Miami By the Sea : The Land of Palms and Sunshine (1106)
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005231/00001
 Material Information
Title: Miami By the Sea : The Land of Palms and Sunshine (1106)
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Miami, Florida Chamber of Commerce
Place of Publication: Miami, FL
Manufacturer: The Record Company
Publication Date: 1921
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6556
System ID: UF00005231:00001

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C 1 1l1 is a city of hot at , vtidi' / i /
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ii it. loher tast n 'i' ii f
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*ills,'. t ion, :l mod n ( i le n a1eVd alrtrnelh'.

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",s. lo/ i /ti the st .eni re t .t io ot h <
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MIAMI-BY-ii III i'i Ft
N\" \ u \ ++,v,{roinec and industry have been wise! .........
' ' titli sentiment arid recreation Productive farms .
' ; feed hIe nati dot fin I .;' -. ;he
.. * . M^ iaini and futrnish a * 1 . 1... . I ... . .. i -y ,
that 1er1e i something in this realm of vital consi
qllene than7 vacationtig.
A foundation o( ' r ith a world-famed atmosphere
of optiisii hai i iven i of 'I .... ii Sea an unwaii
aii, 't 7 proid faitii in her own futurei Shie is ever going
, . and her people know her course can never change. Her
wonderu I a "e . , i a 117atter of , . .... Iiio + lo come.
and in , *s nio'' ..-tof ioom for i .... oit. Nor
w ill ' ever roi if its nati ,e '., '
sc'eni, manifest everywhere, are as precious ..


Su o A. on

Photographs from 1 IIisua]ize th ruth of the above o
extent thai invesli ei yll 1i1h 1 disclose 1
' iore, tIe vast , i il " |inoiama is spread out as
uipon " ";-" T " tie ' ' <. it ( lie b utifil ' . . ..
'f .' ufr senhc invlstue an i T i for
facilities, S nu gl y land -locked , it i s ' . ..
ocean swells and is capable of evei more Imi vatii al


errnt., ;s -occasion requires,
No stid of ihe bau , Miami Beach iuri she
cani be done wilh what, was onte t imet
Appreciating the vale of thse beariih
ixround and| as a supphlemenary home vs
Sdevelo~pnent oft that section


water front. On the ocean
s unhaken proof of what
sirip of incultivated sand,
section a5 an r + ... ~r '-l *
+uhurh, .Miami
i NoI. in the


guarded.


In asset for a resort city such as Miamii From
tie snow flies, to Miami as the airplanes tlis, is


>n short hours; and the journey by rail, in trains de luxe,
nation's metropolis to the Magic i ,, of *'..* requires
-one hours.
likes to call itself the "Land of Palms and " ' * +
is 1 'Itrue. The climate is that of tile
*one. Miami ad . n" ,rtry form a haven ol
Itd birds 17 d almy . . . it is winter elsewhere
Xmr in Miami. liegestra1ge whims of weather, which
e other erritories, have , . ' ,t ni by; and when
If snow cover oilIer 1ands . - grip sections lut
Iet orth, flowers bloom and birds .', . in Miami. A1 l
m Iecemier to Marchl. year Ii and year out, Miami's
itr registers the sort of uva1ying climatic joy tliat mike
lit aid the sport suit an . . uniform of the citi .
ill find us a hippy, enthusiastic, we i ,i' s hit
admit, of {iir '' of spotless beauty , , ' - * xa,


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it 1meni~
F.' ii Va. -I ~PORT
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dirous attractive resort feItres+ with ibs and
coulrses, ' onlndS, "' " ' r . ocean drives,
. li' x' and thhat is stroi i suggcs1
, the world' bes knownf * , *' '" this is con�
nected with the "i' of Miami l 1 ' Cusiway,
the wonder and .! adtmiration of every visitor. From snow"
white minsdios in luxuriant gar1 ti tie smaller but
,i m, , and artistic I ' i housing facilities
1 ,. . it one of tie city' s siow i Parts of it,
in the . , ke on llie colorful spirt oft for the !
leads . . * . " picturesque riverlet that winds
throuiih a I'uigle of angroes, witi lagoons here and
there, ancehorage foi wdter craft+ anti unique and ar+
tistic private docks disinctii e eFIarI.
,tl 1 ', ,1 - k!. , X - . ,.' '.. CA ' t* . uA Y

1here remained hnll one i ast tiuimph of engineering to ink the
luacithiih Miamii Alays aicessibl i a history e wooden }ridge
....on i I * tie world -or er, te civic althorio
ties tiat seei leid betioid realzat io-
a garrt cauiwiiy to spaI t ,, Ba and giiei still , i and
more adequate ac'iess to lieh ocea. ihat dieai nas been realized
' ration: there ias ' I " -' ,
Hlanked hy palms ' , ' ,.'
- ' walk- widilF atutori lei 1 1conorse,
separate thoroughfare for tracks, ;rv latest type of electri-
fieP t Ant the cai1seay is an l to tfh( '.
It is eonstrurted on conIrete arches at its terminals, through i . I
lhe tide etrre n+ rna y at w ilL. us i
the harbtoi, and under these great a+rches+ ',


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x ntaaetl admitted I ....... � .. o ,''rit the
auewa is three- and I ' r. and
Sa a nonumet t he enterprise, . ', city
y ti made A stream of traffic
t i Ie a s e " i le
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Sfor facing
Artists say that the
, of brush or., ;,,- -
ol shades of green and
th}e ch side rainbow tints
* in t}is immense nat urial
cvils are visible against the
cO Ses OB an~d thle iioon


iiay is
d over it all
2 (ii music Ir


Ii Iora;^
llie dis~i


4t}c tulf 5i]trI , laves
the Im-n " a i ioiil lif
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ideedl, 1d imrtl' and


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i n to this.
ii , of dark
m-sraced shore ,.*

of a charming city.
hones, and rich in
dreamy reahm of
the city, the bay-


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now under way are completed, passenger and freight lines to New
York City and other Northern ports, already in contemplation, will
be in operation.
The importance of these harbor measures cannot be overestimated,
for they are a living part of the still greater Miami that is to be.
More than $2,000,000 was expended to complete this task, in which
City and Government affiliated. It means that ocean liners can dock
in Miami harbor and that cargoes from far ports will reach the big
municipal pier, now a hive of shipping activity. No South Atlantic
port can lay claim to greater prestige from this on. Oceanward, the
tugged stone jetties, one thousand feet apart, represent the "Open
Door" to trade that travels on the seas. Again the symbol of Wel-
come is put in imperishable form.
MIAMI'S UNIQUE LOCATION
There is climatic distinction in being "the most southern city on
the mainland of the United States," and Miami can, of course, lay
claim to this. The subtropical zone is the zone of what is truly
"perpetual sunshine." Florida is but sixty miles wide, as a penin-
sula, due east and west, at this point. That lazy, warmth-bringing
old friend of ours, the Gulf Stream, passes within three and a half
miles of the Miami shore. If space permitted, we would gladly quote
a special weather report made for Miami by the United States
Weather Bureau. It is most flattering. Excessive heat is not known,
and the soft rains-only when Nature demands them-generally
occur at night, sweetening the air, refreshing the tropic verdure,
bringing new life to flowers and brighter sunshine on the morrow.
Nights at Miami are wine-sweet as to air and comfortably cool.
And the moonlight nights in Miami-artists have tried in vain
to picture their rare beauty and poets exhaust their superlatives in
describing the matchless nocturnal mellowness. The moonlight, the
palms, and Biscayne Bay-a trinity which makes Miami nights irre-
sistibly fascinating.
Facts about climate? Yes, you will be interested in knowing that
the annual mean temperature is 75 degrees, with the average for
the summer months 81.2, and for the winter 68.6 degrees. It has been
officially reckoned that there are only an average of eleven days in
the year when the temperature reaches 90 or above. What might
be called the "rainy season" comes between May and October. "The
sun seems to be ALWAYS shining," is a common expression and one
that is almost literally true. It is a city of white lawn dresses, bare-
headed children, sport clothes, and plans for pleasure that can be
made far in advance, certain of weather conditions that permit. It
is Summerland, Tropic-Land, when the snow is flying elsewhere.
Miami is far-famed for the luxuriant growth of her royal palms and
her fruitful coconut palms-they are everywhere, and in fine condi-
tion. These two characteristically tropic trees thrive with equal
success in no other part of the United States.


#7


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Yet the distance from Jacksonville is but 366 miles. Topographi-
cally, Miami is situated in a strategic position. The city stands be-
tween the Atlantic Ocean and a flowering world of rich land, at the
mouth of the Miami River. Its gay architecture is reflected in the
calm waters of Biscayne Bay, which runs at its feet, a living stream
of boat traffic. The unequalled railroad systems that connect it with
the transportation arteries of the North, and the harbor which
means passenger and cargo vessels from all ports, are now well
known. Miami, a bright pendant at the extremity of the palm-
shaded Dixie Highway, is the automobilist's ultimate Mecca. Truly,
the trip down the East Coast of Florida over the Dixie Highway by
motor is the most beautiful automobile trip in America. And soon
-almost before we know it-that shining path of marl and Ever-
glades limestone, the strangest and most picturesque boulevard ever
known, the soon-to-be-famous Tamiami Trail, will connect Miami
with the West Coast, opening up a new wonderland for the auto-
mobile tourist. Miami is the Easy-to-Reach City-by motor, by
rail, by water, by air. Henry M. Flagler, the founder of this Won-
der City, twenty-five years ago, when all Florida was in an embryo
of development, shrewdly read the story of that future day, when
Miami would be a synonym for supremacy, and showered upon it
the wisdom, the resources, the infinite trust that was characteristic
of his great gift as an empire-builder.
MIAMI'S IMPRESSIVE GROWTH
According to the record of the Census Bureau, Miami is "the
fastest-growing city in the United States," and actual figures show
it. Think of an increase in population of 440 per cent in ten years!
More than 80,000 people represent the fixed winter population. No
less than 200,000 tourists visit Miami in a season-and this esti-
mate is conservative. Yet there is no sense of congestion-the city
is not crowded. A live Chamber of Commerce, splendid Rotary,
Kiwanis and Civitan Clubs, an active wide-awake Real Estate Board,
progressive and alert Advertising and Motor Clubs, and an efficient
Hotel Men's Association, are all factors that have contributed to
this phenomenal growth, and the working slogan now is "100,000
population by 1925."
MIAMI, THE CITY OF HIGHWAYS
It is trite to say that "all roads lead to Miami," but no other
phrase describes the accessibility of the city. Miami has 55 miles
of paved streets within its own boundaries; about 43 miles of
oiled macadam, and 600 miles of superb rock-surfaced, oil-coated
motor boulevards radiating in every direction. It is becoming a
national event to motor down the Dixie Highway from Jacksonville
to Miami; indeed, there is no similarly beautiful drive in this coun-
try. Three hundred and seventy-eight miles of palms and flowers
and intermittent glimpses of majestic rivers-all pass in gorgeous


