• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 A. Apple pie
 Nursery rhymes
 The railway A.B.C.
 Childhood's happy hours
 Spine






Title: Aunt Louisa's London picture book : comprising, A. Apple Pie, Nursery Rhymes, The Railway A. B. C., Childhood's happy hours
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005251/00001
 Material Information
Title: Aunt Louisa's London picture book : comprising, A. Apple Pie, Nursery Rhymes, The Railway A. B. C., Childhood's happy hours
Series Title: Aunt Louisa's London picture book : comprising, A. Apple Pie, Nursery Rhymes, The Railway A. B. C., Childhood's happy hours
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Valentine, L.
Publisher: Frederick Warne and Co.
Scribner, Welford, and Co.
Place of Publication: London
New York
Manufacturer: Kronheim and Ebans
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00005251
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6599
ltuf - ALG2938
oclc - 20697156
alephbibnum - 002222692

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Preface
        Page 1
    A. Apple pie
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Nursery rhymes
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    The railway A.B.C.
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Childhood's happy hours
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Spine
        Spine
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Aruv#e&si ard Co,






AUNT LOUISA'S




LONDON PICfTURE BOOK.

COMPRISING


A. Apple Pie.

Nursery Rhymes.

WITH

TWENTY-FOUR PAGES


The Railway A.B.C.

Childhood's Happy Hours.


OF ILLUSTRATIONS,


1ri1te6 in Qttoronnr~ bu rtim anbans


LONDON:
FREDERICK WARNE AND
BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN
NEW YORK: SCRIBNER, WELFORD AND CO.


C O.








I









17E find within this pretty Book

Old friends with faces new;

A. APPLE PIE, of old renown,

Of NURSERY RHYMES a few;

A bright new RAILWAY, like the one

That rushes up and down,

And carries nearly every day

Our dear Papa to town.

How beautiful the Pictures are!

Come, let us at them look:

Of all my Toys I like the best

Kind AUNT LOUISA'S PICTURE BOOK.



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A. APPLE PIE.







Av was
swee


an Apple


Pie,


juicy


For very good


treat.

is young
pie,


children


Bertie,


a very


who


great


bit at the


And


took


care


to do it when no one


was by.


stands


for Charlie,


the others,


who


cut for


And handed it round to his sisters and
brothers.


Danced
Pie,


so gaily


before


the great


And showed
of her


her delight by
eye.


the glance


and


B


c


D










































































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is Eating her Pie, with the plate
on her knees,


Such


a good
please.


little girl, and so easy to


Fought
sweetest


for this
of Pies,


largest


With another rude boy nearly double
his size.


Got at the Pie, and
away,


then bore it


To be laid on the shelf and be eaten
next day.


Hid the great Pie under Grand-
mamma's table,


And thought that to find it she would
not be able.


E


F


and


H























































































































Kronheim and Co.,


London.







i Jumped twenty times with a
full ofjoy,
So eager to taste it was this I
boy.

1K Kept it, and thought that
looked very grand,


As she sat by its side
her hand.


with a rod


Longed
wanted


for the
it soon,


Pie,


and she


For her plate was quite
so was her spoon.


M


For


Mourned; for Mamma
sent him to bed,


ready,


and


had just


tasks left undone, and for lessons.
unsaid.


face


little


she


L


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Kronkeim and Co., LowdJn.


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Nodded her head when she stood
on the chair,


And shook all the curls of her pretty
brown hair.


O Opened the Pie,
was in it,


just


to see what


lifted the
a minute.


crust


up


in less than


Peeped at the
thought very


So she asked her
large slice.


Pie,
nice,
Papa


which


she


for a very


Quaked, for he thought
looked rather small,


he feared there
enough for them


that it


might not
all.


be


N


And


P


Q


And
























































































































London.


FO'rheim ,and Co.,







Ran


for a knife, as


to try


he wanted


How


much
Apple


he could
Pie.


eat of this large


Stood by the
the crust,


Table and


picked


You'll


not be


so sly


or so greedy,


trust.


