Who is Rinnama n for instance? He became very vocal. L: I was in law school, he was a year ahead of me. P: I read his letter. L: Yeah, his letter was horrible. P: Vitriolic. L: It was what kind of person I was that a ll I thought about was money and unethical and what an image for the law school. I thought during that time, what an image for the law school you think of the Chloromycetin case and savings and the tobacco, how many lives

PAGE 83

UFLC 75 Page 83 all of this is going to save. I think I’d rather have Fred Levin’s name than Rinaman’s name on that law school. P: You had not been on any cases with him or anything that got him upset? L: No. I may have been on the fringes... P: Did you know Mark Hulsey. L: I knew of him. P: But you didn’t know him. L: No. All these people were big high time society Bar lawyers. Keep in mind that they’re sitting there and Reubin Askew and the influence I had there with W.D. Childers all those years. They had to come running to me if the Bar needed something. P: And they weren’t giving any money either. L: They weren’t giving any money. If the Bar or the university needed anything, “Fred, can you call W.D. and get this thing done.” That’s a little rough on them because I never went to a Florida Bar meeting in forty-one years. P: What role does Marshall Criser play in all of this? L: He just looks down his nose at me. P: You all have never been social friends? L: Oh, no, no. Since giving this money, now I go to any of the presidents’ box, any of the football games. Before, the money I’d given allowed once every couple of years they’d invite me. Somebody introduced me last year and said, “Marshall you know Fred Levin, don’t you,” and he sort of just, “Yeah,” just turned around. I don’t even think he shook hands, walked away. P: Sounds almost as though he had a personal grudge against you. L: I think they’re upset. They don’t want that name on that law school, that’s their law school. P: But it’s there.

PAGE 84

UFLC 75 Page 84 L: Yeah, but I don’t think any of them have ev er given any money of any significance. I think they found out Rinaman had given either $50 or something like that. P: The Crisers have given money to the arts program, to the Harn Museum. L: Really? P: But to my knowledge they have not given to the law school, but I don’t know. Is this the first time you and Matasar are coming together? L: Yes. P: You had nothing to do with his appointment, then? L: Oh, no. I didn’t even know who he was. I had met him before the event of the giving. He had come here, he was a good dean compared to those in the past. He knew how to raise money, and every time he’d come to Pensacola he’d call. We’d go out and have drinks. You know what’s amazing? I’m sitting here thinking, Bernie Sliger at Florida State University, every time he’d come to town, he would do all of his rounds with the FSU alumni, then he’d call me, and he and I would go out drinking together, just the two of us. I look at it as I must be a lot more fun than these fuddy-duddies who run the Bar and things like that. Bernie Sliger was President of Florida State University. I’m glad I did it. It’s created a lot of problems for me, but at the same time, there’s a group of people out there that are saying, “He’s one of us, I’m glad his name’s on that thing.” P: What was the problem, to your knowledge, between Matasar and Lombardi? L: It had nothing to do with me, I understand. The problem was that it was a question of money for the school, money for the university. Matasar stood up for the school and stood up against the provost, and there were a lot of things. Supposedly, Rick called me and told me my naming had nothing to do with his dismissal. P: Lombardi feels that it did have something to do with it as far as his ouster was concerned. L: Yes. Matasar had some friends, so when he fired Matasar, it created... Some people in pretty high places, it’s sort of funny, it wouldn’t be the group that... I think that the Criser’s and that group blamed Lombardi for allowing Matasar to do this, and I think he’s right. I don’t believe, at one point they said, “Matasar’s friends.” Matasar, at that point, didn’t have any powerful friends. P: He hadn’t been here very long.

PAGE 85

UFLC 75 Page 85 L: But, I think that’s why Criser and all of that group thought that Lombardi should never have allowed this to happen. Lombardi, I agree, when he came down on my side and stood up to these people, I think that was the beginning of the end for him. That plus the Oreo remark. P: But I think upon reflection, Lombardi felt that Matasar had overextended himself in getting the money from you. That he did it really impetuously, he didn’t ask for enough and all of those kinds of things. L: That’s possible. Part of the reason was he didn’t slap Matasar down and Lombardi always told me that he was very much in favor of what I did. P: He told me that, too, and he thinks very highly of you, very highly. L: I appreciate that, and I think highly of him. P: As recently as three weeks ago he said that to me in an Oral History interview. The naming goes through, and you have a celebration here in Pensacola at the restaurant, what was that? L: In the meantime, Lawton Chiles died that December before. We had a nice event, Reubin Askew came in, John Lombardi and Rick Matasar were there. Paul Robell came, and it was a really, really nice affair. I had some friends of mine that came in, it was a real nice affair. Then, of course, all hell broke loose with Matasar. P: Where was the restaurant, what was the restaurant? L: Skopelo’s. The same restaurant [where] I agreed to give the money. P: So this was a luncheon meeting? L: A luncheon meeting, and I felt real good. My brother David, I designated part of that money to put a chair in the David H. Levin Chair of Matrimonial Law, and they’ve hired an outstanding professor, Woodruff, I think, is her name, to head that. P: So part of the $10 million, part of it went to this chair? L: Went there. Then, half a million dollars went to the Reubin Askew [Institute]. P: So half a million dollars went to the Askew, $1 million went to David’s chair. L: $1.5 million I believe. P: So that’s $2 million. $8 million is left for the law school.

PAGE 86

UFLC 75 Page 86 L: All of it indirectly is the law school. P: The Askew Institute is not. L: I think it is because I think that was designated to come – part of it is at the University of Florida, part of it is at FSU. P: David Colburn is [the director]. L: Find out, I’m not sure. My understanding was it was going to come within the auspices of the University of Florida. P: I didn’t realize FSU had anything to do with this. L: Maybe it doesn’t. Maybe it’s the University of Florida, but it ________. P: I think it’s all University of Florida. When Matasar left, did that come as a surprise to you? L: Yes. P: How were you notified? L: He called me. P: What did he say? L: He said, “You’re going to be hearing that I’m resigning or something and it has nothing to do with you, I don’t want you to feel that way.” He’s going to teach somewhere, and then of course he got the job at New York Law School. He called me, and I called some people in New York for him. Then, Jon Mills [current dean, Levin College of Law] came on. He’s done a great, great job fund-raising. P: Did you hear from Lombardi at the time of the Matasar resignation? L: No, I don’t think so. I’m trying to remember, I just don’t remember. P: Let me go to this Reubin Askew thing. I know David was very supportive of it right from the very beginning, and that’s because of this relationship with Reubin Askew. L: Yes.

PAGE 87

UFLC 75 Page 87 P: Has he left money for Reubin Askew in his will? L: I think it’s going to the University of Florida College of Law. P: All of his money going to the college of law? L: Yes. P: Was there support for the medical school? Somewhere along the line, I had the idea that David had given money to the medical school. L: He had in the past. I think there’s a small piece. P: You and David have been very supportive of the University of Florida. How about the other members of your family? L: All five of us are graduates of the University of Florida. Five brothers with all degrees. P: Yeah, but I’m asking about their support. L: Oh, financially? Herman couldn’t afford it and Stanley couldn’t afford it. Allen, up until this point, could not afford it. The only two that could actually afford to support it... P: I don’t mean to talk about giving millions of dollars... L: I don’t even know if they are members the alumni association. I think Stanley did give like $1,000 when one of his professors, Freeland or one of them died, or maybe he committed $5,000. P: Have you given up now on the university? L: What do you mean? P: $10 million is a lot of money. Did that wipe you clean for your... L: I gave them $250,000 last year over and above that to help towards the building campaign. P: Is this for the building? The Lawton Chiles building? L: Yes.

PAGE 88

UFLC 75 Page 88 P: Have you been active in fund-raising on that? L: Yeah. I got Bob Montgomery to give, I got a lot of the tobacco lawyers, too. P: Is that going to be a library or is that going to be a classroom building or what? L: I’m not even sure. [End of Tape C, side 6] ...I’ve been to dinner with Mrs. Chiles. Lawton stayed at my home a couple of times, I believe she did, too. [interruption] P: There were a lot of people who were unhappy with the critics, and one of those was Ray Ehrlich. L: I heard. P: You know Ray? L: Just to have met him. He was a Pi Lam, and he was down and I received the Big Pi Award which is from a fraternity standpoint, and he came in for that. That was from Tampa. Back for the Chiles family, I worked rather closely with Mrs. Chiles and the Chiles Foundation, and I guess you’d call her Rhea Junior, which was running the Lawton and Rhea Chiles Children and Mother, Mothers and Children Foundation in Tampa. I also got the young Mrs. Chiles to do some fund-raising for the University of Florida College of Law in regard to the Lawton Chiles. P: Are you on that committee? L: No. P: And so you’re not co-chairing it or anything? L: No. P: You gave your check of $250,000. L: It’s $50,000 a year for five years. P: And you encouraged some of your tobacco lawyer friends to do the same thing. L: Yeah. P: How much have they raised, do you know?

PAGE 89

UFLC 75 Page 89 L: I think it was right at $6 million, which was matched by the University and matched by the legislature, and it got about $22 million for the building. P: They haven’t started building yet. L: I think they have groundbreaking in the fall. P: You’re not on any advisory committees or anything for the law school? L: No. P: One thing we have not talked about in regard to this naming and the criticisms that came up is the role that anti-Semitism has played. Did it play a role? L: Yeah. P: Fred Levin is a Jewish name. L: You’ll have to ask Rick Matasar. Somebody called, and I don’t know who, it was a rather prominent individual. Have you done an Oral History of Matasar? P: No. L: And you probably won’t either. P: We won’t, he’s gone. L: Yeah. They did not realize that he was Jewish. P: They didn’t know he was Jewish? L: Matasar, who had ever heard that? It isn’t Goldberg. P: When he first came, he became actively involved in the Jewish community. L: But somebody, some big shot in the Bar Association made the comment to him in regard to putting a Jewish name on a law school not realizing that Rick was Jewish. There are a number of people who believe that there is certainly more than just a touch of anti-Semitism. I don’t. P: You don’t think that anti-Semitism exists? L: I don’t. I think it’s anti-Fred Levin.

PAGE 90

UFLC 75 Page 90 P: But Fred Levin is Jewish. L: I know, but it gets back to all of the things that were happening about that time. I held, at one time, the record for wrongful death of a house wife, wrongful death of a wage earner, wrongful death of a child, the highest personal injury verdict in Florida. Here I was getting all these damn verdicts up here in a conservative area that, in addition, and this perception of being this great political power who all he’s got to do is cross his legs and he can get anything done through Lawton Chiles or W.D. Childers and Reubin Askew. P: Was that true? L: No. Actually, if you really analyze it... P: So you’re denying that you were a political power. L: The perception was, and I enjoyed the perception because it gave me the image and things of that nature. Also, one of the major things in the country was this Roy Jones, Jr. situation. I was the National Manager of the Year in boxing in 1995 or 1996 or something, and all of a sudden at the United Nations, he’s in school, there’s a chief, and just everything was going on. You can imagine what these people... all this is happening all about the same time. P: Lombardi thought that anti-Semitism played a very specific role in the... L: I never saw it. I thought it was jealously, and I thought these guys would come home at night, the big social type guys... Anyhow, I just felt there was a lot of jealousy. I can tell you this, I went to one University of Florid a function other than the beautiful function that they, the dinner – Matasar was there then. P: Matasar was there that night because we were there. L: Did he come back or had he... P: He had not left yet. L: That’s right, he had been notified. P: Not yet, I don’t think. L: That was fall of 2000. P: A little bit earlier than that, 2000 or 1999 maybe. It’s been three years.

PAGE 91

UFLC 75 Page 91 L: Alright, so it was 1999. P: Matasar had not been notified yet. Everything was swimming along beautifully. L: I just felt that it was basically jealously. I was going to tell you, I attended one University of Florida event, and that would have been in the annual meeting in West Palm Beach. P: You went to that meeting? The annual meeting, the President’s Council meeting? L: In the year 2000, in June. P: That was, I think, 1999 at the Breakers [Hotel], maybe? L: I think it was 2000. P: 2000, okay. L: Lombardi introduced me, and I remember sitting there thinking, “Holy crap,” because this was black tie, all of the elite in the University of Florida, not lawyers I mean, but University of Florida, and I got a standing ovation. It was not just a little tap, tap on the hands. I thought it was meant and I felt very good about it. 1999 or 2000, one or the other. P: Doesn’t make any difference, we can easily document that. L: Anyhow, I felt good about that. P: It was a successful recognition. L: I thought so. P: I wanted to talk to you in addition to the law school business about some of your other philanthropy, I want to get that on the record. What is this foundation that you and [Papantonio]... L: Martin came to me. Martin saw the future of this firm heading into mass torts. He realized that Mike Papantonio was going to lead that image, that field. P: Mike Papantonio, I know, is a partner at the firm, who is he? L: He’s on the fourth floor, runs the mass torts. He’s out front.

PAGE 92

UFLC 75 Page 92 P: He’s a Pensacola man? L: No, he grew up somewhere. P: Not from the University of Florida? L: No. At the time the tobacco money came in, Martin felt that we ought to set up a foundation. Mike was starting to do very well, and Martin felt that it would be [interruption] P: This foundation that you set up, why did you do it with him? L: With Papantonio? P: Why not a family foundation? L: This was Martin’s idea, and it’s very, very bright. Martin saw Mike Papantonio as the future rainmaker. Mike is going to be that. P: What do you mean by the rainmaker? L: The guy is going to go out and bring business into the firm. Whereas that was me and still, Mike has got enough sense to use me as that King Kong who doesn’t show up very often, but oh, if he does. Anyhow, Mike has started to make good money. Basically, Martin suggested we call it the Levin and Papantonio Family Foundation, Mike’s very charitable. P: Mike’s not in the family. L: No. P: Is it a family foundation or not? L: The money comes from Martin, me, and Mike Papantonio. P: $2 million? L: Started with and, then, there’s probably been maybe another half a million, million dollars. P: What’s the money used for?

PAGE 93

UFLC 75 Page 93 L: $500,000 is going to the Kid’s House here in Pensacola. It’s a central location for abused children so they don’t have to go to through ten or fifteen different agencies, they’ll all be contained in one. P: Psychologically, ethical and all of those things. L: Yeah, and it’s good. P: Is it in existence already? L: I was having a drink last night and the guy in charge of it told me they’re signing the papers today to buy it. $250,000 to the children’s cancer camp. A lot of different, $5,000, $3,000.... Martin would be able to tell you. P: So it’s a three man operation? L: Actually, the foundation, I’ve never been to one of their meetings. I don’t guess I’m on it. Martin is on it, Flack Logan, Sue Strawn from channel WEAR television, different people around the community. P: Not necessarily people just in the firm? L: Oh no, no. They may turn down an awful lot of people on different things. They do a great job. P: What else in addition to that? You’ve supported activities at the University of West Florida. Give me that list. L: Basically it was the Abe Levin professorship in, I don’t even know, humanities. P: How much was that money? L: It’s over $300,000. It was a piece of property I gave to them. P: You gave them the piece of property which they sold? L: Yeah. P: And that was matched by the state or hasn’t that happened yet? L: I don’t know. P: Usually a chair is $600,000.

PAGE 94

UFLC 75 Page 94 L: No, this wasn’t a chair, it was a professorship. P: Is that your one and only gift to West Florida? L: $1,000 here. Of any substance, yes. P: What have you done for Florida State University? L: Basically at the same time I gave the piece of property to UWF, I gave property to the Florida State University Foundation. I’m a member of their President’s Council at Florida, UWF, and FSU. P: What is the draw for Tallahassee for you? You’re not an alumnus of that institution. L: Bernie Sliger. P: Personal relationship? L: Yes. We developed a relationship. Actually he testified for me in Thorshaw v. L&N Railroad as an economist. I had met him at a Board of Trustees meeting for the state. They were doing an event at the Ramada here in Pensacola, and the University of West Florida was hosting the Board of Regents. They were doing a Mark Twain review, some guy acting like Mark Twain, and it was boring as hell. They had a bar in the back of the room, I didn’t know Bernie Sliger from Adam. The only reason I was there, I came right after the University of West Florida, I gave the professorship, so I had to be there, Morris Marks, no, it was the president before that, Robinson or something, wanted me to be there. I’m at the back of the room at the bar, and this little sort of stout guy is there at the bar and it was a Sunday. We’re having a drink and he said, “Is there any place in town open on a Sunday we can get away from here?” I said, “You and I got the same idea.” We were right by the kitchen, and we just snuck out through the kitchen and left. The President of Florida State, that’s how I met him. P: And you’re meeting him for the first time? L: Never knew who he was. So we went off and we went to drinking and we really tied one on. And he can drink. Anyhow, that’s how I met Bernie Sliger and then, as a result of that, he testified for me in 1980, 1981 at the L&N trial, and from there, anytime Florida/FSU football games there, I would go sit in his box. P: But Sandy [ D’Alemberte] is the president now. L: And a good friend, but not as close as Bernie and I.

PAGE 95

UFLC 75 Page 95 P: So you get invited to the president’s box in Tallahassee, also. L: Yeah. Through SmartCOP had become a good friend of the School of Criminology, Dan Maier Catkin, who’s head of the School of Criminology. P: What do you do in a major way as far as the City of Pensacola? Any of the cultural events here? Do you support those? I’m talking about big money. L: No. P: But small support. L: Eh, you know. Just piddling. I do for like cerebral palsy, cancer, children’s issues, things like that. But as far as the symphony, and the ballet... P: When you say for cancer and the children, what are you talking about? A $5,000 check? More or less? L: Children’s Cancer Society, $250,000. P: That’s a big support. L: Yeah. P: Would you say that you’re the largest philanthropist in Pensacola? L: Yeah. P: You would? L: Yes. P: In terms of the dollars that you distribute annually? L: Yes. I’m far from the wealthiest guy. P: I understand, but you answered the question. You figure you’re the most generous in many ways. L: Yes. P: What do you do for the Jewish community?

PAGE 96

UFLC 75 Page 96 L: My daughter is the president of the synagogue, this is her second year, and the two years before that my son-in-law was. P: Who is your daughter? L: Marci. P: Marci and Ross? L: Marci and Ross. Marci Goodman, who’s circuit judge now. P: Is there anything named for your father at the synagogue? L: The big dining room or whatever you call it, the meeting room. There’s a big star out front that I donated. I donated $15,000 to put it there, and it’s supposed to be the Abe Levin... I’ve never seen a plaque. In fact, I mentioned to Ross, I said, “ Ross, you know I gave this money,” I just gave them $60,000 a couple of weeks ago. P: You were the largest gift to the synagogue? L: Oh, yes. P: What do you do for United Jewish Appeal? L: I’m the largest giver. P: What is your annual? L: $20,000, somewhere around there. P: They just had an Israeli emergency campaign. Were you involved in that? L: They’ve been to see me. What I did, instead, was gave $60,000 to the synagogue here, and I figured just to make sure they’re still going to be around years from now. I’m more concerned there than I am with Israel. I can do more for Israel through some friendships than donating money. P: I’m going to jump around for some things now that I want to make sure that I get onto the [tape]. Tell me about that penthouse. We were there one time, beautiful facility. L: E.W. Hopkins who was president of First Mutual, they had loaned the money for the Mariner, which was a condo in Destin, and they had this half of the top floor that...

PAGE 97

UFLC 75 Page 97 Anyhow, he was going to sell it to me at their cost and I, as usual, not realizing what I got into, I went ahead and bought the darn thing. P: Was this you or the firm buying it? L: Me. I was just going to do something. P: You didn’t know what, but something. L: And I hired decorators, and it got to be very, very expensive. Fortunately, somebody came along and bought it out. P: What did you use it for? L: Family, politics mainly, fund-raisers, friends. P: Was W.D. Childers one of the supporters of this acquisition? Being a politician I thought he might be able to use it for politics. L: No, I never used it in that way. He showed up for some of the events like we had an event for Gary Hart, Bob Hope spent a week there, he and his wife, several movie stars. It was available for big shots who came in, things like that. P: Sam Proctor visited there. He didn’t spend the night, but he was there. L: Well, he was able to come through. P: Brought in by Mark Proctor. You said that you’re not involved except as a supporter for this new law building project at the University of Florida, $250,000, $50,000 a year over five years. Beyond that, you’re not involved in it? L: No. It will be the Lawton Chiles whatever it is at the Fredric G. Levin College of Law. P: The fund-raisers aren’t after you to get after people? L: They’ve raised the money, it’s done. P: It’s in the house already? L: Oh yeah, the money’s in the house. It was approved by the legislature. They’re designing the building now. P: Tell me about your own home, that in itself I understand, is a story.

PAGE 98

UFLC 75 Page 98 L: It was just like the penthouse. I’m very happy, I’m at my house. It was in the late 1980s, my house that Marci and Ross now live in on Menendez where the kids were raised. I was very pleased, I didn’t need anything, and Dean Baird, the guy who was the bookie, had told me that a developer in Pensacola was having a lot of trouble, it was in the 1980s. P: Is this Tom Underwood? L: Tom Underwood. P: He was the developer? L: He was the developer, and he had built the house. Beautiful exterior, it was horrible inside. What happened was he was trying to get it finished in time to get a certificate of occupancy to protect the homestead from all of his creditors. Anyhow, Dean told me that – and this was after the fact, after he’d gotten away with his bankruptcy or whatever it was – “that the house was for sale and you could buy it for a song, and why don’t you fix it up, you turn around and sell it you’ll make a fortune.” I bought it and bought a little piece of property next to it, and brought in the same decorators. All of a sudden, it got out of hand. It was just my wife and I in this 20,000 square foot home, beautiful home, so we’ve been there ever since. P: Do you still have that Picasso? L: Actually I gave that to Martin, and he’s got it in his home in Cambridge. I’ve got a Dali and I’ve got maybe six or seven original LeRoy Neimans. LeRoy and I are good, good friends, and he’s a world famous sports artist, contemporary artist. P: So you’re an art collector? L: Only with Neiman. P: But you do have a Dali. L: I have a Dali. P: Authentic? L: Oh, yes. P: A lot of Dali’s are not. L: No, this is.

PAGE 99

UFLC 75 Page 99 P: What happened to the house, I remember there was a hurricane that did some damage? L: The house I’m living in, hurricane came through, wiped out the bottom floor. We redid it, put in a new dock, new downstairs. They’re still working on it to this week. P: Were you not an antique car collector that got damaged? L: The antique cars, all but one got destroyed. P: Are you out of that business now? L: I still have the Jackie Kennedy and Aristotle Onassis. It’s a Rolls-Royce limo that they used. Aristotle used it from 1952 to his death, I think, in 1975 in Monte Carlo and Paris. When she got married, it became hers. It’s a limo with just two seats in the back. I’ve got that, it’s being redone and ought to be back here next month. P: So the hurricane that did the damage was Hurricane Erin in August of 1995? L: No, Opal. After Erin, a couple of days after Erin, I had air conditioning, and I had my father come over, and that’s the night he died, he died at my home. P: I wanted you to tell me about that for the record, about your father’s death. You were all together that night. L: It was a couple of three days after the hurricane. I think it was on Friday or Saturday, I’m not sure. P: Were you gathering there because of the light situation? L: The lights, and I had staying over my brot her Allen and his wife. Fred Vigodsky and his wife, my father, David did not come, Stanley did not come over, Martin came over, my son. Daddy cooked salami and eggs, and we all sat around and ate salami and eggs and talked for a long time. He said, “Well, I’m going home tomorrow and 6:00.” I said, “No you’re not, wait around here.” “No, I’m going home at 6:00 tomorrow,” he kept saying that. A little after 6:00, the alarms went off all over the house, I jumped up and ran through the house looking. It was a fire alarm, the thing just kept saying danger, danger, danger. I ran all over the house and ran into the room he was staying in, and he was just laying there and he was dead. P: On the bed?

PAGE 100

UFLC 75 Page 100 L: On the bed. Covers still over him, his right hand was out, and his mouth was open. Never even had gotten out of the covers. P: He died in his sleep. L: Died in his sleep. P: And the reason for the alarm? L: Never know. P: That’s kind of strange. L: Yeah. P: So you discovered your father. L: Yes. P: How old was he when he died? L: Eighty-eight. P: So he’d lived a long life here. L: Yeah, and he was driving. In fact, I drove him to my house, told him to leave his car here. He had driven down. He was driving th e day before he died. Lived by himself. Every Sunday morning we’d have breakfast, mullet, and grits, cheese toast, and sliced tomatoes. Every Sunday morning. All the kids would come over and have, friends in advance. P: The family revolved around him? L: Yeah. P: He was the focal point? L: He was the focal point, yes. P: Was your father an affluent man? L: [When] he died, his estate was $1.5 million. P: So he collected a sizeable amount. I suspect much of that went to the synagogue.

PAGE 101

UFLC 75 Page 101 L: No, that was one of the surprising things. I don’t think there were any charities. I think a lot of it was very similar to my will, and that is I’m going to do during my lifetime. P: That’s a smart thing. L: I’m going to enjoy it. P: Enjoy the giving. L: Enjoy the giving. P: Your father was very close to his grandchildren? L: Yeah. P: I want to ask you about the television and ra dio again. How did all of that come about? L: BLAB. P: What does that stand for? L: Basic Local Audience Broadcasting. P: It seems strange. It came about because of the advertising? L: Yeah, that’s how it started, and, then, it became a business. P: Start from the beginning. L: I was looking to try to get the law firm to do some advertising. P: Was that considered undignified? L: Yeah, they said that basically everybody knows the Levin Middlebrooks firm at that time, and everybody would always come to us. I said, “That’s not the case, the people who are advertising are getting business.” When Larry Lewis at Cox Cable mentioned to W.D. Childers he needed programming, I came up with the idea we’d do a call-in talk law show. At that time, I was representing Gulf Power and Gulf Power had a little studio we could use and we microwaved from the studio. We started off Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 7:00 to 8:00, and, then, had a guy one night a week, Ronnie Joyce do a sports show. Then, five nights a week, we finally started doing Dr. Frank Biasco, University of West Florida, doing Around the Town or something and people

PAGE 102

UFLC 75 Page 102 would call in. It started to generate business and finally we got other people to do [interruption]. It seemed like it could generate [more business]. More and more people started talking about it, so the firm had been doing it, and it was costing a little bit of money. You had to have people there. It ended up, I took it over and got Fred Vigodsky to come run it. P: Fred’s been in a lot of different businesses, hasn’t he? L: Yeah, got him out of the carpet business which he hated. P: From dresses to carpets to T.V. L: This has made money every year. P: Does Fred still operate it? L: Oh, yeah. P: Did you also branch off into radio? L: About the same time, a good friend of mine, Don Schroeder, had found religion, came back to Pensacola. He was a Grammy Award winning record producer. He came back to Pensacola and got a little radio station and explained to me that we could take this little AM radio station, and there was something called an AM, FM grant deal in Congress, and we could get the FM license. I put the money in, and we had a little Contemporary Christian radio station that eventually did lead to me getting another license that I sold, but today that little radio station is CNN radio here in Pensacola, and it’s doing quite well. P: How did my Mark get involved as a T.V. star? Mark Proctor. L: Just as all of the guys here at the office started doing the shows, and it became very popular. Mark would walk down the street and people would recognize him. P: When you go into restaurants, people will think, “You look familiar.” L: Yeah. P: I want you to start at the beginning and tell me about Roy Jones. That’s been an important part of your life. L: And it’s led to a bunch of different things.

PAGE 103

UFLC 75 Page 103 P: Who is Roy Jones? L: Roy Jones, Jr. was a local amateur boxer [who] went to the 1988 Olympics in Seoul, Korea. Absolutely destroyed all of his competitors including a South Korean in the finals. Somehow or another they cheated Roy out of it and gave the gold medal to the South Korean. It was very embarrassing, it was a terrible thing for the Olympics, it was said to be the worst decision ever made in amateur boxing. Roy came back to town. His father, a very domineering person, came to see me, wanted to know if I would represent Roy. P: His father had been his trainer? L: Yes. I told him I loved boxing, but I didn’t know anything about the sport, the business. He said that’s the reason he came to see me, he’d help me learn. P: He just came out of the blue, then? L: Yeah. So I started representing him. P: Had you seen Roy Jones fight? L: I’d seen him on television in the Olympics. I started representing Roy along with my brother Stanley. That would have been actually in the spring of 1989. P: When you say you represented him, how does a lawyer represent a boxer? L: It’s a like a manager type. Negotiate fights for him. P: In other words you negotiate a fight, a place, a time, the money end of it. L: The promoter does that. It started we we re the promoter and the manager. [We] got introduced around to some very prominent people in the television networks. P: Sports people? L: Sports people, national people. P: Had Roy Jones, now he had fought in the Olympics, did he continue boxing? L: Yeah, then he became a professional. P: And you as the lawyer, you helped arrange these bouts.

PAGE 104

UFLC 75 Page 104 L: Bouts and prices, and put my money and St anley’s money into. Slow, but surely, Roy became by 1993, within three or four years, he had become a world champion. Then, by 1994, there were those who said that pound for pound, in other words he’s 160 pounds at the time, that he was the greatest boxer that ever lived. P: When did you come aboard? L: Right after 1988, right after the Olympics. P: And you’ve stayed with him ever since right? L: Yes, still with him. P: What does a boxer need money for? L: We were doing our own promotions. We we re having to fight here in Pensacola and might do 600 people at the gate at $10 a head, that’s $6,000. It’d cost money to pay the opponents, the place, and everything else. P: It’s an expensive sport? L: Expensive sport until he won in 1994, and at that point I negotiated a contract for him with HBO, a multimillion dollar contract, and it’s been renegotiated. P: He’s the world champion by that time? L: Yes, and he’s still considered to be the greatest boxer in the world today. P: Tell me about his relationship with his father. I read something about a dog incident? L: Yeah. I kept trying to push him toward a championship, his father didn’t want him to, and he was holding him back. P: Why? L: I don’t know. P: Was he an autocratic...? L: Yes. I think he didn’t want his son to go on to become... and I think he may have had a little fear that maybe his son was going to get beaten, and as long as he had Stanley and Fred Levin putting the money up, that this is a pretty good situation for him.

PAGE 105

UFLC 75 Page 105 P: Were you making any money out of this? L: No, no. We were getting deeper and deeper in. We were throwing good money out of the bag. P: Tell me about the father and son’s relationship. L: Their relationship was such that the son was starting to get upset. They lived next door to each other, and Roy junior had a dog and the dog bit his sister on the arm. Roy junior was gone, and Roy senior came out with a shot gun and killed Roy’s dog. Then, Roy said, “That’s it,” and he left him and not only moved away, he said that he was through. He did not talk to his daddy for several years. We still handled him. P: Did the father have any investment in this that he was drawing in anything? L: No. Very, very stubborn too. P: He’d been his trainer, however. L: Yeah. We brought in another trainer that Roy had known in the Olympics, and we, then, got these big fights for him, negotiated this thing. Stanley and I were national co-managers of the year in boxing, national, 1995, 1996. P: Where were you boxing now? Not in little ole Pensacola? L: Oh, no. Las Vegas, Atlantic City, New York City, Madison Square Garden. P: Big time. L: Big time. Los Angeles, Reno, Lake Tahoe. All the big events, we were there. P: Were you negotiated with the national NBC... L: Actually HBO was what we eventually ended up doing. P: Pay-per-view. L: And some Pay-per-view, we did all that. P: This in some way, and I didn’t understand it when I was reading the notes, became involved in some issue in Congress with Senator [John] McCain [Republican, Arizona].

PAGE 106

UFLC 75 Page 106 L: Senator McCain, he loves Roy Jones. He thi nks he’s the greatest fighter that ever lived. He’s a boxing fan, and he was upset about Don King and Bob Arum [boxing promoter] and those guys taking over. P: Taking over the boxing? L: Yeah. Basically, as promoters, they do, and so both Roy and I went and testified in front of his committee, and they passed the Mohammed Ali Boxing Reform Act, which has gone a little way towards cleaning up the sport. P: Is the sport kind of a crooked sport? L: Yeah. P: Because of the people promoting it? L: Yeah. P: Betting on it? L: No. They can determine who fights who, and if you don’t side with them, you don’t get to the championships. P: Where is Roy Jones, Jr. today? L: I’m sure he’s here in Pensacola. P: He lives in Pensacola? L: Yes. P: And you and Stanley continued to... L: Stanley quit a couple of years ago. He just felt like there was a personal situation that he was... Stanley did this out of love for Roy. He knew Roy long before I did. Stanley’s son and Roy were in Boys Club together, and Stanley was doing all of this out of love, and I was doing it not for money so much, but as image. This goes along with the same, “God knows, here’s this guy, he’s the greatest lawyer in the world, he’s a politician, and he’s the national boxing manager, what the hell have we got there?” All of this. The publicity was incredible. Any sports fan knew Fred Levin manages Roy Jones, Jr. There were some other champions we took on at the same time. P: In other words, you went beyond just Roy? You had others?

PAGE 107

UFLC 75 Page 107 L: Yeah. P: I’ve heard the term “owned.” L: That is not the case, I don’t own a boxer. I was getting a piece of the action for negotiating. P: Are you the main person as far as Roy Jones is concerned? L: Today Roy has basically taken over himself. He still pays me to go through the contracts. P: So for arranging a fight, Roy Jones arranges them himself or you do it? L: Basically, he does his own. P: But you go to the fights? L: Yes. P: Do you know when he’s scheduled this year? L: Supposedly the first week in September. P: Is Roy Jones a wealthy man? L: I don’t really know. He’s made an awful lot of money, but he spends a lot of money. I think that had a lot to do with why Stanley quit, too. Stanley thought Roy needed to be putting away a lot of money for the future. P: Does Roy take care of himself physically? L: Oh yeah, he’s not a drinker or a druggie. P: What’s he spend money on? L: He’s got cars, he’s got three or four homes, he flies wherever he goes in a private jet and those kind of things. It gets to be expensive. P: So what is the future of Roy Jones’ relationship with Fred Levin? L: I’m sure I’ll continue to be, basically, his lawyer and basically to look at his contracts, things of that nature.

PAGE 108

UFLC 75 Page 108 P: What is the Square Ring... [End of tape D, side 7]. L: ...The corporation that Roy Jones owns totally now. That is the promoter. It’s like Don King. Square Ring is Roy’s promoter, Don Ki ng is promoter for some other fighters, and Top Rank which is Bob Arum is promoter. Anyhow, this is Roy’s promotion company now. P: Sounds like he’s kind of shrewd. Smart? L: Yeah, Roy is. P: Is there a Roy Jones Gym here or anything? L: Yeah. P: Is that where he trains? L: Yes. P: People can go watch him? L: Ehh, yes. P: What else about Roy Jones should we say? L: As a result to representing Roy, I got a call one day from some people in Washington wanting to know if I’d be interested in representing another world champion and [I] said, “Yes.” The people brought in a guy named Ike Quartey. He was the world welterweight champion, he came from the country of Ghana making about $65,000 a fight. I took him over, and within a year, got him a fight for $4.8 million. P: That’s a lot of money. L: That’s a lot of money. He fought a guy named Oscar De La Hoya, which was a big name. Lost the fight. Anyhow, right before that fight, I didn’t realize the people who surrounded Ike Quartey were the relatives of the royal family of Ghana in Africa, a very democratic country. This would have been maybe right after the law school thing. P: It was right after the law school. L: And they gave me a call and said they had nominated me to become a chief in the Country of Ghana.

PAGE 109

UFLC 75 Page 109 P: Because of your relationship to the boxer? L: To the boxer and just the way I handled the whole thing. P: But you had never been to Ghana. L: No, and still hadn’t. P: And you had not met anybody from there up until this time except the boxer. L: And then what they did, I went to the United Nations... P: You were invited to go to the United Nations. L: And they had a ceremony they called an instoolment. P: Did you treat this as a joke? L: I first I thought it was like becoming a Colonel in the Florida Highway Patrol. It wasn’t quite that way. In this particular thing, there were only two other Americans that had ever, and one was Shirley Temple Black, and the other was Barbara Jordan, I believe, from Texas, and Fred Levin. P: Don’t you think that’s kind of strange, when you think about it, that Fred Levin would be made a chief in this tribe, this organization, this government? L: Yeah. P: Did you wonder if they had an ulterior motive? L: I really think a lot of it, and also I got a commendation from the Black Caucus. You go back through and you look through that career, the career with George Stark, Nathaniel Dedmond, Roy Jones, Jr. P: But they would not have known all of the George Starks. L: I’m not sure what they knew and what they didn’t know, but they knew how I treated them. I didn’t know who they were, but they were treated... They came to Pensacola right after the call, they stayed at my home. It’s how you treat people, I guess, I don’t know. P: You must have been flattered by this, this recognition.

PAGE 110

UFLC 75 Page 110 L: Oh, yeah, and when I realized the seriousness of it, it was big time. P: You went to New York. L: Yeah, and in the meantime, through Roy Jones, this would have been 1994, 1995, LeRoy Neiman – the reason I thought about this was he was at the United Nations and did some artwork, I’m not sure you’re familiar with him... P: I know who you’re talking about. L: He’s an outstanding artist. P: Famous artist. L: His work would sell for as much as $1 million a painting now. I called him out of the clear blue sky, love his work. He didn’t know who I was, and I said I want him to do a picture of Roy Jones, Jr. and he agreed to do it. Then we met, must have been 1995, and have become very, very good friends. Every time I go to New York, we go out to dinner, and he’s been in my home, stayed in my home. When he comes in to New Orleans he’ll call and say, “Come on over”. So he was at the United Nations. I was just thinking of the people. P: Who all went to this affair? L: A lot of the law firm, a lot of Ghanians. P: You had to charter a plane or something? L: I think we did, I’m not sure the firm did. The head of HBO, some people from NBC. P: Ceremony was at the United Nations building? L: United Nations, they had a nice... P: I have a date here, January 22, 1999. L: That would have been it. Then, I think a couple of weeks later, I came back to Pensacola and got the whatchamacallit, well I know I did, within two or three weeks came of the luncheon, we had the University of Florida law school, everything coming together. P: What became your name as the chief?

PAGE 111

UFLC 75 Page 111 L: I have it in there, I’ll go get it. P: Your title as chief is Nana Ofori Agyeman. L: The First. P: The First. I hope they have a short nickname for you. L: Actually, after I was instooled, they actually, I mean, the Ghanians came up and they bowed, and they would back [up]... [you] never turn your back on a chief. After I die, Martin will become chief, and, then, after Martin, his son Dustin. P: So it’s an inheritable title. L: It’s an inheritable title. It will always be. He will be two, Dustin will be three. P: Where in Africa is Ghana? L: Ghana is on the Gold Coast. A democratic... there’s no coups or civil wars or anything. P: Is it a productive country? L: Yes. P: They’ve invited you over there, I’m sure. L: Yeah, but I got so many things going now. Eventually I will get there. P: You’ll be a superstar coming in. L: Oh, gees. P: The chief is here. L: Yeah. P: So you began taking this seriously after the event in New York. What did you do at the United Nations? Who was there besides the firm and the ________? L: There were a bunch of celebrities mainly from the boxing world. You have to keep in mind, the Secretary General, Kofi Annan is a Ghanian. P: Was this followed by a luncheon or a reception or something?

PAGE 112

UFLC 75 Page 112 L: Yes, there was a luncheon right afterwards. P: So everybody had a wonderful time. L: Yeah, we really did. P: I saw the pictures of you. L: With my outfit on? P: With your outfit on. They had one ready for you? L: Oh yeah, they wrapped me. I had my own aids who... P: So you didn’t have to bring that up from Pensacola. L: Oh, no, they did all of that. P: Do you hear from them now? L: I just got through writing a letter to the American consulate to get visas for a number of Ghanians that are coming to the country that needed some kind of something from me. I wrote a three page letter where they could get visas. P: Let’s talk about some of your strengths and some of your weaknesses. What are some of your weaknesses? You’re not a major drinker, you’re not an alcoholic. L: No, but I’m too quick to say something and, then, regret making remarks. P: Your mouth gets ahead of you? L: Yeah. I can’t bring myself to hurt somebody, and you say, “Well, that’s not a weakness,” well it really is a weakness. I’ve never been able to fire anybody. People who, “Oh, God, I should’ve gotten rid of them.” I have a number of hanger-ons. When I say hanger-ons, I’m talking about bums that really, it would drive you crazy. Without naming them, these are just people that I listened to and they feel very comfortable. I’m talking about one of them’s retarded, two or three of them are the rottenest people in the world. P: But you’re unable to bar the door. L: I cannot do it. Last night, I had the family over and Martin and the baby. There were, by the time everybody was together, probably twenty, twenty-five people, and had a maid, a

PAGE 113

UFLC 75 Page 113 cook that used to be with me that did the cooking, and the kids are just, “Oh, gosh daddy, you got to hire her and get rid of the one we’ve got.” The one that I’ve got there just sits around and reads the Bible all day, and cooks, and I just don’t have the heart to get rid of her. That’s a terrible, terrible weakness. P: You’ve got your own social security system. L: Yeah. I’ve got thirteen employees at the house, at my house. P: Kind of falling over each other. L: It’s a big house, but still, there’s no need for that. I’d say that’s my biggest fault. P: Are you still smoking? L: I only smoke when I drink. I was able to get that. P: Then that means you have to limit drinking? L: What happened is, and that would mean maybe two or three days a week I would smoke. Since I got involved with SmartCOP, I meet every night, and the CEO, I’m the majority stockholder. P: What is [SmartCOP]? L: A couple of years ago, three years ago, somebody came into my office, a guy named Wayne Stephenson. Wayne’s brother is Ka y Stephenson, actually it’s George Kay, but everybody calls him Kay. Kay was the former head coach of the NFL Buffalo Bills, he was also NFL football player and went to the University of Florida. He actually was second team quarterback, he was under Steve Spurrier at Florida. Outstanding coach, but he’d been married for the second time and wanted to get away from football, come back to Pensacola. Wayne was the CPA for this small little company that just started. What it is, it’s software for police. What would happen is a police officer in a car could get on his computer and put the tag number in, and it could tell them everything about the car within seconds. If somebody called 911 and said, “Go to Mark Proctor’s house at such and such, he and his wife are having a fight,” it would immediately tell him the history of the house. Mark has got a gun, it would tell him everything. That’s how it started. It sounded like a great idea. Kay wanted to come home and Kay would run the company. P: Did he know you already?

PAGE 114

UFLC 75 Page 114 L: Yeah, I had known him. At the University of Florida, he was a few years younger than me. He’s about 58, he’s my brother Allen’s age. We got to talking, and I put some money into it, and it was very similar to the Roy Jones, Jr. thing. I kept putting more money in. Kay’s big buddy was Jack Kemp [unsuccessful Republican candidate for Vice-President; Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, 1898-1993; U.S. Representative from New York, 1971-89]. They had played football together. He got Jack to come down here, Jack looked at it, Jack liked it, and Jack’s big buddy was Bill Bennett [Washington, D.C. attorney]. Got him involved in it, and, then, some other relationships, Bill Bratton was the police commissioner of the City of New York. Actually, COMSTAT, he developed the computer for police. He’s known, he wrote the book. Then, I knew Terdema Ussery, he was former president of Nike sports management. We got Bobby Kennedy, Jr. on through Mike Papantonio. So [it’s] this great board, and I’ve put a lot of money into it. I’m basically the person funding it, it’s probably right at $10 million. It’s more in the research and development. We’re just going into homeland security. We do the Florida Highway Patrol, we just got the contract for Georgia Highway Patrol, it’s going to develop. We teamed with some of the major companies in this country, Dell, Nextel, ACS, EDS, TRW, Qualcomm. We’ve got basically forty employees now, it’s here in Pensacola. We’re right on the edge of maybe hitting it real big time. As a result of this, I have become very good friends with Jack Kemp. We’ve traveled together, a week ago Jack was staying in my house, maybe two weeks ago, a week before the trial. I’ve traveled with him, we’ve gone to football games together, boxing matches together. Wonderful guy, should have been President of the United States, brilliant. His problem is he can’t do the sound byte. If you ever watched him, he’s an economic genius on the economy, great friend of Israel, I mean great friend. Netanyahu [former Israeli Prime Minister] was in Dallas and my friend Terdema Ussery, the black guy, went up to him at this dinner. Terdema is, as I said, former president of Nike sports management, is the president of the Dallas National Basketball Association team, went up to him and he said, “Mr. Prime Minister, I am a good friend of a very good friend of yours.” He said, “Who is that?” He said, “Jack Kemp.” The Prime Minister said, “Jack is not a friend, he’s a brother.” Jack’s been over to Israel several times, just got back. SmartCOP has been over there. If it wasn’t for so much going on now, we’d be putting the SmartCOP concept in over there. P: It sounds like it has a great future. L: I think so, we think we have the Country of China. Getting back to smoking, I’ve got that kind of money in it. I am the majority stockholder in that company. There are a lot of spinoffs of that, things called red light enforcement. We do the software for cars running red lights, photograph the tag. This is available in many states, we think it will be available in Florida shortly. It’s like a parking ticket except it’s seventy-five bucks.

PAGE 115

UFLC 75 Page 115 P: And you can pay it through the mail. L: Pay it through the mail. There’s a lot of potential there, a lot of future. Great friendships that I’ve developed as a result of this. P: What role does Bobby Kennedy, Jr. play in that? L: He’s on the board. He and I are the only two Democrats on the board. Everybody else are Republicans. P: I know Mark said he’s met with him several times, he’s never said what. L: I don’t know. We use his name. We worked with him on the law firm, Mark would be meeting with him in the law firm business. This has got nothing to do with that. P: What about your smoking? We haven’t finished that up. L: Now, every night, I have drinks so I’ll smoke about a half a pack. P: A night? L: Yeah. P: Is that good or is that bad? L: That’s bad, but it’s a heck of a lot better than smoking three or four packs, which I used to do years ago. P: So you drink and you smoke. L: Probably five nights a week. But the drinking is limited to two or three cocktails. I don’t sit around and drink all night. I’ll get there about 5:15, leave about 6:30. P: When you say get there, you’re not talking about home? L: No, the cocktail... I’m going to start having Kay meeting me at my home, we both live in Gulf Breeze... P: So you meet some place at a bar. L: Yeah. And we talk business. P: It’s really kind of a business meeting in a way.

PAGE 116

UFLC 75 Page 116 L: Yes. He’s just bringing me up to date on what’s happened. P: Is he a smoker also? L: Yes. P: So you fall prey to the smoking thing. L: Yes. P: You’ve had no health problems, though, have you? L: Not that I know of. P: Are you watching that carefully? L: I try. P: I shouldn’t call it a weakness at all because if it’s what you like to do. You’ve always liked gambling. Is this going back to the time that you were a kid? L: Yes, watching daddy play gin rummy. P: So you think you inherited those gambling genes? L: When I say I enjoy it, I used to enjoy it a lot more than I do now. It’s an hour and a half away. I can go to Biloxi... P: But do you do that? L: Once every six, seven, eight months. P: How about Las Vegas? L: I went back [when] the law firm had a seminar there, and that was in November before ________. P: Mike said that was very successful. L: Yeah. Before that it was three years maybe before I had been. Then, when I’d been there, it was for a fight. P: When you go to Las Vegas or Biloxi or whatever, what do you gamble?

PAGE 117

UFLC 75 Page 117 L: I shoot dice. P: Is Marilyn a... L: Marilyn likes...that’s the only thing she enjoys really, other than the kids, is she likes to play Black Jack. P: So she goes with you occasionally? L: She’ll go, and basically, the first day or two, she stays in the room like she does at the house and gets room service, and, then, we’ll go out for dinner one night and she’ll play Black Jack that night. Then, the next night, she may play and then we go home the next day. P: So gambling, we won’t call it a weakness, we’ll call it an activity. L: It’s an activity. I don’t jeopardize money or life and limb. P: You obviously can afford to gamble. L: Right. P: And you’re not gambling millions of dollars. L: Right. P: Have you had large real estate investments here in the area? You’re not with Allen on this Portofino are you? L: I owned the property where the Portofino was. I owned, I’m not sure what percentage, but I think I owned probably, between me and the kids, I probably owned 50, 60 percent of those forty acres. Then, I sold them to A llen, or twenty-eight of the acres I sold to Allen and to a group which includes my children, Fred Vigodsky, these are the developers. These are the guys that are going to make big money out of it. P: So you don’t own any of that property or you ow n very little of it. You sold most of it to Allen and the rest of it to your kids and the others... L: They’re developing it. I own the property, but I sold it and I’ll end up... P: What about that apartment complex Mark lived in?

PAGE 118

UFLC 75 Page 118 L: Triston. I don’t think I had any... P: Were you the developer of that? L: No, Allen and Dean Baird. Then, Allen we nt off and started developing things on his own. My children have always been investors with him, and they’ve done well with it. P: You’ve taken good care of your children, haven’t you? L: Financially, yes. P: They’re all well off? L: Very well off. P: Can you think of any other weaknesses that we can attach to Fred Levin’s reputation? He’s a gambler, he’s a drinker, and he’s a smoker. L: What would have been my strength is, of course, that you work, work, work all the time. I don’t have any hobbies. If I see something I want, I buy it right then, I don’t waste a lot of time. I think that between politics, business – keep in mind, Orange State Life Insurance Company, Chick’s Barbeque, the dress business, BLAB T.V., SmartCOP, Roy Jones. SmartCOP takes up a tremendous amount of my time. All of that, full time practice of law, the politics, the sports. My wife suffered a great deal as a result of this. I was constantly the center of attention, I was constantly... it created real problems for her, and I think as the children grew and they became stars in own their own right, they were all really good kids, and I think that even made things worse that, “What am I to do in life?” Just sat there and raised children and prepared the meals for “my husband when he’d come home.” She suffered, I’m sure, emotionally, she’s has all kinds of stomach problems, physical, and emotional problems. That clearly has been a problem. I don’t have the kind of life that most people would have programmed for themselves. At the same time, I’m as happy as anybody I know, I’m as pleased as anybody I know. I do everything I can to make her life a pleasure. I’ve got thirteen employees at that house, and she’s basically in charge of the house. She has like a secretary, it gives her something to say that, “I’m doing.” Whether or not she accomplishes, I don’t know. All of them love her, she takes care of their personal problems. It gives her something in life other than being the wife of Fred Levin and the mother of these kids. P: The questions I want to ask you now deal with your family. Start with your children and go down the list. Give me their full names, their married names, their birth dates, place of birth, if you can remember it, and also their children, your grandchildren. Start with the oldest, Marci.

