• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Preface
 Frontispiece
 General statement
 Advantages of location
 Golf and tennis
 General improvements
 Homes and groves
 Mountain Lake's future
 Back Matter
 Back Cover














Mountain Lake (988)
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005256/00001
 Material Information
Title: Mountain Lake (988)
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Thomas Advertising Service
Manufacturer: Thomas Advertising Service
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6612
System ID: UF00005256:00001

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Preface
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    General statement
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Advantages of location
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Golf and tennis
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    General improvements
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Homes and groves
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Mountain Lake's future
        Page 15
    Back Matter
        Page 16
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text















This Booklet Briefly Describes
a Most Interesting Development at
Mountain Lake, Florida

Location-Center of the famous Lake Region of Polk County;
stations on both the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and the Seaboard
Air Line Railway; served by two hundred miles of new asphalt roads.
Natural Advantages-Highest elevation on the Florida penin-
sula; an exhilarating climate among the pines; a private park of
three thousand acres, with a beautiful lake as its central feature.
Improvements-Under the direction of a famous landscape archi-
tect. The handsomest Club House and the finest eighteen-hole golf
course in Florida; winter homes and groves.
Social Security-The first consideration.


MOUNTAIN LAKE CORPORATION
FREDERICK S. RUTH, President
LAKE WALES, FLORIDA


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MOUNTAIN LAKE
FLORIDA Page two









General Statement
THE Mountain Lake Corporation has had under development for nearly two
years a very beautiful tract of three thousand acres which has been land-
scaped as one harmonious whole by Mr. Frederick Law Olmsted. Mr.
Olmsted has spent many months on the work. He is well known throughout the
country, and his connection with this development is in itself sufficient to interest
those who know Biltmore, Forest Hills Gardens, or Roland Park.
The aim of the development is to supply for those of unquestioned social
position a home or a grove in a beautiful private park, where they may play golf
and tennis, drive, fish and hunt as gentlefolk should, without being crowded by
every tourist in the State. That the development will supply a particular demand
is made clear by a glance at the partial list of those who have already become
interested, which appears on the last page of this booklet. There are other names
of equal prominence which might have been included had space permitted.
Mr. Olmsted struck the keynote of the project in the concluding paragraph of
a newspaper interview published immediately following his first visit to the property:
"Other places have good citrus lands, though none have better; other places
have good climatic and health conditions, though none have better; other places
have the same opportunities for the growth of beautiful tropical vegetation; but
nowhere else in Florida is a systematic effort being made to conserve and develop
the landscape beauty of a large tract to the fullest extent in connection with its
economic development. It will create a district exceptional for its beauty as well as
for its productiveness, and, as such, exceptionally attractive to the seekers for winter
homes in Florida who want the very best."




MOUNTAIN LAKE
Page three FLORIDA















































Front view of Club House taken from ninth putting green, showing trap between green and Club lawn


MOUNTAIN LAKE
FLORIDA Page four









Advantages of Location
THE Mountain Lake estate is in the very center of the Florida peninsula, in
the heart of the beautiful Lake Region of Polk County, about sixty miles
due east of Tampa, and equidistant just far enough from the Ocean and the
Gulf to escape all raw weather without foregoing the advantages of their breezes,
which are broken by the pines and tempered by the warm waters of many lakes.
Here is to be found the maximum of warmth and the minimum of enervation.
Mountain Lake itself, five miles in circumference, is the central feature of the
property. Its water level is 143 feet above the sea. All its shores rise well above
the lake; on the east the rise is 181 feet to the summit of the hill known as "Iron
Mountain." This total elevation of 324 feet is not only the highest on the Florida
peninsula, but is the greatest elevation within sixty miles of the Atlantic Ocean
south of northern New Jersey.
In the very important detail of transportation Mountain Lake is most fortunately
situated, with stations on both the Atlantic Coast Line and the Seaboard Air Line.
Polk County is now spending $1,500,000 on a magnificent system of asphalt roads,
over two miles of which pass through the property. These roads are now being
constructed, under bond for completion by August 1, 1917, and will connect
Mountain Lake with every other good road in the State.
It is no reflection on the beauties and advantages of the east and west coasts of
Florida to say that the crest of the Lake Region is the ideal location for a winter
home. The fact that this section has not been more extensively exploited is due
entirely to the previous lack of adequate transportation facilities, which it will be
seen have now been supplied.