Took up with
a gift,


pleasure so splendid


But found i
to lift.


Lt too hot and


Viewed the
its figure,


big Pie


too heavy


and admired


For Grandmamma's spectacles made it
look bigger.


R


S


at


T


I


V






w


Wished for some more,


but was


ready to cry
When she heard that the servants had
finished the Pie.


x


Expected his
would grieve,


dear


little


sister


So he brought
mind to


Y


her some pudding,
relieve.


her


Yielded the point, and was cheer-
ful about it,


Saying,
all


z


"If the Pie's gone, we must
do without it."


Zealously
cheer,


tried


little


Winnie


to


Like


a good
sincere.


elder


sister, so


kind and























NURSERY RHYMES.


I






L ITTLE Polly Flinders
Sate among the cinders,
Warming her pretty little toes!
Her mother came and caught her,
And scolded her little daughter
For spoiling her nice new clothes.



OLD woman, old woman, old woman, quoth I,
O whither, O whither, O whither, so high
To sweep the cobwebs off the sky.
Shall I go with you? Ay, by-and-by.



H OT Cross Buns!
Hot Cross Buns!
One a penny, two a penny, Hot Cross Buns.
Hot Cross Buns!
Hot Cross Buns!
If you have no daughters, give them to your sons.


IS John Smith within? Yes, that he is.
Can he set a shoe ? Ay, marry, two;
Here a nail, there a nail, tick, tack, too.





















































































































Aru I M I U L r n adU. .







BA-A, ba-a, black sheep, have you any wool?
Yes, sir; yes, sir, three bags full;
One for my master, one for my dame,
And one for the little boy that lives in our lane.



D ING, dong, bell; Pussy's in the well.
Who put her in? Little Tommy Green.
Who pulled her out? Little Tommy Trout.
Oh! what a naughty boy was that,
To drown poor little Pussy Cat!



JACK and Jill went up the hill,
To fetch a pail of water;
Jack fell down and broke his crown,
And Jill came tumbling after.



IR IDE a Cock-horse to Banbury Cross
To see a fine lady ride on a white horse;
Rings on her fingers, and bells on her toes,
She shall have music wherever she goes.
























































































































rmlnh*om ard Co.,


-!


Lonaon.







WHERE are you going to, my pretty maid?
I'm going a milking, Sir, she said.
May I go with you, my pretty maid?
You're kindly welcome, Sir, she said.



LITTLE Jack Horner sat in the corner,
Eating a Christmas pie;
He put in his thumb and he took out a plum,
And said, "What a good boy am I!"



LITTLE Tommy Tucker sings for his supper;
What shall he eat? white bread and butter.
How shall he cut it without e'er a knife ?
How will he marry without e'er a wife ?



SING a Song of Sixpence, a pocket full of rye,
Four-and-twenty blackbirds baked in a pie,
When the pie was opened the birds began to sing,
Was not that a dainty dish to set before the King ?































































































































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Lrronheim and Co.,


London.







M ARY had a pretty bird,
With feathers bright and yellow,
Slender legs-upon my word,
He was a pretty fellow.
The sweetest notes he always sung,
Which much delighted Mary;
And near the cage she'd ever sit
To hear her own Canary.


M MULTIPLICATION is vexation,
Division is as bad;
The Rule of Three doth puzzle me,
And Practice drives me mad.


WHEN little Fred went to bed,
He always said his prayers;
He kissed mamma and then papa,
And straightway went upstairs.


P LUM pudding hot, plum pudding cold,
Plum pudding in the pot, nine days old;
Some like it hot, some like it cold,
Some like it in the pot nine days old.






































































































Kronheins and Co., Ldomn.







TOM, Tom, the Piper's son,
He learned to play when he was young,
But the only tune that he could play
Was "Over the hills and far away."

Now Tom with his pipe made such a noise,
That he pleased both the girls and boys;
And they all stopped to hear him play
" Over the hills and far away."