HOME OF WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN ON
BISCAYNE BAY RESIDENCE OF THOSE. J. PANCOAST, MIAMI BEACH JAMES H. SNOWDEN RESIDENCE, MIAMI BEACH


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review visible from a perfect roadbed and through an embroidered
screen of orange blossoms and tropic foliage. Or, if preferred, the
magnificent driveway along the Atlantic Ocean Beach southward
from Palm Beach, a twenty-five mile journey, restful, majestic and
soul-inspiring. The automobile license numbers on the steady
stream of cars that find their way into Miami each season tell a
convincing story of why all roads lead to Miami-every State in
the Union is represented.
Southward from the Magic City there are still roads that lure the
traveler, and when tested offer perfect going, for they are kept in
superb condition. The splendid Ingraham Highway leads to Royal
Palm Park, a 4,000-acre State plant, game, fish and bird sanctuary,
with its deep jungles and its beautiful display of the flora and
fauna of tropical Florida. There are numberless other roads which
lead to picturesque objectives, orange and grapefruit groves, quaint
Indian camps, and other places of equal interest. Villa Vizcaya,
the $5,000,000 palace and tropical gardens of James Deering; the
Arthur Curtis James estate, Villa Serena, the home of William
Jennings Bryan, and the beautiful estates about Coconut Grove
along Bay Biscayne are also attractive points for visits. The
Tamiami Trail, along the crystal-clear canal, and the magic of the
Everglades Hammock, to add to the unusualness of the scene, also
invite the motorist.
MIAMI A RAILWAY CENTER
Romance, rather than commercialism, is identified with the Flor-
ida East Coast Railway. The very environment of its trackage and
the mission it performs is one of travel-de-luxe idealism. There
are many special-schedule trains, and they represent the highest
type of modernized travel. The majority of these trains are made
up of through sleepers, which means that there is no change, no
inconvenient delays or detours. A forty-one-hour connection with
New York is one of the long-established features, and fast trains
from Chicago, and intermediate points, connecting with all lines
from the West and North, minimize the physical effort of touring.
It is said that these luxuriant, few-stop trains are the equivalent,
in the comfort and service they render, of any well-equipped hotel.
That Miami is the very crux of railroad operations is evidenced
by the fact that the Florida East Coast Railway has its shop yards


tAe


-Se a


in the city. Miami is really the starting-place of the wonderful
Oversea Railway route to Key West, one of the most novel and scen-
ically individual trips in the history of railroading.
MIAMI AS HOST TO THE TOURIST
Through her efficient Chamber of Commerce, Miami offers to
visitors every courtesy, every convenience. Correspondence with
the Secretary brings reassuring information, literature, complete
lists of apartments, hotels, cottages and the prices for which ac-
commodations may be obtained. In Miami there is room for all
who seek to tarry there, and there are accommodations of every
sort, to fit in with the specific needs, desires and pocketbooks of
the visitors. The city has attracted hotel men of sterling qualities
and long experience and each season finds new structures, com-
modious in size, pretentious in appearance, and beautifully de-
signed inside to provide maximum comfort, luxury and pleasurable
entertainment. During the summer more than a score of new ho-
tels and apartment houses have been erected. Each building in its
architectural design is suited to the tropical character of the city.
Nowhere in any part of the country will be found finer places of
their kind, and the apartments, fully furnished, are so many
charming homes, ready for occupancy. For those who desire bun-
galows, cottages, or more pretentious dwellings, these are to be
found everywhere for rent by the season, or for sale, to those who
would become winter residents. The question of setting the hotel
or home table in Miami has been settled by neighboring truck
farms. Tropic fruits and summer vegetables are, of course, in
season in the winter. And in the matter of prices the Hotel Men's
Association have announced their tariffs will be harmonized to cor-
respond with the downward trend of prices in all lines.
MIAMI GOES A-SHOPPING
What of the shopping and business section of Miami? The well-
stocked stores are such as would do credit to a city many times
larger, many years older. It is a well-known fact that in wearing
apparel Miami sets the fashion six months ahead, for her winter
raiment is the social vogue of the summer to come in the North.
Restaurants there are of every variety from the modest cafeteria
to the commodious "eating palaces" where one dances as one dines.
Delightful little tea rooms, sea-food emporiums, hotel restaurants,