PAGE 119

UFLC 75 Page 119 L: Marci Lynn Levin married Ross Goodman. Marci was born in Gainesville at the Alachua General Hospital on April Fool’s Day 1960, while I was a law student. She has two children, Jacqueline who’s fifteen, and Brenton who’s twelve. Marci graduated law school at the University of Florida, did her undergraduate at Tulane, and, I believe, it was in economics or business. Got a law degree, was married to Ross. P: When did she get her law degree? L: I’m not sure. [She married] Ross Goodman from Miami. P: Is that his full name to your knowledge? L: Marci went to work for the state attorney’s office in St. Petersburg. Then, when they moved to Pensacola, she started work for the state attorney’s office in Pensacola. In November 2000, she was elected unopposed to the circuit judgeship. She’s now the circuit judge in Santa Rosa County specializing in juvenile. She’s also president of the synagogue and is a big leader in the community on children’s rights. P: And her husband Ross Goodman is also a graduate of the University of Florida law school. L: He went to work with our law firm, and, recently, has retired or resigned to go teach at the University of West Florida. P: Do they have a law school there? L: No, he teaches paralegals. The next was Debra Lorraine who was born September 20, 1962 in Pensacola. She attended the University of Texas, and she got a masters degree in business administration at the University of Florida. She married Mark Dreyer and they have one child, Jacob. Mark’s a lawyer, but they got a divorce. They both still share custody of Jake. P: What does Debra do? L: Debra teaches, actually. She’s a computer genius, and she does private teaching at Bay Medical Center there, at the Air Force Base there. She goes in and teaches on an hourly basis. I was talking to her, she makes $40, $50 an hour. She lives in Panama City. Then, my only son Martin was born December 11, 1964 in Pensacola. Martin was pretty much everything, president of the student body, vice president of the state, he was a big soccer player, made all “A”s and one “B+” in high school even though he was pretty wild. His SAT score was like 1000, got accepted into Stanford where he graduated with the highest honors in economics. Then, went to the University of Florida

PAGE 120

UFLC 75 Page 120 law school where he graduated number one, then went to work for Judge Davis as a clerk in Miami, and, then, came up and started practicing with our law firm, was an outstanding lawyer. [He] married Terry. Mar tin and Terry just recently, in April of 2002, had their only child, a son, Dustin. In January of February of 2001, Martin probably is as good a trial lawyer or overall lawyer as I’ve ever seen, came in and announced he was very disheartened with the law practice. He applied and got accepted at the Harvard School of Divinity where he ’s attending now and thinking very seriously of also getting his masters in law, and then, he wants to teach. P: You have academics in your family. L: The fourth is Kimberly. Kimberly wa s born March 3, 1969, in Pensacola. Different from the other three, she started at the University of Florida and, then, moved over and graduated Florida State. She met and married Gary Brielmayer who was a student in the FSU School of Hotel and Restaurant Management. He moved through the hospitality industry with the Hyatt and the Hilton and others. He’s now the food and beverage director at the San Destin Hilton in Destin, Florida. Kimberly also teaches computers when she has time, very similar to Debbie. They have two children. Tyler and Alexandra, Alexandra is a girl. The four children are very, very happy. Unfortunately, I’m sure a lot of this is from... let me put it this way, Martin and Marci, certainly, they’re happy with their success. Marci said, “I can’t believe I’m being paid to do this.” Martin is, of course, extremely well off financially, Martin did tremendously well in the law firm. Kimberly and Debbie are extremely close, one lives in Destin and one lives in Panama City. They every day talk, every weekend they’re together, and they bring the children together. I’m not sure how much of their happiness is because they’re so financially secure. They can do whatever they want to. Both of them have two homes in the area. Debbie has two homes on the water, one that her ex-husband lives in, he was living in a real bad neighborhood, and she didn’t want Jake to visit him there, so she had had that house up for sale, and she just stopped the sale, and told Mark to move in there and take care of expenses. Then she just recently built a home on the water, Kimberly likewise. They had a little home in Destin, and, then, they’ve just built on the water, and they’ve got their home up for sale. P: Are you close to your children? L: Yes. Like I said, they’re very, very happy. That pretty much sums up the situation with the family. I think we’ve probably covered almost everything. P: We have. I want to ask you some questions about yourself. Do you have any leisure time or is it all work, work, work? L: It’s pretty much work. That to me is...I wouldn’t know what to do if I was just sitting around.

PAGE 121

UFLC 75 Page 121 P: Are you a reader? L: No. P: You don’t read books? L: No. P: Magazines? L: Yes. P: Newspapers? L: Yes. Magazines and newspapers. P: You go to the movies? L: Only at home. P: You’re not a theater person. L: No. P: A music person? L: No. P: Do you work outside in the yard at all? L: No. I workout. P: You do have an exercise area in your house? L: Yes. P: Are you a boat person? L: I’ve got two boats, but I don’t drive either one. P: They just sit there?

PAGE 122

UFLC 75 Page 122 L: They basically sit there, and I let other people use them. Rarely, like once every two or three weeks, I might take the boat out to go somewhere with a bunch of people. P: But mainly for decorative purposes. L: Yes. P: Are you an art collector? L: Not really. P: Are you an antique car collector? L: No. P: Are you a collector? L: No. P: Are you a happy man? L: Very. Very happy. P: And you’re satisfied with everything that you’ve accomplished? Which has been obviously very great. L: Yeah. P: You haven’t left anything undone? L: I don’t plan on going anywhere. P: Of course, you’ve still got many years ahead of you. L: Hopefully. P: Are there goals that you set in earlier life that you have not achieved? L: I never dreamed in my wildest dreams that I would have accomplished what I did. P: By accomplishing do you mean your wealth or you mean your position?

PAGE 123

UFLC 75 Page 123 L: Position. I honestly believe that I am as good as there is in what I do and that I’ve accomplished way more... I mean it’s been a rather varied career. Whether it be in politics, whether it be in law, whether it be in sports, I have reached the pinnacle. P: You sometimes wonder if you have any place left yet to go. L: I’d like to enjoy the fruits of all of this. I don’t travel, I don’t enjoy that. P: You like getting up in the morning and coming to work. L: That’s about it. P: So you don’t feel depressed or anything? L: Oh, no, gosh no. P: One of the things we haven’t talked about, and I’d like to get a little reflection, and that’s the role you’ve played in politics both on the local scene and the state scene. I know you and the governors have been close, what about locally? Have you ever thought about running for office? L: Oh, no. Martin was very much involved in marketing, and he’s done several studies. I have, almost, if not greater, certainly greater name recognition than any of the politicians in this area. They’ve done study after study. I have basically 100 percent name recognition because I hit all areas. In other words, you might find some people who are very much involved in boxing who could care less about politics or law. They did studies and actually in Northwest Florida out of 400 people I had 100 percent name recognition, and I think Clinton was next, and, then, it was a big drop to the governor, Bush and all of that. I just selected a jury, and the other side, there were forty people there, and they said, “How many of you have not heard of Fred Levin?” Not a hand was raised. I’m not sure that’s good. How many have heard of Hitler? P: I don’t think anybody’s going to put you in the same... L: No. P: Do politicians come to see you? L: Yes. P: They’re looking for support and they’re looking for money? L: Money and support.

PAGE 124

UFLC 75 Page 124 P: That’s both true on the local and the state and even the national level. L: Yes. P: You’ve always voted Democrat? L: I voted for W.D. Childers who’s a Republican. P: But he started out as a Democrat. L: Anytime they think of politics they will... P: They were knocking at your door. L: Yeah, they’ll come see me. P: You’ve been particularly close to W.D. Childers? L: Yes. P: Is he your senator? Has been? L: No. You mean does he represent the area that I’m in? No. P: But if you wanted something in the legislature. L: I would go talk to him although he really hasn’t done that much. P: How are you and Dempsey Barron? L: We were on the other side. We’re on opposite sides. P: So you were not a good political friend? L: No. In fact, I promoted Vince Bruner [Senat or, Florida Legislature]. I was the one who talked him into running against Dempsey and of course he beat Dempsey and that was the end of the reign of Dempsey Barron. P: What about statewide? L: They give me way more credit than I deserve. P: In other words, you’re not a governor maker?

PAGE 125

UFLC 75 Page 125 L: No. P: A lot of people think you are. L: I know, but it’s not true. I’m perceived that way. P: How about U.S. Senate? Bob Graham, is he a friend? L: Yes. P: I remember being at your house at an affair that he was in. I guess it was a fund-raiser. L: Yeah, I’ve raised money for Bob, for Bill Nelson, I guess for all of them. P: Mark told me recently you had Jack Kemp down here. L: Yeah, that had to do with SmartCOP. P: And he’s a Republican. L: I know. I had a fund-raiser for Charles Clary, senator. P: But not for Janet Reno. L: I don’t support...I don’t see Janet winning, and I think that she’s going to destroy the chance of the only guy who could and that’s McBride. P: Has anybody from Janet Reno’s agency approached you? L: I think I told them that I had already committed to McBride. P: That erased that with their hand out like that. Can you think of anything we have not covered? L: Only one thing. I’m not sure what year, I guess it was early 1998, I brought Mohammed Ali to Pensacola not to speak but to be present at an event with Governor Chiles and Roy Jones, Jr. to speak to all of the highschool seniors, maybe all highschool students, we had about 10,000 people in the arena, on the subject of tolerance of others. There was a lot of animosity toward me for having done this. P: Even in this day and time? L: Unfortunately, they looked at Mohammed Ali as being this Muslim, but it was a fabulous event. He stayed at my home the night before. The morning event I was master of

PAGE 126

UFLC 75 Page 126 ceremonies and Lawton made a real nice talk, Roy Jones, Jr. made a nice talk, it was really a beautiful affair. Mohammed Ali’s wi fe did a fabulous job. The main thing was, the evening before, we had a little dinner party upstairs, Lawton stayed over and Mohammed Ali stayed over at my home that night and I was MCing the show the next morning. Somehow or another, I left the two of them in my kitchen. It was a cocktail party downstairs where they all just took pictures with Mohammed Ali and all of that. I left Lawton and Mohammed together and I went upstairs, went to bed, got up the next morning and did the thing, and then they went on. They came in a limo. I got a note from Lawton, and I don’t know where the darn thing is, I’m going to find it, in which is was basically Dear Fred, I appreciate so much spending the night at your home and all the events and things like that, and I want you to know the conversations that I had and the comradery with Mohammed Ali was one of the most fabulous nights of my life. P: You ought to find that note. L: Anyhow, that’s it. P: Who’s been your role model? L: I guess growing up it was my dad. P: You had a strong relationship with him, didn’t you. L: I admired him greatly. I didn’t realize until later that he was extremely well respected in the Jewish community. In the non-Jewish community, he was like the good Jew. I’m not sure that when I realized that that that’s such a great thing and maybe that’s got a lot to do with my contentious nature, that I’m not going to be their good Jew, I’m going to bust their ass. Maybe that’s got a lot to do with why I want them to think not that I’ve beat you, but that I cheated you and I got to you or something, I don’t know. I guess I could give a psychologist one hell of a great story on my life, and I really don’t know. P: But you consider that you’ve led an honest life? That you have not cheated, you have not taken advantage of people? L: Oh, that’s right. Oh, God, if anything, I bent over backwards the other way. Why is it that I would want to give that damn impression? It doesn’t make sense. I’ll sit there and create situations, like David and daddy used to say, he’d rather get up in a tree, climb a tree to make somebody believe you’re lying or cheating, than to stand on the ground and win and let them know you did it on your own ability. P: Well, I think we’ve come to the end of this. L: I appreciate it, I really do. It’s been a great opportunity.

PAGE 127

UFLC 75 Page 127 P: Even with all the interruptions, I’ve enjoyed it thoroughly. [End of interview]



PAGE 1

UFLC 75 Fredric Levin July 1, 2002 127 pages – Open Fredric Gerson Levin begins by telling his fam ily history and talks about his family life while growing up in Pensacola, Florida ( pages 1-14). Next he tells how he and all his brothers became Gators, and about his time at t he University of Florida as an undergrad (pages 14-24). He briefly mentions the illne ss and death of his brother Martin, and talks about his time in law school at UF, mentioni ng his relationship with George Stark (pages 25-31). He then tells how his brother David and Reuben Askew began a firm together, and then how he joined the firm and found the direction of his law career doing personal injury cases (pages 31-36). Mr. Levin next discusses the expansion of the firm and moving from place to place (pages 36-37). He talks about his growing r eputation as a successful lawyer and his stand against segregation within the Society of the Bar, as well as his own defeat during an election for the Bar Association (pages 37-39). Mr. Levin talks about his relationship with Fred Vigodsky, getting into the restaurant business, and later, the dress business ( pages 40-43). He again talks about his growing reputation as a successful lawyer and some of his high profile cases, as well as his part in getting Reuben Askew elected (pages 43-45) He talks about working with Charlie Ruttenberg and Fred Fisher on the Orange Stat e Life Insurance business (pages 45-46). He then talks about becoming Demp sey Barron’s lawyer and defending W.D. Childers (pages 46-37). He talks about forming BLAB television in 1984-1985, and being considered a big shot in politics (pages 47-50). Mr. Levin mentions different members of t he law firm and the growth and prestige it was experiencing in the mid 1980s, as well as the moves the firm made (pages 50-52). Next he talks about becoming the defense lawyer of Gulf Power, and the suicide of Jake Horton (pages 52-55). He goes on to talk about some of his big cases over the years (pages 55-62). Mr. Levin discusses his entrance into the in surance industry with the Orange State Life Insurance Company in Largo, Florida ( pages 62-63). He goes into his work and involvement with the tobacco settlement in Florida [1993-1998] (pages 63-71). He talks briefly about the fen-phen and chloro mycetin drug cases (pages 71-75). Mr. Levin discusses his contributions to the University of Florida and the naming of the law school after him (pages 75-89). He tells about the two instances of censure he received from the Bar in the 1980s, as well as the criticisms from other lawyers (pages 81-84). He refutes the idea that so many people were against naming the law school after him for anti-Semitic reasons, but assigns it to pure jealousy (pages 89-91). He then goes on to talk about some of his other philanthropic activities (pages 92-97).

PAGE 2

Mr. Levin talks about the penthouse he bought and the purchase of his own home (pages 97-99). He then talks about the death of his father during Hurricane Opal in 1995 and the impact it had on the family (pages 99-101). Once again he mentions the beginnings of BLAB television and the radio station in Pensacola, Florida (pages 101-103). Mr. Levin talks about representing Roy Jones Jr., and how the relationship eventually led to representing Ike Quartey and a nominat ion to become a chief in the country of Ghana (pages 103-113). He discusses some of his strengths and weaknesses (pages 113-114, 116-119). He talks about being involved with the computer program for cops, SmartCOP (pages 114-115). Mr. Levin discusses his family and gives a li ttle personal information about each of his kids (pages 119-121). Next he talks about himself and his interests, then goes on to discuss the role he has played in politics both locally and at the state level (pages 121-126). He talks about the event he a rranged in Pensacola which brought in Mohammed Ali, Roy Jones Jr., and Governor Chiles to speak to highschool seniors about tolerance of others (pages 126-127). He concludes by discussing his relationship with his father, stating it as one of the r easons he allows himself to be viewed as a cheat although his life refutes the accusation (page 127).


