Group Title: Press bulletin University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station
Title: Hog management
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005203/00001
 Material Information
Title: Hog management
Series Title: Press bulletin University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station
Physical Description: 2 p. : ;
Language: English
Creator: Spencer, A. P ( Arthur Perceval )
Publisher: University of Florida, Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1919
 Subjects
Subject: Swine -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Swine -- Economic aspects -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Swine -- Diseases -- Prevention   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by A.P. Spencer.
General Note: "May 24, 1919."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00005203
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6527
ltuf - AEP5907
oclc - 52938012
alephbibnum - 000934840

Full Text




PRESS BULLETIN No. 311


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION




HOG MANAGEMENT

By A. P. SPENCER

At the present price of pork there is a satisfactory margin
of profit to the farmer who produces well-bred, growth hogs,
and grows a rotation of pasture crops lasting thru the entire
year, along with sufficient corn, peanuts, cowpeas, and chufas
to supplement the pastures and fatten the hogs for market.
Owing to the high prices of all grains, starchy feeds, such as
sweet potatoes, cassava, and dasheens, and kitchen slop should
supplement grain as far as possible.
PASTURES NOT SUFFICIENT
Stock hogs can be kept thrifty largely on pastures; how-
ever, they will grow slowly without some grain. Hogs should
be supplied with suitable green forage and so managed as to
consume as much of it without waste as possible, since forage
is by far the cheapest feed that can be used. In addition to pas-
ture, one or two pounds of grain daily for every hundred pounds
of live weight is sufficient for young hogs. It is better to feed
the grain twice daily from troughs than to allow the hogs to
gather it from crops in the field, for in the field the hogs will
live entirely off the grain since they prefer it to the pasturage.
By feeding it this way, pork can be produced on Florida farms
at a comparatively low cost.
FATTENING FEEDS
Corn, peanuts, chufas, and velvet beans are the best Florida
grains for fattening. Sweet potatoes, cassava, and dasheens,
when boiled and mixed with grain, give satisfactory results in
fattening hogs. Corn and sweet potatoes are good finishing
feeds for the production of firm meat and lard.


2May 24,,1919








UNIFORM SUPPLY HELPS MARKETS
The lower prices paid in Florida are partly due to the lack
of sufficient hogs to furnish a uniform supply thruout the year.
In order to have a steady market there must be competition
among buyers and a sufficient number of hogs moving regularly
to the packing houses. While light hogs may sell best in local
trade, the packers demand an average of 175 to 300 pounds live
weight.
IMPROVING THE QUALITY
Those who intend to engage in hog raising should procure
purebred or high-grade breeding stock at the start. Where it is
desired to grade up native stock one can cross them with any of
the improved breeds and produce good hogs. However, this is
an expensive method since it takes two years or longer to im-
prove the quality so that it will compare favorably with better
bred hogs. While the breed is largely personal choice, it is to
the advantage of any community to adhere closely to one breed
for the sake of uniformity in marketing.
KEEPING HOGS THRIFTY
The more intelligent use of anti-cholera serum has changed
the attitude of farmers who hesitated to buy good hogs because
of the probable loss from cholera. By using vats and wallows,
hogs are kept free from lice. Medicines and a change of pasture
keep them free from worms.
A still more important consideration is the necessity of
keeping hogs confined to pastures. When allowed free range
they cannot avoid coming in contact with sick animals or grazing
over pastures that are infested with worms. A business as
important as hog raising requires careful management, and if
handled properly can be made profitable under a greater variety
of conditions than most other general farming undertakings..
State papers please copy.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs