Group Title: Eugene Manis Scrapbooks: Africa
Title: Eugene Manis Scrapbooks: Africa (scrapbooks 1 and 2 combined)
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005172/00001
 Material Information
Title: Eugene Manis Scrapbooks: Africa (scrapbooks 1 and 2 combined)
Series Title: Eugene Manis Scrapbooks: Africa
Physical Description: Text
Language: English
Creator: Manis, W. Eugene
Manis, Rosemary ( Donor )
 Subjects
Subject: Manis, W. Eugene
Africa   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: Africa -- Liberia -- Margibi -- Harbel
Africa
 Notes
General Note: Eugene Manis was a horticulturalist, research scientist and USDA plant breeder for much of his career. His first professional job was as a planter for the Firestone Rubber Plantation in Harbel, Liberia from 1939 through 1941. These scrapbooks document the begining of his career.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00005172
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: African Studies Collections in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: Scrapbook Album 1 and 2 (combined)

Full Text



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WALLACE


E MANIS,


-SCHOOL OF


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OFFER YOU JUNIOR


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Mr. Wallace E. Manis

2407 Commonwealth Avenue,

Madison, Wisconsin.


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'-iLtITR'S PUITCH DEC. 10, 1940




Duar liiss Fortune,

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Pa~o 12
VIRGINIA: You hnow I don't'
(The bride fixes her veil; the groom strr i ;tjn: his tic; the bost
man coughs nervously; tho organist grins amicably; and the major
dono at last drops the handkerchiof. Sc-ttcrinh flowers with much
| dignity, the flower girl enters the room, detours D.L. fjllco.'inC
the walls of the roon until she reaches a point midway onf the L.
wall. Thon she turns and starts toward the little group at the CQ
of the t-i. The bride is close behind. They are oscortodto thi
., first turn by the -train. of "THE ,jEDLLIiG 1L .JLCH" played very
:rjs3tic-.lly o17. tlh piano; but :.- they start forward, the strain
mu1idn1,ly, beco-n .'On the I:,c-:,h .t ai'f.iriki". The wlk of the bride
.nd the flowCr irl- -e' "itsr nrr.jcsty, and oven the groom and
best man are affected by the intoxicating rhyth7n. The bride and
her escort reach the altar--the piano--in silence, if not in
dignity, and, at a signal from the flower girl, who is blossoming
into the minister, the nmsic stops.)
ERS. R: (Midway between the flowers and the prayer book, wiping her brow)
I had no idea Boothoovon was so--so abandoned! (She looks rapidly
through the p:c;s of the prayer book) Now then, let meo soo Funerals-
they cogo later, don't they? Christonings--they come later, too.
(She finally finds the pago) Ah, here we aroe (The bridal party
breathes a zci-h of relief.) Do you, Lord Percy, take this woman,
Virginnia, to be your lawful wedded wife, to have and to hold -- and
all that?
LORD PERCY: Rawthor!

M MRS. R: (Reading) Do you, Vir-inia, tako this m,:n, Lord Percy, to be your-
and so on?
VIRGINIA: (WVearily)(And with a glance a Gerry) I do.

LORD PERCY: (Shouting) There you are! She has no fire -- no sparklpl

VIRGINIA: No sparkle? So, I have no sparkle, have I? I've boon told that
once too often tonight. (She includes both Gerry and Lord Percy in
this remark) I'll show you whether I have spark:l:, I'll----
MRS. R: Virginia! (To Percy) Poor child, she's nervous and distraught.
We'll just finish this up quickly now, and then we'll all rest. (She
consults her book) Here's a :ood line' (Addressing the group) "If
there be any person present who can show just cause why these two
should not be joined in holy wedlock, lot him speak or forever hold
his peace
(Staring a Virginia, Gcrry~r,, pi ftf almost inaudibly-tho
strains of "Alohi Oe", She returns his gazo for amomont, then looks
d&own t the chchk in her hand.)
f VIRGINIA: (To Benson) Bonson, what would you do for fifty dollars?

BENSON: If I may say so, Miss- for fifty dollars, I'd doll my shirt!!

VIiGIUA:'L: (Handing him the check) H6w about your rod pyjaman?
(Thoro is gonoral consternation and Gerry pounds the piano to the tune
e of "Thoro'll Bo a Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight as
TE CiUTAIII FALLS QUICKLY
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STAFF ASSTGTI-IEr3TS

June 2, 1941


CAPACIlY


LEAVE DATE


ADMlIT ST NATIVE


Seybold
Hall
Vipond
Knowles
Baar
Matthews
Kilian


General Manager
Actg. Sec'y. & Office Mgr.
Inspector Du Group & Labor
Inspector Farmington Group
Tapping Inspector
Private Secretary
Secretary


February 1942
'August 1942
Supt. April 1943
October 1941
September 1941
November 1942
May 1943