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E20090919_AAAAHJ INGEST_TIME 2009-09-19T15:46:19Z PACKAGE UF00006390_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES
FILE SIZE 122935 DFID F20090919_AABQYS ORIGIN DEPOSITOR PATH UFLC75_Page_081.jpg GLOBAL FALSE PRESERVATION BIT MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM MD5 8f7ec55d13efb7b846dd9d265a0d3d20SHA-1 71650dee699ffd6e839051b1ddd90952c8666de2
82797 F20090919_AABRFB UFLC75_Page_117.jp2 f5a34456fbeb7b3a6e506e7fed0df15cdfe6f7210b36b4e59a2fd92173ebe38dd012f990
90362 F20090919_AABREN UFLC75_Page_103.jp2 b95c9f398a5efdedcf103684443f4104a5f40ea237dee4f9321be0b07420cb5437a78da7
58943 F20090919_AABQZH UFLC75_Page_096.jpg 4cbd0c0379ba7c2204b380731f2487efe70ede8c48a8b420a951e1b9ef686c37a735f681
78041 F20090919_AABRDY UFLC75_Page_088.jp2 1997caf74a50d5721c96864c135f1f8ed4639cc159363c1b2380abb3dcb37b61625b9f9a
83891 F20090919_AABQYT UFLC75_Page_082.jpg 003c89f3fb1fde768b3ac69f353737f49c7beb3fae8942eba60df55d0cdff5916dd9588f
126756 F20090919_AABRFC UFLC75_Page_118.jp2 fc9f67d889ab0bb9b9ddb9689c28a5b0c5cbe3947eba52e97ea0ef36784b6fd779c25a09
87701 F20090919_AABREO UFLC75_Page_104.jp2 162e382207d65f5a717503228d387b51cb7c15af47baa721fbef25f408e61c14dce27571
59454 F20090919_AABQZI UFLC75_Page_097.jpg db16efe2bd38cf5638350faf182cc280e1129d69fb7958ff82416adee460cc178b3c7747
75898 F20090919_AABRDZ UFLC75_Page_089.jp2 2959453e375501c6a260da2aa31bbadd9203db15a14ae5d5770ef6217de3f417b52c1f56
57178 F20090919_AABQYU UFLC75_Page_083.jpg df46bc9cf82de40c2a8dfde2caa61e47039abafbb4286b20ead4ad53f9a6453225edfef5
124630 F20090919_AABRFD UFLC75_Page_119.jp2 c31fb05a596258f992f9547d5690286da912bce40ca7ccf85263898638f7a3c5637cde9d
88258 F20090919_AABREP UFLC75_Page_105.jp2 bf8f6f649189cebea6c9d60b1a9b43bf7efcac4d39cd8cfe8694b15597980fbde004d7e2
81556 F20090919_AABQYV UFLC75_Page_084.jpg 89795e3bff3ec0d4004a6ef63a268c51fe2d57ec3ee10eb9c3f266517e93fd5f476b0dbf
148618 F20090919_AABRFE UFLC75_Page_120.jp2 30fef1211f759a10f7ce983159f388ee131cdf6fa0274be16909053eb036210dd0b01e34
88045 F20090919_AABREQ UFLC75_Page_106.jp2 7cbf8e8eef65e64ea3520c472db4501912429e0a137bad09eeb1ed1b4df7c56fd4701662
60845 F20090919_AABQZJ UFLC75_Page_098.jpg b00185916295272ea4e79382382b49fe0c3efe90c54b33e88581fb5ba6c7ec0103fb9760
74116 F20090919_AABQYW UFLC75_Page_085.jpg 98eac5eb047f3f6cf54db4ab1d4b5991277135d0cedc703460e0dffdad8ba85139cbf5a9
30503 F20090919_AABRFF UFLC75_Page_121.jp2 dc44d41cd260fedf28911599546a6c6c1115ac517ce7a99081bc1140f9dbfd9c2b4d9fd7
70728 F20090919_AABRER UFLC75_Page_107.jp2 4d673cd25aa1614cb18a212086c99f707f3ce8fbcbba22dbd9ff16684ab738e5216f1a08
74093 F20090919_AABQZK UFLC75_Page_099.jpg a2210af026159ef605417e7152ba294fc64a886e68eb564c573f6f05280ccb13106507dc
52874 F20090919_AABQYX UFLC75_Page_086.jpg 471f46b8de79979b57646b583f9c77a163710ab974ac6f0cf92abfe276fb55b2986b5e29
53677 F20090919_AABRFG UFLC75_Page_122.jp2 a1b8b5994b936e8c59b35d04e7d03030da326e0352d1eff0b621894befa71eee8aed6c49
83027 F20090919_AABRES UFLC75_Page_108.jp2 7e42f66aae39cb7b173a4d2b766c258041eb6106e6317e7ee41e5986564618d9392cbd6e
42124 F20090919_AABQZL UFLC75_Page_100.jpg 1166548b727707b52b008c7b82b1536af1f61538552b8fd1afbeafa1aee874c7ad471fcc
54464 F20090919_AABQYY UFLC75_Page_087.jpg 62f2849c543246ace02786ed1bd5a78e6eac01216bea2db9a39337c174dd6abf7cb432d8
100374 F20090919_AABRFH UFLC75_Page_123.jp2 85b7868745a09d994d972cdbf6e751bbf736a037c7d53f6e912d7ea619712e5eda504f1e
59575 F20090919_AABQZM UFLC75_Page_101.jpg 5919312cf7d9970f8a63206617e6c0475b6f5075d68ff2b6c0b0dbfd835b782204beec53
54909 F20090919_AABQYZ UFLC75_Page_088.jpg f443a5d14932c36ac7c08aa1c06d49276391a3f8ae5c8a365ef229359692c602a12892c9
62236 F20090919_AABRFI UFLC75_Page_124.jp2 48ac8625e8225141bd8c559404ec7255158fcfb2813d3d9feaf2e6d7f85136df23ef6e18
85538 F20090919_AABRET UFLC75_Page_109.jp2 bec0cf2c68fa651acea544cd8670ffb9a895bc328dd92782f1dc54ade7414258424284f2
65892 F20090919_AABQZN UFLC75_Page_102.jpg 7b5672620816594fb1444c5712c5e8069895dfa54bc7053b373894d9f5cfd2653c263d53
83531 F20090919_AABRFJ UFLC75_Page_125.jp2 f61d2846f600225a013f6b63ea54e09064f28a056c5bb87a0cb6d8e57136e5d73eca917c
86607 F20090919_AABREU UFLC75_Page_110.jp2 51357dd80c3db053af32f4b49ac6b4bb8b569df6c074c1763c7b18a9e89bf07b98fe3ae9
63414 F20090919_AABQZO UFLC75_Page_103.jpg cfa9afd3f7a5ed8555c5c4f453b4891a2c33a8131b1731e1314015c4490a4dbace3ffb39
129414 F20090919_AABRFK UFLC75_Page_126.jp2 b2cca48e2829c7de7dae452e48e2359c99e7e3f3a4042c8f1adfd40ccb40dccc0d2ad251
69777 F20090919_AABREV UFLC75_Page_111.jp2 20e5035ee8ce3c4b62868cd3fcb9f5cf6def9798c6d483bfd73295935d63ce774b7b86b9
59871 F20090919_AABQZP UFLC75_Page_104.jpg 555e4601e293f811cfea4befb9eea4de05cd3e849009e6110e06a71bc49ddfb885966d82
9012 F20090919_AABRFL UFLC75_Page_127.jp2 c9ab4ff25dad74e84e05ddea72a1e7e41a74e25bdbe1bf6665b6e7916ac4c39a56909f21
90196 F20090919_AABREW UFLC75_Page_112.jp2 9a36ff6ab96525c8eed1d4f0416c53339a5d211b2ec3b4cbed86105909212d1cb7650bd2
59051 F20090919_AABQZQ UFLC75_Page_105.jpg 42dfe41de181232d05056e5068f3cf449b903b4aed802d276386bf297883b5dfa96dc308
152089 F20090919_AABRFM UFLC75summary_Page_1.jp2 adbcd5e8324c7dbe836350a1d6e725e2afb6803a176a2e16000ac9c0cc589e8781326815
111841 F20090919_AABREX UFLC75_Page_113.jp2 faf9b31c6e46db50cb77821c500585c2d274f09ea878ae122e934c0220d88a180c48a1e2
59648 F20090919_AABQZR UFLC75_Page_106.jpg 542a454bf18410ea37871b87e1d972d6aabb1345a3430ee9364d592806a2eb07354b15ef
1053954 F20090919_AABRGA UFLC75_Page_013.tif f8e6160bfb3115facbe4a6c8568bd4cce18fc48315803fa455457d8f9d2160352cd2f408
74433 F20090919_AABRFN UFLC75summary_Page_2.jp2 f31e75ee47686c0f5c7ed6f4a9b1124eb778889222520c631805d3f392749ef0bffec0fb
165727 F20090919_AABREY UFLC75_Page_114.jp2 a0acbfed7e4ca21c2941a739e943fae5d21f4cbd82b5c58296a7e6f3fa6ba25551686852
50743 F20090919_AABQZS UFLC75_Page_107.jpg 66eacd44c3cc5000fd4535513bb43aa90b18848d75c6860158452d7a68f1ba74d787e48b
F20090919_AABRGB UFLC75_Page_014.tif 88c9a702d26e083f479a21576d1f56b92e550ee68a7bca2003ad71c74227beb05e8f76f4
F20090919_AABRFO UFLC75_Page_001.tif cb0735c5470ecc7efbaf441a9db931bd70f3150e2766427acc5d1b314e360576a8eb8797
76338 F20090919_AABREZ UFLC75_Page_115.jp2 91934c0078b109eda998241bfc513dc28e525fd53099927d7caf08ef3c8e76b8ae06daeb
56681 F20090919_AABQZT UFLC75_Page_108.jpg 6c7c921708173d0fbd98d5d88ac68cacf9cfdac38e379ae7e7089821a317eeb014b1f011
F20090919_AABRGC UFLC75_Page_015.tif f9e52a7d3ccabea2ede8e38181950604ef1a7585fc085f283aa0df4f2394bb31715d2159
F20090919_AABRFP UFLC75_Page_002.tif d107bfa6eb2d2f8f78aa7f7a5378ec99cd1e30500f27eb106a987945abab0c0cb022600b
59433 F20090919_AABQZU UFLC75_Page_109.jpg 0c02e4c3c63c3388082386b6a1532abec3caf83f390648f21c0fa46b2cae5088be6fc2e6
F20090919_AABRGD UFLC75_Page_016.tif 791f47425eede7cc355cf2131376665643c77749c651faad6ec83de5a8d0f73d7ef2874d
F20090919_AABRFQ UFLC75_Page_003.tif 26e9ab619713fffcd9e15a504680e0f76d2caf40fc3fe53e898b2a541886d8f7b823a7f1
59927 F20090919_AABQZV UFLC75_Page_110.jpg 004bdf1fdfb9442bc19276eb5439fe5116ecf101b91d1e858b97d65c9ce4902ddcf877bb
F20090919_AABRGE UFLC75_Page_017.tif a86315ce81ed92781187b976eb04ab9bde96140f8d96e16f7ab9102420fc4639da1e8dbe
F20090919_AABRFR UFLC75_Page_004.tif ea84241c3f530196abf4f20987aee2203a64e723a2e0c7d09207ac0895e8196e663ba562
48890 F20090919_AABQZW UFLC75_Page_111.jpg 09b624f11027a2a6b8a4c011bf324bb4395e1cb943025dd68478f27d42604638b33e47b1
F20090919_AABRGF UFLC75_Page_018.tif b6970217c10684d3912509c10d65197acffa2d1d0ff8e07da2b3f90a7689f71cad13dd16
F20090919_AABRFS UFLC75_Page_005.tif c86063136c38dd71464bcb3323bc8934778f37d1a75592deb0432004c116848937732c79
63077 F20090919_AABQZX UFLC75_Page_112.jpg e7785cf11a78323281bdd4ae056e40f62d31eaffae6aed6c565420d7682a1be076c1a9b4
F20090919_AABRGG UFLC75_Page_019.tif d82d5f9068fe4b459faace78a0d01bbf6f815283deaf692b0a6359f202594a14e3a051bf
F20090919_AABRFT UFLC75_Page_006.tif cdf247ca3a232f9db3ee5e871a3e044da6b0578e3c9aa967f5b0ca0c88a41d99b702eaca
75099 F20090919_AABQZY UFLC75_Page_113.jpg f94b8639ca929362c2e3db3d25d230a935aab4a26a73937ac226b448798fd3d56168c616
F20090919_AABRGH UFLC75_Page_020.tif 0e683b02479fd4640c7ef553f9036ee4fc16738de271aaa0a1f29bb69db037522754e5f0
112245 F20090919_AABQZZ UFLC75_Page_114.jpg 1a03462bde474698b03c38fff4b8ad957e3f4730e27db20f7fe5854265e0fb5c53a59bd4
F20090919_AABRGI UFLC75_Page_021.tif 995ede02b5116c7faca7287259b5cfe99871d292fee2faeccee6b65436fa296bfad1ff4e
F20090919_AABRFU UFLC75_Page_007.tif c2ed8f93038e85681ac0769cc8b029861a07da79db1422d749a48e87f88819ef77e07cc1
F20090919_AABRGJ UFLC75_Page_022.tif a1c1cea08b06550e5b378d59e765eb06901374b74ab96d9b87656d75f42c49c266e5e13e
F20090919_AABRFV UFLC75_Page_008.tif 0a91d7f1a5cb9e65523029bc43ea66d196c3c99c992ffcb8cb97ccd21f48112b2b679bc6
F20090919_AABRGK UFLC75_Page_023.tif afd2639a42f0aaff2b2adf7b1b4c05f2133afc6c380eea304943b9f72b12b66459f1d4ce
F20090919_AABRFW UFLC75_Page_009.tif 6ee71eea903b85aff20b26a254a9eb90c76145054ace1fa13f5d851e8d2349e79ef533a0
F20090919_AABRGL UFLC75_Page_024.tif 2915da09309dca38d0ea9d737812d16027811411b3ef69f3b6e9e8491605c055f12fb0dc
F20090919_AABRFX UFLC75_Page_010.tif bc9a99cd652690d2209bb112fca8af1d86072ae7ffc27b44a3fbcdced8f4490fbea398aa
F20090919_AABRHA UFLC75_Page_039.tif 5c46c45bff01027c0cb893b7166d32bdf63e6db6a2bf825f98843d67f4eb345b98e58d29
F20090919_AABRGM UFLC75_Page_025.tif a9268524622468ca7aced692d984714ec53d490ee21ca779319560227572445a18de1463
F20090919_AABRFY UFLC75_Page_011.tif a2cb813e0783912d6742472b2d0610d2e7e3d5336091918d9ced3f17662851cacf40df43
F20090919_AABRHB UFLC75_Page_040.tif 897d9612547285c3153295eb1435c5817eb42a4d0b69416bb47d66ee7c39e276bf9a276b
F20090919_AABRGN UFLC75_Page_026.tif 54a0b2d74e52077cdfb7a7ae4c347d603bf394194868cba28b36e7aa60db7936406a2d59
F20090919_AABRFZ UFLC75_Page_012.tif bac1e9e076bd361598f2b0d8d605440de849b3a86049acb54ef57efbb5c0b72e667d00b2
F20090919_AABRHC UFLC75_Page_041.tif d5825daafe54a8d2039f2c7d1f9dc3e1cd5549eb17979ac932e948f995ae11ae29fc8337
F20090919_AABRGO UFLC75_Page_027.tif 56a95219f189445292a96267d7c4b6bf4f0c4d408ee7deef33ac3685471738908685ccf7
F20090919_AABRHD UFLC75_Page_042.tif c378a79baa787fe52692b324787de13d584828857c6942c2f9b7180ac4f8f65d323637dd
F20090919_AABRGP UFLC75_Page_028.tif 4ce5d723c5282d884878aebea038c51cf38b3a2b0877b65db9ff15841d8c85b067d6de6b
F20090919_AABRHE UFLC75_Page_043.tif 38a82a59893880ace47c309fd4ab59110c47efe3e498b484a68e5a0eb1f27544f19859f8
F20090919_AABRGQ UFLC75_Page_029.tif 509f1821391123a1ea819077bc1d7933d88c44a24badcd20c31e64383b08d5e5ca8c2166
F20090919_AABRHF UFLC75_Page_044.tif d0d3f2b9946e76f812c78f2726b0bddc684faec317227dbd766c4b7badce31a1c404a966
F20090919_AABRGR UFLC75_Page_030.tif 26a7aa36528c7e40373d792e62b8a6e8ef431c273b8bfe61615ddd3504afe95c96e64438
F20090919_AABRHG UFLC75_Page_045.tif e75bb5e3fb98529ecc5a7cbca78f1df1f574ad583aa90e7ec64a68022b22d16f4801d8ec
F20090919_AABRGS UFLC75_Page_031.tif 3063367a1f4a64902e4bc2a25f9e52fe6f03eec9ca28856891906e104984185f60097318
F20090919_AABRHH UFLC75_Page_046.tif d79eac87fffeb9447dbeec2dd56e0e915ddac1c9894bc7a825ce79c765a301a3edd0cca5
F20090919_AABRGT UFLC75_Page_032.tif d0588e8a406d23e6db4f256a0dc795702f549a8e2dfeba58feb5085ce6d40e04e9029ab0
F20090919_AABRHI UFLC75_Page_047.tif 4bca1286f9b9f7acc9121790d00a008a7be98633940b7f7984f295c2f427d87238ad68da
F20090919_AABRGU UFLC75_Page_033.tif 7395e783b60787fba3b47911d27b3903dfaf677172bc60310c0bc68a97fc2fd064744d7b
F20090919_AABRHJ UFLC75_Page_048.tif 569d188dfecc7c3da1840318e477b5f0343cb36cf5e020a72bfa50f8d615e308b5ed2b08
F20090919_AABRHK UFLC75_Page_049.tif 8ecfb50bfbc56c6ded589bb6c8926dd978208a57d0778ec3f9176ecbb875946ce2822584
F20090919_AABRGV UFLC75_Page_034.tif 04d3027f104a51ea5b6e1b83370fd34b16a431448f4823699e35e9eb00949ae533a8e929
F20090919_AABRHL UFLC75_Page_050.tif 3e3e243172bf78ea3bb50486e6fcc20958f88c75a1a89e97f5bfec3de084a8ed021a8716
F20090919_AABRGW UFLC75_Page_035.tif a7d795fdca2c56e38cbcd48b50ec6745d2d6881bc561f0f1d8273d87bc9e292a12f09b97
F20090919_AABRIA UFLC75_Page_065.tif df32eba34e3218318b2791efc383aa7fb407c6957aa96318cca445de9dd5b63e6017f7cc
F20090919_AABRHM UFLC75_Page_051.tif ef2987416916168f968b64d7374c105acb725d715d24dbeb0892358dce568367d42908e9
F20090919_AABRGX UFLC75_Page_036.tif 5524e319635ad46b35340a10562901a7e901c2dde877885190b8231ac3e784cfc3acb054
F20090919_AABRIB UFLC75_Page_066.tif f214e5dabcdddd7370acb185d9a65b29b9429e0419cf966a874f5a8a1569c618ff882e31
F20090919_AABRHN UFLC75_Page_052.tif 0bb6bffc6b006ff07470d4db184bb7356c7d172c5f806495cff293c53fba9c4ae5f546ea
F20090919_AABRGY UFLC75_Page_037.tif a910a24b21e9c17c7405c3996dca951622b39b8162f47c3b58a826c198c82fd70c39658d
F20090919_AABRIC UFLC75_Page_067.tif 6eb457efcceaeca190accbfcb281b681f9e133ad909da2dbc3a98f2e607b47f222ff36ca
F20090919_AABRHO UFLC75_Page_053.tif b5be1be104538222bf41b59f57c49eeecbb67651dbfbf992081a83e76085a0de7b7ebb09
F20090919_AABRGZ UFLC75_Page_038.tif 912bd38495d6820c28a6d09aed85291347b44520c32fa782b6d9ca407a364282925451d3
F20090919_AABRID UFLC75_Page_068.tif 29875aea79c763d98a221312eca22dc3a8f179ebd2264cf57c4985612e86850a31645443
F20090919_AABRHP UFLC75_Page_054.tif b742dffee94e9d09f9e4426fc10d880b217b555d30b074e28c87d3bb241f2f0c67cbb6ce
F20090919_AABRIE UFLC75_Page_069.tif 532f6b15d77275449f18984ac854c814cf88ba351d176a709fa79046a8b199dd7b5d949b
F20090919_AABRHQ UFLC75_Page_055.tif 07d6401f62cbd98ed5cbd793e84106ac1faf66437fd2fe6668d0702419939a36cc5f1c85
F20090919_AABRIF UFLC75_Page_070.tif 10611615a0c622c64638bdb081712760b8f5e66ef75bdb81ccdefb27b018e4e809d6f0ce
F20090919_AABRHR UFLC75_Page_056.tif 57bb6d27e543878cff0017cca117efc6db07a04be525ffc2e49766661c5f129e8bc7534a
F20090919_AABRIG UFLC75_Page_071.tif 07d9468040fc8df8588ebe500dffe2e766a5fbfed1a03851b4e666c7e21d828e5d5da2f7
F20090919_AABRHS UFLC75_Page_057.tif 386f8a92d54135e2d4ba2e3c13e9fa2b0027b07b0b173650f843a80d1810677c45673f1b
F20090919_AABRIH UFLC75_Page_072.tif ec32491916185161ed66ea84a8ed06aebe0a29144a9d1486e90d02a928ff8bc2699d4bff
F20090919_AABRHT UFLC75_Page_058.tif 0fc181d76576c79754336ecf18ccc1cac96d755cd235c321e1fbc46c13db60cdcc15cc3f
F20090919_AABRII UFLC75_Page_073.tif 92449c6458fee7fe015ba1d48a56fb358ca13999cac0656bc49fefec12121b008dc522e4
F20090919_AABRHU UFLC75_Page_059.tif 5e8085dbcdb6f62b0277c670a68ca18c2d020ace9cbfa0085f22cab047c1e8b9a67d297d
F20090919_AABRIJ UFLC75_Page_074.tif 3f45201f45ddeb421541b8e42ebba87f01511a9e56fc3fc64360b7fef63b22a1a688ca96
F20090919_AABRHV UFLC75_Page_060.tif 684802125f2f4d8ad671c13dd1b0689480c1c93f1bda2d76fa4335830fd8f2e6ecd9e57d
F20090919_AABRIK UFLC75_Page_075.tif 6930b86b2bf4a812703871dfa6e5fb66ba82f4a9c034551242bc8e0f136e5866b2e64a17
F20090919_AABRIL UFLC75_Page_076.tif 32574bfd1d31b20bb1fdc0a46fcf8eced8bf50f89b36d6f1478ce56388420a3eb5c8dc7a
F20090919_AABRHW UFLC75_Page_061.tif c72481d15cdc54b3d8ed137f009422fe62411e3966047928995fc757517e43bfc7b2f645
F20090919_AABRIM UFLC75_Page_077.tif 2dfb22550d97cc73758e733f8aef2169f196fa61865bafc523019f21b73af8e06afa66bd
F20090919_AABRHX UFLC75_Page_062.tif a78fe242f561d85666bb8cef77c6ec57ebb8c6c975cf9e64a592d69432201d9033c3583c
F20090919_AABRJA UFLC75_Page_091.tif 2ad460da93a60d33b4a4017f0e3ba8a4d5e700b3eb0c103b912f802ebecd51f92ce4c70d
F20090919_AABRIN UFLC75_Page_078.tif 6f1c695565c600b003a1e359754451b8be5a0a664585f26c7c6db7271f48a94d70f22411
F20090919_AABRHY UFLC75_Page_063.tif f6241b47db8f0b10195996adf7fab3a4f2387004244de6e3777b4a1d3055e91904c9ef0a
F20090919_AABRJB UFLC75_Page_092.tif 1ae485be584e6df081cb99d3ecc9681d3886e3c47b1b76f9e907ab33aa4d126077ef6f19
F20090919_AABRIO UFLC75_Page_079.tif 817f327a026ea1875029964b2f34c99afe77ca9b7029c16d534bf9bc529c14b743971b4a
F20090919_AABRHZ UFLC75_Page_064.tif 2f83cf1fd26872f28ef70cea55c15856701d98166ce17605526175aa05f1325b12784d84
F20090919_AABRJC UFLC75_Page_093.tif 79048d7ae31c572996a88092cfd3c75e4aa6b5c47eb63d17d07afd953f399c3ea4aeb613
F20090919_AABRIP UFLC75_Page_080.tif e3e49ab262b9d657c06b9b71ed4bff1f638d3cc70125de77877160372312a95da77c99bd
F20090919_AABRJD UFLC75_Page_094.tif 65881a5f6e26d070f84d0dad88edf0cd59515dd66353f5bb36145b65e8f1298059dacebe
F20090919_AABRJE UFLC75_Page_095.tif 6166ef857c0e64e862b0ed125223b8fb3293d2b8aa4b140d11588cad5d7cee838e8e03cd
F20090919_AABRIQ UFLC75_Page_081.tif 51428a230dccf17d92452dc2eb80edefbc272e08d3d030dd5a8c0b8214cb3bb00373fd34
F20090919_AABRJF UFLC75_Page_096.tif 00a6b0622c96d822ca78080dc358f11a6468db6565df6ec6d2f523cfaa1ecbacae26ef23
F20090919_AABRIR UFLC75_Page_082.tif e2cb00c119c9b209d7ffea9a2f3c3e91fde3fcccc6ed4976a36b08dba7aead0a85b016cb
F20090919_AABRJG UFLC75_Page_097.tif badd439fa902675fd36ca9ab6c17a0c76815f8a7b1d782ddab439d0135a6e0be82eabbbf
F20090919_AABRIS UFLC75_Page_083.tif 982b9d577f49779c2ae9ea6e033c11bfdabdc98b303b7947d33eac092773cea0cd27fb71
F20090919_AABRJH UFLC75_Page_098.tif 4e003760d37da54782fb942cf00901a5d19b658d172f5eb54fc56d8315a5e9d773a27b63
F20090919_AABRIT UFLC75_Page_084.tif d93be7c35e81d6bff1c73ecf0b30ad6dc8915a207db04e970787b1b635b384068f45a992
F20090919_AABRJI UFLC75_Page_099.tif 1219279af51976e63678539c82f435252017f912b171d6d5a89183c4ed8e25d9921c0ba3
F20090919_AABRIU UFLC75_Page_085.tif efc8035843c837599c7032c521b55018f2eebd613f198ee8056f1df9331b94ac25869336
F20090919_AABRJJ UFLC75_Page_100.tif 367e24760247398292be73fae490aa508e1b8bde227460ab773964822d52b6926f3ad009
F20090919_AABRIV UFLC75_Page_086.tif 3c702d632952d452e5f4d4dcb26dfaff9a17b054d4a4c2c7016dd9f89e9772d01cd34618
F20090919_AABRJK UFLC75_Page_101.tif 773fdf35e4ff14783dcd21f0a4d23f931531e91b4542fa5eb591e51b6a776d159ff5dc0b
F20090919_AABRIW UFLC75_Page_087.tif 7d09a1f4825e91bcb249a61e85beeb164f148443b12e7d667ced2875ba1156bfa79f3ce0
F20090919_AABRJL UFLC75_Page_102.tif be6a78d9e6dec0571e39f5aed05ab123dc41c1ac55e82fc2e1909899d14d768ad2975686
F20090919_AABRKA UFLC75_Page_117.tif ab4f9bda928ca95e37d24ba0d799a113ac4aed84811c1036fbf954c28c99113d28682b77
F20090919_AABRJM UFLC75_Page_103.tif ce2131eb039c15d4410d63231aa8677fb634b4b997e55f8a108a9d3daeb13ab0823c0268
F20090919_AABRIX UFLC75_Page_088.tif 90d827ea2916ff1c7685724b95f8929073f2b0bf503017f76cc562ceb84664fc6421a4a5
F20090919_AABRKB UFLC75_Page_118.tif 071fb2b5255d16a3ea112b1ae42bf213aef141340245fb36accb9da819df4acf7a9a789e
F20090919_AABRJN UFLC75_Page_104.tif 3ecd36583e01fef4d71e4e293d72be51c7ffda2b288d30ff081f8003b7a73a44d7fc179b
F20090919_AABRIY UFLC75_Page_089.tif 123b0cfbc1e3492e72f19e9ee331c06eb291ee0e9e27f490a1f911b9f917c27de5cfb208
F20090919_AABRKC UFLC75_Page_119.tif 597b4a874edee081e660928cbd4159c1d55a283883de07bfeb33bb43c78a7931a3d929b4
F20090919_AABRJO UFLC75_Page_105.tif e8f43012192a9b7d94d250031943b66a1f077d8f0f5ff4325ad90f7c50c5d29b1def9361
F20090919_AABRIZ UFLC75_Page_090.tif 71dc6b04544bd92178e8b850e5f1be8ea830b0f821889d7ff12b2b5c3ce2ce8ebb6ef037
F20090919_AABRKD UFLC75_Page_120.tif a227135ea0de3b897805df1a6ea3d76ed44898a108cb12294e08bdf62fcae087f014ca02
F20090919_AABRJP UFLC75_Page_106.tif 7b0116bf38ab24eb8b08be513b8475a5720baca82b07c535589c540ae0fa7c90dbae90bf
F20090919_AABRKE UFLC75_Page_121.tif e03cf2bfe20131dae15434f2655e88d62cb07bd9a6c4fb08158204a876addcbd9c2aca37
F20090919_AABRJQ UFLC75_Page_107.tif 1e7f6388821337d651a271c0352d3a9db68a3fa88995e52bb47e2bf9a103d1db14d1e310
F20090919_AABRKF UFLC75_Page_122.tif 360b5b6a00a60330201efeb9d64dc1de70faecb87e643572ce671fb75d3685c28743a370
F20090919_AABRJR UFLC75_Page_108.tif 077f50eb2239082cf9e785d966f19379c99f5bf57e3dac152c26a2f470aaf14fc37a1a79
F20090919_AABRKG UFLC75_Page_123.tif 70a3c21a7e9e4727039e25f3d3625e0459aaba94c5def3f8d3d77e44fdbad17043ddcc6f
F20090919_AABRJS UFLC75_Page_109.tif 90504f8e77daa8424a27ced83a7d090a229113fad7cc21657181b40c0fdfdf8f0d20a82c
F20090919_AABRKH UFLC75_Page_124.tif 47a9a68b9ad2b6a7b313c6e6d8fa5e4edd4515bc526b423ef67f53487a10a94c19f3f6d5
F20090919_AABRJT UFLC75_Page_110.tif 23ec169ef527b3ae0ddf03caf87ea4b95149faf4b3da08a90c7786a2d6ce84117d4017d1
F20090919_AABRKI UFLC75_Page_125.tif 4b631960e4d6b371446bd47ec8adceb68960172e8598ccd6cb6252029b4998e2d0346d0e
F20090919_AABRJU UFLC75_Page_111.tif 5cd87080d3ee13f4ac92e643b79b4d2c3c0dafe1183fe246a6f793d64199456074630cf6
F20090919_AABRKJ UFLC75_Page_126.tif 24f35d9e4be06e42ba29354940d30a44b6b66bef092ab6cac10862762ffac3c850c2347d
F20090919_AABRJV UFLC75_Page_112.tif 53951ac8e99509953be22cc7637ffc81d5faba484f53025d1bb5df22fdcb1569864fe1b1
F20090919_AABRKK UFLC75_Page_127.tif 7c02c5699ab0a58951fec734714de1b94a81dee6d35cd0dc2d3f663a7d7d60cc5061c5a1
F20090919_AABRJW UFLC75_Page_113.tif 32f5815bfbeb6cd3fcd77161007a048e611541c49632542513e05effa7bb2bf0f34ff2e0
F20090919_AABRKL UFLC75summary_Page_1.tif bb4fe5b85e8527c2f1d78a103a49761d6ad5d19e6c237d0373034b1e6d0a32e465776566
F20090919_AABRJX UFLC75_Page_114.tif 120fe374801f2146c0f8852810c66678358c2da22d256d0492810ebfe7309746c0992eae
F20090919_AABRKM UFLC75summary_Page_2.tif 071816d17f5f5e7a7b5eecad75f87ddfb21bf40fcb91d2368172059d431c875064c4d4fa
45598 F20090919_AABRLA UFLC75_Page_014.pro 5344b854e7d19261562e5007a4b84dfc8cfd9ad22cd23d9ac676f123b9e5dd2805354dedWARNING CODE M_MIME_TYPE_MISMATCH conflict in mime type metadata
38747 F20090919_AABRKN UFLC75_Page_001.pro 137971a71e94c108c4e96c49584ecc2b79c2f592c248d1aed776136b2d1e392c18624c99conflict in mime type metadata
F20090919_AABRJY UFLC75_Page_115.tif 0e67c0185d67d426edc7c0c1fe8cc10c45dd8b88e3e954dac7ef29c371aeeaf760eb5dac
39465 F20090919_AABRLB UFLC75_Page_015.pro e621ac1feafdb2e6c9dcfbf4aebef8a9a768a9b968ef68f81bc85e98aeb6118de38e301bconflict in mime type metadata
55442 F20090919_AABRKO UFLC75_Page_002.pro abad03f9a0cfc238de0510c5cacb64e5b820e7d34e2b63b2058cfefb49a7cf5d9ad2c703conflict in mime type metadata
F20090919_AABRJZ UFLC75_Page_116.tif 2b4f3b9a570ad01dffd631433763b3317bab91754a1b01f6105d7c974b6e813ecbd74434
74215 F20090919_AABRLC UFLC75_Page_016.pro 119489efcf676512f089faea45679ab917826e5dfee7fa39920bd47128d3b0e205031f4aconflict in mime type metadata
63927 F20090919_AABRKP UFLC75_Page_003.pro e73fc4925215b709b0fad1d6d5f1a56431dee89caac2a776ba378a98a79b8c9e31411316conflict in mime type metadata
81624 F20090919_AABRLD UFLC75_Page_017.pro ca3457c5fc6ec310c61cf628c95c22e673eb1e9f43e8d8086d3978d9c0d2988623300320conflict in mime type metadata
64378 F20090919_AABRKQ UFLC75_Page_004.pro d38417db206deace1a0525d9838d5d17fcdea5004d6bfe217c97fd7f3cacf5260434bf08conflict in mime type metadata
56311 F20090919_AABRLE UFLC75_Page_018.pro 2204dba8d41a17feb6393aa19850f591f649c961971afd94c51751dff827dc839655d299conflict in mime type metadata
51970 F20090919_AABRKR UFLC75_Page_005.pro a22a046d3eed0518d368967100db98ceaba311283f42542f4027cb50f615cd11834744c6conflict in mime type metadata
46234 F20090919_AABRLF UFLC75_Page_019.pro 667369516a71ef143ca4a82f2d4670d734c555640d99aedda99b144d5dff2b455d75e130conflict in mime type metadata
50164 F20090919_AABRKS UFLC75_Page_006.pro 37eeba608aec6c04c88fd0e61cfccd23307c6c341877716321a355016cb3a0d069807126conflict in mime type metadata
40654 F20090919_AABRLG UFLC75_Page_020.pro 9de4c97223c17108b82051a9882ef9f9baf5c8b975ca08867a990dc62cba5f784830e76bconflict in mime type metadata
46797 F20090919_AABRKT UFLC75_Page_007.pro 3ca59457158bd513a9d90845296f98859442b10d9dfaa2a89f41e66728a6420898067fafconflict in mime type metadata
71256 F20090919_AABRLH UFLC75_Page_021.pro 50c2db2090afa8c0756c3a756d2fbb8194e3f82277c5b1250a8e4bb70650583959feb74cconflict in mime type metadata
49674 F20090919_AABRKU UFLC75_Page_008.pro f532aebf28717f1901f0fc481579b2d0d342b5422c49f13b29b46c6bd31dc7a4336196caconflict in mime type metadata
57721 F20090919_AABRLI UFLC75_Page_022.pro 9bd6283928112f70ca84e60122deed694d9ca46e8ca8f0b5626743220b0adc3359720772conflict in mime type metadata
61066 F20090919_AABRKV UFLC75_Page_009.pro 80a782647ad45c9e922742b94078ac0fa657dd7d2090f8f743e2420961b689d423a7faa1conflict in mime type metadata
27903 F20090919_AABRLJ UFLC75_Page_023.pro 5e26311b40c9520d877d069b367790ade6a63ec959617ae613eb736c3ccd2f42c08b7923conflict in mime type metadata
70239 F20090919_AABRKW UFLC75_Page_010.pro 62c393a58873daf44ee64b37a531965df7d7a39058376b60cd1339659d7253821da8b547conflict in mime type metadata
63736 F20090919_AABRLK UFLC75_Page_024.pro 7fd9355f1d2fbc019447e39dc9c7d7b9ea7557ad8ed06c4a715567800e149ad01d1777edconflict in mime type metadata
54885 F20090919_AABRKX UFLC75_Page_011.pro 5c7f88607e3a0c93d1c0d069046361db4e65de2aa4c110fa064ae3c4c8651eea2f509ee6conflict in mime type metadata
74230 F20090919_AABRLL UFLC75_Page_025.pro 296cd51c453b094df209c25d23e6c9901304cc30a6dfed2e8df82998bf9328a310eddb25conflict in mime type metadata
61952 F20090919_AABRKY UFLC75_Page_012.pro 2605436581f493e1ae9bc273b2e25610e0220c1c16cddf96ab0366b4165da059214645d9conflict in mime type metadata
39064 F20090919_AABRMA UFLC75_Page_040.pro 87782f26bd524296deefb61c112a3f7c212ead751c6bd24b2affe0d1cd361294e65fba5bconflict in mime type metadata
77991 F20090919_AABRLM UFLC75_Page_026.pro 0c0da6dd07ad4c9c74c830ae5e656fd785840515d3314e202218c8bce5b2e413cb328b97conflict in mime type metadata
72083 F20090919_AABRMB UFLC75_Page_041.pro 8182c97281d54dc87debadd4cc88c2c407ed1e218fcd9482b351ec0524679e87f788f10aconflict in mime type metadata
78379 F20090919_AABRLN UFLC75_Page_027.pro 6b0baa7a2fa9769c030bf20fb3849e30121b0a915071c07090cf30207a7769100efb1db2conflict in mime type metadata
55609 F20090919_AABRKZ UFLC75_Page_013.pro 24d38276aaa4a3716276ec0993a8c788d94b23a6fba66cdddad18916d6025dbb195e31aaconflict in mime type metadata
56602 F20090919_AABRMC UFLC75_Page_042.pro c20fd0857272c40efc1a21d4197dbb33d44adc65870a579b88d945bc301e656b87d5fa6dconflict in mime type metadata
76779 F20090919_AABRLO UFLC75_Page_028.pro 24f8e7496a398526934a22254e8c4c727d7d0947ebb93bb165400d29b5703a270da55dabconflict in mime type metadata
61337 F20090919_AABRMD UFLC75_Page_043.pro a5d1a5af57748504f8c272db0c2b3cb2b381e18fd57088866d7cf2ace2fffd5e415b6a84conflict in mime type metadata
58722 F20090919_AABRLP UFLC75_Page_029.pro 569ab5b1b0ad93170bd20670331cf4756b8a387a8536761d722a532cdec319c78faf77ceconflict in mime type metadata
77421 F20090919_AABRME UFLC75_Page_044.pro c0f36f86756e67a1f4becbc098fbeb903b79e557a0e330bf122a3c6e765a1e0071d8ea71conflict in mime type metadata
61571 F20090919_AABRLQ UFLC75_Page_030.pro bb152efbbad01dca2daad673cd71235a7c27c46ea636f7a974a2ff1931c5bbd44c337628conflict in mime type metadata
48952 F20090919_AABRMF UFLC75_Page_045.pro 01c752782796afca7496393c92c9499794604d5f097ed1dab47b8f9118559a912ebaa473conflict in mime type metadata
75436 F20090919_AABRLR UFLC75_Page_031.pro 4849de9f6dde93a38c37a671611e80f9888fce05a70431d5c5fd967ee84a9f2aa9cb0a79conflict in mime type metadata
38014 F20090919_AABRMG UFLC75_Page_046.pro 8ea1853c8742f87cea73debbfe1366e2b7352f9ee31ae064fbbf7b88ca955af9d9b23808conflict in mime type metadata
35887 F20090919_AABRLS UFLC75_Page_032.pro ca66f80c54a69a3be48c9b277b693f2a19591c8cfcf18e5b280688ce8ed4f06552cf7d91conflict in mime type metadata
78354 F20090919_AABRMH UFLC75_Page_047.pro c4f9d7f2c861cf923427a8ef564d67f60273895a2f794419a1aadd6522fe23bd36b8b3bcconflict in mime type metadata
38279 F20090919_AABRLT UFLC75_Page_033.pro 13991c78e440ad106d8975602ea62ea65128d853ec83e39eb9374992415a9da6dcdda48dconflict in mime type metadata
48269 F20090919_AABRMI UFLC75_Page_048.pro 140291ebfd941ee32ff9f1e13b4c5cb1f3190bd3f62331baeef5c985814871eef0b46222conflict in mime type metadata
60609 F20090919_AABRLU UFLC75_Page_034.pro ef75a516caf5ac5a6adfa2346ebc5f82f23893b137e4d8972bd15f85895a3703335422f5conflict in mime type metadata
47166 F20090919_AABRMJ UFLC75_Page_049.pro 60bc299f1984e52750f2908601ab54aeeef7af93caa527ed77cdd9de17d9cc43ecc78682conflict in mime type metadata
72807 F20090919_AABRLV UFLC75_Page_035.pro 02be25b07161992066e4669451ee7f1c127924711a5ccb12672413da6afcad5c16f2975dconflict in mime type metadata
55841 F20090919_AABRMK UFLC75_Page_050.pro b9cfc50378b03d7765cbf8c31ff4600345385aed778d9135d5627da9eb3d9807ebd685afconflict in mime type metadata
47380 F20090919_AABRLW UFLC75_Page_036.pro e49257285173af5722b25ad84f7dc534f7c8c13a5277dea470b3296ba916c885846903edconflict in mime type metadata
41526 F20090919_AABRML UFLC75_Page_051.pro 24091f796659363a58ce1d5e7c04a37819c8594fcb5f0b1a978e524b4bd579721f2a780cconflict in mime type metadata
68522 F20090919_AABRLX UFLC75_Page_037.pro 485d259474d3760152a8e65494d0d34114e9bbebcca13fcb34e1869c62a0e5972514afb2conflict in mime type metadata
46617 F20090919_AABRNA UFLC75_Page_066.pro 24117a1aba60d54eab022187024d7e1921248ee0ec782511fc6ba39e296593ef152e4388conflict in mime type metadata
28200 F20090919_AABRMM UFLC75_Page_052.pro bbe13da34a5e8f0b1122a9ac7e0878778addd3f895501becc00e049f83238a136ab1a5b6conflict in mime type metadata
60833 F20090919_AABRLY UFLC75_Page_038.pro 5d44a966f92c8674d6c384219292adc8a3dd82b59a7ac91796a55aeb985f58b3b4e8834bconflict in mime type metadata
64383 F20090919_AABRNB UFLC75_Page_067.pro 3ada205e6eec71c1f3f8d16024e2238fe8fde10ee8efad2ae2a6e8226583fa8aded5569dconflict in mime type metadata
79453 F20090919_AABRMN UFLC75_Page_053.pro 779a66e08a21392dc85ec214816f0d0ef852ccc1cf3373130a884684907f1c38df44c055conflict in mime type metadata
76508 F20090919_AABRLZ UFLC75_Page_039.pro 70e48e94993a0d626408e79aef5a8f3645b0bed691b93dc4846fab165ba9c22681bb8c42conflict in mime type metadata
64944 F20090919_AABRNC UFLC75_Page_068.pro 665a560156e9d359fcc5bfad6365c537c26f814e887181eb9e69d66f1d5f6bfac1c3b074conflict in mime type metadata
48392 F20090919_AABRMO UFLC75_Page_054.pro 285afb0dff5afe05424eee79f38ec9904a1ff0d35f4fadf6fcd0a4f56aa85164d7eaeb00conflict in mime type metadata
49945 F20090919_AABRND UFLC75_Page_069.pro 19d8d7a3d5ee5415fb25551c6b0636aa12e5810cbe8158b8609a63e4e2fb634fd224fa89conflict in mime type metadata
40096 F20090919_AABRMP UFLC75_Page_055.pro 5c69f558e95e68d67ae9e6ec4e74c66eb2d5899234f11025b07a3609bd4712940ba389ccconflict in mime type metadata
40025 F20090919_AABRNE UFLC75_Page_070.pro a372df11578a95efd0d8cae78d06bf0f33854af60ec06eba032a607f17e3c64ba0c7f0b1conflict in mime type metadata
26384 F20090919_AABRMQ UFLC75_Page_056.pro 22cfcb1a734474c517ba984ae450c9ba31cddaf5c13e9618c8b492d766e0f2fae0a18e9bconflict in mime type metadata
60216 F20090919_AABRNF UFLC75_Page_071.pro b23a209e4e83929ee151dc71acde6ae3ea6f31ca891729036349ee93148baa9bae630b63conflict in mime type metadata
41225 F20090919_AABRMR UFLC75_Page_057.pro ec5bc68033f6239ff7da183806a5554cdef6c1eda9ae3652582fff13d0c8931fbb1aac89conflict in mime type metadata
26227 F20090919_AABRNG UFLC75_Page_072.pro 627adbd8871c26a358c52822780adcda2752cf4897df65f6b4a0be415262324b687f885fconflict in mime type metadata
54484 F20090919_AABRMS UFLC75_Page_058.pro 0e52f7a460082dd72ba04d2ee0efd0eb04c9114ea9667833e1430961cb31d68358d8354fconflict in mime type metadata
58778 F20090919_AABRNH UFLC75_Page_073.pro ac69c11a9c7f240ee4f2b78652a0aa793c95f823a68e53827d2d749fe3fb5a0f07b5cbe8conflict in mime type metadata
58568 F20090919_AABRMT UFLC75_Page_059.pro dca7b3fb76edde31bbeb697aebd7caba34a8288d17316529f67b1bc2717e365093988a82conflict in mime type metadata
90127 F20090919_AABRNI UFLC75_Page_074.pro a6959cece4af3ec1fa74a03ecc5a97b25f43e2b10368c100797032bde7d7e50da140592aconflict in mime type metadata
43477 F20090919_AABRMU UFLC75_Page_060.pro 9bd86808da9b3016d9ebdd44a71f3f30d7d2b574b39e3fdf3c40b6f679f57c8264ce1c5fconflict in mime type metadata
73219 F20090919_AABRNJ UFLC75_Page_075.pro d5d88774f9087a7404e958484e424b312da2845ac60107a954d366104d5cdcad37244714conflict in mime type metadata
36483 F20090919_AABRMV UFLC75_Page_061.pro 478a87d6edb9fbf9c2a0fd43cf6c7a3c9b694e7decafbcdbc6b102a016816dd7ed17c072conflict in mime type metadata
51429 F20090919_AABRNK UFLC75_Page_076.pro 89f4e63f8aa4d94150df68c13010021d7daa41343789bb2399d6b7e3a8871407bc7e2d08conflict in mime type metadata
53920 F20090919_AABRMW UFLC75_Page_062.pro 4c596c60e72fefb2111cf0f30c09aeeaaa644175d90088581f54ebf34c7e874ebfdb8f09conflict in mime type metadata
73929 F20090919_AABRNL UFLC75_Page_077.pro 5472e7b2ea9f893e84a3bd02123652cae9865290414f2bd5aeec376ffecb1c6a725ee1fdconflict in mime type metadata
38690 F20090919_AABRMX UFLC75_Page_063.pro d3801d677ee42bb34c09ea6f9f77ab44236da0ed6d0dcf86ae61bd75a8ec6685db5fdc28conflict in mime type metadata
45448 F20090919_AABRNM UFLC75_Page_078.pro e0de64ee66d38faa1ea48c6d83bcf41c44a55ad03eaa88bb45857d09af8ebac820621fabconflict in mime type metadata
44416 F20090919_AABRMY UFLC75_Page_064.pro 06ffb8f1d95cff7cf9a9d4ef15a7820342a9af7a79f004740343fc5653e15ae17345533fconflict in mime type metadata
32904 F20090919_AABROA UFLC75_Page_092.pro 4eb592024d75cad0876bc0158a6938a00a7a128aa6101582e8349ab6afb7a118e28bdf33conflict in mime type metadata
78054 F20090919_AABRMZ UFLC75_Page_065.pro 12066de08642a37a9eab758de635b61242213b29eef36758d937bb27062ea9821040f26fconflict in mime type metadata
38452 F20090919_AABROB UFLC75_Page_093.pro 6495537ffba614c0083e57242720b3b73f768dcc2e2528ccfd64ec0abb31cd3826186857conflict in mime type metadata
45884 F20090919_AABRNN UFLC75_Page_079.pro dcb521bb02a3f59ac1ff05957f8bcdf7ab17a9a44590b53dfd557e477428000038b9c862conflict in mime type metadata
56715 F20090919_AABROC UFLC75_Page_094.pro 4bc44b4dedf2838e4b2c9678e30c4aea5ee21fce6b49a659ea765802a9a5f0d40fa1ac29conflict in mime type metadata
57997 F20090919_AABRNO UFLC75_Page_080.pro 2a418f415f3ac3ce6d08b83edf331a43f6a49a1520c5b03119565ef8e813e1a3b1bd9e22conflict in mime type metadata
29858 F20090919_AABROD UFLC75_Page_095.pro db10730687bc2c4bfc5cca44ba603157da803252df2beefdc49532c54f5c105eb2207050conflict in mime type metadata
94737 F20090919_AABRNP UFLC75_Page_081.pro 92665fd690952e263b7f4595eaa09744afe013f96a79a047a4fb8e8ed546d9202f16c83aconflict in mime type metadata
42419 F20090919_AABROE UFLC75_Page_096.pro 6c0ff42ae890cd1fb7e0a1dadbc22f3e898fa8a3c446dd296a41b16583ccc9cb8e98e14dconflict in mime type metadata
64218 F20090919_AABRNQ UFLC75_Page_082.pro 55253c37f815262d6dc0e401aafc61f285022bd6ecacc1e3a7fdcd985ebfb7b2af270e9econflict in mime type metadata
43270 F20090919_AABROF UFLC75_Page_097.pro 897b0c90a36667b7f684ae2f7397db5c1580498815e1467a1346c3e2baae798f24885a0fconflict in mime type metadata
41419 F20090919_AABRNR UFLC75_Page_083.pro 709587542bf07ba0754b5b1cc08852c7aea92ab9ec9a87109b5ff3f806e9d2a564ad2eaaconflict in mime type metadata
44105 F20090919_AABROG UFLC75_Page_098.pro 6547785a2235deda7319dc4250a506025c640f7a0a7da5e692d20ef6c8a7e7940a3562fcconflict in mime type metadata
60553 F20090919_AABRNS UFLC75_Page_084.pro a886125bd689f520eb78a560680977554198d9f571de707dd277bf510df3814c51dceba1conflict in mime type metadata
54417 F20090919_AABROH UFLC75_Page_099.pro b79477fb88aa50ada5b6f96e868d4188f30b161d8b443f9c8fd6ea35b30c1924bd2e2dceconflict in mime type metadata
54019 F20090919_AABRNT UFLC75_Page_085.pro b4f943717789d9537d8c049520d2c6ee0a32a906c9ae292b553eba20c3c3cc914ce38217conflict in mime type metadata
28458 F20090919_AABROI UFLC75_Page_100.pro b496a6ce582a5816c200882663cc71467360d42de903bf5a20a8dd49088a535f22c3eeb0conflict in mime type metadata
37765 F20090919_AABRNU UFLC75_Page_086.pro 1274722a8b444da5d09a9238aa8edf28a315d0ffb9ff5bbcb8670b1072f5525dbb91918cconflict in mime type metadata
42681 F20090919_AABROJ UFLC75_Page_101.pro d7d77a14ed2aa9fdf57a6e366df9dc87d9db56098fc79bfe602242a0909fb5e1f40ec9beconflict in mime type metadata
37208 F20090919_AABRNV UFLC75_Page_087.pro a34ba6c5926039f112a791a7fe28c1e80e0a0980264ba067052e8dcc9911a0477d7da7daconflict in mime type metadata
47009 F20090919_AABROK UFLC75_Page_102.pro c352f6558d76ae1945ccb069648bdb5d7e0f430805659e4cfc0d4767b5b723114a99a77bconflict in mime type metadata
37647 F20090919_AABRNW UFLC75_Page_088.pro f5ccd22d75dc9fa350bcb1477946540a27beb9c3e13490459c720c0a03e7314575b0e496conflict in mime type metadata
43992 F20090919_AABROL UFLC75_Page_103.pro ad70264c437dc3e9e0c21491d3f9c869c1f0a8c2555c23aa6bc8320186900404b2cb23e6conflict in mime type metadata
36899 F20090919_AABRNX UFLC75_Page_089.pro d47a2b852d3f8af9dbb046f72f2c59b1f22e07d59d0786cd199718c6b210aa9be766cdcdconflict in mime type metadata
66021 F20090919_AABRPA UFLC75_Page_118.pro 3d96a0cd22d8e5d64696fca9e5a6fc9aef3e6379a29907d66c6bed494799a8f296dc4ce7conflict in mime type metadata
42674 F20090919_AABROM UFLC75_Page_104.pro ff9ae60802d17007aafe6446dea87105793357742684fbcc47abd06a6b35a55e7a9b0352conflict in mime type metadata
49618 F20090919_AABRNY UFLC75_Page_090.pro 2724655024b14c4754d6a2f5e42d9c8bcb4c0c4cb00cea126cd5b2977ad86a6e9cb820c8conflict in mime type metadata
62184 F20090919_AABRPB UFLC75_Page_119.pro c741c1a591d4fa3fb4a87581f79c36a590579023d0458b020f9fe833d16b3901fd490512conflict in mime type metadata
42379 F20090919_AABRON UFLC75_Page_105.pro 1fce5e2da65c5ec13e9204779919517a6c9952351cf168140af35701f49eb9182f2a8d7dconflict in mime type metadata
41394 F20090919_AABRNZ UFLC75_Page_091.pro de305ad63d01257287bde0700d42f05685a3de69fa73ccca3940510c6bad06b8e2c7ef16conflict in mime type metadata
76651 F20090919_AABRPC UFLC75_Page_120.pro 3dbe4ed508809378d9242ef330c35a4f6447466b77d50ee3e82c0fe90f07b1ea37c2f314conflict in mime type metadata
43437 F20090919_AABROO UFLC75_Page_106.pro 6c06a9be65fe7215cb0a79779fd6efb1630db31ca6a4585d50ed7de537a38aa7d8012ca8conflict in mime type metadata
14023 F20090919_AABRPD UFLC75_Page_121.pro 655cfa33c6ebbc5a6b15b8a459e7b5d993cdb82328e576f2361535794e52461b540f0519conflict in mime type metadata
34448 F20090919_AABROP UFLC75_Page_107.pro df69b1b3f9319cb909698e6651b583e6206bc7352c87736bf2b4cda3a0f40dccf91d963fconflict in mime type metadata
24910 F20090919_AABRPE UFLC75_Page_122.pro ecca68105e8d948a7c4b92061791ea842de33eddb7ce418989f612cc2acfb5fbb0e72ec4conflict in mime type metadata
40507 F20090919_AABROQ UFLC75_Page_108.pro cbb26c0b27d0a767ad3bd9f77ab2d0e0c1985a8a23929082c507463964917c9aa8a4462aconflict in mime type metadata
50820 F20090919_AABRPF UFLC75_Page_123.pro b096cc1aaf9ffba5876084bff60167c487357cadc7787861a3787cdbaf664e763d2e5d44conflict in mime type metadata
42429 F20090919_AABROR UFLC75_Page_109.pro 4eb0e429d097e19b12f7ca701e8dfc54b7c7ae1218ccb6c94778f5fa50d66669dcbbcf72conflict in mime type metadata
29764 F20090919_AABRPG UFLC75_Page_124.pro 7164de89cd39cf9275a6fd314c49b2e1a830a397fb53d3a327b01c8122d8eb562a47ed3aconflict in mime type metadata
43384 F20090919_AABROS UFLC75_Page_110.pro fe8806565240274d3a105e1b5103e72116fc2a85f8b6e6e635f49e03343c0543ff32702econflict in mime type metadata
41781 F20090919_AABRPH UFLC75_Page_125.pro 109355af1827fd797714c6f7c4ac648c587727f37187ef4ee61834ccf432cf7328f9d651conflict in mime type metadata
34624 F20090919_AABROT UFLC75_Page_111.pro b5b3dcb31dff8cd5cd3fbf8fceba151125cedcb7b64de39262c983d832a4a5a6aae4b6feconflict in mime type metadata
66680 F20090919_AABRPI UFLC75_Page_126.pro 9abeefe50ddda20d3e18078251bb36680dea49b0a376fd8ab04f5fc42a7c5f113c59fed9conflict in mime type metadata
45141 F20090919_AABROU UFLC75_Page_112.pro 551e9db6d7587637cf5ee2c405915c54cfb661136c25d3fc705bc0aa591690f9d7fc931fconflict in mime type metadata
2966 F20090919_AABRPJ UFLC75_Page_127.pro 7c9a4cb1199c06a5365bfa1c7be31f14646cbcc7d2256f18b24a4c1b31e172c300876004conflict in mime type metadata
55477 F20090919_AABROV UFLC75_Page_113.pro 5d05d4def5cda636ad42b7e73e3d51124a9cfdc43b9c4eb76377401e3fb4f50f507f630aconflict in mime type metadata
81206 F20090919_AABRPK UFLC75summary_Page_1.pro 828b3bc6414afe7de1b4c88fc505bbd8c4bae5e72ae37bc5073dbcff16e9c218e4c70979conflict in mime type metadata
84739 F20090919_AABROW UFLC75_Page_114.pro 3361f2d1b18bce2e4490d7fa4fdbf74e67baea63f237d605e450a338ee94d8da25d96c53conflict in mime type metadata
38272 F20090919_AABRPL UFLC75summary_Page_2.pro dca7f48f5eed41378fc3efcacd79ee6dfb15729355602fc30dbb1e7e8099902a604cf269conflict in mime type metadata
37489 F20090919_AABROX UFLC75_Page_115.pro 6585065cb6f4d6105a71cb3f35db8f942e0a3e7f7a86367e297bdf8bb6657e19f164a8c7conflict in mime type metadata
1501 F20090919_AABRPM UFLC75_Page_001.txt 0e98d41e4f497b8198b5d785da81ebdbb35b714ca762d04162cc70a9df8a16cd781ec4e4
29338 F20090919_AABROY UFLC75_Page_116.pro 16abf52454bfc4f3493b603120bf4e3d9ac7b815536bd0fe1abc0c0e25b5e1b10f4aed99conflict in mime type metadata
1527 F20090919_AABRQA UFLC75_Page_015.txt 02930871267117ff3baf242d3afa00c5d74374cf17d8bb2c42bd0861017783bfe205a843
2135 F20090919_AABRPN UFLC75_Page_002.txt 7bd93a5fb280dddd1c5ed93c7596e34062047497dca59bb444fe1950ffbf9dba3ddf57fa
41905 F20090919_AABROZ UFLC75_Page_117.pro 537275b2e06e8a55fd497da3f17bee786eaa31c690e1f2015674927da892b4402b02a948conflict in mime type metadata
2845 F20090919_AABRQB UFLC75_Page_016.txt db368226c49a3221b041d0e1aa24f3f2ea959ce7a18cfeb0771212b9c650b947eb574a1a
2463 F20090919_AABRPO UFLC75_Page_003.txt 58a34bb139c537bfbe3a4e4cd0514a9ef3be52a4ae7223bb2c8d4db79c6fd0b5008f043b
3116 F20090919_AABRQC UFLC75_Page_017.txt a95b0b67af880b83d6f404f3609446eb7c80b3e804cb5d0e39ddd001ec4383e731422dfc
2479 F20090919_AABRPP UFLC75_Page_004.txt a2a8539fe4030ddaaff4e234794e5a8de4657a3345d8756ac72086260596fe4a06dca1c0
2169 F20090919_AABRQD UFLC75_Page_018.txt f3d64f123def0bb5228b8b18c78985d809803887dcb07187967922f4dbf0a0bc81b93cee
2004 F20090919_AABRPQ UFLC75_Page_005.txt cfa7be5707132b9c6adaf09684bf4813e47e4009c7e614c6f9eddddd11f2e4b7781129f9
1793 F20090919_AABRQE UFLC75_Page_019.txt 002a6836175467f41071d15b1688367a012a4b30736bdad11847f778d92521cd40975c10
1924 F20090919_AABRPR UFLC75_Page_006.txt 8c48e2dbc24c7352a6e807ae03d6342993241f68f822210c1fdda6b5e50cf1192c02f87f
1568 F20090919_AABRQF UFLC75_Page_020.txt 7af93a06d478c59cfcd40403e9a722216e575d57e903462c16853edfba4f3e1ba5db9498
1800 F20090919_AABRPS UFLC75_Page_007.txt 22da47fd38421b854b5bdcee27f7868d4306720321c229a8bd39f4b2e219175e23a90a94
2759 F20090919_AABRQG UFLC75_Page_021.txt d6c295e35100d33231295aec1a20ac0178a42f1ec918457b22fd97d8235bbc14ea875719
1905 F20090919_AABRPT UFLC75_Page_008.txt f75a1743bff67f3cd65b35c22c9620539a57c2fd74191a808da04304698d99b647ac7c70
2231 F20090919_AABRQH UFLC75_Page_022.txt 333826e0d61e673e51d9378fcdb97bea1d3e6b84e0df4c6bda777993f4a0867786fde8c3
2366 F20090919_AABRPU UFLC75_Page_009.txt 4a103c6fb000fcdbea6b7af8818e35499eb7af09e3b15bb171e5b8c81c71905562ee57de
1107 F20090919_AABRQI UFLC75_Page_023.txt 693a680a6494f7110141b139e3147745d3fe0bfda192ed623b82f96afce569dabb32440b
2701 F20090919_AABRPV UFLC75_Page_010.txt 7085f7b25a75951061e1cae90bb373f138a69450129e5d68d8ac789b3f75be4b2c558055
2444 F20090919_AABRQJ UFLC75_Page_024.txt ac2ce156efbc3187a169db4f0b55789844a8267006d348f6a75af245a688a25f1116363b
2115 F20090919_AABRPW UFLC75_Page_011.txt 0082b44dceedbb7e4a85872f173c42eb08233f3b788ad49eeffef38b2fd46a9fc81b1201
2840 F20090919_AABRQK UFLC75_Page_025.txt d006dd37700b25a5368f385a07b02d2885adbe2a4b84b228ab33d922f5a0b6df14b42a1b
2390 F20090919_AABRPX UFLC75_Page_012.txt 5360d29f3bd74d8ce9fa89b008105a0438deec103eca98213c0ee67d4fa4b27119f807db
2982 F20090919_AABRQL UFLC75_Page_026.txt eab4873b3fbb2074ef7dd37c24f6f75e2b2c522a1c57036024e6325cce5d18b1ada8387b
2153 F20090919_AABRPY UFLC75_Page_013.txt 3938ad687badc4645bba7ff7116e163c2dfc4d83225ab85bce76e41ab99ed4584c2649de
2961 F20090919_AABRRA UFLC75_Page_041.txt 6212be7c37336a6a0a0e4a2a4c3e4264aa9f16944a5c46c7c7018a9ffd93e45b2cbf827d
3004 F20090919_AABRQM UFLC75_Page_027.txt 48776064b8685ee7f1bfaacc1d908ac6611a62c659395e29e540a22df2cce383e0c7a6e6
1765 F20090919_AABRPZ UFLC75_Page_014.txt 6aee5728f837d6a1d81b63f4b125a7cc5965016e662fcaad31f7f3fde467f10ac9b892d6
2352 F20090919_AABRRB UFLC75_Page_042.txt 48fe990d6a23da7a18e4137d6be8cf7a3815b3e4b706f588d421a0a177a30650b773d3ea
2964 F20090919_AABRQN UFLC75_Page_028.txt ab764372e6c8443258bf5fd9182e1381e1f8f4f329dcd0267a70a612480b4ffba2b87f14
2557 F20090919_AABRRC UFLC75_Page_043.txt 36a45f45674d1ceea5dc9b1033d82b0e51a0a33e8aa59364389440fd54623c4d89b9452e
2255 F20090919_AABRQO UFLC75_Page_029.txt 9e8e626f274ecaca3672e48cf43da212c8a4c64fe9d3e137ad41fb5b457991604fc0fdf2
3221 F20090919_AABRRD UFLC75_Page_044.txt 36b879375534b291ea5c9e73e05bdbc1dd7747ea8698b789beb2ed54ad3d3e47403ea5c7
2364 F20090919_AABRQP UFLC75_Page_030.txt 2fe8813ef95a5248f797d13a25e2c52990c1cdd63dfea19f0c0cc8eaf851d7d3c18e02da
2037 F20090919_AABRRE UFLC75_Page_045.txt 9b2772b9d02d83c7d8de1e023258ac06d180d13f10caed0b3f9785fec0b827c858e9764d
2885 F20090919_AABRQQ UFLC75_Page_031.txt 1de2d8c1ce1f6468dbfddefb8d48f97ba479e6f74adc552b633d0b1e58080ec95658e153
1600 F20090919_AABRRF UFLC75_Page_046.txt 4cdde9f3da3f8154d401d8ed85122aedd8c69005489cce2487d9909f47cdc1134357a7c4
1413 F20090919_AABRQR UFLC75_Page_032.txt 3c3127ae2e63b40fcefa196ab4989afbfbe0377706595d51f2f11bb8f8a15aab27b5afc6
3236 F20090919_AABRRG UFLC75_Page_047.txt dd56e7848c7e74fc2458ada096f61aef5ff31c6a8ff80a63d8c197e0aa41e66e885dfab2
1493 F20090919_AABRQS UFLC75_Page_033.txt 6254a6092f12877cb0ace555fb4ad5bcba1307af9c946f5d607a823467f53b38aab3de60
2014 F20090919_AABRRH UFLC75_Page_048.txt ad7ad2b30b0bfdecdaba58719a0d57088a075335e57de9a2b4f84966887447d72336ab3c
2319 F20090919_AABRQT UFLC75_Page_034.txt 28f6694dc3c3b29ef5e85bdd4c953b46c34b4665976705256cffb76ae393937abd1fc968
1951 F20090919_AABRRI UFLC75_Page_049.txt ea808ed1b51b8c6c699e63ecf447274b092f130d6b5022605cdb2e648605f3df3e667e2e
2798 F20090919_AABRQU UFLC75_Page_035.txt e056a6d6f37ce5e9fa9651c616764cef4adae390aaf2ab80be87d2661d2dd55a4e7ca657
2325 F20090919_AABRRJ UFLC75_Page_050.txt 91139860d0a6d3c60ec1e1c5156b878e78f63dcaca323b441312665fbee1886a0621ace6
1828 F20090919_AABRQV UFLC75_Page_036.txt 495d854f6b42269395e652acf10acc6f7f14834cb63216ccf13e852a1ab5727a37837d6d
1721 F20090919_AABRRK UFLC75_Page_051.txt 3a77e359c965a3df57958d945f396329d46d344ab71863192734ea6d646d69493aff9c40
2655 F20090919_AABRQW UFLC75_Page_037.txt 83beddaf49fbf3492a231eb8811b3fa73a27368256054c51893702e93693474246eb2e5a
2643 F20090919_AABRSA UFLC75_Page_067.txt ed71d302d4f3c3e2c711489d93ed2e0170aa1c04bf32a6d8a9218a1a0e75e9646e7e209c
1198 F20090919_AABRRL UFLC75_Page_052.txt d1d8161214b459c9afb08b4f32b5c43769ebf3234c8141c74b3e8e1b5eaf1ecbbe18764d
2543 F20090919_AABRQX UFLC75_Page_038.txt a61b9d1dbbb0f5f8ba70c26f59fe58a461752f87ad1793894944cd0e936117fe266abb3f
3271 F20090919_AABRRM UFLC75_Page_053.txt 4c9eb54f9a902693480db65ac8e01fcf3f350ca761c41489c83088d609ee10bd4ece8ca3
3185 F20090919_AABRQY UFLC75_Page_039.txt 25c73acf0c04b61c19ac725910dd1cef1f6bfef7d8374f12f32eadde4095d41ccba9a212
2669 F20090919_AABRSB UFLC75_Page_068.txt 142c7bfa0c81e01eef7f27472e4319b0c464b595bff6a93c8a21959382c66df226c8d0a8
2012 F20090919_AABRRN UFLC75_Page_054.txt dabcac61565d9f99644b3236c57cb71adf2afd208305a6abcaff14417b6cf3103bfbfab6
1638 F20090919_AABRQZ UFLC75_Page_040.txt e78e22cd423620265ff2f8c153ed19361d58eb5e3741fd4470bd8f79a3a0e80fac8a9aa6
2088 F20090919_AABRSC UFLC75_Page_069.txt 62f9e920c7df4c81af7a010d2d0246cdff2d4033981e765982ab6e6c626f3f7488e87a89
1671 F20090919_AABRRO UFLC75_Page_055.txt 79946c8653ba1518894ce85cea6c0f57b1648eabadc0398ecf8d52e44c676415456b68dd
1666 F20090919_AABRSD UFLC75_Page_070.txt 74a8a4b77175fca5e066f48307ec5577598ea04795db6e6e5f53e47ca052f8c6c76429bf
1124 F20090919_AABRRP UFLC75_Page_056.txt d184af67db4384d9cf748fe2f8d2d34ecb60bf52f3a818bac16d11b531702212bb698144
2488 F20090919_AABRSE UFLC75_Page_071.txt be42f72aa6925736ddcb1b5931eb3d5eb64b16f05b39fae0a1d0084dde7ea8cce0cd28ff
1714 F20090919_AABRRQ UFLC75_Page_057.txt 97bc09ca6f6ca3e8a0ca656a6639e958cb47b9c508d420ef983c2b8db09b58aee36b4b78
1123 F20090919_AABRSF UFLC75_Page_072.txt a743b18f45b9399bfc10495a26757bc0180e47769c17154e9188b4b9eb5000396c405b5d
2232 F20090919_AABRRR UFLC75_Page_058.txt 90b390863907b751b0161d788c9b5faef09b5eeae6317ce9a0904fb0423b1956c1c4a7f6
2423 F20090919_AABRSG UFLC75_Page_073.txt 15d88fa9450da0c791371da283db154712f57f70952567a415bdd876f47f7a513ebefd09
2464 F20090919_AABRRS UFLC75_Page_059.txt 0ce9ce93e19499edc90d874d67036daf50c331fb4b2629c6603bab81bfed4ce454a95629
3726 F20090919_AABRSH UFLC75_Page_074.txt f39b62fdfc9af7bd18b0909a408ca327c197e2d2ff646c9fbd415ca979fa1644996c18a9
1804 F20090919_AABRRT UFLC75_Page_060.txt 56b7b1baa32bfb5fd285eee9630190fb81f4261e8ae1249461b4c96387158c1709829d1e
F20090919_AABRSI UFLC75_Page_075.txt 2e9ecba357574ff4d8c3a26677d10da58835219d07ffe80fde4132f197827c8a9a21f1df
1535 F20090919_AABRRU UFLC75_Page_061.txt fc312959d4cc710c79d1e464a1ecab4894e9be1abd7fd6839d2d13d72c6e236890dc7ad3
2118 F20090919_AABRSJ UFLC75_Page_076.txt bd012be1e6b50dfbb71fac739a16f27aebf47254823655615f9d946fd7a1691d16a47de9
2246 F20090919_AABRRV UFLC75_Page_062.txt 56a33d639a4d37550f1d9000124fa364c50e06b526f0c9d73ebea91c511300e82b1afc1e
1620 F20090919_AABRRW UFLC75_Page_063.txt ee88fd2fe6b4942190f118b9f5e2565c1bf87901dee7c6e12c32e8c3a6cabb3cf4f47a8e
3036 F20090919_AABRSK UFLC75_Page_077.txt 72d7cbe53f95d4cc0743dcbe9648a41446720fb9f416fffc506e5fd6bf700146cba1e0ea
1831 F20090919_AABRRX UFLC75_Page_064.txt ba98d53d7365bda4a326ec5cc689dfa8ef8a335854e8d76cd935400b48b4a483c37beb6f
1619 F20090919_AABRTA UFLC75_Page_093.txt 5b5ac1d049fcb80f044b88e22cca755db586e34f7790c1a73e2d661d03cc327a2302010e
1899 F20090919_AABRSL UFLC75_Page_078.txt a43c4cba1dbae382f7cfc502047b64d547360f790edd713357c2616c55b506ee168708d7
3259 F20090919_AABRRY UFLC75_Page_065.txt 40681e11828a0d0ad49f9fb747bf5b8eacb87afcefdd8f464a0f3974293c62b305cca4e6
2349 F20090919_AABRTB UFLC75_Page_094.txt c482b02162e8b6d2110875abec87576360bf41fe2638825950adab26b7b9509149c409e4
1893 F20090919_AABRSM UFLC75_Page_079.txt 26f128254235da3cc43db729c0b97f7cba85e69eaca951206bc19d4e11b6e68999422e72
1934 F20090919_AABRRZ UFLC75_Page_066.txt 7aca1696af81942e173e991fbe287eda16fda6ba2b659e96477e3eb28e30e6d2dd7645be
2389 F20090919_AABRSN UFLC75_Page_080.txt fdb0b2d7041ae418dd9202b30c8a36b50f18f5d325f4f49ca5a8bc7c9a142e3e78b23e58
1269 F20090919_AABRTC UFLC75_Page_095.txt 1b8110c9fd19b0e5c1170820b076e03f89de4ff30da6299c06cc310dcde4ba713bc73e90
3938 F20090919_AABRSO UFLC75_Page_081.txt 64f7a1e9ed42f50a8974bb60b936608d0ee46b06c43ed11ef966b739733c771544bc1759
1756 F20090919_AABRTD UFLC75_Page_096.txt 2f7ece947fbba1bffc8fab10b10f3fb94cecd6f0b5a3db2c91d9d499c5dd7c511b9a0623
2672 F20090919_AABRSP UFLC75_Page_082.txt e0c703499bb79f76d84b9274c5eb1ff702d28c1aa728ad5c0c0a194556ff34f49019a3bb
1801 F20090919_AABRTE UFLC75_Page_097.txt 63ca796c303e9f1ba6a6d60d291d1f979cbc0fb96c9e0f55563f8100606a2334c33c7b4b
1739 F20090919_AABRSQ UFLC75_Page_083.txt 34b74d2c1082c2a617e05484c684aaba566c10f965524d2b97954d10e93b4339135a1208
1871 F20090919_AABRTF UFLC75_Page_098.txt 1bc6b2521f2b3ec7bbda79e3085e11592f28b557b1e64dee4642c84b994c367385f9640c
2499 F20090919_AABRSR UFLC75_Page_084.txt 773a89c8000d0eff10ca3a9769c83996eda0ea0f5e342af383682b2d22fa5f47ea43699f
2249 F20090919_AABRTG UFLC75_Page_099.txt dced232d76c9a4ed68c59aa9290561d3ab9fcddf3bd75601ba87d44a91c4e79432d8c340
2235 F20090919_AABRSS UFLC75_Page_085.txt 756b78a454c11deaf20296f2dfaef6fbf39245e36200a61fc5846b7d0eba8a6e44dd1cb1
1216 F20090919_AABRTH UFLC75_Page_100.txt 220939327f6e0ce411b86545afd45f403429093478eb2182fd5c44f865b7fcf64b0253a5
1582 F20090919_AABRST UFLC75_Page_086.txt bc6db45f08d6b4d760fdf057bd14e093913185557e2eff3d5d19fc13e90bd92239b390f3
1746 F20090919_AABRTI UFLC75_Page_101.txt 24fe584ac89269dc4ac3f61a38d6de2879fe56168c484683f2452ba015979fd38065b41f
1563 F20090919_AABRSU UFLC75_Page_087.txt 03e314f102dcafb32f3c6bc1146bd771d07f66fb4978f2dc01a1949bff812d2792788101
1973 F20090919_AABRTJ UFLC75_Page_102.txt 52a760a22318b1885783be6852a8df36493da8f23d039e85188e5bfafaa93dedc400b7a5
F20090919_AABRSV UFLC75_Page_088.txt 639b0a1473831e61d5c3c3d97f3a3a10a987a0e66892fd35d6a6dcb4387568aff10e4584
F20090919_AABRTK UFLC75_Page_103.txt 3a3096f203297e0a0689acaa5e3afab75a5b2cdd5c6a34711dff628a4b4a0b1a6a862d68
1537 F20090919_AABRSW UFLC75_Page_089.txt 9082d0470d0027d979548678b79f5d8e285c3f5b35c98f16e99c11631c3ac51400dc7e94
2562 F20090919_AABRUA UFLC75_Page_119.txt 01db7a0633eeb6b95ff5d81887ce0de4ba3a236d542ce1610cfbe28583da24461cc7896c
1772 F20090919_AABRTL UFLC75_Page_104.txt 62cb897fbae453ebae6ea4f048f07a931933e87edca147b367410e90e405dcdca9689174
2077 F20090919_AABRSX UFLC75_Page_090.txt 82ed70108b1d7289415960e8a7eb5e6526666db74c0fa85acc0d58a9f42f1ff37941f8e9
3186 F20090919_AABRUB UFLC75_Page_120.txt bab712cc7739e30acf0a2bc23fa20b0032b60a60ebd29d6fb46cadbcb1592d9383649560
1759 F20090919_AABRTM UFLC75_Page_105.txt a05dd00feec8e63aca7c31917a2350209f9fc2c2e42b7f379dfe953c98c42b834ffaa198
1723 F20090919_AABRSY UFLC75_Page_091.txt c989617c04454e8c08297ce9ab16d2a9f279b75a1997edd3d928582429fb2e8835e430e5
617 F20090919_AABRUC UFLC75_Page_121.txt a1eca3e0595cafa4424337de4d54bd5fd692264daf349fb901ca9958ef72f47d21f91000
1799 F20090919_AABRTN UFLC75_Page_106.txt 8f4589c9919ee36d9783d8eb09c05e4493aeef62c2dbfcde055959bc5e8cd3bb6884d6a7
1401 F20090919_AABRSZ UFLC75_Page_092.txt 847a9bf24f8e9e9cd826667e95a8d1c6549feb221d2587f105c58ee0c2e4fbdec27dc13a
1441 F20090919_AABRTO UFLC75_Page_107.txt dcff55918b728bd52367a1008c494842f95abb2bd7f0d8f4f7fb4cf95ad19e01ca03d386
1057 F20090919_AABRUD UFLC75_Page_122.txt 278596db779472b5ed51663e5eca3dfc0f20e2112937ab0a645aa9822cd34fda5a62c600
1698 F20090919_AABRTP UFLC75_Page_108.txt a8966ea908ca76b86930c3e794ed9f2662a4f0a2adac36456ef9f1c50ae356c8f2e39597
2124 F20090919_AABRUE UFLC75_Page_123.txt 7cd7a33bde9ae79ea6d9b650ea8697c195b2db2b56aab4525a6ba921eeb38b39afa35de8
1761 F20090919_AABRTQ UFLC75_Page_109.txt 7bee055f508e68dab2479ef2b7ffcf964bfa86f07f356c39a95539103bedd31034aa4e3f
5222 F20090919_AABSAA UFLC75_Page_070thm.jpg b8f65cac3cf050c4ed7bfbb34c4cf4efc87d9698ce641736570d6d73670fde31dfc5722d
1250 F20090919_AABRUF UFLC75_Page_124.txt 250b5083c63deb3387204bfc3d97298ed17c00910535c2436e683d0c2a9eabe9ece96c53
1807 F20090919_AABRTR UFLC75_Page_110.txt 1aee2db908bed053100b16d335dfad63c01ab8141ce0b2ef45a8bb4aa62e891b2dbc2622
22091 F20090919_AABSAB UFLC75_Page_071.QC.jpg 6f5d8751165267c9f1f384da85238c15b609479c8e05dbc48ea8f915f5c6adef416b045d
F20090919_AABRUG UFLC75_Page_125.txt 08b6d450bef9c78c383a1be7428d891ac2884fd8f534dd7d46e97b1dce005da1665c39d9
1437 F20090919_AABRTS UFLC75_Page_111.txt 96720bc483011aa3df63b088cae40b5ff24989b0609f7d9238bdee41e4e76cc5630ca63a
6382 F20090919_AABSAC UFLC75_Page_071thm.jpg a4e5af96c86dc0896576afd5827b8defc57fd0c992ce3e4aff6f82e7f6a83083d78a891c
2756 F20090919_AABRUH UFLC75_Page_126.txt 6993beffb4dcb637e196d822131255fd73125652c3c4f23d0ee9c8a631cc2ab370fefd80
1866 F20090919_AABRTT UFLC75_Page_112.txt 8c63d28d1c2f57899416c957ae859bf52a5e052eee0f02a5cdce9d7df470be267d3ec03a
13281 F20090919_AABSAD UFLC75_Page_072.QC.jpg f00318bcaa0ca0649ebe2716efea6105df723365be42f6d45d68e5df8444913af2997d76
129 F20090919_AABRUI UFLC75_Page_127.txt 0b14e20fe7dfec6b9fedde27e0ac4179c9b8a15e27b471e17c6e7cc88058e17cbdf6f955
2314 F20090919_AABRTU UFLC75_Page_113.txt 382b7aa0c3a1883d0186826d8648dd4253da4c03b697fd82d2ae4006e904a6d80a7e41fb
4272 F20090919_AABSAE UFLC75_Page_072thm.jpg 776ca8c9c6de2e7471bcba19af0a19d9f921c2b52a29d45ef45a21b2527533bf3012b9bb
2903 F20090919_AABRUJ UFLC75summary_Page_1.txt 692cbd189d60325df01cc48bfc6a445762499e1b36436d4d127b66919136e862f4e1dd35
3517 F20090919_AABRTV UFLC75_Page_114.txt 71a80def50e8e7458385711e5430d068d0816b14d6842ebe31dd56b687aee6ccad067bb5
21730 F20090919_AABSAF UFLC75_Page_073.QC.jpg 7fa2165c4f0c6bc7e3528e337515b732af82064e6822ed98aef44bed6bd59178760159fc
1387 F20090919_AABRUK UFLC75summary_Page_2.txt dc0ead262fbb36703d311480c79a30a320f511f7d04bd78ea6cad5341571e7f04c0cd1f7
1566 F20090919_AABRTW UFLC75_Page_115.txt 15769bc2c6c65b8aabdb2ca1fcb14b301f6927b0fcd3f820afc9ac44a909483a63b4a2bd
6286 F20090919_AABSAG UFLC75_Page_073thm.jpg a946bb1a45d7102cb06442367e47224b3cecedc173f5eaf5a3de16b0aa116562749a6fdf
241621 F20090919_AABRUL UFLC75.pdf 6306d9e13e43650393d29f159a5b174a3342a8209bbbcfb95bb5056e9e707482e679f66f
1232 F20090919_AABRTX UFLC75_Page_116.txt 257cef22307c158031937b19e479b76fa762e6278f6c6d9c14acbc698da13613804d7946
6457 F20090919_AABRVA UFLC75_Page_005thm.jpg 47852767ea065a119f88ca4088a68441f382cfa9a28ed7f838788c900d158d66599c4b17
29716 F20090919_AABSAH UFLC75_Page_074.QC.jpg a1e0e2e8535a3811ebbba76eeff495a91c5a0452ecdf52f247aed19cd3a646592e2507db
10547 F20090919_AABRUM UFLC75summary.pdf fc72604088c48f46e043bb5a4377bd99bc4b3813a4e6676f35ad611df4ea18169857ca17
1748 F20090919_AABRTY UFLC75_Page_117.txt fd128c74b462992c0bb0a27964f7246511fdecc723117794b17d0576e0bba06e034e4518
21968 F20090919_AABRVB UFLC75_Page_006.QC.jpg d7a640dd9b5d2ea65d0389caa20e7d1ae9f429fadbacf9f6e2bcc6b4392edc03cb3e1cac
7415 F20090919_AABSAI UFLC75_Page_074thm.jpg 6e084c01ef945c3f6d18a8e4adc95cddba1b696cdf2204985060f62518d7040a8f28eac2
32477 F20090919_AABRUN UFLC75summary_Page_1.QC.jpg 74471295c5a9315d0afb7c0a2605075e8e333ae42fd8ba4419c0bca0080627e530b33dac
2738 F20090919_AABRTZ UFLC75_Page_118.txt b72645c253af7c82b0d2685ebd9b9620eeb2c9e7fa6b5fe12a8539defed2d963aafac1d4
6347 F20090919_AABRVC UFLC75_Page_006thm.jpg 54939d289c7f27a8bceddcdee568cba07c4ba9d9e6ef195ded38bc935d5276d37b0b9af9
26988 F20090919_AABSAJ UFLC75_Page_075.QC.jpg e86da94ff35c3255a1e2339422740bc4f7eec47a918eb77a89cd70d3d18df5a10435ed87
7901 F20090919_AABRUO UFLC75summary_Page_1thm.jpg 9001ddfeb670cf0ea4024a95386e38ea51d6f8daf895c03dec9f41ab1b49584bc23efad6
20916 F20090919_AABRVD UFLC75_Page_007.QC.jpg 600b368a48791e255565ae4a3ab356353b3948840ce9cca1abdd90a16487800b8ae3fed7
7269 F20090919_AABSAK UFLC75_Page_075thm.jpg 3a5ee05c15b6918de13c034d7665cf2610e8478399fdc40f411f1c46c2de5633d08bde8f
16518 F20090919_AABRUP UFLC75summary_Page_2.QC.jpg ce20670fa290432c5aee4fbcdf4406c04de9f369d9fcf27ce38896de7c3acac44bff59d9
20710 F20090919_AABSAL UFLC75_Page_076.QC.jpg 1498551c05bf8eafbaa8f845a8d0660e5c44aa76dbdce5e81ca2ac3d688d5bd10e1fc98c
4419 F20090919_AABRUQ UFLC75summary_Page_2thm.jpg d6b979e0492784a208f8a1971744f7591c44cecc2c875fdf3352901e332fff7442a69e8e
5929 F20090919_AABRVE UFLC75_Page_007thm.jpg bf159136143cee60fe953a48804bb408db18e6ec7cf6f35136c6e668f47b88cf68125833
5588 F20090919_AABSBA UFLC75_Page_083thm.jpg a0a42123d0413da7505b9db9cdfe4758dceba32b06ff04a7621acc9cfb12bdd9881b46a3
5702 F20090919_AABSAM UFLC75_Page_076thm.jpg e07bb6214313370b03da09695efb0c06b8aac79ff015633d0588affbcfc8e2ff4fe3a099
18920 F20090919_AABRUR UFLC75_Page_001.QC.jpg 31076a52b44b72470579fb61846c12b3b85caadc239ae53454bf21288be9297332d40406
22615 F20090919_AABRVF UFLC75_Page_008.QC.jpg 4ca6ff7182d7fe2e3a2a0f76cbde70db3cfbb3f2e1b6182db7730d04134941c367a246dc
23168 F20090919_AABSBB UFLC75_Page_084.QC.jpg 94cbdfa39871a1c3c809a254aab96f9b7b496ab7fee6a4fc5b0926b237136619b9280c50
26852 F20090919_AABSAN UFLC75_Page_077.QC.jpg 1c432106f431bfdea584e12b8e39376a67c75f8672fba24240c9818225cce28dc8d1a185
5544 F20090919_AABRUS UFLC75_Page_001thm.jpg 8bd1ffaab68caeb99dd027ae8b281f92aa88474d1bfbc1c1355538f4a39e5929972450bb
6430 F20090919_AABRVG UFLC75_Page_008thm.jpg 86d9fa4bf9253bd4464b7b11cacebf30434a1fd8759db4b31b710f2c7b0287d3a5b6a6fc
6522 F20090919_AABSBC UFLC75_Page_084thm.jpg 244e86a843bd1ea5fe51a0a3550b26c41e568c93ddbddd3e832cb93f865d54ef2caa2891
24184 F20090919_AABRUT UFLC75_Page_002.QC.jpg e3f17957973a560f4c0d8efad8a04ccd493769a4d0f24809652769466a7142a2a88f8e1a
25976 F20090919_AABRVH UFLC75_Page_009.QC.jpg 9df0ef765aadb31628447fbc016bb165852a16be33e265fbe1dcba5106a22ba44c16b4cc
22479 F20090919_AABSBD UFLC75_Page_085.QC.jpg 5bd0443f8fa36a02bfef40bdea4f190d07ad662aff05f790d125ede03d6420e772f137dd
6868 F20090919_AABSAO UFLC75_Page_077thm.jpg 3d564e54f713a331bc6c3d6b123260937f2b4d59a36e239706792552e45015bb2a3f3113
6603 F20090919_AABRUU UFLC75_Page_002thm.jpg ccd19a8b28204d59065405f2b3e8622fa8537dcf756f74421362f352d1066ef95b71c121
6951 F20090919_AABRVI UFLC75_Page_009thm.jpg 0141b29d41d55c3bab98141277a3ee254a7ca91d232228c9af47c244f64c4569c2dc22b7
6413 F20090919_AABSBE UFLC75_Page_085thm.jpg 582df66c86279341165d7e54070d27c776891468b030080ebbe04b47723bbdb1ff4cc508
19720 F20090919_AABSAP UFLC75_Page_078.QC.jpg a809fe35cc3c8660afbedbbb0492baca526a6ef48debf365bcaea2b1ea34dba0780d96cf
26449 F20090919_AABRUV UFLC75_Page_003.QC.jpg 6968b9a633e262dd5c9293ba1b9ef77f3d938ea720626793219afe25d7bed154efe7cdee
27602 F20090919_AABRVJ UFLC75_Page_010.QC.jpg 087e60db7cdd07376396e14df05cdd17f1e70d5bad7ffa4d15394f980db08f318ab61e5c
17317 F20090919_AABSBF UFLC75_Page_086.QC.jpg d0b7cf0bad8e40f14c220fb15921b13978ce14c681dc00b765d88666302e5d9ed8a69486
5926 F20090919_AABSAQ UFLC75_Page_078thm.jpg fdc0b6f8cfb2f02e08863f99c78ec230695dd73d267495808127c4e2d2a12dd666348146
7090 F20090919_AABRUW UFLC75_Page_003thm.jpg 777da7785144c2f9529519b290e6a5e0e5c2f2530edb55078d4459b6f2b20e08f30f981d
7283 F20090919_AABRVK UFLC75_Page_010thm.jpg f2982408c94b933aecc034915d31d4dec95c0ea24bc1d49878b3df0a0f67050bdfe37e47
4996 F20090919_AABSBG UFLC75_Page_086thm.jpg db29a94cc5a9f91b65182c2425da3860face15cf8e5b596d909602fa43ff8c3b9a03f12b
19922 F20090919_AABSAR UFLC75_Page_079.QC.jpg d925c91fcea6ed98824d5d21aba284b496ef0eb2d3cbefd6016d863c6fe55ea8c75cecbb
26812 F20090919_AABRUX UFLC75_Page_004.QC.jpg f46333a802df721aa475d639ef5e44a89311994e27a7933d7636a898b241eadd96486c7d
6583 F20090919_AABRWA UFLC75_Page_018thm.jpg c4d38adaf1680b3e1d889021fff3e7c377098070b54155fc1f2d04aa6fa36b4d05bb7dcc
23097 F20090919_AABRVL UFLC75_Page_011.QC.jpg a955772adc07e9952e2279ae34cfbbb126d9c754d58fb26a1587f8c268a686a0143c332e
17538 F20090919_AABSBH UFLC75_Page_087.QC.jpg 7d6bd34b1e8ecd6e1ad215736c8d5d8f57cf3e2837fb46e14f1c69eeaf6e16d6efcb6120
6154 F20090919_AABSAS UFLC75_Page_079thm.jpg 537fa94129895cfaa62932688b78dd57b7dbd8cc327438088f09921ec814398e2005da04
7046 F20090919_AABRUY UFLC75_Page_004thm.jpg 640bb4aaaa8231cb715b778d211e11d9c8803b9df2a5a923c7e7f44affb4e85b668a79cf
20898 F20090919_AABRWB UFLC75_Page_019.QC.jpg c88390d534f768b85c418c571b4d8fd65a558214cabba014bd3a3bb97c0c791d8e0aa1c5
6277 F20090919_AABRVM UFLC75_Page_011thm.jpg f3735c9bc6d7a007c5bd1bdff56c38759c6eb338ff476be00493df1f20ed1a93074a2d34
5433 F20090919_AABSBI UFLC75_Page_087thm.jpg 7cc548fc62354021b836afbdb66da4526a7e4eb00bf203f15e7ea2d46eaf7fad166ad5e2
22274 F20090919_AABSAT UFLC75_Page_080.QC.jpg f809258b3bf111b34bb736a8131354f74b53558da1977a74c42e4f3f3139c3df4b385d02
22560 F20090919_AABRUZ UFLC75_Page_005.QC.jpg 099ae9dc726b57c279956ed2ba80001747f4745bac926bbd08ff7fd508d15c0a5390d603
6390 F20090919_AABRWC UFLC75_Page_019thm.jpg 2c10e66393d9714bc85c23a88019e9605bb843812e682132f28185051ba40c7f6a767049
25609 F20090919_AABRVN UFLC75_Page_012.QC.jpg 731cd2c7e1f33bbac9029bb26d0b0c5dc2dd5c4bc3747b0cf96a51032d0a01a9e2ad9c1e
16870 F20090919_AABSBJ UFLC75_Page_088.QC.jpg ac66d6123684fee93b3a71e664ed24d077612df6c69b3028992149698b577e1af432657b
5978 F20090919_AABSAU UFLC75_Page_080thm.jpg 5ff27cb180a92e8980c74cae24f5c93e9e6d7321873745a24904e499c47c9aa9d8e52719
19624 F20090919_AABRWD UFLC75_Page_020.QC.jpg d05d39f423b52139b3bb9c27b98ea899ac54ebfbc88748c7c779cee6bb16eef756de38a9
6642 F20090919_AABRVO UFLC75_Page_012thm.jpg 7e854d6e6d26902bbe4ae5eb2280c86a735ccbe9af0a96c824177b92daaf008a08c19459
5086 F20090919_AABSBK UFLC75_Page_088thm.jpg 52868ae96dc483b7af632deb2d3a31653b8b1bc24ca0ad231b36fb55eea03eb5659145f8
31565 F20090919_AABSAV UFLC75_Page_081.QC.jpg 0a2f51c89fb4638915d06da1cf8783afd8d5f827faaa754d3319285068ba16c0a0b47dd6
5803 F20090919_AABRWE UFLC75_Page_020thm.jpg 47f842101981e24eb75f067b8638bef511ab73ca50d64f47719502ed0fef26b0655cdbe7
24469 F20090919_AABRVP UFLC75_Page_013.QC.jpg 2c7aeb0aa2244debbf4e2fd21d634f10d672a69fc636bd1742c1ff1c86da4199d9f50bd4
16552 F20090919_AABSBL UFLC75_Page_089.QC.jpg 2eb438dbd108acc93524242324d5bfbecfa717c2fb27bee08a64cb199c89da300b314863
7676 F20090919_AABSAW UFLC75_Page_081thm.jpg 3f5356eef99f9c6405d3a7aeebc4ba5342b6528bf56687fa4180a5022cb4c36f2ff59f0d
6416 F20090919_AABRVQ UFLC75_Page_013thm.jpg d936d0a985b23dc4f469262fba7660155b8e10c2aca08b3d286d0d293a86db04d2ebd67a
5593 F20090919_AABSCA UFLC75_Page_096thm.jpg 50cf99b1dd586795b68c68d5d732753004f09612111eacf2de6016b7fcfe5808fc7bddcf
5184 F20090919_AABSBM UFLC75_Page_089thm.jpg 827667fc1695ea881a8cb30df29b58048c2ec29d75a2b0d2f5c2bb811008f744daabbd3d
23500 F20090919_AABSAX UFLC75_Page_082.QC.jpg baacfb247eedbb84f0876351103a14aeb3f004dacf7f19e8af117fdec16689aea416fe3b
27555 F20090919_AABRWF UFLC75_Page_021.QC.jpg ccb2b87d1747ee2cf853138b7aa836bfa8a3d84c32ac9115579acdbd047c799d9dab2e72
21869 F20090919_AABRVR UFLC75_Page_014.QC.jpg 8fa527a47fd10275d06c243108474ec6b2d26244c75a7db6ecc1bc67bf4ae3312967be89
18804 F20090919_AABSCB UFLC75_Page_097.QC.jpg 55dc65f371ecb5a0721c1775d73b13323cb6bcbca8e9740b11d3bb553922e4a50363e496
19304 F20090919_AABSBN UFLC75_Page_090.QC.jpg f4f661d79c1df75dbfb55c0103e485032b3bafd744d4ad3b0ae3f558542759acfed47dc2
6514 F20090919_AABSAY UFLC75_Page_082thm.jpg 334ded13500947b70c3146ec6b9d3c703e8d309b391cd418f6d6be835bba898bde550849
7031 F20090919_AABRWG UFLC75_Page_021thm.jpg 0f4e306f0a6f66371163aa8cda50ab5c471325a9f181a934ffb92ec6b4692864cbe0b177
6639 F20090919_AABRVS UFLC75_Page_014thm.jpg fa3648d4a082a9509d7dda0c481341facf25284a2e67f7a8e6fd62ff0dcc3eb7d04b34e0
5716 F20090919_AABSCC UFLC75_Page_097thm.jpg 4dc03e8bf8a969e0e09218d9994df3d62cf1a80ee795cd847496154715c9ba78344811bd
5741 F20090919_AABSBO UFLC75_Page_090thm.jpg f3a191615ccb2eb9a9cf4824eb7f42f92ad1288741ccc4071ffce248e0118512c6c228ab
18236 F20090919_AABSAZ UFLC75_Page_083.QC.jpg ac87ae60fd939bc644c1240f9c3ed828990c984578639957727664568a23263933afc74b
25072 F20090919_AABRWH UFLC75_Page_022.QC.jpg 2ee6aa4c2329b4032c5809870c559404eb753915cc88dd477fc5d61f9ae83f2a156ddf0c
19129 F20090919_AABRVT UFLC75_Page_015.QC.jpg 7788695fc76167903bd071e019a3d1014eb9b6c78f3294cd40568a5465cf208cc8ed4a09
17521 F20090919_AABSCD UFLC75_Page_098.QC.jpg a85b19f246ece4cbf8ea2e9603856a6294ceadd504561c470e8437b5596ab4978d8cc83b
6794 F20090919_AABRWI UFLC75_Page_022thm.jpg 3ae8826992ccf38b5d11a392a6e5e81a06ea70f25a4c21fdfb8ce448c20a334804fc2b8b
5919 F20090919_AABRVU UFLC75_Page_015thm.jpg 30bb590267252b193931c6d6dff0b5c2081f54b9ffc9560ff37d2df1482cbd36195048a9
5056 F20090919_AABSCE UFLC75_Page_098thm.jpg b76999ae6dfd99b45e095cd13ffa759b7183b8c0c9ba7f4054944da663cf955e6423e1af
17423 F20090919_AABSBP UFLC75_Page_091.QC.jpg 06b9a6f66e3c807127c822f71709d8d94cef558ced248e05eec1cdb5fa8daaf11a45b97c
14901 F20090919_AABRWJ UFLC75_Page_023.QC.jpg 1ade52fe54a039fee3c3d446eaf12149f8322e4d33330899276569a6c9fe9c0e13e63747
29115 F20090919_AABRVV UFLC75_Page_016.QC.jpg 5e4e74f2330b43109e696dd5ac48dbfef90c43d02dcdc42a5b745dc2447cdadf15d60e57
21878 F20090919_AABSCF UFLC75_Page_099.QC.jpg da67395723f62424abd4323dade85997716330737e48846fb2fcaa1b6b92d00e30a31a0d
5421 F20090919_AABSBQ UFLC75_Page_091thm.jpg 8227f9018b7e3f9287e17c74d56affb19c69df12c8c37ed3802d4f0511e2b552b301a729
4893 F20090919_AABRWK UFLC75_Page_023thm.jpg 1f1b4a1b775f379f2cf3a9489d07968fc53f33f5b8d5159f0716d06183d873adfce8a006
7469 F20090919_AABRVW UFLC75_Page_016thm.jpg 97f161ad3c7edd4a7bea7974523b8febdcff9d0fa56a11c0cea36a6c967a58d208715ed1
6218 F20090919_AABSCG UFLC75_Page_099thm.jpg 1989241a3fd29d07c9c1d9e3a3f97be5457a811c84928b6267de4e5a69a672fac3325cbc
15621 F20090919_AABSBR UFLC75_Page_092.QC.jpg a928680850cb243634b789aa9e695a37b6318d3baa99e8423829e16a2ec41034efa5c8f6
7650 F20090919_AABRXA UFLC75_Page_031thm.jpg 6425b7a054d3393e058a96adc16cd81dd3c612e3505c44b742f653fc7b7b787bdb3b3299
26015 F20090919_AABRWL UFLC75_Page_024.QC.jpg f4cd4b0f5b4710e2bad092cf183ed89243200a9c700cb229dbba595f3a69867e8e315bf5
30773 F20090919_AABRVX UFLC75_Page_017.QC.jpg c8007f34a877de581488bbbb3321010f4b4b76a7ce3a3cc70a8050761ac07c2d8ec5e07a
13179 F20090919_AABSCH UFLC75_Page_100.QC.jpg 35076af2c8b642ccc587daf8c6639fd1269706b96283cd22a7763d5d30e65f6588c971e8
4695 F20090919_AABSBS UFLC75_Page_092thm.jpg 48e9d6e2f0b225e99978c7093ce1f91fca6122cef728fe7a8b61f633f96a5f3e016f78df
17867 F20090919_AABRXB UFLC75_Page_032.QC.jpg 5202fa51c4fa399eaa8d40dacc9f98346800f8bad41f2ddfeaa8b2e8e542e2a120813ada
7197 F20090919_AABRWM UFLC75_Page_024thm.jpg 8a9503f1ed4952fbca9095f293dd2bd68aaa57c04c844195018fe346462fdc14a010ff24
7558 F20090919_AABRVY UFLC75_Page_017thm.jpg ab007d187af2f074a123aa963a3670d6b5cdfeff12813db8f84eaec9939bdc28e951ef01
4479 F20090919_AABSCI UFLC75_Page_100thm.jpg 3137cb7cd65de65e8416d37d3c184d87ca9c068f74fc9f825bda19f2112f6eb64563dbd9
17550 F20090919_AABSBT UFLC75_Page_093.QC.jpg c4de518b223fc25ddc64e37c674a6dcd8fc706c61af0bc799a72fd121e275a45503bae64
5532 F20090919_AABRXC UFLC75_Page_032thm.jpg 7e5b0381cbcaa82590551d67f501bf204f2b65f49e5f596c63083ef1f60f3352b95b2d9b
28812 F20090919_AABRWN UFLC75_Page_025.QC.jpg 42328fd8f13037bc5a4327ff6642b040c0af051cc70dcf9c9b1e2c94cf6a1af7c07c8a5f
24369 F20090919_AABRVZ UFLC75_Page_018.QC.jpg 8a23dacbf56a7150b88e7ef47829af1fa6007f6ad376104b524ffc7705431f58f42aa385
17715 F20090919_AABSCJ UFLC75_Page_101.QC.jpg 18d2fa0e8c8ee5c906afddc7c63307efb5bc4c9f12a07908c02c49795ab7258c890d2837
5271 F20090919_AABSBU UFLC75_Page_093thm.jpg 36c32a264665076361f05c5ce67caba70f1c77fe76b2ea8e1e17c4f798a94e9949212479
19050 F20090919_AABRXD UFLC75_Page_033.QC.jpg 2da5376d2eccfa880f833b4862d935c98d1be419b3a9ff9e377939d636a48be3bc69a8a6
7419 F20090919_AABRWO UFLC75_Page_025thm.jpg 54c16f8f3a256e40853f39f0c2043e5e149a5ca8069cbad2315ae5be5ce28fd0c3036374
5036 F20090919_AABSCK UFLC75_Page_101thm.jpg 6bc351b34ea7a2b4d441454b593e43effa375308ab3526ca597281e58601e6a8a5fdeb7b
21588 F20090919_AABSBV UFLC75_Page_094.QC.jpg 8bc42538d7c65c0688fd8cb914a97d8704d3c28812c75e92a1fa32d68b66da464561bc8d
5734 F20090919_AABRXE UFLC75_Page_033thm.jpg a02e2917ba1892d8f650c798e67e882a818db2a8511d94157c70975319e9125006d5c6a6
29961 F20090919_AABRWP UFLC75_Page_026.QC.jpg 066d8c0f90cae1372040a6eaa31dd71136321fb8856027631474b43068aeb9ba348c0529
19514 F20090919_AABSCL UFLC75_Page_102.QC.jpg 2438f052b1533b04c622546e39415786a2c32302cbe6054c468e6ae83174d8fcc9085dcc
6015 F20090919_AABSBW UFLC75_Page_094thm.jpg 1a14269ef4e29d26d81e461cbcd22231e81c5f32fe95a7b6ff5e4ffee26e8eb5c02532fa
24499 F20090919_AABRXF UFLC75_Page_034.QC.jpg ff071cfba23b61a1fa48dd7e83627b3746e479d7d237ef94cb27f665873633fb91a22500
7709 F20090919_AABRWQ UFLC75_Page_026thm.jpg 03c899ef33f5921859f857e32fa0db136df5a97858be6f67a29a0f592345c75553ab56f9
5474 F20090919_AABSDA UFLC75_Page_109thm.jpg 5054481a9f884d02e6eef433a4c38a9b691d1cb67e5485d54d964ec2c7a410a521d2a8b4
5562 F20090919_AABSCM UFLC75_Page_102thm.jpg 5f293ca1925ee1a2dcd015075caea052cecda00adb11b9c5467ebb8a09f17cf4ca7ad878
14142 F20090919_AABSBX UFLC75_Page_095.QC.jpg 067cbf4ab8c883db12ac5b5ee5aa86856da9348e734143f1682991b0cb5d0b14d7867924
29972 F20090919_AABRWR UFLC75_Page_027.QC.jpg 0c191da21b7f81da1f49f3265692907e0ef0fe985bf309e1ef6cef85257f956024b0debe
17899 F20090919_AABSDB UFLC75_Page_110.QC.jpg 02f0c58961b34d81e07444225645d625106f8a293aa305feb7d52a24ba35a4afc39363fc
19039 F20090919_AABSCN UFLC75_Page_103.QC.jpg 06c89ebb408cddc24b7c2118cc7f2702da01b3c793ca38c6fe7053b04bd54aba363b8cc5
4859 F20090919_AABSBY UFLC75_Page_095thm.jpg 0d44700b4507e40527830f45143dacd3e20fa173598f4c4a1a2a58333f52d94d2e30afa7
6768 F20090919_AABRXG UFLC75_Page_034thm.jpg 75218254edfddd4c93ca837903dca44bfdee6726030fb1419805798de3dafc95b13941cd
7503 F20090919_AABRWS UFLC75_Page_027thm.jpg ea8dc0ab50aef13a0d069fb5ac50a3e181d96e885fb41e55dd34b3772d7f4ce00cb5f600
5383 F20090919_AABSDC UFLC75_Page_110thm.jpg 5cd39410c262963019688d1f163cf4acf87d849a91ecafca877757830d44bb290ca47cc5
5528 F20090919_AABSCO UFLC75_Page_103thm.jpg baed5c21c56d3ef0a1d3833763c0d46f5d5dcccfc8d591cb330113d782fc510e176b8967
17618 F20090919_AABSBZ UFLC75_Page_096.QC.jpg 50af6b07b5f41506812400a979d10e37c4e19ce4ec9c691609701808178803a676663b31
28898 F20090919_AABRWT UFLC75_Page_028.QC.jpg 514288603959bac3141df42588817c9b8e4518521bf95a6d28dbd106db02c44b00ccc47d
54314 F20090919_AABRAA UFLC75_Page_115.jpg c68bbfa466e8fa9f48424ac3ee1dc08f2d46bca7c3bc572cd044a3ef9282a4114089967b
28022 F20090919_AABRXH UFLC75_Page_035.QC.jpg ebf0c0f78de7e0e1315cafb13b651a5c15daf725c99745db3f586c501fccdeec6fe08d17
16435 F20090919_AABSDD UFLC75_Page_111.QC.jpg f345e959a7fdfca48c40184fc861298d8c1b73d0ea020617cf70b7181c7d15be9d58d963
18473 F20090919_AABSCP UFLC75_Page_104.QC.jpg f487fa7ff2970914b01c7b67b1362d44d61ef87175255638279748042db50ded6c767196
7582 F20090919_AABRWU UFLC75_Page_028thm.jpg d97ffadec5493eb6db6f770e16f7b3faff12e71e50800c940ffe934afb2b9b4de1bccdb7
42851 F20090919_AABRAB UFLC75_Page_116.jpg f4ee43f81be8e9f6403bab8bd2027e4b979ca0f16cf46579b82c446329fc70df40c853a4
7364 F20090919_AABRXI UFLC75_Page_035thm.jpg eb553b56079201a0a233a8c795b78043ae9201f2b4e27d6261980012d18eaf8ae6d84023
5010 F20090919_AABSDE UFLC75_Page_111thm.jpg ced0d4079e67e044791f247fadad882f263e1b81c00ffa77a5327814f3b328ab9155ff9e
24431 F20090919_AABRWV UFLC75_Page_029.QC.jpg 0b3e03b9efb17b28bfd26bfa021bb9a52ae62d64228a05762d80ff88254076eb96c184d8
58846 F20090919_AABRAC UFLC75_Page_117.jpg 9066b04cc7171560ee6e40ee9d808bec5371a604a9bbd1f07733e323fe4ffd829ae8a60f
21872 F20090919_AABRXJ UFLC75_Page_036.QC.jpg 80efa54ba9e87264ffa48261aac65882d0586b63aa348fb44041d95e94ecdf862a21b7ad
18764 F20090919_AABSDF UFLC75_Page_112.QC.jpg 99b48c9942c3af700d5fbbf9e1bcd19e2bdf0f230ee15695199f25a7377e3b8e8538d1cd
5553 F20090919_AABSCQ UFLC75_Page_104thm.jpg ef783a2a4ddb7056fc74ceaca21e8ab923a94566c15172a96d355539f99168a414015e77
6809 F20090919_AABRWW UFLC75_Page_029thm.jpg 0c004040364b9b39bc96b152c62786555fb297dbd90b99fbb82f9646a4d95837f81dd3a5
85413 F20090919_AABRAD UFLC75_Page_118.jpg 160519827dc896720e088453a2be06d0d09b4f7b0b07eb32acb319b2949879e06c4f2e0b
5999 F20090919_AABRXK UFLC75_Page_036thm.jpg d06d8e45a021542f42427cf91659f06920e4523417c1b2e8232bb3f0616acaf8b8ad5540
5447 F20090919_AABSDG UFLC75_Page_112thm.jpg 99955fc1353023bf037dac893fb7a321ea2587f2a68fd5ac5aa3fc93789f3bbda13f4621
18358 F20090919_AABSCR UFLC75_Page_105.QC.jpg 25f31f10e4ff0acaba62b0108329ab38283f15b9e4c953adeb47e246c174604d90890b53
25489 F20090919_AABRWX UFLC75_Page_030.QC.jpg 8596d236c00ffa59c9c257b801deabed976aa6082138282f9140a8a93a218605b4b600bc
83197 F20090919_AABRAE UFLC75_Page_119.jpg 3c485c6816c17a8d3d342dce628595f705707ea12ea11ecfaac593cf560e1ca4e8542957
6953 F20090919_AABRYA UFLC75_Page_044thm.jpg b5bf852d7bd5458b64fde602c558935f1baeae1b926d0672ccd0170d937ccae266d6f164
26999 F20090919_AABRXL UFLC75_Page_037.QC.jpg 9b7c7bc8e235bbe5aeffd3a80492f6c9296a0aaf9c8594a4d6ddd345ccb256bbfdc3999c
21434 F20090919_AABSDH UFLC75_Page_113.QC.jpg 2c7b36716eb057a084fce65a29f52d396a9e4cb559fc7c88e97c708f70ecc2589826ab7b
5697 F20090919_AABSCS UFLC75_Page_105thm.jpg cbcdf0887b40998591ac02edd58592fb89034e4e3d83f53e06c92328afefc4c17abb68fe
6852 F20090919_AABRWY UFLC75_Page_030thm.jpg 725aa245a8815471afa5c24c83fe16065cd17e2f6583f371c50dd987e5de3761454b12a9
100980 F20090919_AABRAF UFLC75_Page_120.jpg 1e6d079654d905b08e50f2bdacb30d4e7611864b64d84c768d941d9a60682f850050eff1
19714 F20090919_AABRYB UFLC75_Page_045.QC.jpg 368bf299755a6cfc79fd6abebd7f7476f94eefa7989b7ec9bbacc663c4e6feb33072c162
7172 F20090919_AABRXM UFLC75_Page_037thm.jpg 38378ea6dd4a5363299747368a78c1008dc1e915b8c98ee140a0831efdd4437e292afa4e
6050 F20090919_AABSDI UFLC75_Page_113thm.jpg fb8b3847e98fbcdca9ff65da3741f0a75d054ee1973ee1e1e0f9cf5b8c2dea2d7f7efed3
17490 F20090919_AABSCT UFLC75_Page_106.QC.jpg 2a79cd98187fcdc61f248b1044a4aef9b9c3c91657177f2fa6f7ce48d75ccc91d9727cc1
29866 F20090919_AABRWZ UFLC75_Page_031.QC.jpg 6a7a2a3a69a13019c2fc930100d2ce7a5f16af706dc6b84f4cb773854af560af6d72df09
24807 F20090919_AABRAG UFLC75_Page_121.jpg 662569159461663b39c23d242b1e4a593e04423903d3c2437cef395410bf3c0cab3134c2
5794 F20090919_AABRYC UFLC75_Page_045thm.jpg a8c2be5fc456f9b53d28d2d8ffec0a55b755e5f46bda14750171306738421ab3b3d6830d
23415 F20090919_AABRXN UFLC75_Page_038.QC.jpg c314c698d0e28d91c02bfbf7278c23d2b4694fb173fcb186ce1486c9c294588389419daf
29625 F20090919_AABSDJ UFLC75_Page_114.QC.jpg 16509df661a80d1e7b125b8c37863777515172a9c1d3e7dad0e95513c5e399718c1246ab
5291 F20090919_AABSCU UFLC75_Page_106thm.jpg 8cbb24bdb3e6f121945aa82ad063a356f8c5a4e4610729de72ea4ca3ea3d8810232dffc8
38261 F20090919_AABRAH UFLC75_Page_122.jpg 68c4560fbe326accae993a49c4a5732c25c4560c2fa652820ebef611ae5dd9fb4aae3d9f
17029 F20090919_AABRYD UFLC75_Page_046.QC.jpg 6b2190376085acea0bd521673065ce2aaae8a7c82b37b189283dc126f077a0b6920035a8
6078 F20090919_AABRXO UFLC75_Page_038thm.jpg 0210a561ad3b022a4b1919b0ace04fd10a6b76c6f6d84b3bdd46b033c00954df8db6e65a
7247 F20090919_AABSDK UFLC75_Page_114thm.jpg 4f69005a43b2545427bb8c885b25a6c1922b6712e384978a2b091ee722fcd29e899ae80a
15996 F20090919_AABSCV UFLC75_Page_107.QC.jpg 02a2be758eaa89b51653c3998ec8d044f2fdf84e30496c96ae679c991050e51321611630
70020 F20090919_AABRAI UFLC75_Page_123.jpg f7219ff5cee37091667bdb01523e655ecbbd70046b3b0b6dc5583bc4c28ab86ca2654ac0
F20090919_AABRYE UFLC75_Page_046thm.jpg 8ac8c55f19d0e289f9aba1dfadf022563d6667a6e6906765bdd7ca1602abc622e870c96a
26919 F20090919_AABRXP UFLC75_Page_039.QC.jpg af7be6a210bbbc2df0edb1e70711b963e1ab982b7a90e8abedd31fc06b92c1c23b64b157
17450 F20090919_AABSDL UFLC75_Page_115.QC.jpg 867db1db84acb6ba7975b6b609c9392fb3c10974e7df4c782772c832a1522a8f6ebd81d5
5097 F20090919_AABSCW UFLC75_Page_107thm.jpg 78d5057912b32da9e0fdf4e26a63307eea39afe4823157a21b00e9eb32ef6f35df34d7ef
43619 F20090919_AABRAJ UFLC75_Page_124.jpg 633c25768f5b15c8beca873b05ff2566be24eb727491b7c42f6d27f33abf3e53fc098da5
27444 F20090919_AABRYF UFLC75_Page_047.QC.jpg 9c7da7f8a704e4ca13171a9d3c3737ce0acf48a0be177dc38fe034fd19cc5ee9dbf0cd2e
6917 F20090919_AABRXQ UFLC75_Page_039thm.jpg 560a31dbbd5e9f48c5424deac32c1bca08524c4b6447494a6e75ac84ac95cec8c61cb02f
4369 F20090919_AABSEA UFLC75_Page_122thm.jpg 62e85bca9fae75c141a0728ac5e4eb5902be8fe9719185bb4adb508be2f1630309b5038a
5395 F20090919_AABSDM UFLC75_Page_115thm.jpg c9c5b615c2fd6ee63ad271bfd5392f1ea6b677dc30220b70b33a87c14a017e32cd62159c
16676 F20090919_AABSCX UFLC75_Page_108.QC.jpg 8812ef8025da4541ef9d4f5c847ac319dd14112fe530811f8b7492d9be79c4ebbdb5d916
58221 F20090919_AABRAK UFLC75_Page_125.jpg 75da2d2332998a26e8711762fba20951a9d1fc916be23a3d0fec777ec016910bd5e734ef
6899 F20090919_AABRYG UFLC75_Page_047thm.jpg 5c3a0da0f8e6ad055cd383951613d9377329936aee73c7fd8ddb4543237840db27e1e5b9
17770 F20090919_AABRXR UFLC75_Page_040.QC.jpg ecdfb3452d0b8e270335b2e1ffd122f61362de565386b90a1a912e93c74b1f2f0658505a
20084 F20090919_AABSEB UFLC75_Page_123.QC.jpg 7a34fc9084754e07cb33d95d8b7b56a99f9049e8aece757f7199f2872a03f496cd0c3b40
14184 F20090919_AABSDN UFLC75_Page_116.QC.jpg f6d00e6c2a22d2bdbd35d23101cc9d47f45fd9ac020fc87742dece575517f8f376fbe069
5166 F20090919_AABSCY UFLC75_Page_108thm.jpg 5171ccb65d67511e5752a6e1222934b629562d25147184f93ff5b10e97afb6e15f133880
87962 F20090919_AABRAL UFLC75_Page_126.jpg 86e7e134ba5c85df2256d75259e8ae2f2c070ae4234fe6e8dba51b8b4abcd3d909a71e2c
5679 F20090919_AABRXS UFLC75_Page_040thm.jpg 4dfca102b67078cc67f3a47af5f5b60323f092501a11955665cf4c76060cbf3c33d86aad
5633 F20090919_AABSEC UFLC75_Page_123thm.jpg 2ecab54a922d9ecc6d17f56638a4b0a166416252ef0bae70206dceedcd112e5b88edca0d
4626 F20090919_AABSDO UFLC75_Page_116thm.jpg 4084994f213bd059b947fe459aa99b67a9fa0843fa1a9be3b74ada8707e2905361f222c6
18127 F20090919_AABSCZ UFLC75_Page_109.QC.jpg 8d7b16c67ae1ea52edffd842e62637b8a0ab32f8dc7a178d2ac658f46a409b3fdfb0c2dd
12523 F20090919_AABRAM UFLC75_Page_127.jpg 251803e15a614f998008b44fcaf4aac5a43bf40849de7c18289bed25fd5bed0c81fe9a40
19825 F20090919_AABRYH UFLC75_Page_048.QC.jpg 817fdcfc84061d7410c701409cbe3178c6b4e727f927ec30271e77097db1286ca48add12
26123 F20090919_AABRXT UFLC75_Page_041.QC.jpg 742cb43ee9262e2f86e28704121c92562efdd1b3fb68ad8367062ac2fc483947bba20e6e
115519 F20090919_AABRBA UFLC75_Page_012.jp2 06e2e7f1e175d20f68ceca88fb9df36d2e2c7bc59bc769866cfde96a5c796c8f4df0dedb
14262 F20090919_AABSED UFLC75_Page_124.QC.jpg 8abcaafe3d3484e0d936ff83125d1f175691bfc9f313a0d74712313bc87c280140f14cac
18214 F20090919_AABSDP UFLC75_Page_117.QC.jpg fcb63b53c74275f8250fb6520b5d7348dafc9e6de70f29a93fa05d7aaa14385982468a5e
118699 F20090919_AABRAN UFLC75summary_Page_1.jpg 4303b6d03544fdcb3ea0b18abf57762db2a9d4b0231cac56aa5a0dfb840fb9bb7632907f
5832 F20090919_AABRYI UFLC75_Page_048thm.jpg c54518f4a891e98787d0473652bd1d417ede6f2357350e67b1fc517dc56640fc740674c2
6904 F20090919_AABRXU UFLC75_Page_041thm.jpg 3e761b3800d28a385b77f343a4fee11d6bf9f03b27877dbd55d5138ab0b45338c607aba8
104636 F20090919_AABRBB UFLC75_Page_013.jp2 3d89d8c10636a55a9c8ae8c1ab83c0afb63b6dbe3d50846e1d0b73ed17d650d5fbd2fbbe
4758 F20090919_AABSEE UFLC75_Page_124thm.jpg 5fa8aea36aef367a91686dc29c3012ae82d130c2bd70da462bd14593a560f14a04660759
5269 F20090919_AABSDQ UFLC75_Page_117thm.jpg dab506c8e569a56b42bf7e4f8c540d00d6f6c08de604cdff0997cb341f8a084091f974d0
60995 F20090919_AABRAO UFLC75summary_Page_2.jpg e9115502024c489031c871ec5d76de444d70c9fed81fa7755a3d93b73e2a8b008af657af
19880 F20090919_AABRYJ UFLC75_Page_049.QC.jpg 89c301ff89a25328c61af246ebf082654ead0db249fd115ba9c977f9534ed03ec7fc1f88
22292 F20090919_AABRXV UFLC75_Page_042.QC.jpg 4bf1fd1cc7b3ec8e78e7f3ce43a4e4d383b00cc1da98ccf70430a22af9a384b3f4f6fb58
88980 F20090919_AABRBC UFLC75_Page_014.jp2 15271c5575e3d31c0c5d84a6272bcbfa0d694a5ca94011ec3759eaf6c0395303825bb865
17628 F20090919_AABSEF UFLC75_Page_125.QC.jpg 457dda33fca650e442534652eae39e3d09bf80d1582e6a5467fff354911a44f690e0a844
5792 F20090919_AABRYK UFLC75_Page_049thm.jpg 4c4d1347b941f9060c2c9abd5989b14f0d857bca3cf985f06f6f25a65cff2d8bf22b2ad0
6316 F20090919_AABRXW UFLC75_Page_042thm.jpg 0311d0a48ccf82d972f175767fc9dd3e01973bbffbc75fc05d2670875603e342e6978d43
77806 F20090919_AABRBD UFLC75_Page_015.jp2 76ffeb158376a58039cbcc6ae7a62a07d91dc28888ec8e544d222c05e4d5ba04d59d2425
5629 F20090919_AABSEG UFLC75_Page_125thm.jpg 3ab5457f89706710c96083430faac64cd01c60059cb2739d4b6ab048241df29c67ddd7bc
24144 F20090919_AABSDR UFLC75_Page_118.QC.jpg 6bb828aa5b89ca7ffaf3746a4011958d9c8f1ffb2048d7bc0df9a8373b8ee769dc163475
74364 F20090919_AABRAP UFLC75_Page_001.jp2 36b45699495a754d7fc27a8e46fe6b54ac2a467f35e58d55669f5faf8975cc0bdc50ff58
5524 F20090919_AABRZA UFLC75_Page_057thm.jpg a3dfc33e01b9aa48dc61a591bb6361329b8968b34ac09a4669b2de0663a6b372e01c06f2
22751 F20090919_AABRYL UFLC75_Page_050.QC.jpg 179861d6806cb7ee0db2d6bd154f59c4256f2e7e496f8df99e16bc928d94d3e90cdbf1d8
22998 F20090919_AABRXX UFLC75_Page_043.QC.jpg 301e1dc3dcc94c52c4506772b4de42e98300b88b267b305d1b11096da8a6f568bd53b596
133268 F20090919_AABRBE UFLC75_Page_016.jp2 5b49a82a1bba95fcd607af7be2bf21ad072569d87ba1a0817cb36eb8b65a1c5922c9d252
23411 F20090919_AABSEH UFLC75_Page_126.QC.jpg d509775ceb5f3abf1c85bd1c26eeaf1e76f784a70d705da3ccfaf8e0770314f751147104
6377 F20090919_AABSDS UFLC75_Page_118thm.jpg 9140c8d49038f0bf7ebb0f3588fd606c1b3dfa6558b4908e2e41b94fcb9f313f2d54f47d
102238 F20090919_AABRAQ UFLC75_Page_002.jp2 073e0b061c6eaca975abae573c635997d81399ea9ce13802c78d25f62e070330c5b9c9b9
21891 F20090919_AABRZB UFLC75_Page_058.QC.jpg 4b832fffbaaf66826806ac416fc0948bc046d0cd036e051f8bcfff4d29d36127655b0982
6021 F20090919_AABRYM UFLC75_Page_050thm.jpg c73f5b454314be4fb687166bb202ac3bf19beebe5eed96081b61e7fe0c745f9d9ab38712
6335 F20090919_AABRXY UFLC75_Page_043thm.jpg bf72f78bc2e94f7f169ffd8cd787c27b8ba15b278add47d28168dcd87f5c9aa86dc7f3b4
145004 F20090919_AABRBF UFLC75_Page_017.jp2 cdf709377cd489b015245bdf52140576fb0cdf0e496187116555f6a1a947acc36a0f90b0
6310 F20090919_AABSEI UFLC75_Page_126thm.jpg 38a0ad42b809107cf4db57d5d2a35d734d960cc63ee0b03859e80cbead01abb67a258560
23399 F20090919_AABSDT UFLC75_Page_119.QC.jpg 6597f75a5734bbba82d6e1f665d34d2f41ff798635beda4ab8c413add637b0dc5bce5cd2
81774 F20090919_AABQWA UFLC75_Page_011.jpg c13aa7940ea0ee9de1a64bab1a1b5e749023853bf6b65e637d2a595a85684269efcf7214
118824 F20090919_AABRAR UFLC75_Page_003.jp2 508eb20cc2c0b9cc65b79ee93b87d70a735dfc26f12952d21f758adfc32518383511dc56
6345 F20090919_AABRZC UFLC75_Page_058thm.jpg a7bc9150cb9f32adbfc9fddd5a753768da34eb46acde6fc164418183bbeeeb1daf05b44a
18232 F20090919_AABRYN UFLC75_Page_051.QC.jpg a372e8ca4062302d5f55212f2f6cddc531f5b016713fa6bf5872f062a634edca846a3b53
27361 F20090919_AABRXZ UFLC75_Page_044.QC.jpg d2e88f8aed7e1a99409764d2821916aa18c3fb32c456e01ad3a77ee1b805e20de623d5f4
105869 F20090919_AABRBG UFLC75_Page_018.jp2 25fdc190521b560f2fc12e12aea2a99407cef39f26654a5da5651add47780567ac8bad7e
3851 F20090919_AABSEJ UFLC75_Page_127.QC.jpg c95b3c9709b909d3c6347a81db575d9aa43caf1675f3a8cb57f99f6a5ec9f848831fe878
6446 F20090919_AABSDU UFLC75_Page_119thm.jpg eb42c73505c10a3499e3a1be8b433cdbcca2ee28c806fe4ce5b0426068ae07be14fa9c50
89573 F20090919_AABQWB UFLC75_Page_012.jpg 5d586a85c2dd8b80cf00adba9d858e5df51363c2b9e56d77e845706dcfeffc311b82f070
119443 F20090919_AABRAS UFLC75_Page_004.jp2 a9fd136d0f2438115eaaa06cc946e8a95d9e3340bff8ce9affc160ad02fc1edb70a30e77
22317 F20090919_AABRZD UFLC75_Page_059.QC.jpg 3ac01cc212dfda86c3c2d2158ce2f68ec09e139aa9de14fe7c0f0cce9b50d84908d942fb
5742 F20090919_AABRYO UFLC75_Page_051thm.jpg 3bd2626123cfadfef100d1194a5b622616c1e90bf82aee3c435077267a1092d5e6ae6063
87602 F20090919_AABRBH UFLC75_Page_019.jp2 66f9dc917872fa68af692ec3e6b7f5d87d9238974dda7c1217ea8214e5d98fe679d4f452
1599 F20090919_AABSEK UFLC75_Page_127thm.jpg 1f5776fe563b14426d60171c0bed40530fc64c0f07b48653247df7a1645a55a7b7c0d32f
27135 F20090919_AABSDV UFLC75_Page_120.QC.jpg f4d66dc2b44e5e67633d0d04963815fd69c1eaf482e18aac9bd48c91a42528646b7eeef3
82732 F20090919_AABQWC UFLC75_Page_013.jpg 541406c529088e194d88db3b016d3bc8bf7dc86049a55a5d5e546358abb5a37dcf580ca5
98503 F20090919_AABRAT UFLC75_Page_005.jp2 a656e055a346255015d0d78a8a9c44453f1e515fbe6a95cc1bfe0b0625e8de110ff87dbf
5810 F20090919_AABRZE UFLC75_Page_059thm.jpg 42b54642b6141cc4e36b6754d7aa61191958c31ebf45aad3882f16bce0a133d12311a980
196500 F20090919_AABQVN UF00006390_00001.mets FULL 5885086369c9d6568f04702eee2e4f552aeed7a7548adb04efadda52638081c14fcf5757
13700 F20090919_AABRYP UFLC75_Page_052.QC.jpg fa0008bfa86a071748296edd673911bc48856f1a796b7a4232ab12e9456e108ac390655c
79101 F20090919_AABRBI UFLC75_Page_020.jp2 feaf11b0a5a7ac410d2c89cc6a8f5f2b30d5c8e07b692b26dce11f6e6b6cd7030cd27206
242005 F20090919_AABSEL UF00006390_00001.xml 15f19afa813010bfca6648b560092378610cca9b6462524f505bc90e9f5c0f6d76d92ca2
7094 F20090919_AABSDW UFLC75_Page_120thm.jpg 7c0264c1ecfeabd2e9efd4b081fa9d6452e97aa2455e4652146bcdbb242bb75cec5b48f4
70592 F20090919_AABQWD UFLC75_Page_014.jpg bfac31425d951b48aa553d30c84399f14ac7e88e6d14e2e4551f0be2851b7316d686bcb8
94611 F20090919_AABRAU UFLC75_Page_006.jp2 0ea19df8cbe60088eea5861a4e83d01a503fabc6ba2fbe0d00f93a619f6c5be1e7ea9c27
18651 F20090919_AABRZF UFLC75_Page_060.QC.jpg c0b93c80788fc4813a4b8b38b769789db95ab98c19f0657e1b9f5c16d63c7e2e13e45367
4594 F20090919_AABRYQ UFLC75_Page_052thm.jpg 52bbcd2df5e235914293ab00faad8ebfca6023ef22875b250bd0b93b5acb5118c445ddd7
129403 F20090919_AABRBJ UFLC75_Page_021.jp2 c9171a984fd17e0b283f4c281a750e90fa10c24409b0bad5d6bc574b06447348d2e4737c
8499 F20090919_AABSDX UFLC75_Page_121.QC.jpg 28ce5a2670ad7aa3844f45168b3d6b285a5e0e8397601a58d31eb278802b8ad093326dd4
60157 F20090919_AABQWE UFLC75_Page_015.jpg 53f2bf7cf2ffb76c342ca7c85a1fa5177236e16589662d148fb5b15a5527c11e2023dcc2
88476 F20090919_AABRAV UFLC75_Page_007.jp2 5ff1d33cd2ef0bc12efc642f3db06e2abba72d44ffed97d63959c0776a4ff90dabae7bac
5636 F20090919_AABRZG UFLC75_Page_060thm.jpg d71b3d80f75b0cd86e39376f24ec1e6862b6a1efca42e502792a1b4e8cf19de6abbd9f80
27385 F20090919_AABRYR UFLC75_Page_053.QC.jpg da4e24aa587c3f73f4c74b0e7d665afa0003466cdc4d5474e0ff15d56044b3e0bebfdf1c
108449 F20090919_AABRBK UFLC75_Page_022.jp2 ff65b47ddfaed365b29b154cbd53823d603ae6415f39b6dd6880e74cd6e0e5efa826e909
3162 F20090919_AABSDY UFLC75_Page_121thm.jpg bc72564973dad511d43741800dbd4a07e7b43e6146848fea664dc035436a84cf470b9800
104385 F20090919_AABQWF UFLC75_Page_016.jpg 120769be2bd969b12e3acfdcdc246d5bf0ff2d572e856feb9406159e6e2824a7943144df
93294 F20090919_AABRAW UFLC75_Page_008.jp2 734991a6bb1a0b44e0928c15aa047017d166bd17e17ef3fb43264b8050d3440d9b597038
16397 F20090919_AABRZH UFLC75_Page_061.QC.jpg adb0198956f9f2e5ee9c1eb3b23d5764fcdb57ed422028612d34f59e9219f50809939a54
59761 F20090919_AABQVQ UFLC75_Page_001.jpg ce8cee868d53c79a2a4d8af6ea11cde5cb0f2a80510df4629f0726159432b78d00471c4b
7016 F20090919_AABRYS UFLC75_Page_053thm.jpg 56d95ed9d57fb02b2b0ead5846aef6f73b203fd9c0915ec2e95d72739cfc0be54e998e50
56551 F20090919_AABRBL UFLC75_Page_023.jp2 6e260b5bf07e01b2d3498dd2f50975d3ae6a97b689d777318af18d7b5089df422e1451f2
12098 F20090919_AABSDZ UFLC75_Page_122.QC.jpg 387b85f96759cc15d17434d175dce383554df5fd32e56fcf401f6b2f669ce095168e50b6
115640 F20090919_AABRAX UFLC75_Page_009.jp2 db8a1f082aa316b2a6534e32628ad7f945eee3a5ccaf8e671ff0957fc7a09a4adac7a2f2
82202 F20090919_AABQVR UFLC75_Page_002.jpg e5084bfd4a4ec11d20e9087fe1e64c194a2d5b0562549e7eadd8de254cdca4dc68371134
F20090919_AABRYT UFLC75_Page_054.QC.jpg 5838dd1413fbf89ce8c5bd435575d90e33a06a0c4148ac7994b6083fa68a7e0b05c22486
120342 F20090919_AABRCA UFLC75_Page_038.jp2 bdf85e266b6706cc7f96f1bc57b875d0a2127e287caafd039c5b039e1cc422cb87058c67
118226 F20090919_AABRBM UFLC75_Page_024.jp2 fb7cdb852ffb301c11005f276e428d24ef39cab000e356a2e29f4cdee7172eb76aaed47a
115120 F20090919_AABQWG UFLC75_Page_017.jpg d30c4508784af5d9eca23fa1e19a11ad498354875d2f8978f24381d2de1cb4d0c9e8ad66
128607 F20090919_AABRAY UFLC75_Page_010.jp2 b14c605452ed795022f7857607c627cddfc0bc732acbee173db400de28d439f98184309d
5262 F20090919_AABRZI UFLC75_Page_061thm.jpg e04d65b9fe12829c96a449f9c2a1f1727009cc1cf5ad50b474aa7736f2194778aea2ae10
94077 F20090919_AABQVS UFLC75_Page_003.jpg cf326c95349500bca2d60a9408a3f51bccef3369e4cd207abe45eadcff561e4c2cc5ca11
5906 F20090919_AABRYU UFLC75_Page_054thm.jpg 8942f3768dde6a6b06692b321f49f1deeaf50be832344e7147bd6ce1ac4f574b5ed69387
148743 F20090919_AABRCB UFLC75_Page_039.jp2 8abddd5ee5d01707eed0d8a2ad53fe4b625e11abaf205699116b756cf444b8d3cd77b427
135184 F20090919_AABRBN UFLC75_Page_025.jp2 ad4a29d60756a0a296adf312579f033bd866a5955a782582e9569a9a00a2ec65cff9ad94
84052 F20090919_AABQWH UFLC75_Page_018.jpg b13394457f5e13654358672b7c17ca91a9826860d6bbf4974bb6af9b5d299b078d6e014d
102624 F20090919_AABRAZ UFLC75_Page_011.jp2 d759165c7ee834885b322cd07bb6375537da655b4fe296e447c1cd311c02f4226279cab5
21954 F20090919_AABRZJ UFLC75_Page_062.QC.jpg ff0eadc272174ecd324ab108f7c06c09f2bd504529604607075ca73906a76be038198185
94516 F20090919_AABQVT UFLC75_Page_004.jpg b2e8da0e1dda3dfbc6a4a5fa60ea95f773ebbe866fab267cc82eeb7203ed2ff7ad70ab50
17259 F20090919_AABRYV UFLC75_Page_055.QC.jpg 5e76c7171bc861734f55e9fac7e2754251f1ac553e3f48005714284bff79f30432e15784
80656 F20090919_AABRCC UFLC75_Page_040.jp2 131d1046d21c18428c83ca96afb056e6ebe7854c357979a4126262f7af1a1936461583bc
139285 F20090919_AABRBO UFLC75_Page_026.jp2 5368c52b64c19e817c2f24142969996badaea290c6ce39d91a392f0401b7dd6b301440a1
66900 F20090919_AABQWI UFLC75_Page_019.jpg 30da76831895ddcabe7f67ae37828de3c3ff9149ee53d6176c397e256a2f7e13b951275d
6203 F20090919_AABRZK UFLC75_Page_062thm.jpg d71432f51012652423e4512bace506031cb0bebb8f5b8b15fc68865c584b8fbd55c9aa3b
77646 F20090919_AABQVU UFLC75_Page_005.jpg a851c77398cd5187d6306c48b950fcfedba2020d768d9b6c599af870b86e503bf86f19a0
5471 F20090919_AABRYW UFLC75_Page_055thm.jpg 6bb41088c8f153844aa14c38c6d5e13da8e5e5ec5e90ad9cf00e32ad2890c697adae772c
138626 F20090919_AABRCD UFLC75_Page_041.jp2 247fee352aba46673c989b9f02e03a2829306d502e0c804accb550437f84db4db159ff04
138134 F20090919_AABRBP UFLC75_Page_027.jp2 d8792f67ef789ce616eb0139e929fc0a2d261e272819ebaa710b2288777183265927ad28
63351 F20090919_AABQWJ UFLC75_Page_020.jpg bd3f66a1324b53b74e08df99e50120e03cbd82460de730d66b745cff06ebe73e12f3e9da
17157 F20090919_AABRZL UFLC75_Page_063.QC.jpg e86ea9181b213889e35ca1c41752c7a4be6f5b4d2d26b37094e6fcba2964b838ca9740df
76521 F20090919_AABQVV UFLC75_Page_006.jpg bfed5413fe550202927e198afca8b75c76457912adcb1f61ec540c873237ffe76d29ca97
13318 F20090919_AABRYX UFLC75_Page_056.QC.jpg 41330ba6dd1e4f1196ec397b42084dcc371ef05567560ace416dfa67ac11e369a75ab86b
113425 F20090919_AABRCE UFLC75_Page_042.jp2 c2b706ee7600644fe600cc766ec69c196e7b46fed581f04b8e784d21b24ecd3bf12a52db
101099 F20090919_AABQWK UFLC75_Page_021.jpg 401c9cd4c2a793817ff08774ec860b6bc1de9b3405d77f17be60abbfb72ebe714bae214b
5554 F20090919_AABRZM UFLC75_Page_063thm.jpg c8ffd0610d04d6ea8fd6e7ac479d154d93d7cef558c54293301b438e9313036298ef4ad2
70397 F20090919_AABQVW UFLC75_Page_007.jpg 4e1b099270d788cb81ef3f872ca64f4a19a2720a70c827436fbb249005a8c963934e3928
4398 F20090919_AABRYY UFLC75_Page_056thm.jpg a7840bac3d4503f88df4df420feb7dc8690b3d0394733682bfd18b7a7c6b2dd6a2aea43e
123151 F20090919_AABRCF UFLC75_Page_043.jp2 2965a09d9d16cf0350914a6e6bb218a0c8fa0b93656b97c24f7ecff1eb2c9a43a5ef9aea
139966 F20090919_AABRBQ UFLC75_Page_028.jp2 6954fcd2682bdcf51481f770ec22face698cbf06c26600aeccabfef43f787916f3c61250
86993 F20090919_AABQWL UFLC75_Page_022.jpg 838a9e2b6307e916bd4ebda9311e8258a2c08ed93aa4a7f0882581e6997bdf1ecb633d2e
18875 F20090919_AABRZN UFLC75_Page_064.QC.jpg af15f9445548906bc10c43f38767322697859ea268161da1b577b88e1a60b1328feccf78
73528 F20090919_AABQVX UFLC75_Page_008.jpg 5451d5de0ecd8e8fb4134494ef7f137773496f581f4e0b240b3e8cf1a3e437232038805d
18325 F20090919_AABRYZ UFLC75_Page_057.QC.jpg 6219b93260a84f8221d239883fcf0e8216b966ea419def69d1f0f6f275d46eb6651bed0c
149076 F20090919_AABRCG UFLC75_Page_044.jp2 2749957ca9db6c420bf61f06f01e112f1c191c11f7fd67f83b588d372e7167456aecd36b
96474 F20090919_AABQXA UFLC75_Page_037.jpg 2fb4e7732c3240bc69723681e6f2159bab856e5fde97d1cbf5cc4cd3ae18b5a300dcb061
108951 F20090919_AABRBR UFLC75_Page_029.jp2 f01b8ede7737d630e9f9bc9099e3e2625f8ce323b5d5d6c1c87ccb7f6188abec015f354b
47007 F20090919_AABQWM UFLC75_Page_023.jpg 714b4a16a0aad6762ab4616a8433b4f276798b783cddef5bf5b78f5939a99ba677e9a89c
5597 F20090919_AABRZO UFLC75_Page_064thm.jpg 574268c8f5d8c7181fa0de8c94c8330e09097c44c18aac03221cb03eb93d755d440b0b67
90064 F20090919_AABQVY UFLC75_Page_009.jpg 5ac76a4b5425626ee16af2b28c93c6dac31c6e2135d58de2769e3461430f2c8083404fb3
98556 F20090919_AABRCH UFLC75_Page_045.jp2 9b503c856a752d2c58e04581707c61bf4613eecae4c81542ad352be0ca289cbd6e73d2ad
80782 F20090919_AABQXB UFLC75_Page_038.jpg d994a9bbf74cee147b2ceabae0abf30b48543244568773c23b587570c8da4ad34f3c6c43
112559 F20090919_AABRBS UFLC75_Page_030.jp2 4dce254377118d3c295c40e0eb7f91d3bc8b9633fc0d87c83ecf24721ce3c03b218136ff
93487 F20090919_AABQWN UFLC75_Page_024.jpg 88226f3f50d033c4a90486cbfeec8a0973dffc9c01316c6f0d21052c61d7fbccdcdaf5f0
27885 F20090919_AABRZP UFLC75_Page_065.QC.jpg 80bb68b994d7e77f6f6b4dcad4039240f0d67907c6cad13939b35242f482950087bd612b
101459 F20090919_AABQVZ UFLC75_Page_010.jpg 963e92a6336122d712e0ceae0c2d8f686e9605c022912f06375907c8c8a0b911566ad2b8
79489 F20090919_AABRCI UFLC75_Page_046.jp2 b0c1cfdfa9a2f5f66eebecbed91f4bc0df1adeb56946dfbb55dca95b2741c9d6b1d84592
101481 F20090919_AABQXC UFLC75_Page_039.jpg 4eb4b9296e933d9f110e488babf3e6f04871bc1104cb39cd24124a421d84205f937b4b74
136967 F20090919_AABRBT UFLC75_Page_031.jp2 c336235d1632ebeefe821a686c2d00acda4fa2b13a36ff5cb2d3778f78ec9c76b8cd01e5
107061 F20090919_AABQWO UFLC75_Page_025.jpg 58cdeb2244718345d79bce3c695502481c50869d692f3b350dd6401f24d11fa2f206e54b
6941 F20090919_AABRZQ UFLC75_Page_065thm.jpg 94b305e1edb1445577529b742b336762286e22986609418963ef10ac351885a0df6bc751
151748 F20090919_AABRCJ UFLC75_Page_047.jp2 97e14651d5276294d167248081ebc1a11245efcbc30e80758c3c7873bb0a28088de3dcee
57165 F20090919_AABQXD UFLC75_Page_040.jpg 6ea4fd1e803f2f2dffc412f7cd50225383bbc2f5651c300e7ef35c62bd2bbe37b916e27d
72155 F20090919_AABRBU UFLC75_Page_032.jp2 d1ba20de79605095e319d772e0d0017532a53a915755a9527b799efd4326fb5ecee6dba6
110448 F20090919_AABQWP UFLC75_Page_026.jpg a749c2cbc00545a06cbdddbf446722c6ba878113a8db7a86a673ed99ea1f98d11c804e86
19306 F20090919_AABRZR UFLC75_Page_066.QC.jpg c8727cd4db54fd5da21e1bb2cb9824d44c28e8d4256a79c88f7718da475d358288bbefc2
97401 F20090919_AABRCK UFLC75_Page_048.jp2 c4b1e3220c38f26293b718394c10b8720e97e9625e01187bbf38d7771aee4aed14fa6024
95039 F20090919_AABQXE UFLC75_Page_041.jpg b7baf41a35768d116a57218e4939cfcd0951013780ebd452f07456449393cf80a29d01dc
74591 F20090919_AABRBV UFLC75_Page_033.jp2 1c0f490b4cdeb92f6eea41d3d92fcacb45adc3fe3e89e2bfa67efb32e3a3a1af5e4751ab
110230 F20090919_AABQWQ UFLC75_Page_027.jpg f2128dab75cf11669d2f4c2a56cb71a0940daedf25c03d11ba6e9bf48754ae7fc7863511
5638 F20090919_AABRZS UFLC75_Page_066thm.jpg 302169bd9886ae846ee882b51f672d871a2b1cc41c5f29bf7f139eba222bd6a4dc698307
94019 F20090919_AABRCL UFLC75_Page_049.jp2 c1cc7c5c02db993728598335d8321c630e3928fcfbf506d047f7fadfacff58625ca989c5
76387 F20090919_AABQXF UFLC75_Page_042.jpg c372872549d43bd784b39e70979f9cdf3018b99e06ac7dc6334b7469dacc814fc6c930e5
113382 F20090919_AABRBW UFLC75_Page_034.jp2 f1acf34debd438a84848884313e317ae0dab65bdf7527fc2993e5049bfe47f6f53db1252
24451 F20090919_AABRZT UFLC75_Page_067.QC.jpg 62566711953823ed58f58e77dd4973f9c92cb1fe0fbffb702545b813f4c4aa03cb05d93b
109025 F20090919_AABQWR UFLC75_Page_028.jpg b8796838aa5ae2234ad24b13b1b769d41e605768652ae262d0649d02010968c74ec3dc18
89812 F20090919_AABRDA UFLC75_Page_064.jp2 a2732333868a155437e8dbe4f1629ff66c590a407864693a3905af4ab1da44d302b9bd4f
111900 F20090919_AABRCM UFLC75_Page_050.jp2 88796b6caf5112dcd51762d1ccd2277e44ccae221150474202c592eb49a1b7ecc3cf2fe4
82115 F20090919_AABQXG UFLC75_Page_043.jpg 8ddf70b017b1ccceb58e5add86873b91fc652accaf4d03dec9c37f1feda11ddba50eae25
132044 F20090919_AABRBX UFLC75_Page_035.jp2 62d756958f337f379ae6f0bb3b21c4643922cfa7d0e92aedd26503cb908bac0be361c59d
6738 F20090919_AABRZU UFLC75_Page_067thm.jpg 0b54ff2bfb47e176a0b13b1c44649f06ffa4c18ec6e646cbbb60a30a850b95a17723942f
86287 F20090919_AABQWS UFLC75_Page_029.jpg 370d43436c3a95ca544f6a15e8acb8b001addffd0c92b2a90be9502a53b224ec121ab385
153026 F20090919_AABRDB UFLC75_Page_065.jp2 7ee8a2b4503060d571148ed0eeefb4049c0c7948c1a8747c8328d565fba3b7b7a5a2e5be
85264 F20090919_AABRCN UFLC75_Page_051.jp2 092f6e7e5b09297154588ed5f65163ddf7337c26e7d0da69d2cee3b2bde755ec350a0890
88635 F20090919_AABRBY UFLC75_Page_036.jp2 53ef1139dd6ab9acc9dd4225ae0641114125ea47bbe03925e06dda00bc72a52b1495d270
24744 F20090919_AABRZV UFLC75_Page_068.QC.jpg cfa05741e78cf0ef5a6b0300fc943393253eea910b8c20fbb46c9cb1dce1c64425af4b2a
89350 F20090919_AABQWT UFLC75_Page_030.jpg 7a78898a92a21a5b92254555cced5f53b36758ca4cc750f6e6af0885fb4922648703acbb
92129 F20090919_AABRDC UFLC75_Page_066.jp2 835ce0386ead46171cb6032377606bbeb4a15d9b71ccdb7f8563f9e4eb56829645a4108c
58341 F20090919_AABRCO UFLC75_Page_052.jp2 547ea30008444d901c103139c38ac1696e3f6182333f647cd51b54fd8ed733abd6f51a55
101356 F20090919_AABQXH UFLC75_Page_044.jpg a647d838e747db675041828da6554d331caea7c7b795635dd2aa8cba9342ae10725a767e
124526 F20090919_AABRBZ UFLC75_Page_037.jp2 2fc6541b9f89016096f1be4e0856ae276094db1b5ad13bc1207e939263298df598c40f88
6830 F20090919_AABRZW UFLC75_Page_068thm.jpg 87cb6f416061b8c54929718edcf9f81fd650e3e8d7c730206505f3498e1dc61d02bd3cf6
107871 F20090919_AABQWU UFLC75_Page_031.jpg ae6680702e8f5451a6a0c8e2da365ac87504b116ec3ea57f23258884050850d9918fbf6d
124521 F20090919_AABRDD UFLC75_Page_067.jp2 5bc1aded3e4be37e04736e3be1a1034034af8d5a77fee2441f1173d418d677f9c864955c
153523 F20090919_AABRCP UFLC75_Page_053.jp2 fb5b68535192e7688df206c595406e4c170f6e699af53e98dfb82452c94847b8451906d4
67739 F20090919_AABQXI UFLC75_Page_045.jpg 41ee32c28b4b31b7025a76dfcdba1024041b96efaa683e791ff86ca0e6d9575ced392df5
19808 F20090919_AABRZX UFLC75_Page_069.QC.jpg e6525394ecfa31b78dc0930914686a62ef515b75f3ebe2b150a1388e5fcea856136e055f
126792 F20090919_AABRDE UFLC75_Page_068.jp2 99b5e9d8c0f7cf1530149e639e91b4d4e7021286c2fde8d478142e0fce4ceda8d3849d18
97004 F20090919_AABRCQ UFLC75_Page_054.jp2 627c62cb8b806d018414e72a14b1f3442f847f6dd0b202782c776ee7929e837da12c87f4
55133 F20090919_AABQXJ UFLC75_Page_046.jpg 8c137a6e5b86a1a62a4aeb977ee406ef1aab7698fddd2b26e39bc413b63d7436423dd15c
55462 F20090919_AABQWV UFLC75_Page_032.jpg fb14ad21ca28993882022499677e75a9e8e6666c8ffc80e2de504594fa314031f7347c52
5904 F20090919_AABRZY UFLC75_Page_069thm.jpg 8641bf202a91f9298208ee17f085b4451f040ef9125c655b7068b93bf5d7844a41cf6074
99906 F20090919_AABRDF UFLC75_Page_069.jp2 6f588adc3a30d56434cb15706235c327b218ee1645ef13a915f57338189ab73fc112cb32
102270 F20090919_AABQXK UFLC75_Page_047.jpg dcb592be265f6115d4984587053598c0029e33d5dd1a5ce0fb29bb8594dc4944390c5935
60007 F20090919_AABQWW UFLC75_Page_033.jpg 5766acc8b1b3f24a198fe02849eb145160e58ceacbb142196af82720b36670ae151bb380
17261 F20090919_AABRZZ UFLC75_Page_070.QC.jpg aa6418c1a4f197b4272978c4efe6ca7c87c09b36099034a07ab8f5fb5c357002222ddb0a
81338 F20090919_AABRDG UFLC75_Page_070.jp2 9a8a013474f540a64e339e76f2bc409516a81911856810b24c26bd124a055941f74e148b
53914 F20090919_AABQYA UFLC75_Page_063.jpg 4a7d66d5069e93605bb9c510c5aaab13355190493b66e3a517b2d05278c386cb389b58f5
81274 F20090919_AABRCR UFLC75_Page_055.jp2 0a0075e28746daf8f13b08d1ceecc4b7b14440679cdc6ff7ea7659d717ba4ef008434de8
65026 F20090919_AABQXL UFLC75_Page_048.jpg be0773f32a8502cb0e9026d415c5b16058046c431e1c4119a5d76e1b8a5164de38f1543e
87623 F20090919_AABQWX UFLC75_Page_034.jpg ad86d49d43a91889f79f9e23861177c6034c8480a23dba1d41ff3d05ac33e4bf5e4a857c
115305 F20090919_AABRDH UFLC75_Page_071.jp2 3950cc934f3133a5f4dda23503447e38bd22262f9bf4b7d1319686897491647d997207a0
61788 F20090919_AABQYB UFLC75_Page_064.jpg cd5d5ca0b60a7ead97c15472814c5ca6baafaa7f70dca1f9a522d124428c3568f14f207c
56706 F20090919_AABRCS UFLC75_Page_056.jp2 f59c8dd06b13477c7cc60bc0eb15c55d837ae5607cf525ca57b11adc4d6b69756803c330
65615 F20090919_AABQXM UFLC75_Page_049.jpg a3529e4833eaed68637c3786d3a15ed2c01ba6e3dc8082fc382cc1d16eae6e78ec5a4005
104632 F20090919_AABQWY UFLC75_Page_035.jpg 2e492d30b87afaf09900c38ac0b723cf1aa1fd926edb626138c63e0504773849d8492369
55218 F20090919_AABRDI UFLC75_Page_072.jp2 f0b70a5e7ba4e7bffa26e81bc087f4645ceac908564a0ebd1f95f056cd4384817b8cbd6d
103193 F20090919_AABQYC UFLC75_Page_065.jpg 29a72550905ef669b315b3fb6b317a946979ddd813632ee11d7ed87ea10777f839fe2888
83959 F20090919_AABRCT UFLC75_Page_057.jp2 cd64b434c82e0336f65e5a179ce5b4dc8aea6e814ac6525960645488736cfc9d02f16cfe
76211 F20090919_AABQXN UFLC75_Page_050.jpg 617d98cf10fdc92be6b4cee1e7c4cafe52499f62052f3e95e02e70710ca91f2ab16f8c0c
70030 F20090919_AABQWZ UFLC75_Page_036.jpg 80c688b9f40cc7939cd8050d236822e7b1eb575f532eef3c02812de1e098c0ece4036c14
115551 F20090919_AABRDJ UFLC75_Page_073.jp2 73bba763600b339fdef7ab393136764a8d43f133623c0dc9e7cd30d7d054378dd38e7503
62912 F20090919_AABQYD UFLC75_Page_066.jpg ebb1eb41625ae949b1b13cb3d2ab99cc6e5244aebaa12c045979f43328b20d54633b7f1b
107547 F20090919_AABRCU UFLC75_Page_058.jp2 49be00012e3d55d4c5b0915e15424cfd397320636360e355f51227e9e82f3b24e1abc9b5
59106 F20090919_AABQXO UFLC75_Page_051.jpg 0c02b0b8e85d49755754f534fad83b7680d114f78c4118933b7fb7b6938f9d080b4b7bf1
172552 F20090919_AABRDK UFLC75_Page_074.jp2 36cee487c8781d3cc247ddb640e0af6addb475c15c2c77ab34a983015540d6b7c8509eb9
85198 F20090919_AABQYE UFLC75_Page_067.jpg f0d9003363ed9a79d9fa2fa037c36a880a19e46645c8af560e0c5d7797dee17847f36f6e
114911 F20090919_AABRCV UFLC75_Page_059.jp2 a22553cafb488ffe3fa1b9b0d197491f2fd2d248b5a60f76429baa8bd654669b21e32196
42314 F20090919_AABQXP UFLC75_Page_052.jpg 8568815a286b356bbdf5bff6c1de3a04259651e85c0e4b8a7903f38425870d8ccef82a30
142500 F20090919_AABRDL UFLC75_Page_075.jp2 7a22df9006324bdc0891ac327ff5250070ae2b9381cb13501f811cdadc40f0ac27255ff9
84294 F20090919_AABQYF UFLC75_Page_068.jpg bcfc0d9a4c944579ddee3e1a40fdd28881070413ef9d3c830266d534781a5221eb27e7b4
87842 F20090919_AABRCW UFLC75_Page_060.jp2 d45173454de18482b2fb16c44bb760c3a82fe42e7d8004a80511dae162a46bd805a031e9
103738 F20090919_AABQXQ UFLC75_Page_053.jpg 71cd1fcd54999cedd79c592d0cdba70e80078405c7b6e271f2b5e6ccbd2ddf3357ed492a
101186 F20090919_AABRDM UFLC75_Page_076.jp2 fca9346f214a97848b7a6d92f52997fd7d443f98cfedf5b452f1192fed7493f4d516fb96
67407 F20090919_AABQYG UFLC75_Page_069.jpg bea091027bf4701da42f74de044903f9aa67bc4938df8fb323a813b45ba72ad5a7b982ca
73358 F20090919_AABRCX UFLC75_Page_061.jp2 845d1f21a986c78f382375a3e407645c0e38cbcc88f1679e42d3ff2b79d0d303d74b874a
65755 F20090919_AABQXR UFLC75_Page_054.jpg 640d0d6b6fbcfc3f6fbb4cf4c64fc5d929a970b1d59b11c2997c4c6307e350a7b10998b6
98063 F20090919_AABREA UFLC75_Page_090.jp2 6e4cd83b66aba5cf52b35ebe6cdbf1ea9668b76749ba6c42837d598bc080cd229ae7f328
143572 F20090919_AABRDN UFLC75_Page_077.jp2 50ee6d8a462972ce69ce09fe928ed647b3d5c5b5a2e22e43d2f9562797eb8e0580f0b763
55859 F20090919_AABQYH UFLC75_Page_070.jpg b52b5dab228ac94060eb5189ba5475abfce666c15a1d29f800320415ca26facabfaaefeb
108881 F20090919_AABRCY UFLC75_Page_062.jp2 854799c5e3d8707cfbe14e40d9a371dc81dda9e70fa439c521b83a1c10b161bb4a48759f
56015 F20090919_AABQXS UFLC75_Page_055.jpg 138c9abad7060725dd54ba8515263aee328d40f797bafdaece44d6f4c97d72b372911f66
82608 F20090919_AABREB UFLC75_Page_091.jp2 064bd73ef78ee3cbece88dadc93d54fd342cbb7c694e267ab5ebe3df3483f1bbf2b0a208
93253 F20090919_AABRDO UFLC75_Page_078.jp2 4f8350ec309f2241e40757234e45e8a74b7b95446ca303ddf04e5e3de2e96fcf7e0292db
80197 F20090919_AABRCZ UFLC75_Page_063.jp2 e0c41e73b1259042d99e234c94696520530db0bae1a29db95b2684108754d2765b20adfd
39834 F20090919_AABQXT UFLC75_Page_056.jpg 0c683943e9cb5bdae2842bcb56dd5c70406260f434e43b61d42bdc5a5341a793ad654bee
69110 F20090919_AABREC UFLC75_Page_092.jp2 18a0d234d916c11ad9b4cb0f6e2347e481dad25a29fc7b9cf2ce847c1edd5e94c25557dd
93273 F20090919_AABRDP UFLC75_Page_079.jp2 c53db22d4227b08b2acb0e8f588abc962c6d7b0ea796f71ed691ec4ecff62349be9ce243
78274 F20090919_AABQYI UFLC75_Page_071.jpg 8da33c35cc7edd64fbdaf1dc7c37c355f7f22a4f843b8fd9030bc0ef4d568e6f83f302a2
58245 F20090919_AABQXU UFLC75_Page_057.jpg 432ef908211d71498ec8dc000167c862cf3a0aa36444a34bd97529d135ecd666b6395d1d
79531 F20090919_AABRED UFLC75_Page_093.jp2 22f3b72032d8f8d1914d35365e116fcb4162ec4e28a0d6086187d3872047ee300a723d4d
114557 F20090919_AABRDQ UFLC75_Page_080.jp2 e43bc67beac1ceb548f1c58b09791dc14915574adf748043f932361135ae111875cdfd21
40124 F20090919_AABQYJ UFLC75_Page_072.jpg c61d16867de6aaac70f0bebfc6169aab9344d952a079a12541045383c4f80ed551c967f0
75445 F20090919_AABQXV UFLC75_Page_058.jpg a61c88a8a92f8521ffbb2a653e3bad5a347e31093e969effcb74d30edcdd331727d35364
112248 F20090919_AABREE UFLC75_Page_094.jp2 589b8386616f954de87ab20267a14cbce3bb230c5534e138b74e3927d7dda2c5e686fbd6
182858 F20090919_AABRDR UFLC75_Page_081.jp2 ee021744debd881b77ac340c142115a723321d5e5c7b4a848c4bf9d20bf5d111744190c7
79152 F20090919_AABQYK UFLC75_Page_073.jpg 084ec18bf1dbc5da7d2cb70efed314b99e5b9978550d5aa117caa81662b58a0a056cb407
79083 F20090919_AABQXW UFLC75_Page_059.jpg 55344ff3cfb9a5a4f0c5df4d7dea66cc9744204fbe45d0b28e173593dc6abb351362c083
64416 F20090919_AABREF UFLC75_Page_095.jp2 6354b8fedda62a3186a3c08209eafa8b5d31e5f106f71342330caf1154e0ee1fbd217ec8
114677 F20090919_AABQYL UFLC75_Page_074.jpg b92c7e214b89957a7a88371a67696ec2468f423a7f5cf59bf85427f74fc778e9a0749cf6
61210 F20090919_AABQXX UFLC75_Page_060.jpg cb87aab0f4961b7ca6b1c2310ac826470dfa6f318d634f0d8e5d3f9c63e1fcc9dfe33d60
87138 F20090919_AABREG UFLC75_Page_096.jp2 c0a2dab26139a509ff606438e33ca8714359be28e9f74326496b6538ccfee3e43c66528f
53834 F20090919_AABQZA UFLC75_Page_089.jpg f387f6e93a9e3bca0edc4dc494273fc3159e8916ecc0da788dd0ee89b53b2b4b8caa784a
94005 F20090919_AABQYM UFLC75_Page_075.jpg 182b0255d1a01404c478d33b89235e36d75bcf0341a21dd01791a1b23bd2c077690b03a8
50682 F20090919_AABQXY UFLC75_Page_061.jpg d4c65151e601d116d93417a64cb6dd82498f020942aca9d2f42a632a66e7eb7de45d891d
88819 F20090919_AABREH UFLC75_Page_097.jp2 f2c6e698a650666c117e0fe4471633b863e6536709a04bacc7c6fd43a7c1113a69d0b9e1
67919 F20090919_AABQZB UFLC75_Page_090.jpg 114131a46a11c2d5e5ef43dbcc48b41fd8048212328cbccab9d5764746dfefbf899887ad
126035 F20090919_AABRDS UFLC75_Page_082.jp2 92870c45fa481a79ff5e7d371e3260f58347a1a09da860404edaa5280b2168297d13e47d
70698 F20090919_AABQYN UFLC75_Page_076.jpg 1be8b6850c89c77161d42362658a0757ee028745673714942557cde73755ecfbad42f183
75284 F20090919_AABQXZ UFLC75_Page_062.jpg 013fb5418ddd0f0583d274a403e57f088864d0b7c35cd4c1f2566152d80e1e37f3398353
86976 F20090919_AABREI UFLC75_Page_098.jp2 14b7ab3aecbedba2c2ee7ebaec45acf51f720b0fff7fd9bb32457d1c86fa673607468a9d
57799 F20090919_AABQZC UFLC75_Page_091.jpg 4a044f0995765d346e41a0e12ec77196775566523cbfcc77e45140c69c61fdcb64b3ecbc
84674 F20090919_AABRDT UFLC75_Page_083.jp2 81aae398d4f6eb850018f593a1f59377fc1b27b93e38adc4aa32b4382caf00d64062260a
96470 F20090919_AABQYO UFLC75_Page_077.jpg 03f1b04f99c2dcbc0fb5d9e6da690cf51e744820cf3b3845e2c392d02ec17411592aaae2
107799 F20090919_AABREJ UFLC75_Page_099.jp2 ac4811d7542ae743d8805bfd965ce564a71a52325f0597de559ab435b55ef64933429195
49908 F20090919_AABQZD UFLC75_Page_092.jpg b75a7c96f24e81b071f8ea66d73d75b567e764255109fafaeb93b41a5dbb79d3c311748b
119078 F20090919_AABRDU UFLC75_Page_084.jp2 2bfe3f8baa2fab8ba76063637a7a36072546b4a7a24f6f3bbe94a984a4ff5332d23dde3a
64417 F20090919_AABQYP UFLC75_Page_078.jpg 5a6d3e522059b79e777a2536af1d633d4961739c6a389c91e1d3d53bf411a72116b15543
59818 F20090919_AABREK UFLC75_Page_100.jp2 526342e9c98c0206d79dff2619bcebf2febb6d9bca5d568a947e8f9ce7c4ed81fdc74f78
55809 F20090919_AABQZE UFLC75_Page_093.jpg a747328eb263f06e86ad13134d2bc217bc5d051e04c9168518a55c637ca24a551263564b
107259 F20090919_AABRDV UFLC75_Page_085.jp2 15b59b1293f2b03ad6f46610887e8d5e821a30e0d771253e0da5899cd8e64620bd7ff297
63340 F20090919_AABQYQ UFLC75_Page_079.jpg fb641d7042626c66e529ac246a54d290b3be347bce5eb6c38bb558f4a9587a28b308f446
85269 F20090919_AABREL UFLC75_Page_101.jp2 6d6cbf2e56f495cc9cef73ff94f70f4be0d5c2a3d6d7cd1fe39ef9555f01dc799d34a1f6
75623 F20090919_AABQZF UFLC75_Page_094.jpg 5c64b9b8331ffea704176a6f985805ab0f3a54f6d5976f0b9f993cc6f308d53f45f05bfb
75518 F20090919_AABRDW UFLC75_Page_086.jp2 3e476cfe461ab9690844955bc628bff80ea180e991750dde180aad24d7be8967112e9c96
78446 F20090919_AABQYR UFLC75_Page_080.jpg 72d6fd67bb49fe866846dd17b971a1dd01273250b26008e85c8aaae46bee2589c66a7f93
61869 F20090919_AABRFA UFLC75_Page_116.jp2 a771f22e764886fc983e4db08547ba4f5980fab87f33670191f7254490abc59e35373911
94659 F20090919_AABREM UFLC75_Page_102.jp2 c96bbd10684ee7106888fd5beb83ad3f1de593c2ab7df34b6064636032212c911f8b56f9
45062 F20090919_AABQZG UFLC75_Page_095.jpg 1db63a44c69f52dc67cf328e450930fa8600eff1c09517aa0b0385c7c6c6a0ef6289335e
77075 F20090919_AABRDX UFLC75_Page_087.jp2 6668262743f328e0637c45d25f711bb0f4c4e6a849c59245b9954e911944f2fed7e81099


