Group Title: Press bulletin University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station
Title: Steer feeding
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005199/00001
 Material Information
Title: Steer feeding
Series Title: Press bulletin University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station
Physical Description: 2 p. : ;
Language: English
Creator: Scott, John M ( John Marcus )
Publisher: University of Florida, Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1919
 Subjects
Subject: Beef cattle -- Feeding and feeds -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Velvet-bean as feed   ( lcsh )
Peanut products as feed   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by John M. Scott.
General Note: "May 10, 1919."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00005199
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6523
ltuf - AEP5901
oclc - 52924952
alephbibnum - 000934834

Full Text



PRESS BULLETIN No. 307


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION



STEER FEEDING
By JOHN M. SCOTT

In December, 1918,. an arrangement was made with L. K.
Edwards of Irvine, Fla., whereby a cooperative cattle feeding
experiment was conducted during the past winter.
Ten grade Angus steers were used in this experiment. These
were steers that were bred and raised by Mr. Edwards. They
were out of native cows by a purebred Angus bull, and were
about 18 months old when the experiment began. They were
divided into two lots of five steers each.

FEEDS USED
From December 20 to March 4, the steers in Lot I were
fed 10 pounds shelled corn, 4 pounds velvet bean feed and 20
pounds silage, each, daily. Those in Lot II were each fed 10
pounds shelled corn, 4 pounds peanut meal feed, and 20 pounds
silage daily. From March 4 to April 19, the animals in Lot I were
fed 121/2 pounds shelled corn, 5 pounds velvet bean feed, and 16
pounds silage, each, daily. Those in Lot II were each fed 121/2
pounds shelled corn, 5 pounds peanut meal feed, and 16 pounds
silage, daily. By velvet bean feed and peanut meal feed is
meant that the velvet bean hulls and peanut hulls are ground
up with the beans and peanuts. As soon as the steers were on
full feed, they were fed in the proportion of one pound of
velvet bean feed and peanut meal feed respectively to each two
and a half pounds of shelled corn.

WEIGHTS AND GAINS
At the beginning of the experiment, the steers in Lot I
averaged 599 pounds and those in Lot II, 593 pounds.
At the close of the experiment the steers in Lot I averaged


May 10, 1919







857 pounds, and those in lot II 854 pounds. In 120 days, the
length of the experiment, steers in Lot I had gained 258 pounds
per head, or an average daily gain of 2.15 pounds. Those in
Lot II had gained 261 pounds each, or an average daily gain
of 2.17 pounds.
This shows practically no difference in the gain produced
by feeding velvet bean feed or peanut meal feed.
At the close of the experiment, the steers were sold to
Armour & Co., Jacksonville, and were classed as the best finished
cattle ever received at that market. Not only were they the best
finished cattle, but the carcasses in the cooler presented the best
appearance of anything the company had slaughtered in Jack-
sonville. The slaughter test showed no difference in the per-
centage of dressed weight of the two lots. They averaged 56.4
percent.
The farmers of Florida are well acquainted with the value
of velvet beans for beef production, but the peanut meal has been
used but little if any for this purpose. The results of this ex-
periment would indicate that peanut meal is equal to velvet bean
meal for beef production.
State papers please copy.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs