• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Main














Miami in a Coco-nut (1130)
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005328/00001
 Material Information
Title: Miami in a Coco-nut (1130)
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Manufacturer: The Record Company
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6630
System ID: UF00005328:00001

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
Full Text


































































-LL' Q
r. P.
i�~ c urr II

r.


�~�p,
"cu-~~





SEVEN DAYS
NA IN
M IAM I

, - r.P A.:.


^ - ;*' '.I ' .
Sj -tP *.A!^^ ^ *
tr.


Ptvors Band. December, to :1/..i





















Yachts and Houseboats in Biscayne Bay by Moonlight

MONDAY
77 TIEWING A NEW ENVIRONMENT-Fifty-
V five miles of smooth motor avenues,
graced by coconut and royal palms. and
glowing with colorful tropical flowers
and shrubbery, invite you. Starting at
Flagler street, drive north along Bay-
shore Drive, past yachts and houseboats;
seeing steamships at the municipal docks
from northern ports, the Bahamas and
Cuba; glimpsing the Causeway and on
among the beautiful homes of Miramar.
Out the Dixie Highway past Buena Vista,
then back to the busy business section.
Southward across the Miami river,
around Point View, with its luxurious
homes, into Brickell avenue and on
through a virgin tropical hammock
jungle. Return and spend hours seeing
the many suburban sections. Midafter-
noon, hear Pryor's band in Royal Palm
park, underneath the palms.


.. r

�~



















Seminole Indian Family Arriving at Camp

TUESDAY
N THE WATER- Engage a boat of
your own or take an excursion craft.
Down Biscayne bay to Cape Florida past
Villa Vizcaya and other palatial homes.
Returning, go up the Miami river to Musa
Isle and the Tropical Gardens, on into the
drainage canal through vast reaches of
the Everglades. You may come upon a
Seminole Indian camp or pass them,
dressed in colorful raiment, paddling
their quaint canoes. You can visit the
Indian camp and the Alligator Farm. Re-
turning to the bay you pass scores of fine
yachts at anchor, steamshipscargo laden,
and get a magnificent view of Miami.
Skimming over the surface of the bay or
circling overhead are hydroplanes and
huge passenger planes for Nassau, Bimini
or Havana. To see Miami's wonderful
marine gardens in a glass-bottom boat,
you must take another day.


L-7~
L~ril*~L;~�~










"YE ' ", "', e IflllM


Miami Country Club and Golf Links

WEDNESDAY
OUTDOORR SPORT CALLS TODAY - Six
fine golf courses for your choosing.
The Miami Country Club's ideal links
are only a few minutes' distant. The haz-
ards are sporty, the view of river and
pines and palms enchanting. On farther
at Hialeah are the new municipal links
and clubhouse, a splendid place to play.
Out Tamiami trail to Coral Gables is the
nine-hole course of the Coconut Grove
Country Club. There are three fine courses
at Miami Beach, close to the ocean, with
winding canals. If you prefer tennis, the
city parks of Miami have wonderful clay
courts, or you can find a dozen other
places to enjoy this sport. Perhaps you
want to watch a game of polo at Miami
Beach. Climax the day with a plunge in
the pool at the Royal Palm casino, dine
and dance afterward in a garden of
palms or on a spacious veranda.














Ir'





Trophies from the Tarpon Waters

THURSDAY
IET's Go FISHING-You have arrange
for your boat at the pier, with ,
skilled captain as guide. Out in thf
ocean, along the shore northward are the
kingfish; farther out in the gulf strean
are the sporty sailfish, the savage bar
racuda, the beautiful bonitas and dol
phins, and hosts of other varieties. South
ward, down the coast, are the haunts o
the tarpon, mackerel, amberjack, yellow
tail and grouper. Anywhere, cast you
line in the water, a tug, the reel sings an.
any one of a hundred varieties may b
on your hook. It is a fishing paradise c
constant surprises where the amateu
scores with the veteran. Or take a motc
boat, anywhere in the bay, for snapped
grunt, pompano and often some of th
gamy ones that come in with the tide to fee,
Or slip out to Collins' bridge or the CausewE
and join the anglers. It is the fishing experience
of a lifetime.



