Frederic G. Levin
CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS DOWNLOADS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00006390/00001
 Material Information
Title: Frederic G. Levin
Series Title: Frederic G. Levin
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Proctor, Samuel ( Interviewer )
Publication Date: July 1, 2002
 Notes
Summary: UFLC 75 Fredric Levin July 1, 2002 127 pages – Open Fredric Gerson Levin begins by telling his family history and talks about his family life while growing up in Pensacola, Florida (pages 1-14). Next he tells how he and all his brothers became Gators, and about his time at the University of Florida as an undergrad (pages 14-24). He briefly mentions the illness and death of his brother Martin, and talks about his time in law school at UF, mentioning his relationship with George Stark (pages 25-31). He then tells how his brother David and Reuben Askew began a firm together, and then how he joined the firm and found the direction of his law career doing personal injury cases (pages 31-36). Mr. Levin next discusses the expansion of the firm and moving from place to place (pages 36-37). He talks about his growing reputation as a successful lawyer and his stand against segregation within the Society of the Bar, as well as his own defeat during an election for the Bar Association (pages 37-39). Mr. Levin talks about his relationship with Fred Vigodsky, getting into the restaurant business, and later, the dress business (pages 40-43). He again talks about his growing reputation as a successful lawyer and some of his high profile cases, as well as his part in getting Reuben Askew elected (pages 43-45). He talks about working with Charlie Ruttenberg and Fred Fisher on the Orange State Life Insurance business (pages 45-46). He then talks about becoming Dempsey Barron’s lawyer and defending W.D. Childers (pages 46-37). He talks about forming BLAB television in 1984-1985, and being considered a big shot in politics (pages 47-50). Mr. Levin mentions different members of the law firm and the growth and prestige it was experiencing in the mid 1980s, as well as the moves the firm made (pages 50-52). Next he talks about becoming the defense lawyer of Gulf Power, and the suicide of Jake Horton (pages 52-55). He goes on to talk about some of his big cases over the years (pages 55-62). Mr. Levin discusses his entrance into the insurance industry with the Orange State Life Insurance Company in Largo, Florida (pages 62-63). He goes into his work and involvement with the tobacco settlement in Florida 1993-1998 (pages 63-71). He talks briefly about the fen-phen and chloromycetin drug cases (pages 71-75). Mr. Levin discusses his contributions to the University of Florida and the naming of the law school after him (pages 75-89). He tells about the two instances of censure he received from the Bar in the 1980s, as well as the criticisms from other lawyers (pages 81-84). He refutes the idea that so many people were against naming the law school after him for anti-Semitic reasons, but assigns it to pure jealousy (pages 89-91). He then goes on to talk about some of his other philanthropic activities (pages 92-97). Mr. Levin talks about the penthouse he bought and the purchase of his own home (pages 97-99). He then talks about the death of his father during Hurricane Opal in 1995 and the impact it had on the family (pages 99-101). Once again he mentions the beginnings of BLAB television and the radio station in Pensacola, Florida (pages 101-103). Mr. Levin talks about representing Roy Jones, Jr., and how the relationship eventually led to representing Ike Quartey and a nomination to become a chief in the country of Ghana (pages 103-113). He discusses some of his strengths and weaknesses (pages 113-114, 116-119). He talks about being involved with the computer program for cops, SmartCOP (pages 114-115). Mr. Levin discusses his family and gives a little personal information about each of his kids (pages 119-121). Next he talks about himself and his interests, then goes on to discuss the role he has played in politics both locally and at the state level (pages 121-126). He talks about the event he arranged in Pensacola which brought in Mohammed Ali, Roy Jones Jr., and Governor Chiles to speak to highschool seniors about tolerance of others (pages 126-127). He concludes by discussing his relationship with his father, stating it as one of the reasons he allows himself to be viewed as a cheat although his life refutes the accusation (page 127).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00006390:00001

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

UFLC75 ( PDF )

UFLC75summary ( PDF )


Full Text





UFLC 75
Interviewee: Fredric G. Levin
Interviewer: Samuel Proctor
Date: July 1, 2002


P: I'm doing an Oral History interview this morning, July 1, 2002 with Fredric G.
Levin, and we're doing it here in his office in Pensacola. The address is 316
South Baylen Street, Suite 600, Pensacola 32501. Fred, the first thing I'd like
you to do, if you will, is to give me your full name.

L: It's Fredric Gerson Levin.

P: Was it always spelled Fredric that way? Never with a "K"?

L: Never with a "K."

P: Where does the Gerson come from?

L: I'm really not sure.

P: Family?

L: I'm really not sure. It was always a funny name to me, and back early, I think
even when I did my Social Security [card], I was so embarrassed by the Gerson
name [that] I put on my Social Security card "Fred George Levin."

P: You gave yourself a new middle name.

L: A new middle name, but then eventually it got straightened out. The "Fredric"
was spelled the way Fredric March, my mother told me that she liked that way.

P: I like saying him, too. What's your birth date?

L: March 29, 1937.

P: March 29 is my birthday. I didn't realize that you and I had something we could
celebrate together. Where were you born?

L: I was born in Pensacola.

P: Tell me your parents' names.

L: They were Rose Lefkowitz Levin and Abraham Ivan Levin.


P: Where was your mother born?









UFLC 75
Page 2

L: At some points I hear it's Danville, Virginia or High Point, North Carolina. It's
right in that area, the furniture area.

P: How about your dad?

L: He was born in Butte, Montana. His father was a trader, pushcart type trader,
and just happened to park his wife there in Butte, Montana. I've always heard
that he left them there and went up to Alaska for the Gold Rush, but the timing
wasn't there. I think daddy was born in 1906, so that wouldn't have been the
Gold Rush timing. I really don't know, but I know daddy was born in Butte,
Montana.

P: The family came over from Europe from where? Russia?

L: Latvia and Lithuania.

P: Into where?

L: They came into, I think, Ellis Island. It's very unfortunate that none of us ever
really got much information. In fact, I didn't realize that my grandfather had
been married a couple or three times, my grandmother had been married this is
on my father's side that by the time we got interested in genealogy and all of
that it was gone. The Levin side of the family, that was not their name
apparently when they landed.

P: I was going to ask you about that, the change.

L: My father told me he thought it was something like Webber, and somehow or
another the name Levin got there, and there's a videotape of my father doing one
of these interviews, and unfortunately he died before we ever completed it, but I
think it does give as much of the history as he knows.

P: So they came in, you think, into New York. How did they then move south into
Virginia you think?

L: I'm not sure. I know that somehow or another they ended up in Norfolk, Virginia,
and my father was a twin. I'm really horrible when it comes to...

P: I think the most interesting part is how they got to Butte, Montana.

L: Yeah. He was one of the, I'm sure, few Jews that was born in Butte, Montana,
but apparently he was like a pushcart peddler.


P: Your father or your grandfather?









UFLC 75
Page 3

L: I'm talking about my grandfather, and then my father was born in Butte and lived
there about a year. My brother Allen went back, and I can't even remember
what Allen said. I think he went to the archives, and there was nothing showing
that they were born there.

P: The question is how did they get to Pensacola? That's really where the story
begins.

L: Yes. My mother was one of, I think, eight or nine children, all [of them] boys
except for her. They moved to Fort Lauderdale.

P: From Montana?

L: No, my mother was born in Danville. The Lefkowitzes were in the furniture
business in the High Point, Winston [-Salem], all that area there, and fairly
well-to-do and had moved to Fort Lauderdale. The story is that my dad grew up
in Norfolk, and he graduated high school and my mother did also. My father, his
father, my grandfather, they had a little grocery store on Church Street, I don't
know why I always remember that, in Norfolk. Anyhow, my dad said he
graduated high school and heard about the big boom in Florida.

P: Land boom.

L: Yeah, this would have been in the 1920s, 1924 probably. 1923, 1924,
somewhere in there. He told my grandfather that he was going to South Florida
to get involved in this great explosion of wealth that was occurring down there.
My grandfather said, this is according to my father, that he didn't expect my
daddy to last very long, so he bought him a train ticket round trip. My father said
when they got into Fort Lauderdale he cashed in the back end of the ticket; he
wasn't coming home. He said there had been no failure there. He started
working in a grocery store [and] eventually took over the produce department.
He was living in something like a YMCA with a bunch of guys and started saving
his money. He said that time, he was making [$200], $300 a week.

P: That was big money.

L: Yeah, of course. He said it was only costing $6 to room and board, $6 or $8,
and he was saving a lot of money. [He] was going to the synagogue in Fort
Lauderdale and saw my mother, and he kept coming around, and my mother's
father didn't think much of him. This was the only daughter, and they wanted
her to marry a doctor.


P: He was Jewish, but he was also a produce man.









UFLC 75
Page 4

L: Produce man, manager of a little produce stand. My mother was very attractive
and had a lot of suitors. My daddy said he always realized at the synagogue
that... Anyhow, he left a major contribution in order to win the heart of his
father-in-law to be. It was something like $20 for some different thing back then.
This would have been in the mid-1920s, and he had saved up several
thousands of dollars that [he] married my mother in Fort Lauderdale. They
honeymooned in Havana.

P: That was big living.

L: Yeah. The little things you remember, the National Hotel was where their
honeymoon was. [They] came back to Fort Lauderdale. About that time, the
boom busted, and he always laughs because there must have been a major
hurricane down there.

P: September, 1926.

L: All right. And my father's father became deeply concerned and had heard that
there was no water supply, so he either tried to send bottled water down there or
was attempting to. My father used to laugh about his father was going to send
water on [a] train. Anyhow, my father, there was the bust, and started looking
for something else to do.

P: In Fort Lauderdale still?

L: Except there was not much in Fort Lauderdale. I think by that time the hurricane
had occurred, the bust had occurred, so he and one of my uncles, I believe it was
my uncle Morris, my mother's brother, decided to go look and somehow or
another ended up in Pensacola.

P: No relatives here, no family here.

L: Nothing, nothing. But they saw the naval air station here, and it looked like a
great opportunity for a pawnshop. My dad didn't really know anything about
jewelry, but he was a good businessman. They went into partners in something
called the L&L Pawnshop, Levin and Lefkowitz or Lefkowitz and Levin. That
apparently didn't last long and my uncle Morris went back to, I guess it was,
Miami or somewhere and got into the hotel business. Now, daddy and momma
are here in Pensacola, and my brother David must have been born about, either,
we can look it up, but I think, 1928, 1929, 1930, something like that. The
pawnshop started to do better and better.

P: Wasn't there a question about the location of the pawnshop to begin with? The
original site was Ordons?









UFLC 75
Page 5

L: There was, and then he moved...

P: The woman didn't want to after she learned that it wasn't going to have clothing
there too, the Ordons...

L: Yeah. Ordons yeah, who were dear, dear friends. Ordons Men Store was the
men's store in town, and Jewish.

P: The one that just closed on that site?

L: The one that just closed on the same site, not near as nice. Mr. Ordon, Harry
Ordon had just tremendous talent in architectural type, art type things, and you'd
even see the store that he built, which is still there today, was built in the early
1950s, and it was so far ahead of its time. Even to when they closed it last year
in the year 2000 or 2001. They have not really changed it much, it was like for
fifty years the same.

P: But Ordon's sister owned the property next door?

L: I'm not sure [about] the relationships, but apparently somebody got concerned
about my father was going to sell used clothes in the pawnshop, and they
somehow or another worked it out.

P: And they went to another site?

L: Went to another site, and I think that's where it remained until when it closed at
108 South Palafox, which was right across, I'm not sure...

P: Near the San Carlos Hotel?

L: No. This was closer to the Saenger Theater and on that side of the street there
was Walgreens across the street, Tom Macan on the corner, then next to that
was Joe Williams, then Silvermans, then, I think, Singer sewing, then daddy, and
then next to that was Maxie Lipschitz's bar called Sir Richards or Sir something.

P: Anyway, the family opened a pawnshop, and it prospered?

L: Opened a pawn[shop], and it prospered. A lot of military people would come in
and pawn, and daddy learned the jewelry business and started to become a
fixture in the Jewish community here.


P: Was there a Jewish community?









UFLC 75
Page 6

L: Yeah. The oldest temple, a reformed temple in Florida, is the Temple Bethel,
still in the same location. I noticed driving on Chase Street, there's a sign
"Oldest Jewish Synagogue". I never knew that because of an historical sign on
the way home.

P: I wrote that historical sign.

L: Really?

P: Yeah. The plaque.

L: Yeah, the plaque.

P: The state put it up.

L: I didn't even realize there was a synagogue there. Anyhow, there was a very
strong Jewish community there.

P: And your family moved right into the community?

L: Moved into what they thought was Orthodox, but you know, they had the women
in the back, the men up front, and the total service was in Hebrew. Everybody
would go home and eat. We kept kosher in our home, but out everybody would
eat shrimp, my mother used to love shrimp. So my brother David was born.

P: All your family, all of the brothers were born in Pensacola?

L: Yeah.

P: David's the oldest.

L: David's the oldest. Then Herman, Herman would have been three or four years
behind that. Then, daddy built a home on 15 West Blount Street, and that was
like [$5,000] or $6,000, and that was right about the time I was born.

P: Are you number three?

L: I'm number three. So I grew up on 15 West Blount, which is about a half a block
off of Palafox, north of town, a block from P.K. Yonge School, which is now the
Florida Department of Law Enforcement, a very small area. Then, you move a
couple of blocks away I remember Dr. Ames lived there. Then, on one block
was Silberman. Then, next to the Silbermans were the Goldenbergs, Mr. and
Mrs. Goldenberg were my godparents. Then, next to them were the
Danheisers. Next to them were the Rosenthals. That whole block was Jewish.









UFLC 75
Page 7

P: A little ghetto.

L: Little ghetto. But it was North Hill in Pensacola.

P: Was it a close-knit Jewish community?

L: Yes. I think the proudest my daddy was, I think he went for either twelve or
sixteen years as president of the synagogue year after year.

P: It's a reformed temple when they get here. Do they stay in that?

L: No. We had both a reform and Orthodox group.

P: So when your daddy came, the Orthodox community was already established?

L: Sure.

P: So they went right into that.

L: They went right into that.

P: I wondered if your father was one of the founders of it.

L: No. That had been the Lischkoffs and... It was the congregation B'nai Israel,
and I'm not sure whether that sign that you put up is for the synagogue or for the
temple.

P: Only for the temple.

L: So that was the location of the temple, then they moved to Cervantes. When
daddy got here, it was on Belmont Street, the synagogue. I remember right
across the street, the Greenhuts lived, and he had been mayor of Pensacola, or
the father had been mayor, and they were in the candy business. Then, right
down the street was a kosher butcher shop.

P: A kosher butcher shop in little Pensacola?

L: Oh yeah. Mrs. Kalishman, Millie Kalishman. That was a pretty reasonable size.
I think the Orthodox Jewish community probably is almost as big as what is now
the conservative [Jewish community]. Back then, I'm sure there were at least
fifty [or] sixty families, and maybe there's no more than one hundred today. The
temple, the Reformed, they've gotten pretty big. A lot of doctors moved in,
things like that.









UFLC 75
Page 8

P: You named two of your brothers, David and Herman are older than you. Who
else are your siblings?

L: Shortly after me, I was born in March, Stanley was born about a year and a half
later in November. Then, my brother Martin would have been he died in...

P: That's the one that died?

L: In October, 1958. He was just about to turn seventeen, I think.

P: He was the youngest of the children.

L: No. Seventeen, so he was born in 1941. Then Allen, Allen was born, I think, in
1944 or 1945.

P: Allen is the youngest?

L: Allen's the youngest.

P: What did your brother die of?

L: Martin died of leukemia.

P: And your son Martin obviously is named for him.

L: Yeah. I named my first child Marci really for Martin, my brother. Then, along
came Debbie, and then Martin. I was going to name him Martin Lewis Levin,
which my brother's name is Martin Lewis Levin, and my mother said "No, you
don't," because she was superstitious that Martin died at such a young age. So,
I changed it to Martin Howard Levin, and the "Howard" was for somebody on my
wife's side. 1937 is when I was born. The family had been here for seven or
eight years, whatever, 1928.

P: Is your father already becoming part of the business community in Pensacola?

L: Yes. I was getting ready to tell you. I grew up on 15 West Blount Street. We
had sort of like a chauffeur, handyman, yard man named Willy, I think it was Willy
Davis. We had at least one maid and maybe two maids, black women. We
lived pretty high on the hog.

P: I was going to say, you didn't grow up poor.

L: I did not grow up poor. I never wanted for anything. As I grew up, my father
not only had the pawnshop, which was doing well, but he was in the jewelry









UFLC 75
Page 9

business in Tallahassee, Rays Jewelers, I believe, on College Street. Then he
got involved at Pensacola Beach when it started to go and allow motels to be
built there. He and Mr. Silverman and Mr. Goldenberg put up one of the first
motels on Pensacola Beach. Daddy got into the concession business on
Pensacola Beach. Then, in the early 1950s, he took over the concessions at the
Pensacola dog track. My father was very well liked by the non-Jewish
community as well as the Jewish community. They thought of him as being
extremely bright, and I always felt like he knew his place. In other words, he
was a good Jew. We never were "country club" or anything like that. My
parents social life was strictly in the Jewish community. Daddy worked an awful
lot, as you can imagine between all these different things. He got into the
bowling alley business, he got into a bunch.

P: He was a real entrepreneur.

L: Entrepreneur. I was just amazed, I thought he was the most brilliant person I'd
ever seen.

P: Your father was a smart man.

L: Most of the community felt that way, too. I think they probably, looking back,
gave him a hell of a lot more credit than maybe he deserved. I used to couldn't
wait to come down to the pawnshop. I was always working.

P: I was going to ask if you worked at all.

L: Oh yeah. I worked at the Pensacola Beach in the snowball stand. I worked in
the pawnshop. You learn a lot about people by doing that. I used to come
down to the pawnshop, and my daddy loved to play gin rummy, and they used to
have a place in back, and they'd play gin rummy. I loved to watch him play, and
he had a couple of helpers in the pawnshop, and I'd run back and forth between
watching the card game, when he'd let me, and working in the pawnshop. [I]
grew up there on Blount Street, went to P.K. Yonge.

P: Tell me about your education now. P.K. Yonge was an elementary school?

L: Elementary school.

P: Named for P.K. Yonge from Pensacola?

L: Yes, from Pensacola. As I grew up, I'm surprised I was really not a good
student, but I was more social.


P: You go through elementary school at P.K. and then what?