MIAMI COUNTRY CLUB AND GOLF LINKS


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H I II I 0' 100'd f017 tIc j fit
t 1 lurd hc nccdC I H
t~ MillIli 1717'.,17A1 rafitS .t17H 1717. III Iy
o I Ii 11717 nd at any hale IS p111717,11110

ho it% * * in Scull cm lCd
o onsider
-'I ppbc '1 here arc the lInt )d
o It'., Idihenl rk 151 11111 1
d finns. Fuel ci
and spel IASi tank ~c
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I ~ar~es and auton H ole r
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ease ' ; . r a go
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chilren. t'her
[nstitutions of i
Miami has her Public
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THE ROMAN POOLS AT THE CASINO ST. JOHN, MIAMI BEACH


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center of Miami. Description: Eighteen holes, par 72, grass
green; length of each hole-No. 1, 450; No. 2, 359; No. 3, 335; No.
4, 368; No. 5, 335; No. 6, 332; No. 7, 453; No. 8, 140; No. 9, 428;
No. 10, 410; No. 11, 175; No. 12, 387; No. 13, 358; No. 14, 389;
No. 15, 210; No. 16, 446; No. 17, 252; No. 18, 517; Secretary, Dan
P. Healy; Professional, Chas. Thom; rates-$2.00 per day, $10.50
per week, $35.00 per month, $50.00 per annum; located one mile
from city, with autobus transportation.
Schedule of tournaments:
ANNUAL MIDWINTER TOURNAMENT-JANUARY 23RD TO 27TH.
Four Sixteens-Prizes to winner and runner-up in each division.
Final sixteen to be 36 holes.
CHAMPIONSHIP OF MIAMI-FEBRUARY 13TH TO 17TH.
Six Sixteens-Prizes to winner and runner-up in each division.
Final of championship division to be 36 holes.
ANNUAL SPRING TOURNAMENT-MARCH 13TH TO 17TH.
Four Sixteens-Prizes to winner and runner-up in each division.
Final of first sixteen to be 36 holes.
In addition to the courses of nine and eighteen holes at Miami,
the beach also boasts of three wonderful courses. One, already the
scene of important matches, is an eighteen-hole, 6,088-yards links,
with bogey 81 and par 75. The putting greens are a velvety carpet
of Bermuda grass, and nothing quite like the clubhouse can be


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found elsewhere in Florida or the South--a charming red and
white structure beside a winding canal. Another attractive course
at Miami Beach was finished for last year's visitors, in addition to
a third eighteen-hole course set within call of the ocean and framed
on one side by jungle-like tropic growth.
WATER SPORTS
For those who are adherents of the fine and health-giving art of
swimming, there are diversions of many kinds. Since the cause-
way means almost immediate access to Miami Beach by trolley,
horseback, automobile or afoot, not to mention excursion boats
and smaller craft, a dip in the Atlantic Ocean is a matter of min-
utes. There is also the Royal Palm pool. No American city of-
fers easier and more delightful facilities in this regard; and the
"trip across" is, in itself, a sheer delight.
Miami Beach is located on a narrow, yet attractive peninsula.
There are casinos, bathing pavilions, shore resorts and exquisite
little bathing places all along the ocean front, from the jetties,
northward, to primeval mangrove-studded roads that mean "a bath-
ing beach of your own."
We wish to emphasize these facilities for surf-bathing in the
Atlantic Ocean, tempered by the Gulf Stream, are unique, different,
highly artistic, with riot the slightest suggestion of rough-and ready

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beach resorts, as they are commonly found. Exclusiveness is an
essential talking point. Each pretty place has its own bath houses,
casino, restaurant, salt-water pools, and amusements for the chil-
dren-of the innocent, natural kind.
Do not expect a "Coney Island," for you will not find it at Miami
Beach. Life guards, a life-saving station, under Government con-
trol, and instructions in swimming are features. Note that the Gulf
Stream is but three miles off shore, that the water is clear, colorful,
radiant, and that the beaches are unusually wide and unusually free
of the usual clutter and muss. There is no surf-bathing quite as
fine as at Miami Beach! We say this unreservedly. Best of all-
regardless of WHEN you come, the water is JUST RIGHT FOR BATHING.
Its temperature varies but little, winter or summer, with an aver-
age of 72 degrees. Bathing here in the surf is enjoyed 365 days in
the year. No, the breakers are not of the rough variety. The reefs
of this part of Florida soften the impact of the great green waves
as they come ashore. And the beaches are shaded by palms!
MIAMI'S BOATING
Magazines, newspapers, the motion pictures, all have long carried
the pictorial story of Miami's motor-boat races and regatta. But at
all times, the bay is teeming with craft of every conceivable sort.
There is undeniable grace to water travel and its exponents of speed
or leisurely cruising, and the waters in and around Miami favor this