SIN TE S - No matter what
Surf Bathing at aMiami 365 Days in the Year


A DIP IN THE SURF - No matter what
the month, it's never too cold for
ocean bathing in Miami. The sea is
warmed by the sun and tempered by the
gulf stream, the winter average being 72
degrees. You cross the million-dollar
Causeway leading to the bathing beach.
For a thousand feet the fine sand slopes
gradually, the waves are never boister-
ous, and you enioy the most wonderful
surf bathing in the world. Afterward in
the shade of coconut palms, or beneath a
multicolored umbrella, you relax upon
the warm sand, in the invigorating air.
Follow this with a spin for fifteen miles
along the ocean driveway, lined with
coconut palms, back again past quaint
canals, lovely lagoons, homes set in tropical
bowers, to the Aquarium where the queer fish
of the gulf stream and Florida Keys are ex-
hibited. End the day with a dinner at one of the
casinos where there is dancing or a cabaret.






i...'-~~ 2 �
a'


First Studio Unit and Other Buildings of Miami Studios, Inc.

SATURDAY

SEEING THE EVERGLADES - By auto
along the Miami river, past moored
houseboats, by the country club, through
the Allapattah truck gardens, westward
to Hialeah, newest city in Filmland. Visit
the Miami studios and see the atock and
growing crops on the Curtiss-Bright
ranch. Follow the Miami canal a few
miles farther to the 150,000-acre planta-
tion and $1,250,000 sugar mill of the
Pennsylvania Sugar Co. Returning, cross
the Miami river at Musa Isle bridge, go
south to Tamiami Trail and westward
past orange and grapefruit groves into
the Glades again. A few miles out you
see the primitive Everglades, its birds
of brilliant plumage, its waterfowl, often the si-
lent Seminoles and the lazy alligators. You see
also the beginnings of farming in this vast fertile
empire which drainage has made available. It
will be worth while to stop and see some of the
wonderful produce grown in this black muck.





















William Jennings Bryan's Sunday-School Class

SUNDAY
ORLD'S LARGEST SUNDAY-SCICHAJ
CLASS - Out-of-doors, in Royal
Palm park, .William Jennings Bryan,
teacher. Miami's forty-eight religious
organizations invite you to their services
afterward. In the afternoon motor through
Coconut Grove. South on Ingraham Highway
to James Deering estate, open to the public this
afternoon. Most picturesque and magnificent
place of its kind in America, having cost, it is
said, more than $5,000,000 to build. See its
tropical gardens, canals, lagoons, Italian Renais-
sance architecture. On again in a tropical tour
through avenues of palms, past scores of won-
derful homes and luxurious estates. You pass
by groves of oranges, grapefruit, avocadoes and
mangoes. You may travel for miles over smooth,
oiled, rock highways.
We have outlined only a few of the attrac-
tions and fine trips around Miami for your first
seven days. You can spend the next seventy
days delightfully, seeing new sights and enjoy-
ing our wonder climate.








HOTELS


Name of Hotel Capaci:y
Abnerholm ............ 50
Al Fresco ............. 70
Alm o .................. 50
Alpha ................. 25
Alta Vista ............ 180
Ambassador ........... 130
American ............. 30
Arcade ................ 32
Bay Shore Lodge...... 60
Belcher ............... 30
Biscayne .............. 125
Bradford .............. 60
*Brown ................ 50
(Camp Biscayne ....... 60
Central ............... 125
Davis ................. 75
Esmeralda ... ......... 80
*Flamingo ............. 400
Frances .............. 100
Gralyn ............ . o o"
Grand .... ........ 50
Grey0.... ........... ..100
C-en Tree Inn........ 150
Halcyon .............. 300
Hermitage (bachelor).. 106
Hermitage Manor ..... 30
Jefson ................ 22
Kentucky Home ....... 200
Leamington ........... 200
Lenox .................. 60
*Lincoln ............... 100
Luzerne ............. . 30
McAllister ............ 400
McCrory .............. 100
Martinique ............ 100
Minneapolis ........... 35
Oaks .................. 30
Oxford ................ 125
Paramount ............ 50
Pershing .............. 176
Plaza ................. 300
Poinsettia ............. 125
Roberts .............. 300
Royal Palm ........... 600
Royalton .............. 100
Rutherford ............ 100
Savoy ................ 63
Sawtelle .............. 20
Security .............. 250
Seminole ............. 150
Strand ............... 125
tSunshine Inn .......... 50
Tamiami .............. 150
Urmey ................ 400
*Wofford ............... 225


