Group Title: Report for financial year ending June 30th, Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Title: Report for financial year ending June 30th
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 Material Information
Title: Report for financial year ending June 30th
Physical Description: 7 v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Print Co.>
Place of Publication: <Florida
Publication Date: 1904
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1898-1904.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00005154
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AMF8111
oclc - 12029597
alephbibnum - 002452806
 Related Items
Preceded by: Report to the President
Succeeded by: Report for the fiscal year ending June 30th

Full Text



Florida

Agricultural Experiment

Station.


Report for the Financial Year
Ending June 30,
1904.


T. H. TALIAFERRO, Director.






















LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL.


lion. WV. S. Jcnnhigs. Goerrnor of Fldrida:
SiR: I have the houor to transmit herewith the Annual Re-
port of the Florida Agriculural Experiment Station for the year
ending J une 30, 1904. I am, sir,
Very respectfully yours,
T. H. TALIAFERRO,
Director.
Lake City, Fla., June 30. 1904.








BOARD OF TRUSTEES.


GEO. W. WILSON, President ..................... Jacksonville.
C. A. CARSON, Vice-President ......................Kissimmee.
F. L. STRINGER, Secretary ......................... Brooksville.
F. E. HARRIS ......................................... Ocala.
E. D. BEGGS ...................................... Pensacola.
J. R. PARROTT ................................... Jacksonville.
F. M. SIMONTON ......................................Tampa.



STATION STAFF.


T. H. TALIAFERRO, C. E., Ph. D. ...................... Director.
H. K. MILLER, M. S. ................ Vice-Director and Chemist.
H. A. GOsSARD, M. S. ........................... Entomologist.
H. H. HUmE,M. S., ................. Botanist and Horticulturist.
CHAs. F. DAwson, M. D., D. V. S. ................Veterinarian.
**C. M. CONNER, B. S. ..........................Agriculturist.
A. W. BLAR, B. S., A. M. .....................ssistant Chemist.
R. A. LICHTENTHAELER, B. S. ................ Assistant Chemist.
F. C. REIMER, B. S. .................... Assistant Horticulturist.
*Louis DEGOTTRAL, ........ Superintendent Citrus Experiments.
W. P. JERNIGAN ....................... Auditor and Bookkeeper.
A. TYLE ......................... Stenographer and Librarian.
JoHN F. MTCHELL ................... Foreman Station Farm.
JOHN H. JEFFRIES .......... Gardener, Horticultural Department.
E. F. WORTHNOTON ............. Assistant in Field Experiments.
*Resigned August 31st. 1923.
**Superintendent Farmers' Institutes.











Director's Report.


In this report the Director will confine himself to a briei
outline, as the heads of the different divisions have entered into
detail.
As the Legislature convenes during the coming year, the Di..
rector takes this opportunity to impress upon the members of that
body the necessity for appropriations that will enable the Board of
Trustees to enlist and retain the services of loyal and efficient
Station workers. Funds, also, should be provided to carry on
the work in a more efficient manner, for the Station is now recog-
nized as an important factor in the development of the State.
In order to impress upon the public the great resources of the
State, it is absolutely necessary that the experiments at the Sta-
tion, and the co-operative experiments already entered upon else-
where, should be carried out and extended without the difficulties
that have arisen in the past from inadequate means; and further,
that funds should be provided for the enlarging of the field for
co-operative experiments, so as to include oranges, pineapples, vege-
tables of different kinds, tobacco, forage grasses, cattle raising, etc.
In the opinion of the Director it will be infinitely better to ex-
I end the State's money for experimental work of that nature
through the Station than to appropriate it elsewhere. The results
will be much more satisfactory and the moneys thus invested will
return a large interest in valuable data, etc.
The Director takes this opportunity to express to the many
friends of the Station his appreciation of their valuable assistance.

Citrus Experiments at Boca Raton,
The experimental work at Boca Raton was discontinued on
September 1st, 1903.







REPORT FOR FINANCIAL YEAR.