UFLC 75
Page 10

L: About the time I get through the sixth grade, my father and mother buy a home
on the east side of town on 18th and Larua Street, which was the Garmondy
home. I remember looking at it and thinking it was the biggest house I'd ever
seen. The Garmondys, they had a big room upstairs. My uncle Bennie, my
daddy's brother, had come to live with us. Uncle Bennie worked in the store, but
he also drank a lot. We all moved over, and my father's mother had come to live
with us. We all moved to 18th and Larua [Street] big family here the Laruas and
all of that, back from an old Spanish thing. This was in the high rent district.
When I say that, it's not far from the water, and some of the major families lived
on that side. So we moved with all of the boys. There were six boys, but David
had gone off to Duke University at that time. Herman may have gone to Emory
[University] or something, no Herman would be going to high school or
something. I moved from elementary school to junior high at the same time that
we moved to Larua Street, it was over that side.

P: What was the name of the junior high?

L: Clubbs Junior High School.

P: What years are we talking about now?

L: I graduated high school in 1954, so seventh grade around 1948, I guess. I
remember my daddy used to take me and drop me off at junior high, and I started
meeting people. I was somewhat embarrassed either by the car or whatever it
might have been, but he would drop me off at school, and I made friends easily,
and a lot of times, playing the fool. Never really saw any real anti-Semitism.

P: You're still in junior high going on to senior now.

L: I'm in junior high and spent seventh, eighth, and ninth grade in junior high. [I]
developed some relationships. I was a fairly good athlete. I was not real good,
but see, I started school at the age of five so everybody was basically a year
ahead of me. But I was a pretty good basketball player, played with the YMCA, a
pretty good baseball player. My problem was I was slow, had good
coordination. I won the somebody just brought me a copy of the junior
ping-pong championship for the city. So I had good hand-eye coordination, I
just didn't have any speed. Anyhow, I loved to gamble.

P: You didn't start gambling in junior high school did you?

L: I would play gin rummy. You have to understand, all these years I've been
watching my daddy play gin rummy.


P: During the seventh, eighth, and ninth grade?









UFLC 75
Page 11


L: It was not for money, it may have been over at my house.

P: You're supposed to be practicing for your bar mitzvah, not playing gin rummy.

L: Oh, I was doing that.

P: What about senior high now?

L: The bar mitzvah was interesting.

P: Yeah, I want to hear about that.

L: I [was] scared to death, absolutely scared to death. My speech may have been
two paragraphs, but you had to memorize it. I had to have the maftir, the
haftora, and the speech.

P: You remember the rabbi?

L: I practiced with Rabbi Holzman. He lived on top of the synagogue. I remember
[being] scared to death and may have been, but I had to go ahead and do it, and
I remember there was a Jewish progressive club that was maybe four or five
blocks from there, and that was a social place. We had my bar mitzvah party
afterwards, and momma made all the food, the chopped liver, she was a great,
great, great cook. It's funny, because years and years later, Roy Jones, Jr.
[Boxer managed by Levin], buys the place that was the Jewish Progressive Club.
So, [ I was] scared to death to stand up in front of people. The bar mitzvah
which usually works in the exact opposite way, [to] give you confidence, I was
absolutely scared to death. I remember I fumbled on my speech. You have to
understand, I studied for the bar mitzvah for like five years, six years.
Nowadays, they do it in five months or six months or a year. I go off to
Pensacola High School and somehow or another, my friends start to expand into
the, socially, country club set.

P: This is the affluent gentile community.

L: Gentile community, but I was still the Jew and they would call me the "Happy
Hebrew" or something like that. I started to pull away from the Jewish
community. Then, we would drink, and we would gamble over on Pensacola
Beach, blackjack and poker and all kinds of things.


P: Where did you get your money from working? Allowance?









UFLC 75
Page 12

L: Yeah. It really wasn't a lot of money. Two dollars or four dollars, and we would
go out to the dog track.

P: You were kids.

L: Yeah, but it was a different time and a different place. It was the 1950s. It was
just good times, everybody was happy.

P: Doesn't sound like you were a great student.

L: I was not, I thought I was a lot better student than I was until I just went back and
saw my high school report cards. I was a "B" student. A few "A"s, very little
studying.

P: Did you get along with the teachers?

L: Got along with most of the teachers, but I started smoking in high school,
drinking. I was an excellent dancer. This all goes back to the coordination, I
always had great coordination. Between me and a guy named Eddie Gebara,
we were the two great dancers at the high school, and Eddie was a big star
football player. Somehow or another, I got in with a group. This has a lot of
significance in regard to my life, something I regretted, and something that made
a big difference to me. There were two high school fraternities. I had two very
close non-Jewish friends in high school. Gene Rosenbaum and Maurice
Shams, the Jewish guys, I was pulling away from as I became more social.
David Cobb, who was later killed in an automobile accident and Ronnie Williams,
who was later killed by the police, these were my two big buddies. The social
fraternity called the Rebels was the only fraternity that would accept Jews. The
social fraternity called Travares never had accepted a Jew, and they'd been
there for years and years. David Cobb was in the Rebels. Ronnie Williams, who
was one of the best looking men you've ever seen in your life, and all of the big
football stars and everybody else was in Travares.

P: All non-Jews?

L: All non-Jews. Two groups in there. One were the star athletes and the very
wealthy country club group, and the other was just sort of regular old guys.
David Cobb, my dear, dear friend, said I had been invited to join the Rebels,
which I agreed to do. About a week before the initiation, Ronnie comes to me
and tells me that Travares wants me.


P: Even though they knew you [were] Jewish?









UFLC 75
Page 13

L: Yeah. I regret because I said, God knows, what a great opportunity to be with
the elite," and after having accepted, and I felt so bad, but I had to do it because
this was the greatest thing that ever happened. I still maintained somewhat of
a relationship with David Cobb. All of this makes a lot of difference a couple of
years later when I go to the University of Florida. I become [a member of]
Travares, and I start dating Anne Stevens, non-Jewish girls, I'm really "it" now,
and all kind of things, just wonderful, what a great life. It was probably the
happiest times in my life from a standpoint, socially. It was every night.

P: I can see why you didn't have a chance to study.

L: Yeah.

P: Weren't you folks concerned about that?

L: I think in a way, but my daddy [unclear] all these guys started coming. You
have to understand, Pensacola High School was "the place." Pensacola High
School played football, it was front page news. Here I was, his son Fredric, he
was big time. I think that probably made him feel good. You have to recognize
the times. This was 1953 and 1954. Abe Levin, they called him the Prince of
Palafox, everybody was accepted, the Levin's were no longer the little Jewish
merchant.

P: You weren't an outsider...

L: Not an outsider anymore. John Pace would say nice things about my daddy and
he was the big wealthy people, MacHenry Jones all of the elite, the "power
struck," everybody. So I go ahead and graduate in 1954. Back then, anybody
could go off to college, the University of Florida.

P: Where'd you stand in the graduating class?

L: I would've probably been about the middle of the class, something like that.

P: In other words, you didn't get any great academic honors?

L: No.

P: When did you get a car?

L: Never. I always used a car. I think the first car that I ever actually got was a
hand-me-down station wagon once I went into law school and had gotten
married.









UFLC 75
Page 14

P: So as a high school student you didn't have a car?

L: I had the use of a car. I had my brother's and my mother's and my father's,
there were all kinds of cars around, I just never had one.

P: What kind of a home life did you have? Was it a religious home life? Did you
go to service?

L: For them, yeah. Momma and daddy went to every Friday night service.

P: And you say your mother kept a kosher kitchen?

L: Kosher home all the way through until she died. Daddy did all the way till he
died in 1995. He maintained the kosher home.

P: So they kept all the holidays?

L: Oh, yeah. Pretty much, it was getting to a point as I got into high school that the
Friday evening services went by the wayside, and I would do the bar mitzvahs
and kept Rosh Hashana and the high holidays.

P: Your family were strong financial supporters of the synagogue?

L: Yes, and United Jewish Appeal. Even though he was certainly far from the
wealthiest Jew in town, he was the biggest contributor to the synagogue and to
United Jewish Appeal.

P: So the Levin family was recognized both within the Jewish community and the
non-Jewish community.

L: Yes.

P: Why did David go to Duke?

L: Mr. Harden, who was his Algebra teacher (and David was a good trumpet player
too), he loved David and he wanted David to go off to a good school. David
went off to college at fifteen, and went to Duke and hated it.

P: David was a good student?

L: Yes. Mr. Harden was a high school teacher that David loved. Anyhow, he got
him to go to Duke.

P: So he goes to Duke for his undergraduate work.









UFLC 75
Page 15

L: He said it was the most anti-Semitic place he had ever been in his life.

P: At Duke?

L: Yeah, this was in the 1940s right after the war. There was a quota, either 1 or 2
percent Jews could go to...[he] just found it to be just miserable.

P: So he was not happy at Duke?

L: No. Then he decided to go to law school at the University of Florida.

P: So he graduated from Duke, he took a Duke degree?

L: Yes. Three years, and then went to the University of Florida law school and did
very well and loved that. Became a Gator. He may have given $10 to Duke,
but he hated Duke.

P: I know he was a great philanthropist of the University of Florida.

L: Yes. So it was the summer of 1954.

P: Are you back to you now?

L: Yeah.

P: Because I was going to ask you, your brother Herman is older than you and he
goes where?

L: Emory and was going to be a dentist, but he couldn't handle the dentistry and
goes into psychology.

P: And that's what he is today, a psychologist?

L: Yes. He got his doctorate I think at the University of Florida. All of the brothers
got a degree at the University of Florida, all five.

P: So everybody in the family are Gators.

L: Stanley got two degrees there, David got his law degree, Herman got his PhD
there, I got both of my degrees there, Allen got one degree there in business.

P: Why did you select Gainesville?









UFLC 75
Page 16

L: I guess in the meantime, David had gone to Gainesville, and this is where all of
the Pensacola boys went.

P: There was a school in Tallahassee, they didn't have a law school there.

L: Well, I wasn't even concerned with law school. I didn't know law school, it didn't
make any difference to me. At that point, all of my buddies, Y.B. Patterson and
Ed Sears, big football heroes, [there] may have been others, going to the
University of Florida. They were Travares. Then, I was going to room with
Winston Bailey, we got an apartment down there, who was Travares. Jack
Gardener, now Jack was not, we used to call him Alibi. There were four of us.
Was David Cobb? I don't know. Anyhow, there were four of us that went, and
we roomed right off of University [Avenue in] an upstairs apartment.

P: I'm surprised they weren't pledged to fraternities.

L: This is how the story goes. So here I am, the football players, everybody, all the
social elite, we're all down in Gainesville. I was so naive, I didn't know anything
about Jewish fraternities, non-Jewish fraternities. It's rush week, and
everywhere these guys went, I went. S.A.E., Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Pike, all of
this.

P: You didn't get to the Tep house or the Pi Lam house?

L: I didn't know anything about Tep or Pi Lam or anything like that. S.A.E.'s, I was
going to go S.A.E.. Either way, all the Pensacola boys did. It was either
Thursday night or Friday night before the bids came out, or it was the last night of
the parties, the evening parties. All the guys came in to see me. Bill Cobb,
David Cobb's older brother, was a big S.A.E. All Pensacola [boys] always went
S.A.E. on the corner of University and 13th, with the lion. They came into the
room where I was, and they said they were all going S.A.E., and I said that's
great, I will too. I noticed the look on their face, and they said "Fred," and they
went on to explain that I could not. And I said, "Why?" And they said, Well
you're Jewish. But, that's not bad because, you see, the S.A.E.'s sister
fraternity are the Teps, and they are the coolest Jews you ever met. I know it's
wrong, Jews just, you know how it is, they just can't belong to this fraternity, but
we have the greatest parties together and we adore each other, and the Teps are
it, and I have already made arrangements with whoever the rush chairman was.
Tomorrow at 2:00, they can't wait to meet you, the cool Jews. I've told them all
about you, and they just absolutely, they can't wait to meet you. You're going to
be like a star there."


P: Must have hit you like cold water.









UFLC 75
Page 17

L: Oh, God. The first thing that went through my mind was, I said, "I don't believe I
could do this if I were them. I believe I would take a stand." But then I thought
back, I didn't take [a stand] on the Rebel and Travares thing, I jumped [ship]. All
this has a great effect on me throughout life, and has a lot of effect just how
things went as to how my life could have changed completely by going into the
Tep house that next day. I think it was a Friday at 2:00 or noon, and I remember
they were having hamburgers. I got dressed up, and I went down, and I walked
in. Nobody came up to me, they didn't know who the hell I was. I kept looking
around for the guy I was supposed to meet, and he was there in like a corner,
and there were four or five of the top recruits. I remember, later, it was Norman
Lipoff and a couple of other guys. So I walk up and I stand there, it's as vivid as
if it were yesterday really, and I stand there, and I stand there until there's a
break. I introduce myself, "I'm Fred Levin," expecting Bill Cobb has just really
set this thing up. "Oh it's nice to meet you, why don't you go over there and
have a hamburger?" I went through the line, took a left, and got this hamburger
and potato chips or something, Coca Cola. I went and sat at the table, by
myself, nobody ever came up, nobody said a word. I'm sitting at a four person
table by myself. I don't know a soul. I saw Gene Rosenbaum off to the side.
Gene had been my buddy all the way through until I went into high school. I saw
maybe another person I knew, but they were all covered up with Teps rushing. I
had my hamburger, I looked around, nobody seemed to give a crap one way or
the other about me. Had somebody walked up to me and said, "Welcome,
heard a lot about you, or something like that, can we talk to you," I would have
ended up being a Tep, and there could've been big changes in my life for a lot of
things. I walked out of the house, I remember I walked out of the Tep house.

P: This was in 1954 you said?

L: 1954, August, September.

P: They were still down on the Avenue, they haven't moved to the new house yet.

L: [No], they were down. My house would have been across 13th and to the right,
but I walked by the S.A.E. house...

P: ...which was right on the corner.

L: I walked by the S.A.E. house and everybody was out partying, they were having
their party, and I looked over and really, oh God, you can't imagine how it felt.
Now I was not only not an S.A.E., I was nobody. I wasn't even with the cool
Jews. So I go back to the apartment, and Alibi Jack Gardener comes [by]. I
was really feeling bad, I'm talking about teary bad. He said, "Come on with me."
He had been one of the Rebels, he had not been accepted by S.A.E. either, and
he was going Sigma Chi. He said, "I want you to come along with me," he said,









UFLC 75
Page 18

"I met some great, great Jewish people over at this Pi Lam house, and they really
want to meet you." At that point, I thought my whole career at Florida had gone
down the drain. So I go over to the Pi Lam house...

P: ...which was on University Avenue.

L: Right next to the Sigma Chi house. I get there, and you would have thought that
Yetsky [Yiddish for "Jesus"] had walked in the door. Alibi was a real personal
kind of guy, and he had gone over and he had told them all about me. I walked
in the door, and they grabbed hold of me. I remember Fernando Storch, just
made me really, really feel very, very comfortable. So I end up being a Pi Lam.
There I met Jack Graff and Fred Vigodsky, we were all in the same pledge class.

P: You and Fred, is that your first meeting or you knew Fred?

L: No, I didn't know any of these people. This was Miami High as compared to
Miami Beach High. So I, then, become a Pi Lam.

P: Both of my two brothers, George and Saul were both Pi Lams. They were
before you, though.

L: Yeah. So I become a Pi Lam, and it was amazing because Sam Goldenberg,
who was my god-brother, had been a Pi Lam, Norman Williewzik, in fact all the
Jews from Pensacola...

P: I knew Sam well when he was a student.

L: Yeah, Sam's still living, isn't he?

P: Yeah.

L: Nobody ever rushed me. Honest to God, I went off to college, I had no idea
there was such a thing as a Jewish fraternity here, that I could not belong. It did
have an impact on me because as I went through college, I began to realize,
these guys that I had become associated with were really a lot sharper than my
buddies who had gone on to S.A.E., Dick Massington, Stanley Rosencrantz.
Then I would go over to the Tep house, and we'd play cards over there, Stan
Greenberg, and I began to realize these people just Pi Lams had won the
scholastic thing like twenty straight years. And they'd just all moved into...


P: Both Jewish fraternities were very smart.









UFLC 75
Page 19

L: And they moved into the Orange League or whatever it is, and they had done
very well athletically, and they went politically, and I began for the first time to
realize....

P: To what degree were you scarred by the anti-Semitism?

L: At the University of Florida?

P: At the University of Florida. You ran into some of it, obviously, in Pensacola, but
not to the degree...

L: Not to the degree it was there. I saw it as my buddies didn't stand up when they
should have and said "Hey guys, if you can't do this ." This actually, in law
school, did occur with my brother Stanley where the whole fiddley-fi group stood
up and said if Stanley Levin is either coming or you got to break this Jewish bit
and bang, they did. Otherwise they were all going to go ...

P: But it's a different kind of a world. You leave your gentile friends now in many
ways and move into a Jewish crowd.

L: Yes, and became good friends with Jack Graff and Fred Vigodsky. These are
guys who later moved to Pensacola. Jack became my law partner.

P: And became life-long friends.

L: Life-long friends. The other guys, David Cobb, Bailey, Alibi, I'm still somewhat
friends with Alibi Gardner.

P: Did you still live in the apartment?

L: Still lived in the apartment, and, then, moved into the fraternity house when they
moved over. They were Number One, Fraternity Row.

P: Dean Weil was...

L: Yeah. When that opened, I moved in the new house.

P: What kind of a student were you at the beginning in Gainesville?

L: Nothing. Just played.

P: You took university college courses.


L: Sam, I took your course.









UFLC 75
Page 20

P: You were never in my class.

L: Yeah I was, somehow or another. I remember in a big room. I must have
taken Florida History.

P: I taught the C1 class, American Institutions is probably what you took, second
floor of Peabody Hall.

L: I took something. Yeah, it was a big room.

P: A big room, elevated.

L: Yes, elevated room.

P: I hope I gave you a decent grade.

L: It didn't make any difference to me. At that point, if I didn't know what I was
going to do, I was going to go back into business and be a pawn broker or
something.

P: In other words, you were looking for four years of good times.

L: Four years of good times. We would go, Fred Vigodsky and I, there was a
professor, I can't remember his name, we'd all go over to the dog track a lot of
nights. I had pretty good money to spend at the time, I think like $120 a month.

P: Where'd that come from?

L: My daddy. We used to go to the dog track, Fred had a car, I didn't have a car.

P: You went to the Jai Alai Fronton?

L: No, in Ocala? That wasn't anywhere near...

P: Where'd you go to the dog track?

L: Orange Park or Jacksonville Kennel Club. They had a whorehouse down by a
place called South of the Border, across the border, we'd go there every once in
awhile. It was just party, party, party. Grades didn't really make much of a
difference.

P: I can see that you weren't setting any great academic records.









UFLC 75
Page 21

L: No. Then, the years I really enjoyed myself I met Marilyn who was later to
become my wife, Marilyn Kapner. Her cousins were Teps, Norman and Lewis
Kapner. Her sister had been a D Phi E, Marilyn was an A E Phi. She had
dated Lenny Golden who had been Fred Vigodsky's roommate his freshman
year. She was still in high school. Fred Vigodsky introduced me to her, and I
remember Freddy told me, "She's the most beautiful Jewish girl you'll ever meet."
When I met her, I may have been certainly either a sophomore or a junior. I
remember going to the dorm with Fred Vigodsky, and I walk up, and there's
Marilyn sitting on this couch with about seven or eight Teps around her. Again,
I'm waiting my turn to be introduced. Unbeknownst to me, she's engaged to a
non-Jewish boy back in West Palm. I'm introduced, and, then, I call her. Back
then, I get a date for like seven weeks, eight weeks off. Jack Graff and Cissy
Holly, we double date. Jack had a car, and we'd go to the Alamar Bar. I'm
drinking, and I remember the first date she says, "Don't you think you've had
enough?" I say, "No". I'd ordered a V.0 and Seven or something like that. I
call the waitress back, it was just embarrassing that here she had put me in this
situation, and I said, "Make that a double." To make a long story short, as I
walked her back to the dorm that night from the car to her dorm, she said she
was not really turned on by me. I reached over, and I grabbed a newspaper,
and I said, "Tomorrow when you get up, put a nickel in there for me." It was a
five cent Gainesville Sun or something. I walk off, and she was just stunned that
anybody could be such an asshole. Anyhow, I called, and every Jewish guy in
both fraternities were trying to date her. Then, I'd get another date, eight weeks
off, ten weeks off. So I'd met Marilyn, and I was having a great time. I loved
the University of Florida.

P: It sounds to me like you were even more of a social animal in Gainesville than
you were in Pensacola.

L: We'd go out a lot.

P: Did you ever go to class?

L: McHouston was his name, was our buddy who'd go gambling with us, and he'd
taught business, letter writing, a couple of business courses. I went to his class,
and he gave me a couple of "A"s. Fred Vigodsky got "B"s and had never been
to class, and he got all upset at him. The guy would just give you the grades. It
was just fun times. We get into 1957...

P: By this time you did have a car.

L: No. Fred Vigodsky...


P: It was his car.









UFLC 75
Page 22


L: Yeah. By the way, he and I, then, move out of the fraternity house, and we
room together. We originally move up way near where the airport is. Nice
home, we had a maid. Eddie Heller was going to move in with us. Eddie was
the drum major, Eddie was big politically at the University of Florida. Fred
Vigodsky and myself and Chuck Ruffner were going to room together. I think
Stanley may have been involved. Anyhow, Eddie Heller got all upset because
there was a disciplinary action against all of us in that apartment for gambling. A
guy named Harvey Ward had been arrested, I remember him, with a bunch of
student cards. By the way, a week ago Friday, I was having drinks at a place
called Lou Michaels here in Pensacola. Jackie Simpson introduced himself to
me, and a guy named Dick Hobin, who had been a basketball player, all of them
were there about the same time, and I was mentioning to Dick about this guy
who had gotten me into so much trouble and was a great dancer and he said,"
Harvey Ward." He had remembered Harvey. Harvey, years later called me
from Eglin, he had been arrested for bookmaking or something.

P: He was still booking.

L: Yeah. We got picked up by the disciplinary committee, and Stanley, who didn't
want to stay in school anyhow, took the blame for everything. He got
suspended.

P: When you were in school, which of your brothers were there? Stanley was there
later, Stanley's much younger.

L: No, Stanley's just a year and a half [younger]. Stanley was two years behind
me.

P: David's not there?

L: David's gone and was practicing law at the time.

P: Had David made a good reputation at school?

L: Yeah, David did well in law school. Herman came back during some of this time
when I was in law school, I believe, to get his PhD. at Florida.

P: Where was this place that became the gambling house, again?

L: Two things. One is downstairs at the fraternity house we'd built this thing and,
we had a dice table.


P: This is the new fraternity house now?









UFLC 75
Page 23


L: On One Fraternity Row. Used to have Saul Fruchman come over.
P: You had Teps over there a lot.

L: Yeah. We'd gamble and stuff like that. This apartment that we were in, Stanley
and myself.

P: You knew what happened to Saul Fruchman?

L: No.

P: He committed suicide. His mother and father were both dead by that time.

L: He was in the shoe business or something?

P: His father was in the shirt business selling Manhattan shirts. Saul worked with
him, and, then, he hung himself.

L: He was a miserable [person].

P: Lost a lot of money.

L: Gambling?

P: Gambling.

L: Yeah, he did. Is that why he killed himself?

P: I don't know. I think he was just depressed. I remember the house on
University Avenue next to the Sigma Chi house, the Pi Lambdas, and in back of it
was a one car garage.

L: Two story garage.

P: A cottage.

L: Yeah. There was something on top, you had to go upstairs.

P: And that was not the gambling house?

L: Oh, no.









UFLC 75
Page 24

P: We went into that place once. My son Alan was in there then. There must
have been 2,000 used condoms lying around on the floor and mattresses
everywhere.

L: I never stayed in the fraternity house, there. First place I stayed, I roomed with
Stanley Hammerschmidt. Stanley was the dumbest guy I've ever met in my life,
but was very, very wealthy. The family had some kind of potato chip deal in
Miami. Miami exploded, and he was the Wise potato or whatever the hell it was,
but they had done extremely well. So our gambling was going on in our
apartment, and we had Jimmy Dunn and Joe Hergert, a lot of the football players
coming over. Harvey Ward gets arrested.

P: How did he get arrested?

L: Got arrested for stealing student cards and cashing checks, and, then, blamed it
on us that he'd lost all his money gambling.

P: That's how the university became involved with you.

L: Yes. And Stanley copped a plea for a one semester suspension.

P: Did they interview each one of you separately?

L: Yes. I basically told them, along [with] Fred Vigodsky, "Listen, it was a lot of
playing bridge and things. If I go, we're all going." That was Hergert and Dunn,
that was the football team. This would have been 1957, so I was put on a one-
year probation. So all of a sudden, I have to figure out what in the world am I
going to do.

P: I was going to say, you were building up a great record to get into law school.

L: It didn't make any difference back then. What in the world am I going to do for a
living? I was having such a good time, I needed to stay in college. My brother
had become a lawyer, David, and had been a lawyer for a lot of years, five or six
years, whatever. He said, "Why don't you go to law school." I'm getting out in
spring of 1958, June, I'm going to graduate, except Dr. Ring who had this
German accent, he flunks me.

P: I want you to know, he's still around.

L: I know. The Alfred Ring Tennis Center is right across from the Levin College of
Law. So all of a sudden, here I am, I have to go to summer school and, then, go
to law school. I go to summer school and take the course over again,
transportation. I enter law school. In the mean time, I was home in the spring.









UFLC 75
Page 25


P: Once again, I want to make sure. To get yourself into law school, because you
had such a poor academic record....

L: It didn't make any difference then. Anybody could join, anybody could go.

P: Fenn was the dean at that time? Henry Fenn?

L: Yes. So I'm home for the Easter holidays, 1958, and we're living on 18th and
Larua [Streets], and my brother David and his wife are across the street. My
brother Martin was being checked, he'd been feeling real, real bad, and this
again goes back to something that you'll remind me of later. Martin had been
treated by Dr. Charles Kahn and had a bad case of acne Chuck Kahn who's a
district court of appeal judge is his son that during, probably the fall of 1957 or
early 1958, she goes to Dr. Kahn, he gives Martin a prescription for
Chloromycetin, it had to be Chloromycetin, I didn't know at the time, which was
an antibiotic. Martin immediately started getting blotches, and my mother said,
"I knew something was wrong, and I knew he shouldn't have taken that."
Anyhow, he took it. I'm home for the Spring and Marilyn's with me, we are
engaged at the time.

P: So Marilyn's broken off with the guy in West Palm Beach.

L: Oh, yeah. We got engaged I think maybe....

P: You're both students when you got engaged?

L: Yeah, and she's in nursing. Momma comes in, and she's crying. "David," she
said, "I think Dr. Ames thinks that Martin has leukemia" and Marilyn gets out the
book and starts reading that, back then, it's fatal and everything. I remember
David walking across, he grabbed the book and threw it across the room, and I
don't know what in the world is going on. Keep in mind, Dr. Ames is the family
doctor who lived around from 15 West Blount Street. His wife and daughter,
very, very big Catholics. His wife and only daughter were killed in an automobile
accident in North Carolina when she was on her way to Duke or somewhere and
left his whole estate and everything to the Catholic church, and today it's still a
home for nuns, a big beautiful home across from P.K. Yonge
Anyhow, it becomes apparent sometime during that weekend that I'm
there, that my brother Martin had leukemia. Everybody up until this point, you
have to understand, [was] just a happy, happy family. From that point, to the
day she died, I don't think my mother ever really had any happiness. Martin
lived maybe six months. He died. It was a miserable disease back then. I
remember they went to City of Hope in California. Nothing worked. They had
some remission, and everybody was so happy, and, then, three weeks later, he









UFLC 75
Page 26

went. I was home with Martin a couple of weeks before I was to go to law
school. I think Martin knew he was dying. I took him to the firehouse drive-in, I
remember he caused a big scene there, mean. The last words we had, I
remember he threw a plate across the room at me as I was walking out to go to
law school. So I get to law school....

P: Had it already moved down to the new area or was it still in Bryan Hall?

L: It's on University and 13th. At that time I'm rooming with David Levy and
somebody. We're up in a loft somewhere. I go to my first day of law school,
and I'm sitting on one side of the room, and the other side of the room, the
auditorium, nobody's in it. Dean Fenn stands up, look to your right, look to your
left, neither one of them are going to be here. We graduated about 20 percent
of those that started with us, it ended up being. About that time, back of the
auditorium opens up and here comes George Stark, first black student to enter a
public institution in the State of Florida.

P: You're in the room the day George appears first?

L: Yes. I'm in the auditorium, all the white guys on one side, and, then, George
comes in. I didn't understand a lot of what was going on. I remember looking
at him, he was dressed in a suit, and all the rest of us were dressed like a bunch
of bums. We have two sections in law school, George ends up being in my
section. I am slap scared to death. I realize, they're going to flunk two-thirds of
these people out, then what am I going to do? For the first time in my life, I start
a program that even to today, some forty-four years later, I still do, and that is
from the moment I get [up], I am constantly working on something, a case,
whatever it is. I get my books in law school and fell in love with law. It just
made sense.

P: Let's get back to the segregation and George Stark. Had you been following
that, because there was a lot in the newspapers at the time, and Judge Devane
is the one who issued the order. The Supreme Court was turning it down, the
Board of Control was turning it down, and they were trying to organize a new law
school at Florida A&M.

L: I really wasn't into the politics of it. We go to our sections, and they ask people
to give a little something about themselves. Hell, I had to go to summer school
to get out. All the rest of them were magna cum laude from here and all that. I
start studying my butt off, I mean day and night, and this stuff starts to make
sense to me, it's so logical. In the mean time, poor old George Stark, wherever
he went, they would shuffle him with a law school prison type shuffle. We'd go
into the library, and everybody had study groups except me because I was so









UFLC 75
Page 27

dumb and George because he was black. I worked so hard at it, I really did. I
worked day and night.

P: What brought this turn around with you?

L: Hell, I didn't know what I was going to do in life.

P: And you finally thought you found it.

L: I didn't know. I knew I had to get out of law school, and they're going to flunk
two-thirds of these people out.

P: Didn't Fenn once advise you not to come back?

L: Yeah. I'm there in September, and toward the end of September I get a call.
"You need to come home, Martin's dying." Fred Vigodsky, Marilyn, Stanley, and
myself drive I think Stanley had a car, somebody had a car we drive back.
Martin died before I could get there. I go in to see Dean Fenn, and I said, "My
brother's dying," and he pulls up my name and everything, and he tells me, I
mean just cold [ly], "You know, really with your grades and everything, you
[might] just as well stay home." My brother's dying, I've been told I have no
chance at all. I remember it was the first time I'd ever seen my dad crying. Just
a real sad situation. Back to Gainesville, and I'm working my butt off. I see all
of the things that are happening with George Stark, and I don't do anything.
Some of the most prominent, later prominent lawyers at that time Phi Delta Phi,
a legal fraternity, would not accept Jews. I became a Phi Alpha Delta. All of
those guys in fiddle-d-fi, they called them, they were the same as the society
group all the way through. George would walk into the library, they'd start that
shuffling, he'd sit down by himself, scared to death in class, and the same thing, I
started thinking "God, I really know this stuff," and I would start asking questions
in class, and they'd shuffle me. So we basically were shuffled. George had
enough sense to stop. I really wanted some answers to some things to fill in the
gap.
Along come midterms, and I remember I walk out of an exam, and there is
Normal Lipoff, Strawn ,who became a circuit judge, another guy, and they were
all post-morteming the exam. I remember I walked up, and I sort of felt like I did
when I went to the Tep house. They were talking about what they had done on
the exam. I said I had this answer. It's amazing some things that stay with you.
I remember Normal Lipoff saying, "Levin, wait till the grades come out." Oh,
hell, here I go again. I knew that all these guys were so bright, and I....
Thanksgiving break took place, I think I went home to Miami, I got married in
1959, yeah, I went home Thanksgiving. The only break I had out of law school
I went home with her, and I don't think her dad really ever cared a lot for me. [I]
came back, and at some point, when I came back, they gave you the grades by









UFLC 75
Page 28

your student number, and I remember looking down and figuring mine was going
to be low. I'm leading the class. I didn't go home for Christmas holidays,
studied throughout Christmas holidays, [I] come back, and I'm clearly leading the
class.
In the meantime, the next semester, we had to do something called case
comments or something. Dean Fenn is my tutor. Future interest is the
toughest course in law school. That's where they all flunked out. Dean Fenn
gives me a future interest case to write a case comment on. I hit on something
that nobody else had ever thought about. It's insignificant now, but it was how
the market there's something called a rule against perpetuities and options.
This would have blown a senior law student out at Yale, it wouldn't have made
any difference. I really think that Fenn was really trying to embarrass me. I've
always had a good economic background or understanding of money and the
marketplace, and I realized that for hundreds of years the rule against
perpetuities was supposed to be an economic tool to keep people from going
from generation to generation, keeping it within the family. Anyhow, I came up
with some theory on options and why it worked in reverse. It blew Fenn out of
the water.

P: Fenn remembered the advice he'd given you?

L: I don't remember whether he ever remembered that, but many times, for the next
two years, he would call me down to the office and say, "Such and such from
Wall Street is on the phone, and they're very interested in this option theory, and
I told him you'd talk to them. So I won [End of Tape A, side 2] ...Her name was
Gertrude Brick.

P: That was a different one, then. Gertrude Block became the writer person there.

L: This was the Brick Award which is still being given today. I won everything,
absolutely everything. All of a sudden, as Fred Levin spoke, there wasn't
anymore shuffling. There was nothing but writing. I'm trying to remember,
maybe it was the fall of next year, but whatever it was, keep in mind that
everybody would join in on this shuffling of George Stark, and I think it was either
the start of the next year, start of 1959, fall, or it may have been January 1959.
Anyhow, George Stark walks into the library, and they start shuffling. He goes,
and he sits down by himself. I do know, that when I stood up and walked, I was
the star at the law school. There wasn't any question about that. I stood up,
and I walked over, and I sat down next to him, and I said, "George, you need any
help?" He says, I sure do." I said, Why don't you and I study together." I
had been rejected by all the others. So we became...


P: The Jew defends the black.









UFLC 75
Page 29

L: But the interesting thing was, all of a sudden, over the next several days, I would
be sitting in the library with George and more and more joined. Pretty soon, the
great, great majority of that law school were with us, and it was six or eight races
by themselves other than the professors. George Stark got three "A"s in law
school, all by a professor named Josh Okun. I heard that Josh had died ten or
fifteen years ago. I heard that for the first time when my ex-roommate Dave
Levy came through. I had gotten married June 14, 1959, got married in
Pensacola. I must have had fifteen ushers, all my non-Jewish buddies and just
a very few Jewish friends, Fred Vigodsky, Gene Rosenbaum. It was a big
wedding for Pensacola, it was in the synagogue. Then, momma did all the
cooking.

P: Why in Pensacola and not West Palm?

L: Because we were going to live there, and Marilyn's folks were not well-to-do, and
there had been some problems in the meantime in the Kapner family, I think.
There were five or six brothers together, and one of them had formed his own
company and pulled a lot of the business away. They were not doing good.

P: So an internal family problem.

L: Yeah. They were not doing well.

P: So your folks were happy to have it in Pensacola.

L: Yeah. I'm married, we move into an apartment.

P: Let's finish the George Stark story.

L: This gets back to the George Stark story. We're living in the apartment and
George and I study at the law school.

P: Are you pretty much the only one befriending him? The only white person
befriending him?

L: I think there were others that came along.

P: Began to join in.

L: Yeah. It's getting close to the end of the semester. I had befriended him and
helped him, but as far as really studying, I had never done that with him. We
were going to study for the exam the next day, I told him to meet me at my
apartment. I was running a little late, and I got there, and he's sitting on the
steps, we were an upstairs apartment. I said, "Why didn't you go on in?" He









UFLC 75
Page 30

said," You don't understand, a colored man doesn't go into an apartment where a
white woman is." I said, Oh the hell with it, come on." So we came in, Marilyn
cooked supper for us, and we studied all night long. I had these little flip cards
that worked real well. All night long. He goes home, and I clean up and go to
the exam, and he never shows up. He had gone home just to lay down for a
second [snap of fingers], slept through the exam. They wouldn't give him
another exam, they flunked him. He was getting "D"s and everything else other
than [in] Josh Okun's class. They flunked him out.
P: He withdrew himself. He said it was too competitive.

L: Whatever it was, he was gone. I never saw him again until back when he came
for my...

P: I wondered if you had maintained a relationship.

L: I tried to find him. I finally called Willie George Allen, who gave me an address.
I wrote him a letter, and he eventually wrote me back.

P: He comes to Gainesville on occasion, and I've done an Oral History interview
with him.

L: I don't know if he remembers it the way I do.

P: He remembers you in a very positive, friendly way.

L: I continued to do very well in law school and, then, nine and a half months later,
my first born Marci...

P: You graduate law school at the top of your class.

L: No, this is now, I'm into my junior year. I remember when Marci was born at
Alachua General [Hospital], and I'm studying, holding Marilyn's hand, while she's
screaming. I go home that summer, and I worked for David. I'd fallen in love
with the law. The next semester two people kept me from high honors. I
actually graduated number one with the three hundred and some students I
started with, but two students came in from the Spring class and graduated with
me that were ahead of me, J.M. Starling and Park Hill Hayes. With the class I
started with I graduated number one, but there were two professors that kept me
from getting high honors. If either one of them had given me an "A" instead of a
"B" one was Judge Crosby who taught appellate practice.

P: Who later becomes part of your friends out here in West Florida.









UFLC 75
Page 31

L: Yeah, and partner here in the firm. I wrote the brief, I argued the case, and
George Dunlap was with me. He gives George an "A" and me a "B" obviously
because of the personal relationship, he didn't want to look too obvious. Then,
Professor Day, our property law professor, adored me. Wanted me to teach
property law, he was going to be retiring. The grades were like, in his class, I'll
give you an example, would have been out of fifty points, a forty-nine, a couple of
forty-eights, a forty-seven, a forty-six I had missed one question then it
dropped down to thirty-nine and I had the forty-six. He draws the line between
forty-six and forty-seven and gives me a "B." It was just unheard of. The line
was clear where it should have been drawn. I take trial practice. Jack Graff
and I were a team, and Professor Enwall was a trial practice professor. I don't
know why I took that because I was going to be a tax lawyer. We're having
coffee or something down in a restaurant on 13th and somehow or another,
Enwall was there, and he says to Jack Graff, "Where are you all going to
practice?" I said, "Back in Pensacola with my brother, both of us." He makes a
comment, he says, Well, I'll tell you one thing. I am glad I'm not still
prosecuting there, you two guys are great at trial practice." Keep in mind now, I
had never stood up in front of anybody up until this point and said anything. So I
have one more year of law school, and I go through that and graduate number
three in the class.

P: You're not working, your father's still supporting you?

L: Yes. During the summer I work at the dog track as a bartender and make some
money, but daddy's supporting me. I don't work. Marilyn's father sends, I think,
$50 a month. We have the baby, I'm using an old station wagon that daddy had
let me have, and I graduate and come back to Pensacola.

P: You graduated well? Your grades and all were good?

L: Oh, yeah, I graduated number three. I had a 3.48. Like I said, either one of
those two-hour "B"s had been an "A," I would have graduated with high honors.

P: I just wanted to have it on the record.

L: Yeah. I would have had high honors. I come back to Pensacola. I adored the
law. I understood more about the logic behind it than anybody I'd ever met. I
understood it. [For] everybody else it was rote, this is the law and things like that.
I understood why things were the way they were.

P: You had by this time given up the idea of being a tax lawyer?

L: No. Reubin Askew had become David's partner, it was Levin and Askew. I
was getting $400 a month, which was big money back then. Jack Graff









UFLC 75
Page 32

graduated in the summer in August and came with us. I was going to do tax
law.

P: Did you have to take a special course for tax law?

L: Yeah, there were some tax courses, but I was going to go to NYU tax school.

P: Yeah, which had the program.

L: Then, another great event takes place in my life.

P: When did you take the Bar exam?

L: Took the Bar exam, I guess, August.

P: No problem?

L: No. And then I get sworn in October, October 27. I'm back in Pensacola doing
the research.

P: With one child, Marci.

L: One child. Doing the research for David and Reubin, and we're over on
Government Street.

P: That's the office?

L: The office, Levin and Askew.

P: I want you to stop for just a minute, and tell me the origins of the firm and the
relationship between David and Askew.

L: David went off, became a lawyer, started working for the county solicitor's office.
Worked awhile, and, then, it was Korea, and he joined the Air Force. Got a
commission as a lawyer, went to Korea, came back, and went to work with J.B.
Hopkins and George Roark, whose son later becomes a judge. He practices
law, and he's a good lawyer.

P: By himself?

L: Goes off by himself, and he's an excellent lawyer.

P: Doing all kinds of cases.









UFLC 75
Page 33

L: All kinds of cases. DUIs, divorce, a little bit of personal injury, I guess. Then, a
guy named Henry Barksdale, who had come to work with him, it was Levin and
Barksdale. Henry got elected, I believe, county solicitor and, then, Reubin
Askew and David had a number of cases together. Reubin was working for the
state attorney's office.

P: Where did Reubin Askew come from?

L: Pensacola.

P: But originally he was from Oklahoma, I think.
L: Yeah.

P: He came here with his mother.

L: And she was a maid at the San Carlos Hotel.

P: No father.

L: No father.

P: So it was just Reubin and his mother came here from Oklahoma.

L: He had a father, but either the father left, divorced, died, something. I remember
his father's name was Goldberg, something Goldberg Askew.

P: Almost sounds Jewish.

L: She was. His father had been dear, dear friends with a Jewish guy named
Reubin Goldberg I believe.

P: But Reubin Askew had no Jewish ancestry at all on either side.

L: No.

P: What's his background, Reubin Askew? Does he go to the University of
Florida?

L: Goes to FSU and becomes president of the student body there. Then, he moves
over to the University of Florida law school and, politically, was always involved,
Blue Key and all of that.


P: Did he and David know each other in Gainesville?









UFLC 75
Page 34

L: No. David graduated before Reubin and went into the service.

P: What brought those two together?

L: Reubin was with the state attorney's office, and David was defending cases.
They would come up against each other, and when they would do this, they had
mutual respect, and, then, David, when Henry Barksdale got elected county
solicitor, David asked Reubin to come in with him, and they became partners,
became Levin and Askew. That would have been, maybe, a couple of years
before I graduated.

P: That really became the beginnings of a legendary firm.
L: Yeah, that would have been in the late 1950s. You haven't done Reubin Askew
in Oral History yet?

P: Not yet, no. It's a natural that needs to be...

L: Oh, God, yes. Levin and Askew...

P: And that's the name of the firm, Levin and Askew?

L: Yes. Then, I get in.

P: You're the third person in the firm?

L: Levin, Askew, Levin, and Graff. My number is four, so it must have been Henry
Barksdale had a number, Reubin had two, I don't know.

P: Where was the office then?

L: It's over on Government Street, 120 West Government or something, upstairs of
the building. So I'm waiting around for my Bar and waiting around a year to go
to NYU Tax Law School, and I'm doing research. I passed the Bar, and David
tells me about doing divorce cases. I'm doing uncontested divorce cases, and
then, one day, a lady comes in, and secretary Dorothy Steinseck, it may have
been Bonnie Anderson, I think there was one receptionist and one secretary
[who] took care of Reubin, David, and myself. The lady came in, was a walk-in,
she needed a lawyer on a contested divorce case, and I was listening to the lady,
and I was taking the information down. You get $50 for an uncontested divorce
and $170 for a contested divorce. She mentioned that her husband said he was
going to kill her lawyer. That ended my divorce career. I went in and told David
I'm going to be a tax lawyer.
The story of how I ended up as a trial lawyer was about that time, it was
probably right around Christmas time, a lady named Angeliki Theodore [was]









UFLC 75
Page 35

living out on Scenic Highway at this brick home that had some fire damage. She
had Traveler's Insurance Company. Traveler's had offered her like $17,000 to
settle for the fire loss. She came in to see me, and she said she would pay me
a percentage of anything over $17,000. I called Traveler's, and they said that
was it, $17,000 was it. My typical way of doing things, I start working and
working, and finally I filed a law suit, Theodore v. Traveler's. They move it to the
federal court.

P: Why the federal court?

L: Because there was diversity of citizenship and Judge Arnow..

P: Who was originally from Gainesville.

L: Yeah. Had he already become federal judge in 1960, 1962, 1963? Maybe it
was Judge Carswell. Whatever. I filed a lawsuit, and I don't ask for a jury trial.

P: Why did this become a federal case?

L: It's called diversity of citizenship. When a local resident sues a corporation, they
removed me. At this point, the lawyer [for Traveler's Insurance Company], what
they used to say about Bert Lane of Beggs and Lane, they would ask, "Who's the
best lawyer in Northwest Florida?" "Bert Lane when he's sober." Who's the
second best lawyer?" "Bert Lane when he's drunk," and that was the story. He
represented the L&N Railroad, he represented a telephone company, he
represented all the insurance companies. Bert Lane was a great, great lawyer.
I filed a lawsuit, and Bert Lane calls up and says, "Fred?" I says, "Yes." "Bert
Lane." Yes sir, Mr. Lane." "Listen, this case against Traveler's ." and he
goes on and on, "We'll pay you $18,000, but if you don't take it, Fred, I've got to
ask for a jury trial." So I call Miss Theodore and beg her to take the $18,000, no
fee, no nothing. She just says "No." She wanted $20,000 or something. I'm
sitting there, I don't know what to do. For the next seven or eight days I can't
sleep, I'm scared to death. Finally, I just couldn't take it anymore. I went ahead
and amended the complaint and asked for a jury trial. I start working, and I
work, and I work, and I learn everything about that case, everything. Then, we
go to trial.

P: With the jury.

L: With the jury in federal court. Bert Lane, the bailiffs, the court reporters,
everybody's laughing, "Are you crazy? You're going up against Bert Lane? It's
your first case," and all this kind of stuff. I'm just scared to death. But I was so
well prepared, I knew everything about the case, I had every witness, so well-
prepared, jury verdict comes back, and it's a $45,000 verdict. The judge gives









UFLC 75
Page 36

me a $5,000 fee on top of it. Here's a guy making $400 a month, and I decide,
"Heck, I like this game."

P: You're in high cotton.

L: I like this game, and that's how I became a trial lawyer.

P: And that woman was thrilled to death.

L: Oh, God. [She] was a friend for life, her son, the whole Greek community. No
matter what I did, whether it was a motion hearing or it was a jury trial, no matter
what it was, I would overwork it to the point where...
P: But you also had the golden touch. It seems to me that everything you turned
to... I understand it was backed up by hard work, it just didn't happen.

L: Hard work. I became more and more comfortable standing in front of people
talking. Keep in mind, the first time I had done anything had been in law school.
I had never made a speech. Never in all the classes. I always avoided it in
some way. If it was required like at the University of Florida....

P: Except your bar mitzvah.

L: Except for my bar mitzvah, but I blew that.

P: That's right, that reading, speaking, and writing course you're supposed to give a
little talk.

L: Yeah, never did.

P: For freshman.

L: Never did. I was absolutely scared to death.

P: But now you've become a master.

L: Well, I was still well prepared. I'm still well prepared, but I can ad lib, I can
handle it when it gets rolling. I always have my comfort level of having
everything prepared. Anyhow, that started a career. I began doing personal
injury cases.

P: Talk about the expansion of the firm and the move from place to place. You
started a small little office over here with two or three people and one secretary.









UFLC 75
Page 37

L: Then Dick Warfield came in. He moved in front of Levin, Askew, Warfield,
Levin, and Graff.

P: Graff was a full-time partner?

L: Yeah. He came up in August.

P: At some point, Reubin, Dick Warfield, Jack Graff, David and myself meet with the
guy who had just bought First National Bank building, which is Seville Tower.
Very funny story about that, J.B. Hopkins is his lawyer, and we all go to lunch at
Carpenters, which was a very nice restaurant. They're inviting us to lunch, Jack
Graff [was there]. Anyhow, they invite us to lunch to pitch us on renting some
space in Seville Tower. The greatest line in the world, he said," Oh, this fish is
so good." He orders another fish. The check comes, and he says, "I don't
know who to thank for this meal, but it was one of the greatest meals I've ever
had." Here's the guy who invited us to lunch, and he walks out, he and J.B.
Hopkins walk out, and we start laughing that this was the best line. Here's a guy
who invites you to lunch and [says], "I don't know who to thank." After that,
Reubin and David and I really used to laugh about the thing.
We ended up moving into those offices. In the meantime, I think Stanley
comes with us... Reubin, in the meantime, runs for state representative, and,
then, he runs for state senate... No, no, no. Because we're still in those offices
on Government Street when.... Alright, the story I say about the Seville Tower
takes place later, because when Reubin ran for governor, we were still over on
Government Street.

P: That's not the First National Bank building is it?

L: No, we didn't move over there until later. It was in the late 1960s when the guy
did bring us all together for lunch, but we didn't buy into it until after Reubin got to
be governor. At that point, Reubin became governor, W.D. Childers ran for his
seat and got elected.

P: In the legislature.

L: State senate, and, all of a sudden, we'd become like the political geniuses having
taken this guy, David and myself. Everybody says, "Oh my God, these guys
from Pensacola have gotten this guy elected."

P: Is this a preeminent law firm by that time in Pensacola?

L: No. Reubin had some anti-Semitic campaigns run against him for being with Jews, and
we still don't represent anybody of any significance. In the meantime, I have kicked
butt in personal injury cases. David's handling divorce cases, Jack Graff and I are









UFLC 75
Page 38

handling personal injury cases, but I'm really starting to get the reputation, winning,
winning, winning.
P: Did you also have a reputation of being mean?

L: No.

P: You hadn't turned people off from that point of view.

L: No. What was happening was I was getting such great verdicts, winning so many cases,
but from hard work, I mean really hard work, I'm talking about every little thing. I've
never been surprised in a court room until last week, but that was just a cheap shot by the
state attorney's office. I was good, really good. I felt I was as good as any lawyer in
the country in trial. The reputation of, "He's got to be doing something bad to get these
results." I fed that idea. I'd always laugh or something and fed the idea that I was
cheating, which I wasn't. Never did anything, as far as I was concerned, unethical or in
that way.

P: Were you then developing a reputation of being slick?

L: I was developing a reputation of getting great results. Among the community, "He's
good, he's real good." Among the lawyers, the jealously factor was starting to come in,
"he can't be that good." Buddy Caro had gone for years and never lost a case, and, I
think, I beat him seven times in a row. Bert Lane, as I told you, was thought to be the
greatest trial lawyer in Northwest Florida, I beat him in the Traveler's case...

P: Inebriated or otherwise.

L: Yes. I beat him in another major case against Pensacola Restaurant Supply, and I beat
him in the case that made my reputation, the Thorshov case. I had kicked butt of all the
great defense lawyers. I don't think they reacted so badly as did the other plaintiffs'
lawyers. I think they felt, "God knows, Buddy Caro never lost a case, Fred Levin beat
him seven times in a row." There had to be something going on. Plaintiffs lawyers
themselves, my competitors, and I started to develop... there's a lot of animosity. After
John Kennedy had been killed in the 1960s, 1963, there came up a few months before
that, there were no blacks and members of the Society of the Bar in the First Judicial
Circuit. I had recommended either Charlie Wilson or Nathaniel Dedmond. Charlie
may have already gone by then. Whatever it was, I recommended him for the Bar
membership.


P: What is this Society of the Bar?









UFLC 75
Page 39

L: That's the Bar Association for Northwest Florida. I remember the meeting, Bert Lane
stood up, D.L. Middlebrooks stood up, Pat Emmanuel stood up, Rollin Davis, T.A. Shell,
everyone.

P: All in opposition?

L: All in opposition to this. They had called my wife, and I was more proud of Marilyn -
and actually, I know in the book it says Charles Wilson, but it was Nathaniel Dedmond.
There were two black lawyers in Pensacola. I know it's Nathaniel Dedmond because
they called Marilyn and they said, "Marilyn, in the Bar Auxiliary, how would you like to
be sitting next to Nathaniel Dedmond's wife," whatever her name is. She said, "Oh, yes,
that will be fine." That wasn't the answer they were expecting. They were expecting to
get back to me, to tell me to withdraw this thing. But these were every prominent
lawyer, every major firm.
P: Including Middlebrooks?

L: Including D.L. Middlebrooks that was with Beggs and Lane at the time. Everybody.
So they had the big vote, the big meeting, and I think Nathaniel got five votes and about
100 against him. I just couldn't believe it. Then, John Kennedy got killed thereafter, I
believe, and I said, "You know, it's the same kind of people. This could not be."
Election time came for the Bar Association, it was around Christmas time. We
were at Mustin Beach Officers Club. They had the nominating committee, and this must
have been 1963 or 1964, and they had for president, vice- president, secretary, treasurer
and all this stuff. The Board of Directors for the Bar Association and one member for
the Bar Association had to be less than five years in practice. Fred Levin was
nominated. It was at Mustin Beach Officers Club. The president moved for
acclamation, this, this, and this. The Board of Directors bang, bang, bang. A member
less than five years, I was sitting there. Somebody said, "I'd like to nominate Frank
Bozeman." They wanted us to go outside. So the two of us sitting out there, I
remember Frank sitting out there," I don't know why I would even think about doing this.
Nobody has ever run against anybody who's been nominated." We come back in the
room, and there's all this clapping, "Congratulations Frank." I'm just floored. It was
the last time I ever ran for anything by the way, the first and last time. I did not get the
votes of all of the members of my firm. I really believed Dick Warfield voted with
them. I got beat by about the same score that Nathaniel Dedmond had gotten beat by.
That was another of the [events] that engendered in me this competitive, which even to
this day that I relish the idea of somebody taking cheap shots at me. Like I say, I work
off that, and I become a much, much better lawyer, and I take it and usually am able to
turn it around and shove it up their....

P: How serious was the defeat?


L: It was embarrassing, it was really embarrassing.









UFLC 75
Page 40


P: Particularly if members of your own firm voted against you.

L: I may be wrong, I think I may have gotten six votes, and there were six of them there, but
I always...

P: Was this because of the stand that you had taken on segregation?

L: Sure.

P: They were getting back at you.

L: Sure. I didn't believe that it would happen like that. I really thought these people...

P: From there on in, what happened to integration? This is the beginning of it, but whether
they are resisting or not.

L: Yeah. And eventually it came about.

P: Soon or later?

L: I don't remember, but I remember all of these guys had stood up. They were all the
preeminent members of not just this Bar, but the Florida Bar. These guys went on to
become federal judges, President of the State Bar, all of them had been president of the
local Bar.

P: It was a turning point, obviously, in history.

L: Yeah. It was, again, the same thing that I had done a few years before with George
Stark.

P: I want to ask you something before we leave it. This organization, Society of the Bar,
was that a social organization?

L: No. It would be something like the Alachua County Bar Association.

P: How could they keep even a black [person] out who had gotten his law degree and got
his...

L: 1963. Blacks were members of the Florida Bar.

P: Of course it came later in West Florida than it did elsewhere, but by the 1960s the
universities were integrated.









UFLC 75
Page 41


L: They did it. Legally, of course not, they could not do it. That's what I argued to them.
These were the prominent members. Judge Mason was there, here are your judges, your
leaders of the Bar, everything. But it was a different time. If these same people were
living today.... People remember things a lot differently. I'm sure the guys who went to
law school with me all saw themselves in never having participated in that shuffling and
all of that. A lot of them went on to become judges, justices, friends of black lawyers.
It developed, and I'm glad that happened. I recall both of the instances very well, and
some day, 100 years from now, people listening to this, I guess they'll be able to listen to
the tapes?

P: Of course.
L: They'll never be able to understand. That would have been 1963. About the same time,
Fred Vigodsky calls me, Jack Graff s already moved to Pensacola, practicing law.

P: Fred is originally from South Carolina?

L: Newberry, South Carolina. His daughter has just been born, his daughter Holly, and
he's married to a Brenda Cousins. He said he really wanted some Jewish life for them.
He was in the Jewish store in every little southern town. Their family had that. Slowly
but surely the big boys were coming in. So he called and wanted to know what was
going on. I told him my brother David and Bill McAbee and I had just bought in to a
barbeque joint, and it looked like it was going to do well. He wanted to get out of
Newberry, so he went to FSU restaurant school for one semester, and then moved over to
Pensacola. We were the closest of friends and we've been that for the last almost forty
years, since they moved to Pensacola.

P: He's one of your very best friends.

L: Yes, and business partners. He got into Chicks Barbeque with me, and this began a
business career. We got into the restaurant business.

P: Explain all this getting into the restaurant business. It seems kind of strange from your
career point of view.

L: I've always been like a closet entrepreneur, I love business. A lot of this has to do with
the understanding of business, how people react, dollars, how supply and demand works.
This all came very natural to me, it wasn't anything I studied. It had a lot to do, going
back to that law school, rule against perpetuities and options. It's how the economy
works. I guess if I have anything that I've got great ability with it's the understanding of
business, the understanding of marketing, and how people react; whether it be on a jury
to a set of circumstances or it be to a business situation. [End of Tape B, side 3] ...The
first one was. They were in trouble, and we helped bail them out.









UFLC 75
Page 42


P: What was the name of it?

L: Chicks Barbeque.

P: It was at the beach?

L: No. Eventually we had a place at the beach. This was out on the intersection of Pace and
Palafox, and, then eventually, we had one in Fort Walton, we had one on Gregory Street
in Pensacola, we had one in Mobile. Then, we got into the night club business, we had a
night club in Pensacola, one on Pensacola Beach.

P: I don't know how you had time to be a lawyer.

L: I loved it. I would work the law practice and, then at night, sit down with Fred and have
a few drinks and discuss the business. In the meantime, I'll get into Poppa Don and that
story and the business. I'm kicking butt in lawsuits, really doing well.

P: Was the barbeque business a lucrative business?

L: It ends up being, yes. It's making enough money to pay Fred and his wife a salary.
[She's] working in it. I eat free, travel on it, things of that nature. Reubin Askew
becomes governor, and I want Fred Vigodsky to get into the food and beverage
[industry], and Reubin remembered Fred from doing a lot of drinking, and he didn't want
that. About this time, a dress store called Sam's Style Shop, which was owned by Sam
Rosenblum, became available here in downtown Pensacola. We were wanting to get out
of the restaurant business, so we sold...

P: Why did you want to get out of the restaurant business?

L: It was just a pain. It's a horrible, horrible business. They call you all hours of the
night, tell you they got a bad barbeque sandwich. It finally got to a point where we sold
the building that we had in Fort Walton, we sold the building on Gregory Street. We
sold the restaurant to some doctors who had opened up a restaurant. In Mobile, I think
we just sold the building. Anyhow, and made a little money. The dress store came
open, which was Fred Vigodsky's original background, ladies apparel, so we then bought
Sam's Style Shop.

P: The "we" is you and Fred?

L: Fred and myself. David...I think we took the money from Chicks Barbeque and moved
it into that. What started as one dress store, in the meantime, my brother Allen had gone









UFLC 75
Page 43

to work for the State of Florida. He had been a teacher, and he goes to work in the
business regulation, which included the tracks.

P: Allen never gets a law degree, he goes for business.

L: Right, he goes from business school to a couple of months of law school, realized he
didn't like it, goes to teaching, and, then, goes to work for the Department of Business
Regulation in the parimutuel end of it working for a guy named Richie Pallot who was a
good friend of Reubin Askew. Eventually, Allen needs to get out of that, and he comes
in to the dress business with Fred Vigodsky. From one Sam's Style Shop, we end up
with fifty-two apparel stores around the Southeast.

P: All with the same name?

L: No. Some of them were David Fredric's, which was my brother David and myself;
Brenda Allen's, which was Fred Vigodsky's wife, Brenda, and my brother Allen. Then,
we had some warehouse sales. One year, I remember we actually, on an audited
statement, made $1 million, but we were in the discount business, and interest rates
started skyrocketing towards the end of the 1970s, and, by the early 1980s, we were
basically bankrupt. Allen and Fred Vigodsky came and talked to me and told me that it
was not good. I was on a bunch of notes. We filed for bankruptcy on December 31,
1978 or 1979, somewhere around there, maybe 1980. Within three months, we'd come
out of bankruptcy, we paid our creditors, ended up using the bankruptcy court to be able
to sell out of the dress business. From Chicks Barbeque, all the way through the
bankruptcy and the sales and all of that which would have been the early 1980s, we
actually netted out almost $5 million, which, back then, and still is, a lot of money. This
is just hard work, not giving up, drive, drive, drive when things look horrible.

P: Does this leave Fred without anything?

L: Yes, except he, then, goes off into the carpet business, and I'm out of the businesses for a
few years.

P: You're back to becoming a lawyer.

L: Well, I was a lawyer all the time. Some great cases, I had some million dollar verdicts,
which was unheard of. In the meantime, politically, people think that I'm an absolute
genius. I've gotten Reubin Askew elected, everybody who wants to run for anything
kind of spread....


P: I'm looking for you.









UFLC 75
Page 44

L: Yeah. 1977 or 1978, a doctor and his wife and two children living on the bluffs on
Scenic Highway, a train overturns, there was ammonia emission. The doctor dies that
night, the wife dies ninety days later, and the family comes to see me. I had had a $2
million verdict against K-Mart for a pharmacy case, I think I tried it in the mid-1970s,
1976, 1977. Let me back up. The pharmacy case came in as a result of my returning a
telephone call. I always returned my telephone calls. They had called two or three
other lawyers and had not gotten a return call. A couple of years later, after the case, I
tried the case and won the case. The client told me the reason I got the case was because
I had returned the telephone call, which I still, to this day, always return a telephone call.
It goes back to my days at the University of Florida when Marci got sick, and I called a
pediatrician and called him and called him, never could get a return call. This had an
effect on me, and, then, as a professional, it's something that I realized that if they feel
strong enough to call me, then I can at least return the call. So I end up taking this case
against the L&N Railroad. They start, Bert Lane's on the other side.

P: Bert Lane continues to be one of your opponents.

L: Right. This is the third of the three big cases: that Theodore case, and, then, the case
against the Pensacola Restaurant Supply, and, then, the case against the L&N Railroad.
I end up getting an $18 million verdict, and there's a whole story about that. Bert dies
not long after that. It just blew him away. He turned out to be rather anti-Semitic. He
was "country club," however, he had never been to college. He studied to become a
lawyer. He was a big name all over the South. He represented all the big time
companies. I remember, I was getting ready to go do the closing argument, and I had a
Countess Me..., and he looked over there at it and saw the c.m., he says, "What does that
say in Yiddish? Is that in Yiddish?" I said, "Yeah." I said, "It says I'm going to kick
your fucking ass in a few minutes in this courtroom." So we go in there and I did. I
destroyed him. It was not long thereafter, Bert, he got drunk a couple of days later, and
they hit a car, and, then, within a few months, he died. Not as a result of the accident,
just as a result, I guess, of a broken heart. So that was 1980, 1981, 1982. In the
meantime, back in the 1970s, Reubin gets elected, and Broward Williams, I believe, was
the treasurer and insurance commissioner, and I wanted to get into the insurance
business.

P: I want to ask you something, though. Did you elect Reubin Askew? What role did you
play in his campaign?

L: Worked like heck. Reubin got elected, he just happened to be in the right place at the
right time from Northwest Florida.

P: He was an able man.


L: He was very able. Raised money for him and things like that.









UFLC 75
Page 45


P: Were you part of an inner circle?

L: Oh yeah. I was part of an inner circle of advisors with Tom Adams [lieutenant governor
under Askew, 1971-75] who was there.

P: I knew Tom.

L: And all of these things. Had it not been that Jack Matthews was running and everything
that gave Reubin just enough [votes] to get into the run-off against Earl Faircloth [Florida
Attorney General, 1965-1971] that's what did it. Had it been. same way Bob Graham,
everyone of them, always, they were able just to get into that run-off In the early 1970s,
Reubin is Governor...

P: Reubin never forgot his Pensacola friends and associates.

L: No.

P: His mother no longer had to be the maid at San Carlos.

L: Right. David really was Reubin's closest friend in life. Reubin didn't have a lot of
really good friends, but David was.

P: David supported that Askew Institute.

L: No, I did. I put the half a million dollars into it. So, I got with Broward Williams, and
he got me with this idiot who had a company called Orange State Life Insurance
Company. Charlie Ruttenberg of U.S. Homes was part of it, Fred Fisher who went on to
become the Fisher School of Accounting.

P: I was amazed when I read about Ruttenberg and Fisher being involved.

L: They had a big blow up. Anyhow, as a result of this, I was chairman of the board of the
company. I didn't know what the hell I was doing, and it was going down the drain,
and, thankfully, Charlie Ruttenberg had a good friend named Barry Alpert. Barry was a
banker in Chicago, he came to Florida. Barry pulled the company out, and we sold it to
Home Life, and I did better than I would have done had I been in the stock market. It
wasn't worth all the pain and aggravation and everything else.

P: Were you close personal friends with Ruttenberg and Fisher?


L: Yeah.









UFLC 75
Page 46

P: Are you still good friends with them?

L: No. Both of them would certainly know who I am. Fred Fisher was Ruttenberg's
accountant.

P: But they split, didn't they?

L: They split at U.S. Homes. Charlie Ruttenberg was a very strong willed person. Arthur
Ruttenberg, of course, still has the home business, but Charlie Ruttenberg had the U.S.
Homes.

P: Barry Ruttenberg lives in Gainesville and builds homes.

L: Really?

P: Arthur's son.

L: Fred Fisher got together with the rest of the U.S. Home board, and they got rid of Charlie
Ruttenberg and Fred Fisher got a lot of stock in U.S. Home for having masterminded this.
But Fred Fisher was an accountant. He and Charlie Ruttenberg were the closest of
friends.

P: We've been very good friends of Fred and his girlfriend over the years.

L: Fred did him in. It was wrong, it really was. He masterminded this takeover. I'm now
out of the Orange State Life Insurance business. I'm out of the Chick's Barbeque, Sams
Style Shop business.

P: You're no longer a restaurant man.

L: No, I'm practicing law.

P: Have you ever gone back into business?

L: Oh, yeah. So I'm back up again. W.D. Childers had got elected to the state senate.

P: Who was W.D. Childers?

L: He was just a teacher who became a little businessman here who ran against Gordon
Wells or somebody to become state senator.


P: He was in the right place at the right time?









UFLC 75
Page 47

L: Walks into Dempsey Barron and becomes...

P: He was not a particularly...

L: No, never had run for anything.

P: Anything on the local scene.
L: Became the "hey boy" for Dempsey Barron, and, slowly but surely, becomes the
president of the Florida senate. I was against him in every race he ever had until in the
late 1970s, they were trying to pass "no fault," and I was the only person against him
who donated money to his opponent. The Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers, W.D. was
the chairman of commerce or something and asked me to go speak. He was given five
minutes. W.D. allowed me to get behind Bill Gunter [Florida insurance commissioner,
1976-1989], who was the insurance commissioner who was pushing this, and, then,
allowed me to talk for almost an hour. Modestly, I did a magnificent job. The
commerce committee voted down Gunter's "no fault" proposal. I went back and sat
down, and I got this note that said, "Senator Childers would like to see you." I thought
he had forgotten all about the fact that I had been the person who had been against him.
We go, and I thank him for allowing me do this, for putting me in position and all that. I
started to walk out, and he said, "Do you think," whatever this guy's name is, his
opponent was, "you think he could have done that for you?" I said, "No, sir, Senator."
We became fairly good friends, and, then, he gets involved with this waterfront property
here and the state buying it, and there's a statewide grand jury. He's the incoming
President of the Florida Senate. Dempsey Barron tells him to come get me, to use me as
his lawyer, and I'm not sure whether Dempsey was doing it because W.D. was getting
too big for his britches, and he figured this would be perfect because I never had handled
a criminal case.

P: Had you worked with Barron before?

L: I knew Barron, and I'd always been on the opposite sides of him. He was a big
insurance company guy. Never had tried a case with him. Anyhow, they come get me,
and I represent W.D., and it's really bad. They're out to bust his behind, the statewide
grand jury. I talk him into taking a lie detector test, I believed him. He takes a lie
detector, he passes it. Instead of the statewide grand jury indicting him, they give him a
presentment in which they say just the most fabulous things about him. What a great
guy he was, open and honest and all of this, and everybody who runs for elections should
use W.D. Childers as the example. So we become friends.
Here, back in Pensacola, cable television is just being started. For the last many
years, I had been trying to talk our law firm, which is now David Levin, D.L.
Middlebrooks, LeffMabie, all these guys, I wanted to talk them into advertising. I saw
what was happening in the late 1970s. All of the law firms started advertising, and they
were taking business like crazy, and our firm kept saying, "We are the firm for plaintiff's









UFLC 75
Page 48

law," nobody would go anywhere else. That's not so. People didn't... what you
thought they thought, advertising worked. It got into about 1983, 1984, and W.D. had a
dear, dear friend who was working for Cox Cable. They needed local programming, so I
came up with the idea for something called BLAB television, and that we would start,
and we would do call in talk, legal, call law line, people would call in and we would
answer questions. This was 1984, 1985. From there we had a sports show, and to this
day, now it starts to move along, and toward the end of the 1980s, I get Fred Vigodsky to
come back into it. Today it's twenty-four hours a day, it's billings are over $2 million.

P: You own the station?

L: A big chunk, 40 percent of it.

P: But you do it personally, it's not the firm's.

L: Not the firm's, no. Nobody wanted to be a part of it. My family controls [it], between
the kids and everything and Marilyn.

P: So it's more than just a couple of three hours that Mark is involved with?

L: Yeah. At one point, we were in New Orleans, we were in Mobile, Tampa, Clearwater.
Now we have a little one in Clearwater that does maybe twelve hours a week.

P: Does the firm lease three hours?

L: Yes.

P: And that's where Mark is...

L: Yes. In other words, what happens is it's an infomercial station. You can buy an hour
of time, and you can sell commercials if you want to on your time.

P: So the firm has bought three hours, is that right?

L: Yes, that's right. And some reruns. But it's twenty-four hours a day, and like I said,
the billings are pretty strong. It's also been great for trade-outs.

P: What channel is it on in Pensacola?

L: On channel 6 in Pensacola, channel 2 and channel 38 in Gulf Breeze, we've got two
channels.


P: So you think it's paid off?









UFLC 75
Page 49


L: Oh sure, sure. I've got nothing in it and I've been drawing....

P: You said you have a 40 percent interest.
L: Yeah, I mean I have no money in it. It's paid for almost anything I do, food....

P: The lawyers from the firm, they just volunteer their time and effort.

L: Yeah, but they build themselves up in doing it.

P: I forgot to ask Mark how he became a television star.

L: Yeah, and you become comfortable, and it's fun for awhile. I did it for fifteen years.

P: So far we've got you as a lawyer, a businessman, a restaurant man, in the dress business,
and, now, we get you in television.

L: All of this time, I'm doing all of these things.

P: Not much sleeping it sounds like. You take it in stride?

L: Take it in stride. Debbie was born about the time Holly Vigodsky and then Martin
was born.

P: You have four children?

L: Four children, and, then, Kimberly. I guess we'll get back to family.

P: Oh, yeah, I'm going to get family at the end.

L: In the meantime, I've become a big shot in politics with the Academy of Florida Trial
Lawyers, they give me the Perry Nichols Award. I've passed the Wrongful Death Bill.
When I got him [W.D.] out of that grand jury mess, he said he would pass the new
Florida Wrongful Death Act, which has been fabulous for plaintiffs lawyers. It was the
best in the country, it allowed so many great things. That caused the falling out between
W.D. and Dempsey. That was a big war, but W.D. came down on my side, he had
promised. So the Academy gave me the Perry Nichols Award, and I became known all
over as being this guy who got the new Wrongful Death Bill, the guy who got Reubin
Askew elected.

P: Could do no wrong.

L: Could do no wrong. I built a penthouse down in Destin.









UFLC 75
Page 50


P: You were jumping around a little bit too much.

L: No, this gets it back.
P: Because I want to get into a little bit more detail about some of these things.

L: In the penthouse in Destin, which was beautiful and gorgeous, we used that for political
fund-raising.

P: We were there once.

L: As a result of that, Ed Addison, who went on to become President of Southern Company,
had me go to work for Gulf Power, and I became, probably, the only plaintiffs lawyer in
the country that was representing the power company, all kind of things. Everything
good was happening. All of these things were taking place in the 1980s, the BLAB
T.V., the representation of the power company, the great politician. I had just
everything. Everybody running for anything, I don't care if it was Bob Graham.

P: The politicians still cling to you, don't they?

L: Yeah, but I'm a has-been. Anyhow, in 1988, and then we'll back up, 1988 Roy Jones,
Jr. is in the Olympics, from Pensacola, and beats the hell out of the Korean and has the
Gold medal stolen.

P: Let me take over a little bit now. When did people like Mabie come into the firm, and
Middlebrooks.

L: Nixon appointed D.L. to be a judge. Before that, we had tried to get D.L. D.L. was
upset at Beggs and Lane, he didn't like the situation. We wanted him to come with us,
but he decided to go with Harold, Caro and Wiltshire, which was Buddy Caro and Joe
Harrold. Then, he went on the bench. Then, about maybe 1974, 1975, 1976, he left the
bench, I think he was the first federal judge to ever resign, and he was the same D.L.
Middlebrooks who was against Nathaniel Dedmond. The reason he did not like the
federal bench, it was in Tallahassee, and he was getting all the civil rights cases, and it
was about to drive him crazy. He went back to Pensacola, joined our firm.

P: To get somebody like him, you have to make an offer or he comes seeking you?

L: He came and we talked. Warfield had been there. Warfield was a mistake. He looked
good. He had the big hat and no cattle. He looked good, but he wasn't that good a
lawyer.









UFLC 75
Page 51

P: What about Crosby? As I remember, he was on the faculty at the law school in
Gainesville.

L: When I went through. Then he came up, and he became president of the UWF
[University of West Florida], circuit judge. Then, in the mid 1980s, he came with us, he
came with the firm. LeffMabie was already here, D.L. Middlebrooks all of this
occurred in ten, twelve years. Leo Thomas came, Stanley had already been there.

P: So the firm is growing in size and in prestige?

L: Yeah. And in the meantime, we move over to Seville Tower.

P: I want to ask you about the moves. The original office was in the Florida National Bank
building?

L: That was before I came.

P: That's before you joined up. Where was it again when you joined?

L: On Government Street, 120 West Government, I think.

P: Then you moved to where?

L: To Seville Tower, which is the old bank building tower.

P: Did you own that? Did the firm own that?

L: No. This guy, I can't remember his name, the one who said, I don't know who to
thank for this meal," but it [was his].

P: You could afford to buy a building then if you didn't have to pay for food.

L: Yeah. At that time, when we moved over there, that's when we started doing food
everyday, we'd have breakfast on Monday morning, Saturday morning, and lunch
everyday. Then eventually went into haircuts.

P: A lot of perks.

L: A lot of perks. Then, we moved over to this location that we're in now.

P: The building over here, the one with all that, you didn't own that building, you say?

L: No.









UFLC 75
Page 52


P: You leased floors there?
L: Leased floors.

P: Then, you came here. Do you own this building?

L: Actually, my children own 40 percent of it.

P: But I mean it's family owned?

L: Yeah. The majority of this business is owned by the Levin family.

P: And the firm leases space here?

L: Yes.

P: Are these floors the choice floors?

L: Oh, yes.

P: And yours is a choice office?

L: I would think so.

P: I think so, too.

L: The firm grew, and they would have lawyers and get rid of..lawyers would quit. A lot
of the lawyers went in on their own. Jim McKenzie, actually Dick Warfield left, George
Estess, Bill Rankin, Mike Griffith.

P: You were going to get a list of those so you remember.

L: We'll get those.

P: What is the relationship with the firm and what was the relationship of the firm in Gulf
Power? Was it the firm or was it...

L: It was me, actually.

P: Tell us for the tape what Gulf Power is.

L: Gulf Power is the power company for Northwest Florida. The same as Florida Power
and Light.









UFLC 75
Page 53


P: It's mainly based where?

L: Based in Pensacola, but it goes all the way through to, I guess, certainly Destin, Panama
City. The president of the company is a guy named Ed Addison.

P: The president now or then?

L: The president then of Gulf Power. Jake Horton was vice-president, and Jake was a dear
friend of W.D.'s. W.D. and I in the meantime had become close friends after I saved
him. Jake and W.D. and I, pretty much, had a threesome. Then, I was winning cases
right and left, and Ed Addison wanted me to become their counsel, litigation lawyer.
His board, here in Gulf Power, said we're not going to have a plaintiff's lawyer do this.
In the meantime, Reubin Askew had become governor, and he was already out at that
point. As things would have it, Ed Addison gets the presidency of the Southern
Company, which controls Georgia Power, Mississippi Power, Alabama Gulf Power,
Savannah Power it's the largest publicly held utility company in the world. He
becomes president, and one of his first orders of business is to call down to Pensacola
and say, "Fred Levin's going to do the legal work." His board had stopped it here,
locally. So I started representing them and did really a magnificent job for them
defending cases.

P When you defend a case like that, are you on a fee basis or are you on the payroll?

L: Actually, I would be on an hourly basis, but they bonused me a couple of times back in
the 1980s, $100,000. Just flat bonused me. Just did, like I said, a great job for them.
Also the penthouse, I was using it for politics. They would bring in, Alabama Power
would entertain, you've been there, fabulous, fabulous place. Remind me, and we'll get
a brochure to take to put in the thing, because it was incredible. We're doing all kinds of
politics, and, as things would have it, the local IRS felt that they were using power
company money to promote politicians. Actually, it exploded way out of what it should
have been. My law firm was contributing more money to politicians each year than all
of Gulf Power put together. They blew this thing out. Jake Horton became the
scapegoat. On April 10, 1989, which I believe was a Monday, W.D. is in Tallahassee,
Jake Horton calls and says "I need to see you," comes in to see me. He said, I think
I'm going to get fired." I said, "Jake, you're crazy." I called Ed Addison in Atlanta,
and I could tell Ed was a little funny about things. They had worked it out, Jake was
going to be the scapegoat. It'd been going on for months and months, these
investigations, grand jury, IRS, and all of that. We're in my old office, and Jake's on the
other side of the room, he said, "I need to use the telephone." He calls for a power
company plane to come pick him up from Mississippi Power, pick him up, and take him
to Atlanta. As he walks out, he tells me, "Fred, if anything were to happen to me, you
make sure they take care of Francis." I said, "Oh, what are you talking about?" He









UFLC 75
Page 54

said, I'm going to the power company, and, then, I'll meet you back here at 1:00."
Jack Graff had retired in 1976, but Jack was doing some work also for Gulf Power. I
said, I'll have Jack here, and we'll meet again." Jake gets on the plane, and the plane
blows up between Pensacola and into Escambia County. Catches fire and crashes.

P: They never recovered the body, I don't think.

L: No, they got all three bodies. Two pilots and.... That evening I called W.D.
immediately, and W.D. comes back to Pensacola, and he and I go over to the Horton's
home. We see Jake's ring, Auburn ring, which he never took off, and his watch. W.D.
had to go to the bathroom, and there they were. What had happened without a question
was Jake had decided to commit suicide. That went on for a couple of years [unclear].

P: I remember there was a lot in the papers.

L: Magazines, Wall Street Journal, everything. That was on a Monday. On Wednesday, I
went to [interruption].

P: Did they ever solve the Jake Horton mystery?

L: Not really, but I knew.

P: Why would he commit suicide?

L: Everything, his whole life he had no children, he had girlfriends, and his wife was very
demanding. He just....

P: Just got tired of it all?

L: Yeah.

P: That left you out in the cold as far as that firm was concerned.

L: No. That Monday afternoon, after he killed himself, I went and saw the President of
Gulf Power, and I said, "Listen, there's no need to put Jake Horten through all this, his
memory and all of this. Let's just let it be." That wasn't to be, they blamed everything,
all of the problems on Jake. I resigned, I told them I wasn't going to be a....

P: So that ended your relationship?

L: Yeah, I told them I wasn't going to represent them anymore.
P: And it has never been resumed?









UFLC 75
Page 55

L: No. I stopped representing them.

P: Another Pensacola firm represents them now?

L: Beggs and Lane always had represented them. They're back to representing them full
time now.

P: What is it you started talking about before of the train wreck? That was the Louisville
and Nashville freight trains and that happened in 1977?

L: Yes, November of 1977.

P: Why was it called the "Great Florida Train Fight"?

L: That's just what the American Lawyer called it. At the time, it was the largest verdict
for the death of a wage earner, largest verdict for the death of a housewife. In the
meantime, all during this time, I also got the first $1 million verdict for the death of a
child, and it was a black child, got $3.6 million, which was unheard of.

P: I found here listing $10 million punitive damages in the train wreck.

L: Yes, it was.

P: And $8 million compensatory.

L: Right.

P: Do you get 25 percent of that? Is that a general figure, not necessarily in just this one
case?

L: In that case, we actually ended up settling it for, I think, the fee was one-third. We
settled it for a present value fee of $13 million.

P: Really want I to get is not necessarily just this case, but you ranged from 25 to 35 percent
or something like that?

L: Yeah, that would be fair.

P: Were there children involved in this train wreck? The father and mother died.

L: Yeah, the two children, but they're well today. Both of them are married, they live in
Colorado.









UFLC 75
Page 56

P: I have the estate of the black women, Pamela Denise Williams, what is that case? The
Allstate Insurance?

L: That was the black...

P: Was that the child?

L: That was one of them that got a $1 million verdict.

P: What was the basis of that case?

L: She was a University of Florida student on her way home in a rental car, a passenger,
wonderful young lady.

P: What happened?

L: They ran off the interstate, her driver did, and she got killed.

P: Was it the car malfunctioned?

L: No.

P: Who were they suing?

L: Suing the driver and the owner, which was whatever the name of the rental car, Hertz or
Avis or something.

P: I've got All-State Insurance.

L: Yeah.

P: And they got $1.2 million?

L: Yeah.

P: Who was killed in that?

L: Pamela Williams.

P: Pamela Denise Williams v. National [Rent A Car]. Why were they suing a rental
[company]?
L: The owner of the car is responsible for the driver. National Car Rental owned it.









UFLC 75
Page 57

P: So there wasn't anything wrong with the car, there was something wrong with the driver.

L: The driver.

P: Was the driver killed?

L: No.

P: And who pays this million dollars, the insurance company?

L: Yes, for National Car Rental.

P: Is this an unusual type of thing?

L: No. Now it is, because the laws have been changed, but, back then, rental car
companies, the Gillette case also back then I got $13 million, about.

P: I have another case I want to ask you about that's similar to that. February 1983, David
Gillette with the University of West Florida, student, and there was also National Car
Rental.

L: Yes. That was somebody up here working at the News Journal and drove his car,
actually, he was on a through road, David was a passenger that pulled out, and they hit.
David was a quadriplegic, and we ended up getting a verdict of $13 [million], $14
million. Eventually, it was paid after years of appeals and everything else.

P: David still lives here in...

L: In Pensacola. David still lives here, has got children.

P: He's the [quadriplegic].

L: But he had children thereafter, married this girl, and, apparently, is doing very well.

P: Who are Terry and Joyce [Darangelo]? Auto injuries also.

L: He broke both his heels in an automobile accident, this was an uninsured motorists case,
got $1.1 million or something. He's still around.

P: You sound like the battering warrior, staying up there, beating these insurance companies
to their feet.

L: I did a good job against them.









UFLC 75
Page 58


P: Both for them and for everybody concerned. Who is Helen Caldwell?

L: I represented her... it was down near Destin. She was just a real estate agent, and a
tractor trailer crossed over on her, and she got a $1 million verdict.

P: A $1 million verdict, that's right. [End of Tape B, side 4] ...tell your other case.

L: I'll get into that. You wanted to ask me, though, about the Neese case. Her husband,
she had just gotten married to him, and her husband touched the fence, a power line had
fallen and he got electrocuted. We got a [$3.3] million verdict.

P: Then the parents also got $1 million.

L: Yeah, so it was four point something against the Rural Electrical Coop.

P: But that's kind of an accident that happens.

L: I was kicking butt back then. Southeast Toyota...

P: Jim Moran?

L: Jim Moran. My son-in-law, Ross Goodman, had come with the firm, and somebody had
come to him about suing Southeast Toyota for a Toyota dealer, and I told him he was
crazy. We later found out that that Toyota dealer had settled for like $4 million. All of
a sudden, Doc Hollinsworth who owns Quality Imports in Fort Walton came to see me to
represent him in a similar case against Southeast Toyota, and it had to do with tie-in.
They wouldn't sell him the good cars unless he took the bad cars, and it was a whole
bunch of things.

P: And Moran was the southeastern [dealer].

L: Jim Moran was Southeast Toyota, the wealthiest, billionaire, wealthiest person in Florida
at the time. He had been an automobile dealer and Ford dealer in Chicago.

P: He was a Gator you know, Moran, I think.

L: I think his children, I don't think Jim Moran would have gone to college.
P: I thought I met him at the.... He's the southeastern dealer. As I understand it, from what
you're saying now, in order to get good cars you had to buy bad cars.

L: You had to buy some of his bad cars. I sued him. On the other side was Williams and
Connoly, a guy named Ray Bergan who was the head of their civil department, great law









UFLC 75
Page 59

firm. We go to trial in Crestview. Before that I took the deposition of Mr. Moran, and
he and I got into it. Somehow or another at break, I saw his big boats, he said, "If you
win this case, you got a week on my boat called the Gallant Lady," which was the finest
boat on the East coast of the United States. We go to trial and I do, I got a forty-some
million dollar verdict. We had a high-low, which meant that we couldn't get less than
$4 million or more than $22 million. We ended up settling for about $15 [million], $18
million or something.

P: Who gets that money?

L: Doc Hollinsworth. We got about $4 million, but the time and effort and everything we
put into it, it wasn't really worth it. About a year later, I get a call from Southeast
Toyota wanting to know when I would like to use the boat. We went down, a friend of
mine name Max Seelig from Atlantic City and his son, Fred Vigodsky and myself, and
my brother Allen, brother Herman, and I think that was it. We go into Fort Lauderdale,
we fly in one of his many jets to the Abacos [Bahamas Island] where the big Gallant
Lady is, we spend three or four days, come back. The following year I get a call, "When
would you like do it again?" We go down to Fort Lauderdale, we get on one of his big
jets and we fly to Martinique or somewhere down there, we're on his new Gallant Lady.
Then, just recently, I called and Roy Jones, Jr. was fighting in Miami in January of 2002.
He was at the American Airlines arena which is right next to the water, I'd like to rent
his boat for a cocktail party. They refused to rent it to me, but they sent it over there,
fabulous cocktail party, food, everything in the damn world. I ended up sending him a
check for $25,000 as a contribution to his foundation, but the party would have cost
$50,000. It was just unbelievable. So we became fairly good friends.

P: I was going to say, he loses a case to you and then he makes his boat available to you.
Where does he live?

L: In Deerfield Beach, I believe.

P: He's still a rich man, obviously.

L: Yes.

P: Still in the Toyota business?
L: Toyota business, yes.

P: And he's still dealing?

L: Oh yeah.


P: You're looking at your watch.









UFLC 75
Page 60


L: I'm going to leave here in about five minutes.

P: Tell me about the Orange State Life Insurance Company in Largo, Florida.

L: That was the insurance company that Broward Williams got me into that I was with
Ruttenberg.

P: I want to hold that because that's a story I think that's going to be bigger than we can
cover, so let's leave that for just a moment and come back to that. Also, I know the
tobacco settlement, I have a huge number.

L: Yeah, that goes years later.

P: One of the ones that intrigues me tremendously was the Howard Hughes business.

L: Lefft Mabie had a friend in Alabama, a lawyer. At the time, Norton Bond was a lawyer
in our office, and this guy was sort of like just a mentor to Norton, a friend of Leff's, and
he came up with the idea that Howard Hughes had these children, a boy and a girl...

P: Adopted children.

L: I'm not sure how that worked, but yeah, it was some type of adoption called common law
adoption that's available in certain states.

P: Adopted children in Alabama.

L: Yeah. So Alabama has a common law adoption. Anyhow, he got us to work on the
case with him. It ends up settling and the whole group gets 9.5 percent.

P: Of the entire estate?

L: Of the entire estate.

P: Which was a multimillion dollar thing.
L: Yeah. I ended up owning a quarter of 1 percent, I think Leff had a half of 1 percent.
I'm not sure how that dam thing worked. I'm still getting a little bit from here and a
little bit from there. Anyhow, they settled it.

P: But the court settlement was that these were adopted children, they were Howard
Hughes' children.









UFLC 75
Page 61

L: Right, but they only settled for, I'm not sure if it was a total of 9.5 percent that went to
the children and the lawyers.

P: If the estate was $1 billion, it was still a lot of money.

L: Yeah.

P: Howard Hughes left a lot of money.

L: Yeah, but they sold out way too soon. They sold all that Las Vegas stuff, the Howard
Hughes medical thing is worth billions. The whole estate ended up being worth about
$1 billion back in the 1970s.

P: You're representing the two children at the time.

L: Yeah. We're representing a piece of the two children. I think between Leff and myself
and the firm, we got 1 percent of the estate.

P: I don't know what the means in terms of dollars, it may be a substantial amount.

L: I'd say well over a period of time it's about... I'm not sure how that ended up being. I
think it was like several millions of dollars, less than ten.

P: On the basis of just the amount of the cases that you and I have gone over so far for the
tape, do you have some special person in here to just count the money as it rolls in?

L: No, it's not quite that easy. It doesn't come that quick.

P: It doesn't come morning, noon, and night?

L: No.

P: You have to wait your turn a little bit.

L: Yeah.

P: But this was Leff's case to begin with, wasn't it?

L: Yes.

P: And it was 9.5 percent of the estate?

L: [Yes].









UFLC 75
Page 62


P: Who was Larry Lewis, the local manager of the estate?

L: That was Cox Cable, that was W.D. Childers' buddy who was Cox Cable, got us into
BLAB T.V. He allowed us to take over that channel for nothing, and that's developed
into BLAB television.

P: I want to ask you about the Orange State Life Insurance Company in Largo Florida.
What was that case?

L: It wasn't a case. When Reubin Askew became Governor, Broward Williams was the
insurance commissioner and I had told Broward we had become acquaintances, close to
being friends that if there were an opportunity in the insurance industry, I thought that I
and some of my friends would be interested. Then, he introduced me to this guy who
turned out to be a drunk who had Orange State Life Insurance Company, Bill Whalen.
Bill Whalen had this insurance company, and I bought into it, and I got some friends of
mine in Pensacola to buy into it. I became chairman of the board, the board included
Charlie Ruttenberg and Fred Fisher and some others.

P: How'd you get involved with those two?

L: Apparently, Fred Fisher was a friend of Whalen's, and Ruttenberg was a friend of
Fisher's. We got involved in the business. Whalen had a real drinking problem, and we
were in big trouble when Ruttenberg realized this and brought in a guy named Barry
Alpert to take over the company. Barry was with a company in Chicago, today he works
with Raymond James, very prominent citizen in St. Petersburg. Barry helped make the
company into something. We ended up selling it to Home Life. I probably did better
than if I had been in the market, but it was an experience.

P: But Orange State spread around. You have thirty-five states that had offices?

L: It was selling insurance in thirty-five states.

P: Is it still in operation today?

L: I think Home Life spun it off. It's not called Orange State anymore.

P: It's acquired by a New York state buyer, state firm.

L: I'm not sure what ever happened to it.


P: What's happened to Charles Ruttenberg?









UFLC 75
Page 63

L: Charles Ruttenberg lost a great deal of money in U.S. Homes. Fred Fisher had some
problems and he put together a group of the board to get rid of Charlie Ruttenberg.

P: He maneuvered him out of...

L: Out of the company, and they were dear, dear friends.

P: But no longer, obviously.

L: No.

P: Ruttenberg lost money as a result of the maneuver by Fred Fisher.

L: Ruttenberg, certainly, at one point, was an extremely wealthy man. He's not in that
position anymore.

P: Fred Fisher, though, hasn't suffered?

L: Fred Fisher hadn't. Fred, I think, got all kinds of stock deals and, of course, made a
wonderful contribution to the University of Florida School of Accounting where they
named it the Fred Fisher School of Accounting.

P: Ruttenberg was chairman of the board of U.S. Homes. Is that what brought him and
Fisher together?

L: Somehow or another, Fisher was Ruttenberg's personal accountant also I think, and close
friend.

P: Do you see either one of those?

L: No, it's funny. I really need to see both of them, but I have not.

P: Let's talk about the tobacco settlement, that's a major, major activity. Go back to the
very beginning.

L: In August of 1993, I'm a member of a group called the Inner Circle of Advocates.

P: What is that?

L: It's a group of no more than one hundred lawyers who have made a name for themselves
in the plaintiff's personal injury field.

P: Only personal injury?









UFLC 75
Page 64


L: Basically. Civil type cases from around the country.

P: Are there others from Florida in that?

L: Yes. Bob Montgomery, J.B. Spence.

P: All of those are names that are connected with the tobacco settlement.

L: J.B. wasn't. Bill Colson, Bill Hicks. They both died. Mike Maher, Booty Nance.
Florida has a number of guys who were either in or are still in or died off

P: Go back to 1993, the very beginning.

L: I'm at their conference in Whistler, British Columbia.

P: Whistler, is that a resort?

L: Whistler is a resort like north of Vancouver.

P: When do you all meet, once a year?

L: Once a year for a week and we exchange views and brag on each other.

P: But it's a social kind of a...

L: And an educational type thing. And it's a good referral source. Anything happens, they
just send cases...

P: Are you active in it still?

L: Yes. So I was in British Columbia at this resort called Whistler. It's a big winter
resort, but it's reasonably cool during the summer. I'm sitting at the bar waiting on my
wife, as usual, and having a drink and a cigarette. A friend of mine named Ron Motley
walks up from South Carolina, he's a member of the group, and starts talking about
smoking. Ron drinks a lot, too. He said that they had been doing some focus groups
about suing the tobacco industry for the state of Mississippi, would I be interested in
doing that in Florida?

P: When he said, "we are," because he's from South Carolina?

L: But he's got friends in Mississippi, a guy named Dickie Scruggs. Dickie was a friend of
Michael Moore who is state attorney in Mississippi. Legally, I basically said, "No."









UFLC 75
Page 65

Nobody's ever collected a nickel from the tobacco industry, and if the state sued for
Medicaid damages, in other words the money that the state had to pay for illnesses
caused by smoking to indigents in Florida, that you'd, number one, have to identify who
the person was. You'd have to prove that cigarettes caused the condition; you'd have to
prove what cigarettes caused it, and a lot of people smoked different brands. And that you
then were faced with the assumption of risk, I should know if I smoke that I'm assuming
the risk. I said, "I wouldn't be interested." That was in August of 1993.

P: Let me ask you something. There had been cases in Florida, so there was already a
history of it?

L: Yeah, there had been cases all over the country. Nobody's ever collected, at that point,
one cent, none by the state against tobacco. I came back to Pensacola, and, either by
chance or something, I'm looking at a statute called Florida's Third Party Medicaid
Recovery Act, which basically says the State of Florida I'll give you an example. In
an automobile accident, if a guy negligently causes injury to an indigent in Florida and
the state had to pay for the medical bills, the state would have a claim against the
negligent third party, but you have to do it in the name of the person who was injured,
you have to prove that it was negligence, you have to prove that the negligence caused
the injury, and you'd be subject to any defenses that they may have against the indigents
such as he'd been drinking and walking across the street and all of that. I saw the statute
and I realized that with a few punctuations, a few added words, a few removal of words, I
could remove everyone of those problems so that the state could sue the negligent third
party without having to identify the person.
They could use statistics, if necessary, to prove causation, such as: "Center for
Disease Control says 8.9 percent of the illnesses for which there are Medicaid damages
are caused by cigarettes." That you could use market share so that if Philip Morris had
62 percent of the business, they'd be responsible for 62 percent of the total damages, and
that no defenses would be available against the state other than if the state did it. I saw
that I could do this so I called my friend, W.D. Childers, who at that time he was the dean
of the Florida Senate, and I told him about it. This would have been fall of 1993. I
asked him, I said," I think the Governor would like this." I said, "I'd like to go to
Lawton about this." W.D. being the way he is said, "Okay." So we called and Lawton
said, "Come on over," and we had breakfast.
P: Childers understood what you were talking about, what you were trying to do?

L: Reasonably. Lawton picked it up immediately. He said, "You know," I think his words
were, "those bastards hooked me" talking about the cigarette company -" when I was a
kid."


P: And now he's going to get even.









UFLC 75
Page 66

L: Yeah. He said, "I like it, let's go with it," and I remember saying, "Alright, great, why
don't we have a press conference" and he said, "Let me tell you something, if they find
out about it, it will never see the light of day." He said, Fred, I can't get a five cent tax
on tobacco, they are that strong. What I want you to do is go to the attorney general and
ask [Bob] Butterworth [Attorney General of Florida, 1986-present], will this meet
constitutional requirements." I think later that afternoon, W.D. and I went to see
Butterworth, but he turned us over to, I can't remember the guy's name, I think his chief
assistant, he said, "You'll never get this through." I said, "Okay." "But if you do,
we'll.... "

P: What would have been the opposition?

L: Tobacco. They had forty lobbyist.

P: They had big lobbyist in Tallahassee? [interruption]

L: That was the fall.

P: The assistant to the attorney general thinks you could not get it through?

L: He said, "Tobacco's just too strong." Apparently it remained quiet, and I'm not sure
who they let know about the bill.

P: The bill would have to go through the legislature.

L: It had to go through the legislature, and W.D., I think, added it onto some attorney
general stuff, liberalizing the Medicaid Recovery.

P: It got hidden a little bit.

L: Got hidden all the way, and, then, they cleared it on a voice vote. It passed the Senate
39-0, I believe in the House 120-0.

P: And the lobbyists never heard about it?

L: Never realized it until afterwards. Then, either I announced or somebody....
P: Did they try to put pressure on Askew to veto it?

L: You mean on Chiles?

P: I mean Chiles. I kept saying Askew, but we're really talking about Chiles.









UFLC 75
Page 67

L: The governor had a health insurance thing that he wanted, and I thought he would give
that up if they'd give him his health insurance for indigents and for poor people and
things, but he stuck to his guns, he said, "No, he wasn't going to agree to veto the bill."
He signed the bill into law, and a tremendous amount of publicity. "This was a payoff to
Fred Levin because of his relationship with Childers and with Chiles." I got it.

P: Why did the press think it was a payoff to you?

L: Keep in mind, tobacco, this was the spin they wanted to put on it. They controlled the
press, too, so they're getting their spin out.

P: I can see why they're saying it, but I was just wondering what the justification for it was.

L: This is all over the papers. Everything is going on. I still never dreamed there was
going to be any money out of this thing for the lawyers. I got everything I wanted which
was the great publicity. I did this, Fred Levin and his buddy Lawton, all that. So I told
W.D. that he had to go to Lawton and get me out of this thing. Lawton said, "I'm his
lawyer." The Attorney General said he couldn't handle it, it was going to be too
expensive and too time consuming to handle it for the state. I said I would go and call
and select the dream team of lawyers. So I started calling lawyers around the state. I
got about one out of every three that agreed to get involved. Then, I had W.D. come and
talk to them as a group and explain to them why I could not be part of this.

P: Where were they meeting?

L: Somewhere in Tallahassee. I could not be part of this because of my relationship and
that this... I'd love to do it, but I would not be part of this.

P: I still am not quite sure in my mind [interruption]

L: I didn't, I didn't want to get involved. I got what I wanted out of it, and that was
publicity. I never dreamed that this thing was going to end up with money.

P: A lot of money.

L: A lot of money. I knew it was going to take several million dollars a year in out of
pocket costs to fight these people. It was going to take twenty-five to thirty lawyers. I
was happy. So I got W.D. to go talk to the group.

P: And you didn't want to be on the dream team, then.

L: No, I got everything I wanted. In the midst of all of this, I brought in Ron Motley and
his group who started, and they were going to get 46 percent of the fee. I told Ron, "If









UFLC 75
Page 68

you ever get anything out of it, you can take care of me." Basically, that was the extent
of it, never dreaming anything would ever be anything.

P: Why were you bringing out of state people into it if this was a Florida...

L: This was his idea. Remember this is the guy who told me about Mississippi.

P: I know he told you about Mississippi, but the law that you are passing, the bill that passes
is only in fact for Florida.

L: It's just a relationship. So then, it gets on into the State hires the dream team. I guess
that was in early 1995, the bill was passed in 1994. Early 1995, they hire them and they
enter into a contract. Now, tobacco has gone in full force, put a lot of money and a lot of
people.

P: When you say the state entered into a contract, did they specify in the contract what the
cut would be for the legal [team]?

L: Twenty-five percent. Tobacco has put a lot of money in lobbying, and the legislature
repeals the act with W.D. Childers leading the way.

P: Why?