Plan Rate
A $1.00 and up
E $1.00 and up
R $1.00 and up
R $10.00 per week and up
E $1.50 and up
E $3.50 and up
E $1.50 and up
E $2.00 and up
E $1.50 and up
R $10.00 to $35.00 per week
E $1.00 to $2.50
E $3.00 to $5.00
E $2.00 and up
A $35.00 per week
E $2.00 and up
R $1.00 per day, $5 per rk.
E $4.00 and up
A $15.00 and ,r
F eaco and up
A $6.00 and up
E $2.50 and up
E $3.00 and up
E $1.50 and up
A 88.00 to $12.00 per day
E 51.00 to $2.00
E $6.00 to $20.00 per week
E $1.50 and up
A $9.00 per week and up
E $3.00 and up
E $1.00 to $3.00
A $10.00 and up
R $1.50 and up
E $4.00 to $10.00
E $1.50 and up
E $5.00 and up
A $12.50 per week and up
A $18.00 per week and up
E $2.00 and up
E $2.00 to $6.00
E $3.00 and up
A $6.00 to $10.00
E $2.00 and up
E $5.00 and up
A $10.00 and up
R $2.50 to $5.00
E $2.00 and up
E $1.50 and up
R $5.00 and up
E $2.00 and up
E $2.00 and up
E $6.00 to $10.00
A $18.50 per week and up
E $2.50 and up
A $7.00 and up
A 07.50 and up


*Located at Miami Beach. fLocated at Coconut Grove.
A-American. E-European. R-Rooms Only.