sport. Down the "Inside Route," every season, come thousands of
boats. They "cast anchor" in Biscayne Bay, the "Port o' Dreams."
There are important entries in the power-boat races, a yearly fea-
ture, and records for speed have been made that make wires tingle
across the continent. It may be stated that the Midwinter Biscayne
Bay Regatta and Races represent not so much a Miami as a National
event. There are cups and valuable awards, and the contestants
come from far and near to participate. During this regatta, all
Miami turns out, as on a series of gala days, and every craft flies its
flags, every sea wall and dock and beach-front embankment be-
comes an excited community of sportsmanlike interest. These fast
motor boats are things of grace and beauty as they round the buoys
in a shimmering cloud of green spray. The harbor becomes sud-
denly animate with sight-seeing craft, bands play, and the town
turns out to pay tribute to King Speed! Overhead linger the air-
planes, dragon flies of space, sometimes nose to nose with the swift-
est contestant. It is at such gala times that attention is called to
the colony of very picturesque houseboats that girt the bay front
and overflow into Miami River. There is quite a colony of them,
and many are wonderfully designed. Yachts, from well-known
clubs of the North, content to make Biscayne the season's final port,
lie at anchor along the palm-draped shores, or steal out, on pleasure
cruises, still further southward, a-gypsying amongst the famous
Florida Keys.


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ENTERING MIAMI VIA THE DIXIE HIGHWAY


MIAMI, FISHERMAN'S DELIGHT
There is an official book of the East Coast of Florida, which
states that there are more than seven hundred different varieties of
fish to be caught in this territory and off this coast.
It was written by a man who has fished here and knows. His rec-
ord shows that Miami is the very middle ground of the angler's am-
bition. Select your catch and then go and get it. Even amateurs
have success. Perhaps the real lure of these fishing grounds is
their wide diversity. There are fishing docks where professional
boatmen await your call, and testimony of success is evidenced by
the twilight showing of the parties as they return and unload the
day's catch. There is a boat, waiting and eager, and professional
guides, if you desire them, for every form of fishing. Oceanward,
they go for the big fellows-and get them. Tarpon and the fight-
ing barracuda, sea trout, drum and what-not await the angler of
the realm beyond the keys. Then there is the quiet fishing of the
bay, the lazy jaunt through cuts and channels, and off prolific isles,
and the fishing that is done in rivers or up the Tamiami Trail Canal.
Ah! that is the place for fighting black bass! Do you want excite-
ment-if so, go in for the fighters out in the Gulf Stream-shark,
sailfish, devil fish, bonefish, and grouper! The angler gets his fill


out from Miami. And he need never go for the same variety of fish
any two days in succession. Miami ships much fish to northern
markets and her commercial catches are a native institution. You
will want to go out for pompano, the delicious-and blue fish. But,
select your own catch-we keep all of them in stock.
One of the quaint and unique organizations of Miami is the An-
glers' Club, which boasts a world-wide membership of modern
Isaac Waltons. Handsome prizes are offered each season for the
best skill with rod and line, according to the most ethical sports-
manship rules. Weekly meetings are held at the clubrooms, whose
walls bear witness to victories over the denizens of the deep, where
experiences are exchanged and wondrous fish yarns spun.
And for those who wish to see the queer and strange varieties that
abound in the tropical waters in and near the Gulf Stream, a com-
plete aquarium, due to the enterprise of Mr. James A. Allison, has
been built at Miami Beach, which is being constantly stocked from
fresh catches.
So clear are the waters adjacent to Miami, that it possesses a
marine garden second to none in the world. Here the visitor can
observe the peculiar fauna of the ocean bed, with fish of all colors,
shapes and sizes darting in and out or resting quietly upon the
bottom.