ACCOUNTING


C. Kolves
P. Warden
J. Swain
Van der Meer
R. Storts
A. Auth
Johnson
Ielson
Steckhan
Meyer


Accountant
Accountant
Accountant (Factory)
Traffic & Beach Master
Accountant
Accountant
Paymaster & Cashier
Accountant
Purchasing
Accountant


November 1941
August 1942
October 1942
July 1942
November 1942
January 1943
June 1942
April 1943


May 1943


RESEARCH


E. Manis
A. Harkins
P. Spangler


In charge
Chemist
Field Assistant


December 1941
October 1941
May 1943


MEDICAL


Dr. G. G. Campbell
Dr. H. D. Murray
Robert Campbell


R. E. Wilson
M. G. Mayer
J. L. Jamieson


F. Laxton
Robertshaw
R. Santee


Medical Director
Physician & Surgeon
Administrator


Chief Engineer
Road Maintenance
Construction

CONSTRUCTION


Carpenter
Bricklayer
Detached (Amcrican Legation)


November 1941
December-1941
March 1943


December 1942
June 1942
March 1943



November 1941
January 1943
November 1942


NAME


ENGILTiER ING


















































Jav C. )7i a;d244A $J/ltu z

have never been teamed before-but there's no reason why they should not
have been, since both are well versed in all branches of show business and have
been friends for years. Jay Flippen, one of Manhattan's favorite M.C.'s, has
tossed quips at audiences since, a timid amateur of 16, he appeared in black-
face at an amateur minstrel show in his native Little Rock, Ark. Thereafter.
in vaudeville, he became a protege of the late Bert Williams, who recommended
him to take over in "Broadway Brevities" on tour. Flippen's Broadway debut
was in "June Days," and his other shows are "Hello Lola," "The Great
Temptations"- his last show at the Winter Garden, 15 years ago, in company
with Jack Benny and Arthur Treacher-,"Padlocks," and the second "Little
Show." Happy Felton stands 6 feet 1 and weighs 278 pounds. He pteps into
"Hellzapoppin" after eight years of leading his own distinctive-styled dance
orchestra. Francis J. Felton was born in Pittsburgh, studied chemistry at
Allegheny College, played the fiddle in vaudeville, and then became master of
ceremonies for the nation's first commercial broadcasting band. Jay and Happy
are Olsen and Johnson's personal choices to succeed them as chief zanies in
H ,'Il:., f, ,pf. i "












O(1n 4n; /aA'f/VFO,
present
THE NEW






The Screamlined Revue
DESIGNED FOR LAUGHING

witd

Jay C. Flippen Happy Felton
Barto & Mann Charles Withers
The Radio Rogues Harry Reso
Walter Nilsson The Charioteers
Lyda Sue
Theo Hardeen
JUNE WINTERS BONNIE REED SHIRLEY WAYNE
RUTH FABER STEPHEN OLSEN BERGH and MOORE
DIPPY DIERS -BILLY ADAMS SID DEAN And 100 Others

Book by OLSEN and JOHNSON
Music and Lyrics by SAMMY FAIN and CHARLES TOBIAS
Production Staged by EDWARD DURYEA DOWLING
Dances Arranged by GAE FOSTER
Costumes Designed by JOAN PERSONETTE

































1Ba,1 and ita n

became a vaudeville team only because
the difference in their size proved a good
starting point for a comedy act. They've
been together twelve years and have
alternated between vaudeville and night
clubs. They appeared in one of Earl
Carroll's "Vanities" and have been in
several pictures.
















































has been a vaudeville headliner for twenty-five years and more. His Op'ry
House, with variations of one kind or another, has been shown in England,
France, Australia, Canada, Sweden and South Africa. So popular has it proved
that in London he remained at one theatre for a full year. He was with Frank
Bacon's stock company before he originated his present characterization. Charles
Dillingham featured him in "Hitchy Koo."


CCaltia WiBou







Reprinted from The New York Times, January 17, 1939


PBaw, /iJbo ,,
Written by the boys who created all the noise away back when that drama
called "Hellzapoppin" had its first anniversary.
By OLSEN and JOHNSON