MOUNTAIN LAKE
FLORIDA


Page five















































A more intimate view of the Club House loggia, taken before the lawn of Bermuda grass was planted


MOUNTAIN LAKE
FLORIDA Page six









Golf and Tennis
A~ up-to-the-minute eighteen-hole golf course, with grass putting greens, has
been planned by Mr. Seth J. Raynor, the golf architect. Mr. Raynor is
favorably known to all Eastern golfers through his work on the National,
Sleepy Hollow, Piping Rock, and new Lido courses. In the planning of the
Mountain Lake course he has had the benefit of Mr. Olmsted's advice, and the
result is an exceptionally beautiful course.
The first nine holes have been completed and will be opened for play January
1, 1917. One of the best New York professionals has been engaged for the season,
and the service of the course will be complete in every respect.
Much has already been done on the second nine holes, and work will continue
throughout the winter, summer and fall so as to have them ready for play by the
following season.
The principal criticism of Florida courses is their flatness. An inspection of
the lithographed contour map in the back of this booklet will show that this objec-
tion can not apply to the Mountain Lake course, which has been so planned as to
derive the full benefit of its unusual topography. It will stand out as the only
course of its kind in Florida, and neither talent nor money will be spared to make
it the best in the South.
Two tennis courts have been constructed by the expert who prepared the courts
for the last international matches at the West Side Tennis Club, Forest Hills. He
is now a member of the Corporation's permanent organization. These courts were
built of a special material, mined on the property, and, in point of excellence, rank
with the best in California.





MOUNTAIN N AKE
Page seven FLORIDA


















































Top-Rear view of Club House, taken September 25th, 1916. Note the view across ninth fairgreen to the lake below
Bottom-Portion of fifth putting green, showing Club House in background, and, through the pines, windings of the lake




MOUNTAIN LAKE
FLORIDA Page eight


















































Top-Club tennis court on terrace above lake. Since photograph was taken a second court has been added to right
Bottom- First Mountain Lake orange grove, photographed when thirteen months old. These are now large trees


MOUNTAIN LAKE
Page nine FLORIDA



























































































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View of sixth fairway, taken from tee, showing hundred-yard carry across lake. Short tee for "duffers" at right


MOUNTAIN LAKE

FLORIDA


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General Improvements
ATOPOGRAPHIC survey of the entire tract was made by Messrs. Brown &
Clarkson, formerly of the United States Geological Survey, and the property
was then sub-divided by Mr. Olmsted. The lithographed map shows his
general plan, which will be revised from time to time as development proceeds.
Water, electricity and long-distance telephone service have all been supplied
in accordance with the best Northern standards. The water comes from a well
436 feet deep, and is remarkably soft and pure.
The whole 3,000-acre park has been enclosed, and entrance gates provided.
Miles of private driveways have already been constructed within the park bound-
aries, and the work of completing the system of roads, shown on the plan, will be
carried on without interruption.
The main building of the Club has been finished. It is a strikingly handsome
building, and contains every modern device for comfort and convenience. It is so
located as to include the most beautiful views of lake and hills. Play from the first
tee and on the last putting green may be watched from the porches.
A number of private winter homes have been built and will be occupied by
their owners during the season of 1916-17; other homes are now in course of
construction, and still others will be started during their owners' stay this winter.
One hundred and fifty acres of grove have been planted and sold. In addition
to being the very best that can be made commercially, these groves will contribute
much to the beauty of the property as a whole, for Mr. Olmsted's landscaping
extends to these also. Drives among the orange blossoms will be one of the
many delights of the place.