APARTMENTS

Name Season Name Season
fAlabama ........ $360- 181 *Helene ........ .51,450-1,630
Alton Road...... 600-1.000 High White ..... 150- 259
*Ansonia ......... 800-1,000 Holmer ......... 375- 475
Aplington ....... 240- 300 Huntington ..... 225- 250
Asbury ......... 600-1.000 Johnson ......... 450-1,000
*Aurora ......... 500-1,000 Kimbark ........ 600- 800
Avondale ....... 300- 750 Lafayette ....... 400- 550
Bayshore ........ 900-1.000 Long ........... 600-1,250
Bay View ....... 500-1,000 Luke ........... 350- 950
*Beach Haven .... 200- 550 Lyndale ......... 450- 650
Belfort ......... 600-1.200 Mansfield ....... 200
Berni ........... 700-1,250 *Marevista ....... 500-1,000
Billike .......... 800 Marion ......... �10- 75
Bluestone ....... 275- 375 Marshall ........ 450 up
Boulevard ...... 350- 600 **Martha Louise.. 600
*Breakers ........ 650-1.150 Martina ........ 550- 875
Brickell ......... 450-1,250 Merriam ........ 600- 800
B=l mer ........ 1,500-2.000 Merrick ......... 850
*Castle, T,,, . 750-1,500 Merwil ......... �50- 100
Causeway ....... 860- 100 *Mizpah ......... 525
Chamberlain .... 500-1, Morrison........ 800
Chapman ....... 400- 450 Mon , ....... l115- 20
Chester ......... 600 New Gautier . 425- 700
Chesterfield ..... 400- 700 Oaklynn ........ ..a. 850
Clara Ed ....... 400- 450 *Ocean View ..... 850- so
Cleveland ....... 500-1,000 Osceola ......... 500- 750
Clifford ......... 400- 500 Ostend .......... 500-1,250
Clyde Court .... 575-1,785 Palms .......... 650- 750
Connecticut ..... 300- 100 Point View .....1,250-1,500
Crosel .......... 750-1,200 Principia ....... 500- 800
*Dade ........... �100- 150 Quinn .......... 500- 750
Dayton .......... 450- 600 Rice ............ 450-1,000
DeLeach ........ 400- 600 Rio Vista ....... 450
Del Rio ......... 750-1.250 Riverview ....... 350- 600
Don ............ 400- 900 Rose ............ �50
Dundas ......... 800- 900 *Royal .......... 400-1,000
*Eleanor ......... 600 Saragossa ....... 450-1,000
*El Mar .......... �150 Songer .......... 700
Eureka ......... 250- 275 Southland ...... 450- 600
Fairfax ......... 600- 900 *St. George ...... 700- 800
*Fenway ......... 600-1.000 *Toledo .......... 300- 900
Fink ............ 400. 700 Valencia ........ 430- 950
Fort Dallas ..... 500- 950 Vendome ....... 450- 600
*Fo.lr ........ 12.400 Waddell ........ 300- 400
Fredora Court ... 850-1,500 Waldinpere ...... 480- 650
Gallat Court .... 450-1,200 Walker ......... 300- 400
Goodsell Court .. 600- 800 Washingtonia ... 420- 550
Hamilton ....... 800 Williams ........ 675-1,200
Harold .......... 350- 750 Winton Court ... 700- 750
*Located at Miami Beach. tLocated at Coconut Grove.
�Monthly. �Wcekly. tGarage and servants' quarters included.
**Located at Lemon City.

For further information and handsome booklets
address:
MIAMI CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
MAIMI, FLORIDA

Printed by The Record Company, St. Augustine, Florida




























Roman Pools at Casino St. John, Miami Beach


_Ziami, the Wonder City of America

Attracted *-t-nnal attention in 1920 U. S. Census by show-
ing remarkable gain ot 440 Der cent in population. Present
population, 45,000; winter populatri, r0.000. Only large city
in the United States located in Tropical Zone. Dnde County,
fastest growing county in the United States, 258 per cent.
Location and How to Reach Miami-Miami is 366 miles
south of Jacksonville. One may take any trunk line from the
North or West running into Jacksonville, there change to the
Florida East Coast Railway, and in twelve hours step into a
fairyland of sunshine, palms and flowers. Through sleepers
are also operated between Boston, New York, Chicago and
intermediate points.
Most Beautiful Auto Trip in America- The Dixie
Highway will take one direct to Miami. For sheer enjoyment
nothing equals the changing scenes of land and water. Along
the ocean, and beside wide rivers, whose banks are fringed
with thick foliage, into the Tropical Zone of palms, the bril-
liant colors of flowers, and the wonderful winter homes.
Inland Water Route-One may reach Miami by water in
his own yacht or houseboat. If a seagoing craft, skirt the
Florida coast; if a smaller vessel, take the safe "inland" route
from Jacksonville southward, through the Halifax and Indian
rivers and connecting canals, and at last reach lovely Biscayne
Bay and Miami.
Yacht Anchorage in Biscayne Bay- The yacht anchor-
age in Miami harbor is the finest in the world. Water craft to
the value of $10,000,000 have anchored here in one week, among
them some of the most palatial yachts and houseboats afloat.
Miami's Wonderful Climate-Annual mean temperature
of Miami (U. S. Government weather report) is 75 degrees.
Four winter months, 68; four summer months, 81. Highest
temperature during summer of 1922, 89 degrees. Miami is in
the subtropical zone, in same latitude as South Central Egypt,





























Coconut-Lined Boulevard in Midwinter at Mian.