Tom with his pipe did play with such skill,
That those who heard him could never keep still;
Whenever they heard him they began to dance,
Even pigs on their hind legs would after him prance.





W ILLY, boy, Willy, boy, where are you going?
I will go with you, if I may.
I am going to the meadows to see them mowing,
I am going to see them make the hay.








































































































Londen,







LITTLE Bo-peep has lost her sheep,
And cannot tell where to find them;
Leave them alone, and they'll come home,
And bring their tails behind them.

GOOSEY, Goosey, Gander, whither shall I wander?
Up stairs and down stairs and in my Lady's chamber,
There I met an old man who would not say his prayers,
I took him by the left leg and threw him down stairs.


THERE was a jolly Miller,
Lived on the River Dee;
He worked and sung from morn till night,
No lark so blithe as he.
And this the burden of his song
For ever used to be,
"I care for nobody-no, not I,
Since nobody cares for me."

I HAD a little Pony,
His name was Dapple Gray,
I lent him to a lady,
To ride a mile away;
She whipped him, she slashed him,
She rode him through the mire,
I would not lend my pony now
For all the lady's hire.














THE RAILWAY A.B.C.






Sis the Arch; underneath are the
rails,


carry
and


the passengers,
mails.


baggage,


is the Bell,
and clear,


which


rings


loudly


And tells that the train which we wait
for is near.


is the Carriage,
must stand


where


William


With your coat
bag in his


on his
hand.


arm and your


the Driver,


just


starting


train,


He cares not for cold, nor for
nor for rain.


wind,


To


B


C


D


is


the





































































































































































































Xroaheim and Co.


L






is the
machil


So prettily
green.


E


that

with


wondrous


scarlet


and


is the Fire;
stoker,


just


look


at the


He is stirring the coals
iron poker.


with a


long


is the
blue,


Guard,


all in silver


Telling
is


his mate
due.


that the


next


train


is the Horse-box,


a neat


little


room,


Where the
Harry


pony may
his groom.


travel


with


Engine,
ie
painted


F


G


and


H































































































































ronmein and Co.,


Inadoo.






is the Iron
made,


And


of which


rails


are


J is the Junction where two lines
are laid.


is the Key,
door


which


fastens


Whel


n the carriage is fu
not hold one more.


ill, and will


is the Lamp,
will light,


which


the porter


we pass through a tunnel or travel
at night.


the Mails
land,


from


all parts


To the General Post in St. Martin's-le-
Grand.


I


K


the


L


If


M


are
the


of































































































































Kruiteisas ua C.,


London.































































































































a.o a LonCdoo






is the News-boy, who cries "Here
you are!


"Punch, Times, Daily
Standard, and Star."


Telegraph,


O are Officials, in uniform coats,


With pencils, and paper
take notes.


on which they


is the Platform at
station,


Charing


Cross


Which


has gained


great


for the Builder
If


reputation.


is the Queen, just come out of the
train,


her carriage will take
Windsor again.


her to


N


P


Q


a


And






















































































































rakwim aandd F .


jmnomW.






RLD are the Rails which the workmen
are laying;
They labour all day, and have no time
for playing.


s


And

T


is the Steam which comes out of
the funnel,


gets into our eyes when we
through a tunnel.


go


is the Tunnel which runs through
the hill,


And is hollowed and
wonderful skill.


built


with most


is the
make,


Uproar


the boys


When they hear the trains rattle, and
see the arch shake.


U


like


to


0


















































































































rronbeim and Co.






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is the Viaduct,
pains,


built


with


great


To carry the
the train


Railway which


carries


is the Watchman, with
his hand,


flags


in


ten times a day at the crossing
must stand.


is the Excursion,
which comes,


from


Brighton


With passengers,
and drums.


soldiers,


and rifles,


is the Yeoman, just come up from
Kent,


He farms his own land,
pays rent.


and he never


V


Who


x


Y


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CHILDHOOD'S


HAPPY


HOURS.


II






THE GENERAL'S PROGRESS.