MOUNTAIN LAKE
Page eleven FLORIDA
















































Bungalow of Mr. Frank S. Washburn, showing Club lawn of Bermuda grass and Club House in background


MOUNTAIN 1 LAKE
FLORIDA Page twelve








Homes and Groves


THE Mountain Lake homes vary in style from simple but artistic bungalows
to the more pretentious houses. All property is subjected to rigid restrictions,
including a provision that no building or other structure shall be erected
except according to plans (including exterior color scheme, grading and planting)
approved by the Corporation. An equitable maintenance tax has been provided,
thus assuring the future upkeep of the property.
Home sites range in size from one acre to ten, and in character they vary from
lake fronts to locations on the slopes and crests of the hills, nearly 200 feet above
the lake. Nowhere else in Florida can any such choice be had.
There are orange and grapefruit groves for those who want them, in units of
approximately ten acres. Citrus fruit culture in Florida has reached its highest
development in Polk County, due primarily to favorable soil and climatic conditions.
The exceptional elevation of the Mountain Lake tract affords immunity from cold
which can not be secured 100 miles farther south.
The 2,000 acres set aside for groves will constitute the largest single grove in
Florida. These are sold under a contract calling for their care by the Corporation
for five years from the date of planting, thus assuring the same excellent care for
all. The Corporation will continue the management from year to year if desired.
The planting and care of the groves are under the direct supervision of Messrs.
M. E. Gillett & Son, of Tampa, who are well known wherever the citrus industry
has attained importance. These gentlemen occupy the same eminence in their
profession as Mr. Olmsted occupies in his. The groves will be planted only with
the very best trees produced in their famous Buckeye Nurseries.





MOUNTAIN LAKE
Page thirteen FLORIDA

































































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A bit of lake shore scenery. Ground cover of palmetto and wild flowers, with fringe of young pines


MOUNTAIN LAKE
FLORIDA Page fourteen








Mountain Lake's Future


HE combination of the very best in homes with the very best in groves,
worked out by Mr. Olmsted, will furnish a landscape such as can not be seen
east of California; no single development of equal magnitude is known even
out in that distant country.
Photographs reproduced in this booklet are wholly inadequate to portray the
natural beauties of the country, and are intended merely to furnish some slight idea
as to the progress of development.
Completion of the eighteen-hole golf course will attract the best golfers, but the
restrictions surrounding the golf privilege preclude the possibility of the course
ever becoming congested. It is intended for gentlemen golfers.
Because of the necessity for preserving the social balance, the Corporation is
doing no advertising and no soliciting by mail. In deciding whether or not to
invite one to visit the property, one's social status is the first consideration. If found
not in keeping with those already interested, the name is dropped. The colony will
be exclusive without being snobbish.
Both the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and the Seaboard Air Line Railway are
extending their lines. It will soon be possible for residents of Mountain Lake to
visit the resorts of the East and West Coasts, and share in the social life there, with
as little inconvenience as is experienced on a trip from Tuxedo to New York.
In short, the plan provides a winter home among the most delightful surround-
ings; absolute relief from all care and responsibility for its upkeep; only the best
of neighbors; a most remarkable climate, and every facility for enjoying with these
features the best of the out-of-doors.





MOUNTAIN LAKE
Page fifteen FLORIDA















Partial List of Those

Who Have Already Become Interested


HENRY ALLSOPP, South Orange, N. J.
FREDERICK KINGSBURY BULL, New York, N. Y.
FREDERICK DARLINGTON, Great Barrington, Mass.
HENRY LAY DUER, Baltimore, Maryland
GLADSTONE FESSENDEN, Philadelphia, Pa.
M. E. GILLETT, Tampa, Florida
HERBERT E. GOODMAN, Chicago, Ill.
AUGUST HECKSCHER, Huntington, L. I.
J. ALBERT HUGHES, Baltimore, Maryland
OLIVER GOULD JENNINGS, Fairfield, Conn.
ARTHUR R. KIMBALL, Waterbury, Conn.
FREDERICK J. KINGSBURY, New Haven, Conn.


STEPHEN LINES, Bolton Landing, N. Y.
WALTER B. MANNY, Larchmont, N. Y.
H. PERRY MILLS, Greenwich, Conn.
JAMES MITCHELL, New York, N. Y.
STUART OLIVIER, Baltimore, Maryland
THEODORE W. ROBINSON, Chicago, Ill.
ELMER A. SPERRY, New York, N. Y.
DR. C. J. SWAN, Chicago, Ill.
E. C. STUART, Bartow, Florida
GEORGE W. WALSH, Chicago, Ill.
FRANK S. WASHBURN, Rye, N. Y.
EDWARD WOODMAN, Portland, Maine


MOUNTAIN LAKE
FLORIDA


Page sixteen




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