City Parks-Miari has five public parks, total area twenty-
two acres. New 40-acre park on Biscayne Bay now under
development. It has water frontage of 4,225 feet.
Schools and Conservatories-Eleven grade schools and
one high school comprise the public-school facilities. One
parochial school, twelve private and commercial schools, and
conservatories specializing in music, art and dancing.
Band Concerts-Arthur Pryor's famous band gives free
daily concerts, afternoon and evening, in Royal Palm Park,
under coconut palms overlooking Biscayne Bay. These con-
certs are given from December to April.
Million-Dollar Causeway-This two-way double automo.
bile concourse, with electric trolley and walkway for pedes-
trians, crosses Biscayne Bay and links Miami and Miami Beach.
It is three and a half miles long, cost $1,000,000 and was
opened to the public in February, 1920.
Miami's Harbor and Docks-Ship channel from munici-
pal docks to the Atlantic ocean now eighteen feet in depth;
proposed depth twenty-five feet. Steamship lines to Jackson-
ville, Bimini, Nassau, Havana and Key West. Freight line be-
tween Miami and Charleston and Baltimore with passenger
service from Baltimore assured in December, 1922. Docks, rail-
way and channel represent expenditure of more than $2.000.-
000 by city and local interests and over $1,000.000 by federal
government.
Fruit and Vegetable Production-Thirty-five per cent
of all Florida grapefruit comes from vicinity of Miami; 95 per
cent of all avocadoes; practically all mangoes. Large shipment
of oranges annually. Number bearing grapefruit and orange
trees in Dade county, 800.000; yield, 1921-22, 82,500,000.
12,000 acres in winter vegetables, tomatoes, beans, peppers, etc.
1921-22 crop, $7.000,000.
Miami City Statistics-Area, 18 square miles; land, 5,473
acres; bay, 4,776 acres; river, 75 acres; miles of sidewalks,
64; storm sewers, 10; sanitary sewers, 62; asphalt paving, 12;
oiled macadam, 44; high pressure fire mains, 31/; tax val-
uation, 1922, $64,967,724, or 75 per cent of market value.






























An Avenue of Royal Palms


South Central India and Burmah. Miami's climate is tem-
pered by the ever-present Trade Winds. Average hourly wind
velocity, nine miles. Not more than three hours of fog during
the year.
.Surf Bathing Every Day in the Year-The water va-
ries from emerald green to turquoise blue, with clean, firm
and gradually sloping beach. The winter temperature of the
water is 72 degrees. One large pool in Miami and four at
Miami Beach, for those who prefer still-water swimming and
diving.
Fishing Trio to Florida Keys-More than 600 varieties
of food and game fish are to be caught in waters about Miami
and southward among the keys. Thte kngs of the game fish.
tarpon, sailfish, merlin, king, tuna, dolphin, amberjack, sea
trout and barracuda, are here in large numbers. Veteran or
amateur is sure of a fine catch.
Cruising and Motor Boating-South of Miami lie hun-
dreds of miles of protected cruising waters, among coral island:;
of tropical verdure, coconut-palm-covered keys, over subma-
rine gardens of exquisite beauty, and in waters of ever-chang-
ing colors. For larger yachts it is only a short run of forty
miles across the Gulf Stream to the Bahamas.
Six Sporty Golf Courses-Three in Miami and three at
the beach. New 18-hole municipal course just opened. Hazards
of all courses scientifically arranged, and grass greens in per-
fect condition. It is always golfing weather in Miami.
Numerous Tennis Courts -Public courts in the city parks.
Private courts at several hotels. Also at. the beach. All
hard-surfaced and well kept.
Fine Po!o Fields- Fields at Miami Beach have extensive
stables in connection for housing ponies. Visiting players are
welcome. Match play almost every afternoon. Grandstand and
auto-parking place for spectators.
Wild Game Abundant-Within a few hours of Miamiare
large cleared areas abounding in quail. Out in the Everglades
are deer, wild turkey and other game.






