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(6) MIAMI EXCHANGE BANK. (7) MIAMI BANK & TRUST CO.
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TENNIS
Are you fond of tennis? The hotels have their own courts-
wonderful ones, and the city has built a very large and fine tennis
ground within easy walking distance. Every day during the months
of winter and spring one sees crowds of happy young folks on the
courts of the big hotels and on the public tennis grounds, deriving
the greatest of pleasure from this splendid game that offers such
scope for healthful exercise. Tennis tournaments are a part of the
season's interesting sport happenings, and there are always many
entries for these events.
MIAMI AND AVIATION
It was the Great War that gave Miami its leadership in aviation,
for at that time three training stations were located there by the
United States Government. Probably in no city in the United
States is air travel so consistently a part of the community life. The
sky is buzzing and humming with machines much of the time, and
only the tourist marvels at the astonishing number and frequency
of them. Hundreds of people took airplane trips from Miami last
season, and there were no fatalities. These skybound objectives
were Bimini, Cuba, Key West, Palm Beach, Nassau and the Ba-
hama Islands.
MIAMI'S AGRICULTURAL INTERESTS
Miami is ideally located, in a rich agricultural section of Florida,
and she has, for the shipment of produce of every kind, wonderful
facilities, her rivers and harbor, and splendid railroad connections
with northern markets. Farms, groves, cattle ranches and dairy
farms are among the county's assets, and all are accessible by rea-
son of the splendid system of good roads, built for commercial ve-
hicles. Stock raising is carried along on a big scale, and the truck
farms and gardens adjacent to the city yield abundantly for both
home and foreign consumption. Miami has her own curb market
where the home people may obtain fresh produce, and many car-
loads of fruits and vegetables are sent to the northern markets, the
shipments consisting of oranges, grapefruit, limes and lemons,
fruits, tomatoes, avocadoes, beans, eggplants, peppers, potatoes,
sweet potatoes and garden truck generally. And while northern
sections are in the grip of the usual January and February bliz-
zards, in the environs of Miami are being picked an abundance of
the largest and most luscious strawberries that ever delighted the
palate of an epicure. Her farmers are continually discovering new
possibilities of the rich soil. In the Everglades section, for exam-


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ple, a generous acreage is being planted in sugar cane by the Penn-
Southern Florida may yet rival Cuba as a producer of cane sugar.
Drainage of heretofore unclaimed land has given Florida - the
sylvania Sugar Company, the tract consisting of 120,000 acres, and
Miami section of it-a keen insight into agricultural fields long
submerged and undiscovered, of wonderful fertility and thousands
of acres in extent.
MIAMI'S BUILDING RECORD
Each summer, when the crowds have gone, Miami sets to work,
creating still greater attractions for the year to come, and it is then
that she builds. It is primarily a "City of Concrete," and in conse-
quence of this no great disastrous fire is likely. The first six
months of the year showed building permits issued to the total of
over three millions of dollars, and for this period Miami led all
Florida cities by a wide margin. The approximate appraisal of
realty values for 1921, as shown by the assessor's statement, is $64,-
045,930, a year's gain of $9,142,770 over 1920. Ten years ago the
valuation was around one and one-half millions and the greater
percentage of property increase as compared to the 440 per cent
population increase of the town during the past ten years is indeed
impressive. It shows most conclusively that financial resources are
finding Miami a most attractive resort as a permanent investment.
The deposits of Miami's seven banks on March 31, 1921, aggregated
$20,723,736, showing a gain of just double in two years' time. All
this can mean only one thing-despite the period of reorganization
through which the country is going, Miami remains rock-ribbed
and invincible.
MOTION-PICTURE INDUSTRY
Very large and elaborate commercial motion-picture studios are
now being erected, to be operated upon a commercial basis. These
studios will be leased to some of the foremost producing companies
who will bring their stars to Miami for their big productions. It
is expected the studios will be in operation by December, 1921. Un-
doubtedly the first project will call for additional facilities, as
Miami's climatic and scenic conditions have been recognized as
superior and was really the magnet which brought this great in-
dustry to this city.
The city has progressive newspapers, morning and afternoon, a
Sunday newspaper, one monthly issued by the alert Chamber of
Commerce, the Miamian, and the visitor can secure his home-town
newspaper or periodical almost as rapidly as if he were at home.


WONDERFUL TENNIS COURTS


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Name Location Capacity
Abnerholm.......----...... 222 N. E. 3rd St.......... 50
Al Fresco ....... .......169 N. E. 6th St .......... 50
Alpha............ . ...35 N. E. 2nd St.......... 30
Alta Vista ....------.27 N. E. 2nd St.......... 75
American ............---.. 123 S. Miami Ave....... 35
Arcade---- . ............ 135 N. E. 1st St.. ---- . - 60
Belcher ..................... 440 N. E. 2nd Ave....... 40
Biscayne ...........------.......---10 E. Flagler St............. 100
Boyd Cottage...............242 N. E. 4th St.......... 50
Breakers--.....................Miami Beach............. 75
Brown-- .....................--...Miami Beach....... ... 25
Esmeralda --------......--...444 N. Bay Shore Dr.... 100
Flamingo.....-.....-------......Miami Beach-........---...... 300
Frances.....------ .............. 19-21 N. E. 3rd St....... 100
Gamble ........................26 S. E. 2nd St ........... 20
Gralynn - ----... 134 S. E. 1st Ave.......... 250
Grand ............ .......... 72 N. W . 2nd St.......... 14
Graystone ................- 29 N. E. 1st Ave....... 100
Green Tree Inn ........... N. E. 2nd Ave. &
1st St........................ 125
Halcyon--- ...................N. E. 2nd Ave. &
E. Flagler.................. 300
Leamington ................N. E. 1st St. & N. E.
3rd Ave......................---- 200
Lenox-----..........-.........----11 N. E. 2nd St............. 35
Lincoln ........................ Miami Beach............... 150
Luzerne ........ ............11 N . E. 1st St............. 30
McAllister..........--.........East Flagler St............. 500
McCrory.....................--- 27 E. Flagler St.......... 100