T HE cocked hat! and cravat! and what more must
we have ?
The cock-horse and the jacket! with sword to look brave,
The gaiters and gloves, and a trumpet for Lucy!
And now we'll dress up, and mount General Godfrey.
You go first, Lucy dear! but pray don't march too fast,
And blow on your trumpet a fine noisy long blast!
Harry push! but don't lean on the cock-horse at all!
For fear Godfrey should get a most terrible fall.
We'll send in a card, on a waiter, by Power,
"General Pavenham, C.B., of Pavenham Tower,"
And oh dear, it will be such surprise and such fun
When Mamma sees arriving her own little son.










































































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THE GENERAL'S PROGRESS.


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THE DAISY CHAIN.


Y OUR behaviour, Miss Pussy, is much to be
blamed,
Though I see by your face you're not one bit ashamed.
Don't you know, my dear Pussy, you've broken my
chain ?
We must gather more daisies to mend it again.
Pussy now ought to say, (if a poor cat could speak,)
"I had no thought of harm in my frolicsome freak,
You saw Master Harry (though I can't tell you why)
Put his arms for last leap most uncommonly high,
So I stumbled, and shattered the chain you'd begun,
And your pardon I beg for the mischief I've done."
Well, Puss, you're forgiven! though you can't make
amends
By getting fresh daisies to help your four friends.




































































































































































































THE DAISY CHAIN.


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THE NOAH'S ARK.


T CAN'T call you baby, any more, little man,
Growing taller and wiser as fast as you can,
Why, before long you will talk as clearly as we,
And be too heavy to stand on old Sissy's knee.
When Mamma comes to-morrow you'll say your new
words,
And show how you can crumble bread small for the
birds.
Now we'll go through the lessons I've taught you,
dear thing.
What do my little birds do? they "hop" and they "sing."
Yes, and lambs, when the poor things have lost their
Mamma,
Droop their tails, and run bleating out sadly "Baa Baa."
The gentle old white cow bellows slowly "Moo Moo"
Well, and what does the cock say ? "Tock a loo loo."















































































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FEEDING THE PONY.


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FEEDING THE PONY.


SATHER grass, little Lucy, with sweet clover
leaves,

How I wish we might take some ripe ears from the
sheaves!
Shaggy Pat is of excellent ponies the best,
He deserves to be well-fed and kindly caressed,
He has fetched second post, and brought dear Harry
home,
Too fast, (fine old fellow,) I see by that foam.
Now Harry, hold Godfrey-grasp him firm by his band,
And he also shall ride, while I hold his small hand.
Don't be frightened, my pretty; there's nothing to mind,
Brother loves you too much to be ever unkind;
Stroke the good pony's neck, and say "Nice old gee gee,"
For going so nicely with precious Wee wee.


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GATHERING WATER-CRESSES.


T HINK what you're about, Harry! once on that
stone
Remember (except for the bough) you're alone;
And if you fall in, though with fright you may shout,
What is most to the point, brother, who'll pull you out?
There! the stone shook this minute, oh! Harry, take care!
I'm quite frightened to see you stand balancing there,
And you know, if we get into mischief to-day,
They'll not venture to trust us here next holiday.
Now the cresses you safely can reach, you must pick,
And so drive them across with the hook of your stick.
With thin bread and butter, they'll be so nice at tea
For you, Nurse and Lucy, Mamma, Godfrey, and me.






































































































./
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BUILDING MOSS HOUSES.


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BUILDING MOSS HOUSES.



W E like best building moss-houses under the tree,
Where Papa too built his, with his sister, Aunt
Leigh ;
And to-day we have made one with logs, and old bricks,
Which we covered with moss, when we'd roofed it with
sticks.
Harry never minds climbing that troublesome wall,
Which I don't like getting over for fear I should fall;
So he always picks faggots for Lucy and me,
And we all are as happy as happy can be.
We can't trust housebuilding to a small baby-boy,
So we bring out for Godfrey a ball or some toy.
(Which to-day we forgot) so we've lent him some cones,
And he's just as well pleased as with moss, twigs and
stones.









































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