Where a Tropical Environment Gives Life Added Joys


Building Record--Miami building record shows steady ad-
vance. Figures for corporate limits of Miami only: Total
permits, 1918, $1,250,725; 1919, $3,160,525; 1920, $4,556,365;
1921, $5,415,800. First eight months, 1922, $3,323,700.
Shopping Facilities-Miami has numerous modern and
metropolitan stores. Fashion's newest modes, especially sum-
mer wear for men and women, get first showing here.
Speed Boat Regatta- Fastest speed boats in world com-
pete annually in Miami waters in the world-heralded midwin-
ter regatta.
Superb Motor Highways- In Dade County are 600 miles
of fine rock roads, oil-surfaced and in good repair, "The
Motorists' Paradise." Famous Dixie Highway ends at Miami.
The Ingraham Highway runs south to Florida City, thirty-three
miles, and then fifteen miles farther to Royal Palm State Park,
4,000 acres virgin glade and hammock, and then across the
Everglades almost to Cape Sable, which will ultimately be the
terminus. Tamiami Trail now extends twenty-eight miles west
of Miami through Florida Everglades.
Estates, Ranches and Plantations-The Miami zone has
some of the most elaborate estates in America, if not in the
world. Among them is the one of James Deering at Miami.
It is said to have cost more than $5,000,000 and is still un-
finished. Visitors admitted Sunday afternoons. Other noted
homes are those of William Jennings Bryan and Commodore
Arthur Curtis James. Curtiss-Bright Ranch, 14,000 acres, five
miles west, at Hialeah, produces wide variety of stock, soil
products and poultry. Open to public. Pennsylvania Sugar
Plantation, 150,000 acres, 3,500 now in cultivation, $1,250,000
sugar mill now in operation. In Everglades west of Hialeah.
Open to public.
Social Clubs and Trade Organizations-Miami's social
clubs extend cordial welcome to visiting members at their week-
ly luncheons, Rotary, Kiwanis and Civitan. Miami Real Estate
Board and Miami Ad Club have weekly luncheons, to which
visitors engaged in these lines are invited. Woman's Club has































Fourteen-Passenger Limousine de Luxe Aeroplane Operating
Between Miami, Cuba and the Bahamas


beautiful home on Flagler Street, with public library of 10,000
volumes. Miami Motor Club and Anglers' Club maintain club-
rooms.
Miami Chamber of Commerce-In Chamber of Com-
merce Building, 39 N. E. First Avenue. Has 750 members and
maintains information bureau and registry for tourists. Total
disbursements, 1921, $128,803.96. Special literature about
Miami and Dade County furnished upon request.
Financial Institutions--Miami has seven banks. Total
deposits, May, 1922, $20,008,765, more than double deposits
of four years ago.
45 Minutes to Foreign Countries-By aeroplane it is45
minutes to Bimini, Bahama Islands; three and one-half hours
to Havana, Cuba; two hours to Nassau; Palm Beach, up the
coast, is only 45 minutes.
General Information -Y. M. C. A. Building, value with
equipment, $300,000; Y. W. C. A. Building, value with equip-
ment, $250,000; churches, 48 denominations and organizations;
number hotels, 65; apartment houses, 143; number hospitals,
6; theatres, 6; number restaurants, 86; city curb market;
number autos, 10,000-one to every four inhabitants.
Historical- Miami was the site of an extensive Seminole
Indian village. Visited by Spanish explorers more than 300
years ago. Fort Dallas established at mouth of the Miami
River, 1836, during Seminole Indian war. Florida East Coast
Railway completed to Miami, April, 1896. Miami incorporated
as city July 28, 1896. Now fourth city in Florida.
Night Entertainment-One can spend a lively evening in
Miami. There is dancing in hotel ballrooms, or on wide veran-
das, or in open-air gardens. Several restaurants cater to late
supper parties. At Miami Beach there are cabarets at the
casinos. Within easy motoring distance are several famous inns.
Miami is the fastest growing and liveliest winter resort in
America.


\ \- r,




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - - mvs