Plan Rates
A On application
E On application
A or E, on app'n
E On application
E On application
E On application
R On application
R On application
A On application
A and E, on app'n
E On application
E On application
A On application
E On application
A On application
A $6.00 up
R $2.50 up
E On application
E $1.50 up
A $7.00 up

E On application
E $2.00 up
A On application
E On application
E On application
E $3 to $6 per day


A- American; E-European; R-Rooms Only


Name Location Capacity
Manhattan-....-..-....-----....141 N. Miami Ave ..- 40
Martinique ...... - 226 N. E. 1st St.. .... 150
Mechanics ......... 38 N. W. 8th St......... 100
Miami Beach Inn ........ Miami Beach ........ ...... 40
Minneapolis --...-..-.. 134 N. E. 5th St.... 80
North Bay Shore Inn .Lemon City..... _.. 50
Oaks ---..-------..-----. 421 N. W. 3rd St.... 36
Ocean Side Inn ............Miami Beach .......... 35
Ohio.....--................------------. 161 N. E. 1st St .. ..... 150
Oxford-...................------------ 140 N. Miami Ave..... 125
Paramount ................. 18 S. E. 1st St...-..-.. 50
Pershing .....................226 N. E. 1st Ave...... 150
Plaza --.......-.. ..........316 N. Bay Shore Dr .... 300
Poinsettia................... 117 N. E. 2nd St. ........ 40
Roberts...--------....-- 24 W. Flagler St..... 300
Royal Palm............ S. Bay Shore Dr .... 600
Royalton............-- .132 E. Flagler St... 100
Rutherford .......-- 135 N. E. 3rd St.. . 50
San Carlos. N. E. 2nd Ave. &
1st St. ........... --.. . 125
Savoy ----.. . .. ....... 250 N. W . 2nd St. ... 40
Sawtelle ... ..... .. 144 N. E. 5th St......... 2"0
Security ......-----....117 N. E. 1st Ave... 200
Seminole...................... 53 E. Flagler St........ 150
Strand .....------.............226 N. E. 2nd St ........ 150
Sunshine Inn ........ .......Coconut Grove .......... 50
Tamiami ------...................... 203 W. Flagler St....... 200
United States .............. 165 N. W. 2nd St....... 80
Urmey.........................34 S. E. 2nd Ave......... 400
W indsor...................... 105 N. E. 5th St .... . 20
Wofford ........-----.....Miami Beach. ----... 105
Ye Peacock Inn...........Buena Vista .... ......-.. 50


Rates
On application
On application
$5.00 up week
$15.00 up week
$15 to $20 week
$3.00 up per day
$20.00 per week
On application
$2.50 up per day
$2.00 up
On application
On application
and E, on app'n
On application
On application
On application
On application
On application
On application
On application
$5.00 up per week
On application
$2.00 up
On application
On application
$3.00 up
On application
On application
O n ... i.. ., ..r
O n 'i. I.. ., ...n
On application


APARTMENTS (FURNISHE D)- Rates on application


Name Location Capacity
Aplington.............1105 N. E. 1st Ave............. 15
Avondale............... 315 N. E. 2nd Ave............. 60
Ban Yan............... 152 S. E. 3rd Ave........... 20
Bay Shore Court.._1411 Bay Shore Court......... 16
Bay View-..............234 N. E. 3rd St................... 80
Berni...............204 N. Bay Shore Drive...... 60
Billike ...---.............. 213 N. E. 5th St.............. 35
Boulevard ........936 N. Bay Shore Drive ..... 32
Brickel................. 186 N. E. 8th St.................125
Bulmer..............S. E. 8th St. & Bay............ 85
Causeway..............301 13th St., N. E........... 60
Chamberlain........ 313 E. Flagler St...........----. 40
Chapman ..............139 W. Flagler St....---- ... 40
Chester..................161 N. E. 2nd St......... 25
Chesterfield........... 126 N. E. 6th St.............. 44
Cleveland ....-----........ 323 S. E. 1st Ave.............. 30
Clifford ............. 2724 N. E. 2nd Ave............. 60
Clyde Court.......... 56 S. E. 2nd St .............. 250
Colonial ................429 N. E. 2nd Ave............. 25
Congress ..............126 N. E. 6th St................... 35
Connecticut ..........120 N. E. 3rd St...............100
Craig---.....-- .....227 N. W. 2nd St............ 50
Crosel ...............223 E. Flagler St........ 60
Dade ..................13 N. E. 4th St..... .... 8