L: I never said anything to him that I recall. He took lobbying money like the rest of them.
They repealed it big time. The governor vetoed the repeal.

P: Lawton Chiles is still the governor?

L: Yes. We now go into 1996, and they're going to override the veto. Some lady senator
who they expected to be on tobacco woke up the morning of the repeal, and in debate
changed her vote, said her daddy died from smoking, she just could not bring herself [to
override] regardless of everything. So they withdrew, they knew they'd lost it, the
repeal was lost. The tobacco team went on, and Florida led the way. Had it not been
for the Florida statute, none of this would have ever taken place because the cases
without the statute in any state subjects them all to the same questions I had from before.
P: Had other states by this time began to pick up the ball?

L: Mississippi and Texas had brought... but it was on what was called a common law theory.
They didn't have all the defenses of [the] Florida statute. Once the Florida statute was
in, and Florida was going to win based on the statute, if Florida wins, no other state I
mean they could stop it in other states with lobbying, but not if Florida gets $13 billion.
It's too late. So it was this little statute that Lawton Chiles passes at a suggestion by me
that made for the whole tobacco industry that they say will save in thirty years 100,000









UFLC 75
Page 69

American lives a year. 450,000 Americans a year die from tobacco, and they think they
can save a minimum of 20 percent of those people by new smokers that they're
preventing, and it is. It's dropped [the death rate for smokers] more than 20 percent.
So we run through 1996, and, I believe in 1997, the Florida Supreme Court rules 4-3 that
it's constitutional. 1998 rolls around, we're ready to go to trial in August. The case is
settled with tobacco, it becomes a national settlement, and part of the national settlement
is an attorney's fee provision of $500 million a year maximum to be divided among all
the states. They'll keep paying it until such time as....

P: Did this wipe out the 25 percent for the Florida dream team?

L: There was a big fight that went on, but in effect, they ended up getting an arbitration of at
least 25 percent, but to pay that over years and years.

P: Where does this leave Fred Levin?

L: One guy on the dream team, a lawyer named Bob Kerrigan from Pensacola, voluntarily
told me all the way that when I brought him in that it's a 25 percent referral for me. I
never thought anything about it, and I ended up getting 8 percent from the law firms out
of state, South Carolina and Mississippi firms that were handling it. I, individually,
because the firm was so kind, get the 1.5 percent, personally, directly, from Kerrigan to
me.

P: So you get 1.5 percent.

L: Of the Florida fee directly, and the firm gets 8 percent.

P: And that amounts to what?

L: 1.5 percent of $3.43 billion or something like that, it will end up being, I guess, $50
million over a...

P: Fifteen year period.

L: Yeah.

P: And what is the firm's amount over the period?

L: Almost $300 million.

P: And that's divided up. Does everybody in the firm get a piece of it?


L: Everybody who was in the firm at the time got a piece of it.









UFLC 75
Page 70


P: I know Mark was involved.

L: Yeah. Everybody's got a nice little nest egg coming in for the next....

P: How has the tobacco industry reacted to all of this? Are they still fighting it? Are they
taking it?

L: No, they went ahead and settled everything around the country.

P: How many of the states have [settled], every state?

L: All the states have come in. Now they got individual cases that still are....

P: Have you handled any individual cases?

L: No.

P: Would you turn them down if they came to you?

L: Yeah. Just that they're tough cases.

P: You're smiling.

L: I'm just looking at all the names of the guys who came in the firm. What I'll do is give
you this list. Seems like they either skip number twenty-nine or they forgot who number
twenty-nine was. I'll let you go through this, and when you come back tomorrow, you
may ask me specifics about individuals, and this is the order they came in with the
exception of Dick Warfield and myself. I came and Jack Graff came before Dick
Warfield did, but when Dick Warfield came with the firm, they gave him number three.

P: So you end up on the tobacco case a settlement...

L: A very wealthy man.
P: And you're a satisfied person.

L: Very satisfied person. All this took place in 1998, which leads to the University of
Florida if you want to get into that now.

P: I'm going to get into that in a minute. You found that this was obviously a happy
ending. Have you had a lot of criticism since?









UFLC 75
Page 71

L: Yeah, there [were] a lot of different things that smokers, the amount of the fee, a lot of
things occurred that were not, you know...I guess a lot of jealously, an awful lot of
jealously among other lawyers.

P: Some of them who had the opportunity to turn in and didn't.

L: Yeah, turned it down.

P: Before we get into the university thing, I want to ask you about the fen-phen case. I
think that kind of fits in.

L: Those things lead into the mass tort field. I'd never been a mass tort lawyer, I've shared
in the benefits. That all gets into Mark Proctor and Mike Papantonio and all those guys.
That's more into the business of the law firm where I used to run the law firm until
Martin got here and realized just how little I knew about running a law firm until he got
here. Then he and Mark started working together, and then when Martin left, Mark took
over and helped. Both of them have done more towards organizing the law firm
business-wise, ethics-wise, and have built this really major law firm, not so much by
numbers, but by influence. It's one of the real influential plaintiff firms in the country,
in the mass tort field, and I'm still totally removed from that. I still do the individual
cases.

P: Mark plays an influential role in this firm?

L: Yes, very much so. Mark and Mike Papantonio would be the two people that would be
the most difficult to replace.

P: Neither one of them are going anywhere.

L: No, they're not going anywhere. I'm still the rainmaker, even though I....

P: The firm and you are one and the same.

L: ...never touched a mass tort, but they think I do. In other words, it's Fred Levin and
everybody does a wonderful job of promoting that. There are things that have happened
in the Roy Jones arena, you have to understand that a chief in the country of Ghana, all of
these things built the... we're not just a law firm. We've become somewhat above it and
it's hard to explain, but it's really worked out well. They've done a great job. Mark in
organizing, Mike in going out and shaking hands, rainmaking, using me as the rainmaker.
I'm never there, but he's always saying man, Fred. Have you ever met him? He's so
great, he's this, he's that.


P: It's your reputation.









UFLC 75
Page 72


L: Yeah.

P: We were getting into the fen-phen case.

L: Fen-phen would not be anything that I had anything to do with.

P: But it was a firm case.

L: Firm case and they did extremely well.

P: How did it come to the firm?

L: It was just part of Mike Papantonio's mass tort thing.

P: I'm a lay person, what do you mean by mass tort?

L: Where they go out and advertise to get a bunch of cases where a lot of people were hurt
by the act of a company.

P: A huge number of people.

L: Yeah.

P: But somebody has to come to the firm and say we want you to represent us.

L: They advertise and they've networked. They've got firms all over the country that
network with Levin Papantonio.

P: What was the final settlement on the fen-phen case?

L: I don't know. These were well in excess of $100 million.

P: Is that paid over a period of time too?

L: That's paid.
P: Do you get any of that?

L: Oh, yeah.

P: Fred Levin, plus the firm.

L: Yes.









UFLC 75
Page 73


P: Is it similar to the...

L: No, I won't get as much as that because the percentages change each year, and fees that
come in during that year are determined by the percentages. It's a big formula that goes
into it.

P: None of them get poor as a result of this.

L: No. All of the guys have done extremely well.

P: You think Mark can afford to take us to New York?

L: I hope so.

P: I hope so, too. What are these people suffering from that took fen-phen?

L: I have no idea.

P: All you're doing is just cashing the check.

L: I'm cashing the check and I'm building a reputation in other arenas, in other cases.

P: The only other case I want to ask you about is you've really mentioned this before is that
drug that Parke-Davis...

L: Chloromycetin. That goes way back. About mid 1960s, a lady came in too see me.
Her son had acne, sixteen years old, only child, and had gone to see a Dr. Holmes, Grant
Holmes, a dermatologist in Pensacola. Dr. Holmes gave a prescription for
chloromycetin to her son and his name was Jim Cosper. Jim had taken the drug, had
come down with aplastic anemia, leukemia type condition. I think when she came in to
see me, he had already died. She had remarried a guy named Ira Heinberg, who was a
friend of the family's. She came in to see me and she said she'd been listening on the
radio and she heard that there was a causal connection between chloromycetin and the
condition her son died from. I didn't have an awful lot to be doing, this was mid 1960s.
I then went down and started doing some research and found out that chloromycetin was
an antibiotic developed by Parke-Davis in I think the early 1950s. It was described as a
miracle antibody that by 1960, they were spending $6 million a year advertising this
drug, a prescription drug. Back then, they didn't advertise prescription drugs in Life
magazine or Look or things like that. They were advertised only in medical journals.
There were two factories doing nothing but going twenty-four hours a day
manufacturing chloromycetin. Every time a doctor turned a page in a medical journal
they would see: Does your patient have urinary tract infection? Prescribe









UFLC 75
Page 74

chloromycetin, the miracle antibody. Does he have acne? Prescribe Chloromycetin. I
got into it and I realized that this was the drug of choice in only one condition and that's
something called Rocky Mountain spotted fever, yet they were selling I think 5 million
Americans each year were getting a course of treatment with this drug. I got to
researching it, and I found out about an advance man for the drug [End of Tape C, side 5]
...He told me I'm not going to go through this whole thing with you, but this is my whole
file you can go through it, boxes. I started to go through it and I found a little memo and
the memo said that one in every sixty people who took this drug are going to develop a
blood dyscrasia, which is a condition, it's usually reversible, just some kind of disease of
the blood. One in 1,000 they estimated would die from aplastic anemia/leukemia. If 5
million Americans a year were taking it, that means 5,000 were dying each year. It was
a drug of choice in only Rocky Mountain spotted fever and I don't know, about a handful
of those people.
I file a lawsuit toward the end of the 1960s, maybe early 1970s. Went to trial
and asked for punitive damages. For the first time that we know of, the court allowed
punitive damages to go to a jury against a drug company. Park-Davis said that if they
did this, they would probably have to withdraw the drug from the market because there
were other cases around the county, they told the judge this. The judge said that might
be a good idea. Unfortunately, the case went to the jury, the jury did not return punitive
damages. The verdict for the death, they found the death was caused by chloromycetin,
but the verdict was less than what I'd settled with the doctor for. In effect, I lost. But
not long thereafter, the drug company withdrew this drug from the market and it's only
available today in a hospital setting in a very specialized situation. The drug is still
being sold almost everywhere else in the world, except in this country. The effect of this
was, although I really lost the case, that over the last more than thirty years, you look at
5,000 people a year, 150,000 lives, that are still living. The 150,000 lives, to put it in it's
proper perspective, to bring it home are three times the number of American lives than
were lost in Vietnam all because of Fred Levin having discovered this and having got
punitive damages charged even though we never collected them. Never did anything, I
lost the case, yet saved three times more lives than were lost [in Vietnam].

P: Is Fred Levin's reputation...does the world know about these things? Or is it just the
money they know about.

L: The money basically. But not only is that three times the number of American lives that
were lost in Vietnam, you go back and look at tobacco, all that tobacco settlement
included a monstrous tobacco campaign against teenage smoking. If you look at
100,000 lives a year that are going to be saved, and you say God knows both of those are
directly the result of something I did and you begin to realize the number of lives and that
maybe it's not so bad that the law school has that name on it. That makes me feel good
that in one situation like I said, I really lost the case and saved [lives]. This whole country
went crazy over the loss of lives in Vietnam and I saved three times that many.









UFLC 75
Page 75

P: I think tobacco settlement case in Florida, wasn't there a stipulation that there had to be a
certain amount used for education of young people?

L: Yeah, and there's a big battle going on about that. There is more than a 20 percent drop
in young people starting to smoke in Florida. A lot of lives saved because of that. Does
anybody know that about Fred Levin? No. Not really.

P: Everything gets covered up by the money part without seeing the more positive results.

L: Yeah. I guess all of that came to a head in the law school naming. I've had a career
that I can't imagine that there are, I imagine maybe Dr. Jonas Salk [developed the polio
vaccine], he saved a ton of lives.

P: This is a continuation of the Oral History interview that I'm doing with Fred Levin at his
office here in Pensacola. This is now July 2, [2002]. Fred, I want to talk to you about
your giving now. Enough of the business of the firm's cases and so on. When did you
start making contributions to the University of Florida? Was David the first?

L: Not really, I'm trying to think what I did at the University of Florida. I know I gave
some property. My brother David and our law partner Leff Mabie and myself had some
property south of Tallahassee, some waterfront property. We gave it to the University of
Florida College of Law and they sold it for $1.2 million or $1.3 million. It's the Levin,
Mabie, Levin chair and the first recipient of that was Dean Rick Matasar. When he
became dean, he also became Levin, Mabie, Levin professor, I'm sorry.

P: I've heard long before Matasar arrived on the scene.

L: Yes, and it took that long for them to sell it and everything else. At the same time, we
gave some property to Florida State University, or I did, and became a member of their
president's council. At the same time, I gave property to the University of West Florida
for their first professorship. They sold it and I think that professorship is several
hundred thousand dollars, named that for my daddy, the Abe Levin professorship at the
University of West Florida. That was the first major giving and I think that was back in
the late 1970s probably.

P: I remember at the beginning of the 1980s when we were reorganizing the Center for
Jewish Studies, and I was writing a solicitation letter to lots of people around the state
and to you. I remember that you wrote back and said that you had recently given or was
giving some land in Franklin County to the University of Florida, and if it was ever sold,
something off the top of that could go for the Center for Jewish Studies which didn't
happen, but I was just wondering if you're thinking about the early 1980s.


L: It could have been the early 1980s, late 1970s.









UFLC 75
Page 76


P: Was this the land then that created the chair?

L: Yes.

P: Levin, Mabie, Levin.

L: Yeah, I think they made it a professorship. It got $1.2 million, $1.3 million. It
wasn't quite enough for...or maybe they weren't matching back then or whatever.

P: Had David given money before that time?

L: Mainly athletic type things. Nothing this size.

P: But he had been giving support to the athletic department?

L: Yes.

P: Anything to the medical school?

L: I think maybe we gave part of that land to the medical school too, but no major cash
contribution. Of course over the years just having been raised in the kind of family, I
gave to everything, nothing major. I was always the largest contributor to United Jewish
Appeal.

P: Don't get into that yet. I want to stick first to the University of Florida.

L: Then, the situation with tobacco in 1998, and in December of 1998 we were about to
receive a major payment from tobacco, the state of Florida was. I had 1.5 percent
individually and the firm had 8 percent. I was sitting in my office when Rick Matasar
who was dean of the University of Florida College of Law and Jeff Ulmer was marketing
or whatever it is for the University of Florida law school fund raiser. They came into my
office...

P: Unannounced?

L: I'm sure they called. They were sitting there and I had over a period of time, for
whatever reason I hope it was jealousy, but there may be some other reasons the
organized Bar had jumped me about so many things and even the courts had taken away
two major verdicts because they said I was unethical in my closing arguments, the most
ridiculous things in the world. Anyhow, they had done this and the organized Bar, and I
guess it has a lot to do with if I can go to an aside for a second because this had to do
with the giving. Instead of acknowledging whether it be in a lawsuit or anything else,









UFLC 75
Page 77

instead of acknowledging that I am that good at what I do, I give the impression that I've
cheap shot it or cheated or took advantage of the other side. Instead of just being honest
and saying listen, I really am that good at what I do. My daddy and my brother David
used to say why you'd rather climb a tree and make somebody think you're a crook than
to stay on the ground, he said it's just unbelievable, and this is so. I had gotten some
amazing verdicts. You get a great verdict against somebody and he thinks you cheated
him and it just drives him... I don't know. Whatever it is, the organized Bar was very
much against [naming the law school Levin College of Law].

P: The organized Bar in Florida or in this area?

L: In Florida and the area. Reputation-wise, you have to realize I passed basically the
wrongful death bill, I passed the cigarette bill, I had received as a result of this the
highest award from the trial lawyers of Florida, the Perry Nichols Award. All of a
sudden, I'm sitting in the office and Jeff and Rick are there and we're talking about
trying to get a major gift from Bob Montgomery who's a good friend, philanthropist,
down in West Palm Beach.

P: So they came to talk to you about somebody else.

L: How to get Bob Montgomery to do this. In the midst of the conversation, they said what
we'd like to do is try to get about $6 million from him to build this big, beautiful new
building and to be called the Robert and Mary Montgomery building at the Spessard
Holland College of Law or whatever the heck. In one or the other, Rick said heck, tell
him $10 million, we'll name the law school for him.

P: This just came out of the blue?

L: I had just received notice that the checks had come in from tobacco. I was going to do
something for the law school anyhow and within about five minutes, my mind was going
through this mind game of what a great way to number one, spend the money, number
two, I was financially in great shape, the kids were all in great shape....

P: You didn't need the money.

L: I didn't need the money and this was sort of payback. At the same time, I've always
been one, in fact I told David, David when he died last January left a nice sum of money
to the University of Florida. They'll come to it over a period of years. I always told
David, David get the enjoyment of giving while you're living. I don't want to leave
anything in my will for all right. I really feel that way and I said God knows, and it's
proven to be true. Within about no more than fifteen minutes, I told them, I said I might
give the $10 million. I want to check with my tax lawyer and it was as if I'd shot both of
them right between the eyes, like oh my God. I said we'll meet later today, which we









UFLC 75
Page 78

did, we went to Skopelo's restaurant that evening for cocktails. They had called John
Lombardi [president, of the University of Florida, 1990-1999] and gotten permission. I
had called Bob Kramer, my tax lawyer, and he said it could be done. My son Martin,
myself, Bob Kramer the lawyer, Rick, and Jeff went and had dinner Skopelo's and shook
hands on my doing this.

P: You had not been approached by Paul Robell at all earlier for a big gift? Not necessarily
this, but...

L: I don't believe so, no.

P: This kind of just came out of the blue.

L: I doubt if there's ever been anybody who contributed this amount of money in this short
of period of time.

P: Not in this kind of short period. They didn't have to woo you at all.

L: In fact, I think it's probably the largest cash contribution the university's received.

P: What happened to your friend down in Palm Beach?

L: Bob Montgomery? We went back recently. There was a big war over the gift
obviously, but this past year, 2001, they decided to raise they used this $10 million to
hire professors, discretionary funds, which has really done a lot toward bringing the law
school [to national prominence]. Now they needed a new facility, they went out and
raised $5 [million] or $6 million last year.

P: But not from Bob Montgomery?

L: Bob Montgomery gave $250,000.

P: That's a long way from your $10 million.

L: I know. I gave $250,000 more. They raised the money, it's going to be matched, and
we're going to do over a $20 million facility.

P: Why did Montgomery give such a small amount?

L: At that point, that's what we asked for.


P: But originally, you all were talking about $5 [million] or $6 million.









UFLC 75
Page 79

L: They were talking. Bob's got a lot of other interests. He's very much into the cultural
things. He's got museums named for him down in West Palm, a lot of other things.

P: He's not a graduate of the university...

L: He is a graduate of the University [of Florida] Law School, and mentioned then that
when things get straightened out, he would give more money to the university, and I'm
sure he will.

P: How did they justify naming the school for you when it was already named for Spessard
Holland?

L: It was the Spessard Holland Law Center.

P: Did they know that at the time? Did that come up in the negotiations?

L: It's called the Fredric G. Levin College of Law.

P: I know what's it's called now, but I thought that during the negotiations...

L: And then it's the Spessard Holland Law Center at the University of Florida.

P: But that's true now. At the time of the negotiations, did that come up in conversation?

L: It was always called the University of Florida College of Law. There was the law center
there, the Holland Law Center, but it was always called the University of Florida College
of Law and they changed that to the Fredric G. Levin College of Law at the University of
Florida.

P: What would have happened if they had asked you for more money?

L: I don't know. I don't know what to tell you.

P: The $10 million just kind of came out of the blue.

L: Came out of the blue.

P: It was later suggested that they sold it too cheap.

L: I paid more for that than they paid for the school of accounting, the school of business.

P: I understand what you're saying and I agree with you completely, but I'm just saying,
later when the criticism began to evolve.









UFLC 75
Page 80


L: And the criticism immediately started.

P: Where was Lombardi in all of this?

L: He came down on my side and that added to his troubles. In the meantime now, Jeb
Bush goes in 1999, in January.

P: You had not supported him?

L: No, I supported Buddy MacKay. But Jeb Bush goes in. The dean of the law school
gets a letter signed by a number of former presidents of the Florida Bar complaining that
here is somebody, why would name your school for somebody like this?

P: This letter came where, to Lombardi?

L: I know it went to Rick Matasar.

P: And to Jeb Bush?

L: I'm sure it ended up there. There was a movement afoot in the legislature to give me
back my money in 1999 and rename it the University of Florida College of Law. There
were a lot of people that were upset.
P: For the record, tell me what the two instances were of censure from the Bar or whoever it
was that they handed that out in condemnation.

L: I guess it was in the early 1980s, a guy named Dean Baird who was actually a friend of
my family's, he turned out to be a bookie, booking football. I would bet on football with
him or his group. Dean gets arrested for bookmaking, and this is a big deal in Pensacola.
If it happened in Miami, Jacksonville they slap his wrist and let him go. But in the
state attorney's office here, they charged him with racketeering and all of this stuff

P: They charged you with racketeering?

L: No, Dean Baird. At that time I was doing my BLAB television show. I made some
comments that the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and all of this, there a lot
better things they can be doing than picking up bookies and charging them with
racketeering. At the same time, the Bar Association was notified that there were a
number of lawyers, judges in Dean Baird's little black book as betters. This again is a
situation where my mouth got myself in trouble. They sent a notice to all of us,
everybody in the book, to come take a private reprimand.
I went down to the Bar Association grievance committee and made the statement
that it is inconceivable to me that Reubin Askew and the governor of Massachusetts bet a









UFLC 75
Page 81

box of oranges against Maine lobster when Miami played Boston College, that that is a
crime, the same crime that basically we all, we bettors, are charged with. I said when
two judges are out of the golf course and bet a dollar on a hole, that's the same crime that
they allege I did. It's nothing but a third degree misdemeanor. I said there are five
lawyers in this town practicing law right now who have been charged with stealing from
their clients, and they're still practicing law. I said you bring me down here to give me a
private reprimand over betting on a football game, I said it's absolutely insanity. Take
care of these guys who don't care whether they win or lose, I mean I went into a real
tirade. I was upset and told them that I was at a bar having a drink the other night and I
was watching two lawyers laughing about having lost a case, a criminal case, a murder
case. I said this is just...anyhow.
The Bar gave everybody else private reprimands and then they brought charges
against me wanting to make a public reprimand. I demanded that the trial go on in
public. It was headlines every day in the local section. I did repeat my speech that I
thought it was absolutely ridiculous what had happened. The case, the judge found, that
I should have a public reprimand. I went to the Florida Supreme Court which affirmed
on a different ground than the betting, they affirmed on the ground that I had brought the
Bar into disrepute because of my comments about why in the hell aren't you worrying
about these damn things, here you are running around getting somebody betting on a
football game. I also had pointed out that Justice Rehnquist had his regular Wednesday
night poker game in Washington. They took the supreme court decision from Florida
and petitioned for certiorari to the United States Supreme Court where they held it for
about a year and a half and finally they turned it down. Came back to Jacksonville for
the Board of Governors meeting and stood there in the middle of the room of the Board
of Governors while they chewed me out and all that.
Then it was a few years later where I kicked butt in a case of Stone v. Sacred
Heart Hospital and the jury awarded almost $5 million. In the midst of the closing
argument, I said the defense in this case is ridiculous. These doctors acted like, you
know... in that case all I said was the defense in the case is ridiculous. It was an
automobile accident. They didn't object. There was a motion for a new trial, they
never mentioned this in the motion for a new trial. Then on the appeal, they said that
this was an unethical comment because I had put my opinion into the case. The district
court of appeal reversed the case, said the conduct was unethical and sent it back for a
new trial that we later settled reasonably, probably somewhere between $3 million and $4
million.
When this decision was coming down, it came down the day that I was getting
ready to make a closing argument in the case of Rawson v. Baptist Hospital. It came
here and they didn't want to tell me that the case had been reversed on this. Anyhow, in
the Rawson case, I again said the defense in this case is absolutely ridiculous. This is a
medical practice, Rawson v. Baptist Hospital. These doctors were idiots. They were
sitting there fooling around while this guy who had had a diving accident and had the
bends, they needed to get him to a hyperbaric chamber. That case goes up and they
reverse that, an $8 million verdict, send it back for a new trial saying this conduct is the









UFLC 75
Page 82

second time Mr. Levin has made unethical remarks. I'm notified by the Bar Association
they're bringing charges. By the way, the $8 million verdict ended up being $31 million
the last time it was tried.
They bring these charges, again I've demanded a public trial and I had testifying
for me J.B. Spence from Miami said it was absolute insanity that they would object. I
had Morris Dees [Director of the Southern Poverty Law Center] from Montgomery, a
dear friend, testify for me that what a great lawyer I was and this is absurd. I had the
chairman of the American Bar Association Grievance Committee state that he had looked
through a million possible [unfinished thought]. Anyhow, this was the first time anybody
had ever been charged with a closing argument as a violation. The judge found in my
favor, the supreme court affirmed that there was nothing unethical about it.

P: So these are the two cases in which they, the critics...

L: The critics said Mr. Levin had been charged with. A lot of people say it's just an
absolute factor that these guys, they're country club elite, and here Fred Levin is doing
all of the things that I'm sure they would like to have done, all of them would love their
name on a law school. We're going to go into another arena when we start talking about
the Roy Jones situation and how all of that, I think, probably led to a lot of the jealously.
The political connections with Reubin Askew and W.D. [Childers] and becoming the trial
counsel for the power company. Then the Roy Jones situation, being the chief in the
country of Ghana, just everything. The children have turned out so well, I could not ask
for more in life. A lot of the things that upset other attorneys, upset a lot of the social
elite, that here's a guy who just didn't care to be with them.

P: A lot of the criticism comes out of a group of lawyers, mainly out of Jacksonville.

L: A lot of it out of Jacksonville.

P: Who are these people? Who is Rinnaman for instance? He became very vocal.

L: I was in law school, he was a year ahead of me.

P: I read his letter.

L: Yeah, his letter was horrible.

P: Vitriolic.

L: It was what kind of person I was that all I thought about was money and unethical and
what an image for the law school. I thought during that time, what an image for the law
school you think of the Chloromycetin case and savings and the tobacco, how many lives









UFLC 75
Page 83

all of this is going to save. I think I'd rather have Fred Levin's name than Rinaman's
name on that law school.

P: You had not been on any cases with him or anything that got him upset?

L: No. I may have been on the fringes...

P: Did you know Mark Hulsey.

L: I knew of him.

P: But you didn't know him.

L: No. All these people were big high time society Bar lawyers. Keep in mind that
they're sitting there and Reubin Askew and the influence I had there with W.D. Childers
all those years. They had to come running to me if the Bar needed something.

P: And they weren't giving any money either.

L: They weren't giving any money. If the Bar or the university needed anything, "Fred,
can you call W.D. and get this thing done." That's a little rough on them because I
never went to a Florida Bar meeting in forty-one years.

P: What role does Marshall Criser play in all of this?

L: He just looks down his nose at me.

P: You all have never been social friends?

L: Oh, no, no. Since giving this money, now I go to any of the presidents' box, any of the
football games. Before, the money I'd given allowed once every couple of years they'd
invite me. Somebody introduced me last year and said, "Marshall you know Fred Levin,
don't you," and he sort of just, "Yeah," just turned around. I don't even think he shook
hands, walked away.

P: Sounds almost as though he had a personal grudge against you.

L: I think they're upset. They don't want that name on that law school, that's their law
school.


P: But it's there.









UFLC 75
Page 84

L: Yeah, but I don't think any of them have ever given any money of any significance. I
think they found out Rinaman had given either $50 or something like that.

P: The Crisers have given money to the arts program, to the Ham Museum.

L: Really?

P: But to my knowledge they have not given to the law school, but I don't know. Is this the
first time you and Matasar are coming together?

L: Yes.

P: You had nothing to do with his appointment, then?

L: Oh, no. I didn't even know who he was. I had met him before the event of the giving.
He had come here, he was a good dean compared to those in the past. He knew how to
raise money, and every time he'd come to Pensacola he'd call. We'd go out and have
drinks. You know what's amazing? I'm sitting here thinking, Bernie Sliger at Florida
State University, every time he'd come to town, he would do all of his rounds with the
FSU alumni, then he'd call me, and he and I would go out drinking together, just the two
of us. I look at it as I must be a lot more fun than these fuddy-duddies who run the Bar
and things like that. Bernie Sliger was President of Florida State University. I'm glad I
did it. It's created a lot of problems for me, but at the same time, there's a group of
people out there that are saying, "He's one of us, I'm glad his name's on that thing."

P: What was the problem, to your knowledge, between Matasar and Lombardi?

L: It had nothing to do with me, I understand. The problem was that it was a question of
money for the school, money for the university. Matasar stood up for the school and
stood up against the provost, and there were a lot of things. Supposedly, Rick called me
and told me my naming had nothing to do with his dismissal.

P: Lombardi feels that it did have something to do with it as far as his ouster was concerned.

L: Yes. Matasar had some friends, so when he fired Matasar, it created... Some people in
pretty high places, it's sort of funny, it wouldn't be the group that... I think that the
Criser's and that group blamed Lombardi for allowing Matasar to do this, and I think he's
right. I don't believe, at one point they said, "Matasar's friends." Matasar, at that
point, didn't have any powerful friends.


P: He hadn't been here very long.









UFLC 75
Page 85

L: But, I think that's why Criser and all of that group thought that Lombardi should never
have allowed this to happen. Lombardi, I agree, when he came down on my side and
stood up to these people, I think that was the beginning of the end for him. That plus the
Oreo remark.

P: But I think upon reflection, Lombardi felt that Matasar had overextended himself in
getting the money from you. That he did it really impetuously, he didn't ask for enough
and all of those kinds of things.

L: That's possible. Part of the reason was he didn't slap Matasar down and Lombardi
always told me that he was very much in favor of what I did.

P: He told me that, too, and he thinks very highly of you, very highly.

L: I appreciate that, and I think highly of him.

P: As recently as three weeks ago he said that to me in an Oral History interview. The
naming goes through, and you have a celebration here in Pensacola at the restaurant,
what was that?
L: In the meantime, Lawton Chiles died that December before. We had a nice event,
Reubin Askew came in, John Lombardi and Rick Matasar were there. Paul Robell came,
and it was a really, really nice affair. I had some friends of mine that came in, it was a
real nice affair. Then, of course, all hell broke loose with Matasar.

P: Where was the restaurant, what was the restaurant?

L: Skopelo's. The same restaurant [where] I agreed to give the money.

P: So this was a luncheon meeting?

L: A luncheon meeting, and I felt real good. My brother David, I designated part of that
money to put a chair in the David H. Levin Chair of Matrimonial Law, and they've hired
an outstanding professor, Woodruff, I think, is her name, to head that.

P: So part of the $10 million, part of it went to this chair?

L: Went there. Then, half a million dollars went to the Reubin Askew [Institute].

P: So half a million dollars went to the Askew, $1 million went to David's chair.

L: $1.5 million I believe.

P: So that's $2 million. $8 million is left for the law school.









UFLC 75
Page 86


L: All of it indirectly is the law school.

P: The Askew Institute is not.

L: I think it is because I think that was designated to come part of it is at the University of
Florida, part of it is at FSU.

P: David Colburn is [the director].

L: Find out, I'm not sure. My understanding was it was going to come within the auspices
of the University of Florida.

P: I didn't realize FSU had anything to do with this.

L: Maybe it doesn't. Maybe it's the University of Florida, but it

P: I think it's all University of Florida. When Matasar left, did that come as a surprise to
you?

L: Yes.

P: How were you notified?

L: He called me.

P: What did he say?

L: He said, "You're going to be hearing that I'm resigning or something and it has nothing
to do with you, I don't want you to feel that way." He's going to teach somewhere, and
then of course he got the job at New York Law School. He called me, and I called some
people in New York for him. Then, Jon Mills [current dean, Levin College of Law]
came on. He's done a great, great job fund-raising.

P: Did you hear from Lombardi at the time of the Matasar resignation?

L: No, I don't think so. I'm trying to remember, I just don't remember.

P: Let me go to this Reubin Askew thing. I know David was very supportive of it right
from the very beginning, and that's because of this relationship with Reubin Askew.

L: Yes.









UFLC 75
Page 87

P: Has he left money for Reubin Askew in his will?

L: I think it's going to the University of Florida College of Law.

P: All of his money going to the college of law?

L: Yes.

P: Was there support for the medical school? Somewhere along the line, I had the idea that
David had given money to the medical school.

L: He had in the past. I think there's a small piece.

P: You and David have been very supportive of the University of Florida. How about the
other members of your family?

L: All five of us are graduates of the University of Florida. Five brothers with all degrees.

P: Yeah, but I'm asking about their support.

L: Oh, financially? Herman couldn't afford it and Stanley couldn't afford it. Allen, up
until this point, could not afford it. The only two that could actually afford to support
it...

P: I don't mean to talk about giving millions of dollars...

L: I don't even know if they are members the alumni association. I think Stanley did give
like $1,000 when one of his professors, Freeland or one of them died, or maybe he
committed $5,000.

P: Have you given up now on the university?

L: What do you mean?

P: $10 million is a lot of money. Did that wipe you clean for your...

L: I gave them $250,000 last year over and above that to help towards the building
campaign.

P: Is this for the building? The Lawton Chiles building?

L: Yes.









UFLC 75
Page 88

P: Have you been active in fund-raising on that?

L: Yeah. I got Bob Montgomery to give, I got a lot of the tobacco lawyers, too.

P: Is that going to be a library or is that going to be a classroom building or what?

L: I'm not even sure. [End of Tape C, side 6] ...I've been to dinner with Mrs. Chiles.
Lawton stayed at my home a couple of times, I believe she did, too. [interruption]

P: There were a lot of people who were unhappy with the critics, and one of those was Ray
Ehrlich.

L: I heard.

P: You know Ray?

L: Just to have met him. He was a Pi Lam, and he was down and I received the Big Pi
Award which is from a fraternity standpoint, and he came in for that. That was from
Tampa. Back for the Chiles family, I worked rather closely with Mrs. Chiles and the
Chiles Foundation, and I guess you'd call her Rhea Junior, which was running the
Lawton and Rhea Chiles Children and Mother, Mothers and Children Foundation in
Tampa. I also got the young Mrs. Chiles to do some fund-raising for the University of
Florida College of Law in regard to the Lawton Chiles.

P: Are you on that committee?

L: No.

P: And so you're not co-chairing it or anything?

L: No.

P: You gave your check of $250,000.

L: It's $50,000 a year for five years.

P: And you encouraged some of your tobacco lawyer friends to do the same thing.

L: Yeah.


P: How much have they raised, do you know?









UFLC 75
Page 89

L: I think it was right at $6 million, which was matched by the University and matched by
the legislature, and it got about $22 million for the building.

P: They haven't started building yet.

L: I think they have groundbreaking in the fall.

P: You're not on any advisory committees or anything for the law school?

L: No.

P: One thing we have not talked about in regard to this naming and the criticisms that came
up is the role that anti-Semitism has played. Did it play a role?

L: Yeah.

P: Fred Levin is a Jewish name.
L: You'll have to ask Rick Matasar. Somebody called, and I don't know who, it was a
rather prominent individual. Have you done an Oral History of Matasar?

P: No.

L: And you probably won't either.

P: We won't, he's gone.

L: Yeah. They did not realize that he was Jewish.

P: They didn't know he was Jewish?

L: Matasar, who had ever heard that? It isn't Goldberg.

P: When he first came, he became actively involved in the Jewish community.

L: But somebody, some big shot in the Bar Association made the comment to him in regard
to putting a Jewish name on a law school not realizing that Rick was Jewish. There are a
number of people who believe that there is certainly more than just a touch of
anti-Semitism. I don't.

P: You don't think that anti-Semitism exists?

L: I don't. I think it's anti-Fred Levin.









UFLC 75
Page 90

P: But Fred Levin is Jewish.

L: I know, but it gets back to all of the things that were happening about that time. I held,
at one time, the record for wrongful death of a house wife, wrongful death of a wage
earner, wrongful death of a child, the highest personal injury verdict in Florida. Here I
was getting all these damn verdicts up here in a conservative area that, in addition, and
this perception of being this great political power who all he's got to do is cross his legs
and he can get anything done through Lawton Chiles or W.D. Childers and Reubin
Askew.

P: Was that true?

L: No. Actually, if you really analyze it...

P: So you're denying that you were a political power.

L: The perception was, and I enjoyed the perception because it gave me the image and
things of that nature. Also, one of the major things in the country was this Roy Jones, Jr.
situation. I was the National Manager of the Year in boxing in 1995 or 1996 or
something, and all of a sudden at the United Nations, he's in school, there's a chief, and
just everything was going on. You can imagine what these people... all this is happening
all about the same time.

P: Lombardi thought that anti-Semitism played a very specific role in the...

L: I never saw it. I thought it was jealously, and I thought these guys would come home at
night, the big social type guys... Anyhow, I just felt there was a lot of jealousy. I can tell
you this, I went to one University of Florida function other than the beautiful function
that they, the dinner Matasar was there then.

P: Matasar was there that night because we were there.

L: Did he come back or had he...

P: He had not left yet.

L: That's right, he had been notified.

P: Not yet, I don't think.

L: That was fall of 2000.

P: A little bit earlier than that, 2000 or 1999 maybe. It's been three years.









UFLC 75
Page 91


L: Alright, so it was 1999.

P: Matasar had not been notified yet. Everything was swimming along beautifully.

L: I just felt that it was basically jealously. I was going to tell you, I attended one
University of Florida event, and that would have been in the annual meeting in West
Palm Beach.

P: You went to that meeting? The annual meeting, the President's Council meeting?

L: In the year 2000, in June.

P: That was, I think, 1999 at the Breakers [Hotel], maybe?

L: I think it was 2000.

P: 2000, okay.
L: Lombardi introduced me, and I remember sitting there thinking, "Holy crap," because
this was black tie, all of the elite in the University of Florida, not lawyers I mean, but
University of Florida, and I got a standing ovation. It was not just a little tap, tap on the
hands. I thought it was meant and I felt very good about it. 1999 or 2000, one or the
other.

P: Doesn't make any difference, we can easily document that.

L: Anyhow, I felt good about that.

P: It was a successful recognition.

L: I thought so.

P: I wanted to talk to you in addition to the law school business about some of your other
philanthropy, I want to get that on the record. What is this foundation that you and
[Papantonio]...

L: Martin came to me. Martin saw the future of this firm heading into mass torts. He
realized that Mike Papantonio was going to lead that image, that field.

P: Mike Papantonio, I know, is a partner at the firm, who is he?


L: He's on the fourth floor, runs the mass torts. He's out front.









UFLC 75
Page 92

P: He's a Pensacola man?

L: No, he grew up somewhere.

P: Not from the University of Florida?

L: No. At the time the tobacco money came in, Martin felt that we ought to set up a
foundation. Mike was starting to do very well, and Martin felt that it would be
[interruption]

P: This foundation that you set up, why did you do it with him?

L: With Papantonio?

P: Why not a family foundation?

L: This was Martin's idea, and it's very, very bright. Martin saw Mike Papantonio as the
future rainmaker. Mike is going to be that.

P: What do you mean by the rainmaker?

L: The guy is going to go out and bring business into the firm. Whereas that was me and
still, Mike has got enough sense to use me as that King Kong who doesn't show up very
often, but oh, if he does. Anyhow, Mike has started to make good money. Basically,
Martin suggested we call it the Levin and Papantonio Family Foundation, Mike's very
charitable.

P: Mike's not in the family.

L: No.

P: Is it a family foundation or not?

L: The money comes from Martin, me, and Mike Papantonio.

P: $2 million?

L: Started with and, then, there's probably been maybe another half a million, million
dollars.


P: What's the money used for?









UFLC 75
Page 93

L: $500,000 is going to the Kid's House here in Pensacola. It's a central location for
abused children so they don't have to go to through ten or fifteen different agencies,
they'll all be contained in one.

P: Psychologically, ethical and all of those things.

L: Yeah, and it's good.

P: Is it in existence already?

L: I was having a drink last night and the guy in charge of it told me they're signing the
papers today to buy it. $250,000 to the children's cancer camp. A lot of different,
$5,000, $3,000.... Martin would be able to tell you.

P: So it's a three man operation?

L: Actually, the foundation, I've never been to one of their meetings. I don't guess I'm on
it. Martin is on it, Flack Logan, Sue Strawn from channel WEAR television, different
people around the community.

P: Not necessarily people just in the firm?
L: Oh no, no. They may turn down an awful lot of people on different things. They do a
great job.

P: What else in addition to that? You've supported activities at the University of West
Florida. Give me that list.

L: Basically it was the Abe Levin professorship in, I don't even know, humanities.

P: How much was that money?

L: It's over $300,000. It was a piece of property I gave to them.

P: You gave them the piece of property which they sold?

L: Yeah.

P: And that was matched by the state or hasn't that happened yet?

L: I don't know.

P: Usually a chair is $600,000.









UFLC 75
Page 94

L: No, this wasn't a chair, it was a professorship.

P: Is that your one and only gift to West Florida?

L: $1,000 here. Of any substance, yes.

P: What have you done for Florida State University?

L: Basically at the same time I gave the piece of property to UWF, I gave property to the
Florida State University Foundation. I'm a member of their President's Council at
Florida, UWF, and FSU.

P: What is the draw for Tallahassee for you? You're not an alumnus of that institution.

L: Bernie Sliger.

P: Personal relationship?

L: Yes. We developed a relationship. Actually he testified for me in Thorshaw v. L&N
Railroad as an economist. I had met him at a Board of Trustees meeting for the state.
They were doing an event at the Ramada here in Pensacola, and the University of West
Florida was hosting the Board of Regents. They were doing a Mark Twain review, some
guy acting like Mark Twain, and it was boring as hell. They had a bar in the back of the
room, I didn't know Bernie Sliger from Adam. The only reason I was there, I came right
after the University of West Florida, I gave the professorship, so I had to be there, Morris
Marks, no, it was the president before that, Robinson or something, wanted me to be
there. I'm at the back of the room at the bar, and this little sort of stout guy is there at
the bar and it was a Sunday. We're having a drink and he said, "Is there any place in
town open on a Sunday we can get away from here?" I said, "You and I got the same
idea." We were right by the kitchen, and we just snuck out through the kitchen and left.
The President of Florida State, that's how I met him.

P: And you're meeting him for the first time?

L: Never knew who he was. So we went off and we went to drinking and we really tied
one on. And he can drink. Anyhow, that's how I met Bernie Sliger and then, as a result
of that, he testified for me in 1980, 1981 at the L&N trial, and from there, anytime
Florida/FSU football games there, I would go sit in his box.

P: But Sandy [ D'Alemberte] is the president now.


L: And a good friend, but not as close as Bernie and I.









UFLC 75
Page 95

P: So you get invited to the president's box in Tallahassee, also.

L: Yeah. Through SmartCOP had become a good friend of the School of Criminology,
Dan Maier Catkin, who's head of the School of Criminology.

P: What do you do in a major way as far as the City of Pensacola? Any of the cultural
events here? Do you support those? I'm talking about big money.

L: No.

P: But small support.

L: Eh, you know. Just piddling. I do for like cerebral palsy, cancer, children's issues,
things like that. But as far as the symphony, and the ballet...

P: When you say for cancer and the children, what are you talking about? A $5,000 check?
More or less?

L: Children's Cancer Society, $250,000.

P: That's a big support.
L: Yeah.

P: Would you say that you're the largest philanthropist in Pensacola?

L: Yeah.

P: You would?

L: Yes.

P: In terms of the dollars that you distribute annually?

L: Yes. I'm far from the wealthiest guy.

P: I understand, but you answered the question. You figure you're the most generous in
many ways.

L: Yes.

P: What do you do for the Jewish community?









UFLC 75
Page 96

L: My daughter is the president of the synagogue, this is her second year, and the two years
before that my son-in-law was.

P: Who is your daughter?

L: Marci.

P: Marci and Ross?

L: Marci and Ross. Marci Goodman, who's circuit judge now.

P: Is there anything named for your father at the synagogue?

L: The big dining room or whatever you call it, the meeting room. There's a big star out
front that I donated. I donated $15,000 to put it there, and it's supposed to be the Abe
Levin... I've never seen a plaque. In fact, I mentioned to Ross, I said, Ross, you know
I gave this money," I just gave them $60,000 a couple of weeks ago.

P: You were the largest gift to the synagogue?

L: Oh, yes.

P: What do you do for United Jewish Appeal?

L: I'm the largest giver.

P: What is your annual?

L: $20,000, somewhere around there.

P: They just had an Israeli emergency campaign. Were you involved in that?

L: They've been to see me. What I did, instead, was gave $60,000 to the synagogue here,
and I figured just to make sure they're still going to be around years from now. I'm
more concerned there than I am with Israel. I can do more for Israel through some
friendships than donating money.

P: I'm going to jump around for some things now that I want to make sure that I get onto the
[tape]. Tell me about that penthouse. We were there one time, beautiful facility.

L: E.W. Hopkins who was president of First Mutual, they had loaned the money for the
Mariner, which was a condo in Destin, and they had this half of the top floor that...









UFLC 75
Page 97

Anyhow, he was going to sell it to me at their cost and I, as usual, not realizing what I got
into, I went ahead and bought the dam thing.

P: Was this you or the firm buying it?

L: Me. I was just going to do something.

P: You didn't know what, but something.

L: And I hired decorators, and it got to be very, very expensive. Fortunately, somebody
came along and bought it out.

P: What did you use it for?

L: Family, politics mainly, fund-raisers, friends.

P: Was W.D. Childers one of the supporters of this acquisition? Being a politician I
thought he might be able to use it for politics.

L: No, I never used it in that way. He showed up for some of the events like we had an
event for Gary Hart, Bob Hope spent a week there, he and his wife, several movie stars.
It was available for big shots who came in, things like that.

P: Sam Proctor visited there. He didn't spend the night, but he was there.

L: Well, he was able to come through.

P: Brought in by Mark Proctor. You said that you're not involved except as a supporter for
this new law building project at the University of Florida, $250,000, $50,000 a year over
five years. Beyond that, you're not involved in it?

L: No. It will be the Lawton Chiles whatever it is at the Fredric G. Levin College of Law.

P: The fund-raisers aren't after you to get after people?

L: They've raised the money, it's done.

P: It's in the house already?

L: Oh yeah, the money's in the house. It was approved by the legislature. They're
designing the building now.

P: Tell me about your own home, that in itself I understand, is a story.









UFLC 75
Page 98


L: It was just like the penthouse. I'm very happy, I'm at my house. It was in the late
1980s, my house that Marci and Ross now live in on Menendez where the kids were
raised. I was very pleased, I didn't need anything, and Dean Baird, the guy who was the
bookie, had told me that a developer in Pensacola was having a lot of trouble, it was in
the 1980s.

P: Is this Tom Underwood?

L: Tom Underwood.

P: He was the developer?

L: He was the developer, and he had built the house. Beautiful exterior, it was horrible
inside. What happened was he was trying to get it finished in time to get a certificate
of occupancy to protect the homestead from all of his creditors. Anyhow, Dean told me
that and this was after the fact, after he'd gotten away with his bankruptcy or whatever
it was "that the house was for sale and you could buy it for a song, and why don't you
fix it up, you turn around and sell it you'll make a fortune." I bought it and bought a
little piece of property next to it, and brought in the same decorators. All of a sudden, it
got out of hand. It was just my wife and I in this 20,000 square foot home, beautiful
home, so we've been there ever since.
P: Do you still have that Picasso?

L: Actually I gave that to Martin, and he's got it in his home in Cambridge. I've got a Dali
and I've got maybe six or seven original LeRoy Neimans. LeRoy and I are good, good
friends, and he's a world famous sports artist, contemporary artist.

P: So you're an art collector?

L: Only with Neiman.

P: But you do have a Dali.

L: I have a Dali.

P: Authentic?

L: Oh, yes.

P: A lot of Dali's are not.


L: No, this is.









UFLC 75
Page 99


P: What happened to the house, I remember there was a hurricane that did some damage?

L: The house I'm living in, hurricane came through, wiped out the bottom floor. We redid
it, put in a new dock, new downstairs. They're still working on it to this week.

P: Were you not an antique car collector that got damaged?

L: The antique cars, all but one got destroyed.

P: Are you out of that business now?

L: I still have the Jackie Kennedy and Aristotle Onassis. It's a Rolls-Royce limo that they
used. Aristotle used it from 1952 to his death, I think, in 1975 in Monte Carlo and Paris.
When she got married, it became hers. It's a limo with just two seats in the back. I've
got that, it's being redone and ought to be back here next month.

P: So the hurricane that did the damage was Hurricane Erin in August of 1995?

L: No, Opal. After Erin, a couple of days after Erin, I had air conditioning, and I had my
father come over, and that's the night he died, he died at my home.

P: I wanted you to tell me about that for the record, about your father's death. You were all
together that night.

L: It was a couple of three days after the hurricane. I think it was on Friday or Saturday,
I'm not sure.

P: Were you gathering there because of the light situation?

L: The lights, and I had staying over my brother Allen and his wife. Fred Vigodsky and his
wife, my father, David did not come, Stanley did not come over, Martin came over, my
son. Daddy cooked salami and eggs, and we all sat around and ate salami and eggs and
talked for a long time. He said, "Well, I'm going home tomorrow and 6:00." I said,
"No you're not, wait around here." "No, I'm going home at 6:00 tomorrow," he kept
saying that. A little after 6:00, the alarms went off all over the house, I jumped up and
ran through the house looking. It was a fire alarm, the thing just kept saying danger,
danger, danger. I ran all over the house and ran into the room he was staying in, and he
was just laying there and he was dead.


P: On the bed?









UFLC 75
Page 100

L: On the bed. Covers still over him, his right hand was out, and his mouth was open.
Never even had gotten out of the covers.

P: He died in his sleep.

L: Died in his sleep.

P: And the reason for the alarm?

L: Never know.

P: That's kind of strange.

L: Yeah.

P: So you discovered your father.

L: Yes.

P: How old was he when he died?
L: Eighty-eight.

P: So he'd lived a long life here.

L: Yeah, and he was driving. In fact, I drove him to my house, told him to leave his car
here. He had driven down. He was driving the day before he died. Lived by himself.
Every Sunday morning we'd have breakfast, mullet, and grits, cheese toast, and sliced
tomatoes. Every Sunday morning. All the kids would come over and have, friends in
advance.

P: The family revolved around him?

L: Yeah.

P: He was the focal point?

L: He was the focal point, yes.

P: Was your father an affluent man?

L: [When] he died, his estate was $1.5 million.

P: So he collected a sizeable amount. I suspect much of that went to the synagogue.