WENTY-FIVE years ago war in Europe was horrify-
ing the world, Ziegfeld in New York was glorifying
the girls, and we were in the Riverside Theatre .
mortifying our stooges.
Twenty years ago the war was over in Europe, Ziegfeld
was over in Atlantic City, and Olsen and Johnson were still
over in the Riverside but by then we were mortifying
the manager.
Today war in Europe is vandalizing the world; George
White, replacing Ziegfeld, is "Scandalizing" the girls, and
at the Winter Garden Theatre Olsen and Johnson in
Hellzapoppin are still tantalizing Time and Reason.
Of course, the only thing this proves (if it proves any-
thing) is that history not only repeats itself it stutters.
Yet, despite our having headlined in vaudeville, nationally
and internationally, for twenty-five years with slight in-
terruptions to star in six motion pictures, on the radio and
elsewhere-the critics of Hellzapoppin hailed us (and in the
same breath, "farewelled" us) as "newcomers."
As a matter of record, the critics laughed when they sat
down at Hellzapoppin the opening night, but (with a few
notable exceptions) they got up again and said it was a
"bust." They didn't exactly insist their readers would have
to be screwballs to enjoy the show-though they intimated
it would help-but they were certain anyone with fortitude
or daring enough to sit through an entire performance would
be a fit candidate for the foolish-factory before the show
was over.
Maybe they were right! However, if they were, the
screwball population of the world has been even more than
slightly underestimated, and we're going to erect a sign over
our theatre telling the world, "Through these portals pass
the most illustrious screwballs in the world." And if Anthony
Eden, Mayor La Guardia, Governor "Happy" Chandler,
Elliot Roosevelt, B. M. Baruch and more than seven hundred
thousand others are screwballs please, teacher, we want
to be on their side.
That's the score today. We'll admit, however, it looked
as though the critics were right-in the beginning. And the
morning after the New York opening two bewildered clowns
(Olsen and Johnson to you) read the criticisms stating that
" 'Hellzapoppin' is "Hellzafloppin' and tried to shoot our-
selves with blank pistols. It was, as the indictment says,
murder!
We had cancelled our dates with our successful stage
unit to take this gambling flyer on Broadway, and we'd done
a Brodie. Our attempts to laugh through our tears wouldn't
have bamboozled even a Metropolitan Opera audience -
accustomed as they are to sympathizing with over-stuffed
Pagliaccis. Not only did we have a practically unbeatable
chance to lose several thousand bucks-which is no cause
for unseemly exuberance in itself; but we had dragged a
hundred others-chorus kids, stooges, musicians and specialty
artists-down with us. All in all, we were so low in spirits
we couldn't even look down on Hitler.
It was awful! Casey had struck out. Even the thought
that Congress was adjourned and wouldn't reconvene until
January failed to cheer us.
Fate, however, apparently took a look at the ranks of
the unemployed and decided to give us a break, and business


began to pick up to a point that grossed $19,000 the first
week-the poorest week the show has had since opening in
New York.
We, it seems, were right and the critics wrong. How-
ever, we're not screaming "I told you so!" We can under-
stand their opinion; because Helizapoppin is not orthodox
"theatuh"-such as the critical eyes are accustomed to-in
any respect.
It's noisier than the second Battle of the Marne, as
performed by the original cast. With nearly one hundred
people on the stage, we have fewer gag lines of dialogue than
any show on Broadway-except the Flea Circus; giving us
more "boon dogglers" than the original WPA, and making
our stooges practically careerists in the gentle art of being
paid for doing nothing. And almost as many laughs are
generated by "plants" in the audience as by more "legiti-
mate" performers on the stage.
During our twenty-five years of entertaining the
public we have often been criticized for the confusion on
our stage of the moment. The critics, if we're not too
obvious, don't know the agent's per cent of it.
While maintaining our confusion is orderly, we'll still
take the rap and plead guilty-but with the stipulation that
the circumstances are extenuating and we're the victims of
our environment. Take, for instance, a time years ago when
we were playing vaudeville in New York.
In our act at that time was a colored dancer who had
been with us for years. Speedy was his name. As the time
approached for our act to leave New York, Speedy was in a
veritable dither because romance had flowered during our
stay and his heart belonged to Harlem.
During our final week he practically beat his brains out
in an effort to find a tactful way of telling us he was leaving
the act and would not go with us on the road. However, he
said nothing to us about it, and our first knowledge of his
desertion was delivered in the true Olsen and Johnson spirit.
It was the last day of our New York engagement and
the audience applauding enthusiastically, stopped the show,
forcing encore after encore from the dancer.
Sid Marion, who had been drawn to the wings by the
sudden, unexpected tumult, walked over to Ole.
"Where'd you get the new dancer, Ole?" he asked.
"The guy's sensational!"
"New dancer?"
Ole walked over to the wings and peeked out. It was
a new dancer and he was sensational. But Ole had never
seen him before.
"Maybe Chic hired him."
Ole and Sid walked over to where Chic was standing.
"That new hoofer's terrific, Ole!" Chic greeted them.
"Where'd you get him?"
Ole's eyebrows pushed up until they joined the part
in his hair.
"I didn't hire him, Chic. Didn't you?"
"No!"
We looked at each other and grinned. Here was a
hoofer in the middle of our act, stopping the show, and we
had to be introduced before we could hire him. And the
critics complain about confusion!














were formerly connected with a small station in Brooklyn. One of them, Jimmy
Hollywood, was a Wall Street clerk, and the other, Eddie Bartell, a sporting
goods salesman. They had an occasional spot on the air. One evening they
were called upon to fill in for an act that could not appear. They decided to
do imitations, and Sidney Chatton, the announcer, joined them. It so happened
that a booking agent heard them and, over night, they became the Radio
Rogues and turned professional. They have been heard on many important
radio programs and have made a number of pictures, including "Thanks a
Million," "Every Night at Eight" and "Going Hollywood."


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