Name Location Capacity
Day................... 260 S. W. 1st St............... 25
Dean .................-- . 119 N. E. 3rd St............... 50
Del Rio.---- ....W. Flagler St. & River Dr. 50
Dennis.----.-........12 N. W. 5th St............ 35
Ebsary-----...... ...1405 Bay Shore Court . 16
El Mar..--............ Miami Beach ..................... 40
Fairfax....----.....257 E. Flagler St ........110
Fairfax Court....... 26 N. E. 3rd Ave ..---...... 30
Field ........ 49 N. E. 5th St...... ........ 50
Fink ---- ---..- .43 N. E. 4th St .......--........--- 100
Fort Dallas ---............325 S. E. 1st Place .......... 75
Fowler.....--......... 627 W. Flagler St..........- 25
Gallat Court ....... 431 N. W. 3rd St.. ........ 350
Gautier..--...-- ....240 N. E. 1st Ave.. ..--- 90
Goodsell Court .----- 300 N. E. 14th St .. ...-.. 30
Harold................561 W. Flagler St..........---- 50
Helene ---------.......---..Miami Beach ..........--------........150
Hibiscus -.--...-- - -----.. Miami Beach-.......... ....... . 40
Holmer......------- ..136 N. E. 9th St ......----. 100
Johnson -- .. 227 N. E. 2nd St ..---.......140
Lafayette......... ....336 N. W. 2nd St ... ..--. 40
Liberty .......... 13 S. E. 6th St---.... ...... 30
Long --...- ........ 233 N. E. 5th St --........-- . 70
Mackinaw ............ 158 E. Flagler St..---...-- . 15
Marion ................227 N. E. 3rd St........----......... 50


Name
Marshall.--..---
Merwil-.....---
Olmstead.....
Osceola...---...
Ostend .... -
Palms.......
Point View .-
Principia...
Rio Vista-..
River View
Rose.... ..
Saragossa.
Sea Crest ---
Seminole ..
Songer..........
Toledo . .....
Valencia ...---
Vendome.......
Waddell.--..
Waldimere
Walker.. ---
Washingtonia
Williams ....
Winton Court


Location Capacity
.225 N. W. 1st St....---- .. - 35
..... 105 N. E. 2nd Ave .. ....... 70
... 147 S. E. 3rd St -- ....--.- 36
.247 W. Flagler St.....--- 36
.101 N. Bay Shore Drive--.- 50
_242 N. E. 3rd St.... ......25
.....185 S. E. 14th Terrace .... 30
..... 45 S. E. 2nd St.. .....---- 75
.....262 W . Flagler St .... . ...... 30
--.293 S. W. 1st St.... 80
...-722 N. E. 2nd Ave.......... 50
......221 N. E. 3rd St........- ... 75
.-Miami Beach ........ . 60
265-9 N. W. 1st St .---. 25
30-38 S. W. 5th Ave .....--... 30
...Miami Beach .................... . 00
......535 N. E. 2nd Ave . 150
...906 N. E. 1st Ave . 35
.30 N. Miami Ave . ... 60
..1305 N. E. 2nd Ave . . 60
..282 S. W . 1st St .....- . ...... 30
..1174 W. Flagler St.- --- 65
. .151 N. E. 5th St.. ... 60
.....127 N. E. 5th St.... . ..... . 30


IF YOU WANT TO BORROW TO BUILD, SEE US


IF You HAVE IDLE MONEY, SEE US


IT WILL PAY You TO SEE US, ANYWAY


DADE COUNTY SECURITY COMPANY

A BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION

33 N. E. FIRST AVENUE


MIIAMI, FLORIDA


Art Work, Printing and Engraving by i'he Record Company, St. Augusti,e, Florida







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81


RINGING the Ocean nearer to Miami has long been one of the ambitions of those who see a wonderful future for this fast-growing tropic metropolis. And the dream
has come true ! Spanning Miami's unparalleled harbor is a million-dollar Causeway, perfect alike in its structural details and its utilitarian possibilities, ri r, i,
in all the country, is there a more impressive ,.. , f , , . . ... , , r it touches on a Ship Channel, row eighteen feet deep .,
to be increased .-, J- r. , thirty feet Fromrr ',... , ,. . i H .I J , u!, ,' I 1, i .,-reaches of r r--.".Biscaycne Bay can be seen. The Cauaewav,
is one hundred i . . wide, carries a modern electric trolley service, pedest-ian walks, and wide, roorn, ,I. I f immaculate concrete for vehicul.,,i* .1-.
Progress is 1 *,;,I made in the final artistic dressing of the Causeway, and flowers will bloom, -*.f-I palms shade thl walks and - ,r- 1 1 1 - rest-stations r ,, ,.1
This mean.' I , Miami is but an . * p across to he ,,, ,, . ' beaches, and her sunlit i,,.-r. , wears a necklace in which .,!I F. r, 1. will justly take pride,
Civic enterprise is rapidly making .I ....'.. the "Perfect C.'


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