Changes in Station Staff.
F. M. Rolfs, M. S., was elected on June 21, 1904, as Botanist
and Horticulturist, vice H. H. Hume, M. S., resigned April 30,
1904. Mr. Rolfs will enter upon his duties on July 1, 1904, and
will be a valuable addition to the Station force, as he comes highly
recommended.
R. A. Lichtenthaeler. B. S., was elected and entered upon his
duties as Assistant Chemist on September 1, 1903.
F. C. Reimer, B. S., was elected and entered upon his duties
as Assistant Horticulturist and Botanist on September 1, 1903,
vice Lucia McCulloch, B. S., resigned June 30, 1903.
L. De Gottrau resigned as Superintendent of Citrus Experi-
ments at Boca Raton on August 31, 1903. The position was dis-
continued.
E. F. Worthington was elected and entered upon his duties as
Field Assistant in Agriculture on September 1, 1903, vice G. F.
Mitchell, B. S.. resigned March 18. 1903.
A. Tyler was elected and entered upon his duties as stenogra-
pher and librarian on February 18, 1904, vice A. L. Clayton re-
signed February 15, 1904.

Buildings and Equipment.
Although more buildings were needed badly on the Station.
the funds at his disposal would not allow the Director to erect them.
Such repairs as the funds would permit were made, the most nota-
ble being the renovation of the greenhouse.
Several valuable additions of apparatus were made and thb
equipment is on a better footing than ever before.

Publications,
During the year the following publications were issued:
Bulletin 69, Cultivation of Citrus Groves.
Bulletin 70, Pineapple Culture. II.
Bulletin 71, Japanese Persimmons.






FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.


Bulletin 72, Feeding Horses and Mules on Home Grown Feed
Stuffs.
Bulletin 73, The Honey Peach Group.
Bulletin 74, Anthracnose of the Pomelo.
Bulletin 75, Diseases of Irish Potatoes.
Bulletin 76, Insecticides and Fungicides.
Twelve Press Bulletins have been issued.

It will be necessary to increase the number of Bulletins in each
edition at the beginning of the new fiscal year.

Correspondence.

The correspondence continue to increase, which indicates how
strong a hold the Station has upon the people of the State and
upon prospective settlers.

College Farm.

While far from a "model" as yet, immense strides have been
made on the College Farm; a new hay barrack, with complete
equipment has been built; more land cleared; part of the land
stumped; roads made; new fences built and old ones repaired:
good returns obtained from crops planted last year and good pros.
pects for those just planted. All has been done that could be
done with the funds available.

Farmers' Institutes.

With an aggregate attendance of about two thousand, twenty
Institutes were held. The outlook is encouraging, as more interest
is being taken each year by people actually engaged in farming,
which condition is more healthful than it was when large numbers
came out of idle curiosity. A report containing addresses delivered
was published.







REPORT FOR FINANCIAL YEAR. 7


Financial Report.
rThe financial report of the Station for the year ending June
30, 1904, is given below in tabular form:
Receipts:-
Experiment Station Fund ......................... $15,000.00
Station Incidental Flud ......................... . 1,722.21

Total ................................. $16,722.21
Expenditures:-
Salaries ..................... .... ............... $7,805.07
Labor ................ .......................... 1,690.63
Publications .......... ........................... 699.65
Postage and Stationery .............................. 432.77
Freight and Express ................................ 294.22
Heat, Light, Water and Power........................ .553.65
Chemical Supplies .................................. 239.16
Seeds, Plants and Sundry Supplies ................... 412.03
Fertilizers ......................................... 177.85
Feeding Stuffs ..................................... 405.36
Library ............ ............................... 164.13
Tools, Implements and Machinery ..................... 178.30
Furniture and Fixtures ............................. 15.98
Scientific Apparatus ............................... 975.87
Live Stock ........................................ 389.33
Traveling Expenses ................................ 426.20
Contingent Expenses ............................... 15.10
Buildings and Repairs ................. ............ 1.557.71
B balance ........................................... 289.20

Total ................................... $16,722.21






FLOaIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.


REPORT OF THE CHEMICAL DEPARTMENT,


Dr. T. H. Taliaferro, Director.
Sir: The following report of the Chemical Department for
the year ending June 30, 1904, is herewith submitted.
The pineapple investigations have been continued and satis-
factory progress has been made, when the time available for con-
ducting this work, is considered. Bulletin No. 70, which gives the
composition and description of the varieties of pineapples grown
in the State, has been published in co-operation with the Horti-
cultural Department. The pineapple fertilizing experiment has
been continued at Jensen, in co-operation with Hardee Bros.,
where 96 plots are receiving different applications of plant food.
We have endeavored to publish the results of the first crop, which
was gathered in June, 1903, in bulletin form. but have been unable
to do so on account of having no clerical assistance for the De-
partment and the pressure of other matters. A second crop was
gathered in June of this year, and we hope to publish the results
from both crops in a short time.
Some progress has been made towards carrying out the plans
of making a chemical study of Florida fruits. Thus far our at-
tention has been, for the most part, confined to different kinds of
citrus fruits and pineapples. Analyses of a number of varieties of
sweet oranges, which were furnished by the Horticultural Depart-
ment, have been nearly completed.
Three digestion experiments of Florida feeding materials
have been in progress in co-operation with the Agricultural De-
partment. This work was done in duplicate with young steers.
The analytical work has, as yet, been only partly completed. "
In carrying out the above lines of work, together with other
miscellaneous items, somewhat more than two hundred analyses







REPORT FOR FINANCIAL YEAR.


have been made. The correspondence of the Department is still
increasing and it seems that additional help for facilitating this
phase of the Station work is desirable.
Much has been accomplished during the year in the installa-
tion of better equipment. This has been done. for the most part,
by myself and assistants, and has required much time which other-
wise might have been devoted to analytical work. Among the im-
provements may be mentioned, a new 200 light Springfield gas
machine, of the latest type, a distilling plant. a complete power
vacuum drying machine and a new system of drain pipes. An-
other small room has been made available for the laboratory work:
but even with this the quarters are quite limited. The need for a
new chemical building becomes greater each year.
A second assistant has been allowed in this Department,
though the greater part of his time is devoted to College work.
With the improvements above mentioned, the outlook for the work
in this Department is encouraging.
Respectfully submitted,
H. K. MILLER,
Chemist.







FLORIDA AGRICUIATURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.


REPORT OF THE ENTOMOLOGIST.


Dr. T. H. Taliaferro, Director:
Sir: The following is a report of the work done by the Di-
vision of Entomology for the year ending June 30, 1904.
Owing to the demands of the ceasaroom no extensive field
work could be carried on during the first half of the year. How-
ever, considerable was done in filling out a cycle of observations
on pecan insects. Considerable progress has been made with in-
sects of the pecan. Possibly the information accumulated regarding
them may be worked into bulletin form at a later time. Extensive
field tests, comprising dusting and spraying operations for the most
injurious pecan insects, have been outlined for work this fall. My
successor should take up this work at once.
A manual treating of the preparation and application of in-
secticides and fungicides has been prepared conjointly with Prof.
Ilume and is now in the hands of the printer.
Substantial progress has been made with the insect collection
during the year, the coleoptera being systematically arranged and
comprising, perhaps, about 4,000 species. A little student help
with the collections is of the greatest advantage to the Depart-
ment and should be continued. From $200 to $300 worth of new
equipment, in shape of cabinets, insect cases, photographic mate-
rial, etc., have been added to the department. The entomological
equipment is far better than it has previously been.
Respectfully submitted,
H. A. GOSSARD,
Entomologist.







REPORT FOR FINANCIAL YEAR.


REPORT OF THE BOTANIST & HORTICULTURIST.


Dr. T. H. Taliaferro, Director.
Sir: The report of the work done by the Department of
lPotany and Horticulture from June 30th, 1903, to April 26th,
1904, mS submitted herewith.
In July, 1903, Mr. F. C. Reimer, a graduate of the Michigan
Agricultural College was appointed assistant in Botany and Hor
ticulture and entered upon his work in September. Mr. Reimer
has proven himself careful, painstaking and thorough in his work
and his hearty co-operation in the work of the Department. has
been greatly appreciated.
There has been a decided increase in the number of inquiries
concerning the various horticultural crops produced in Florida.
We have had the hearty co-operation of the horticulturists of the
State and everything indicates a steady growth of interest in the
Department and its work.
Publications. -During the year the following publications
have been issued: Bulletin No. 69, Cultivation of Citrus Groves;
No. 70, Pineapple Culture II, varieties, a joint publication with
the Department of Chemistry; No. 71, Japanese Persimmons; No.
73, The Honey Peach Group; No. 74, Anthracnose of the Pomelo:
No. 75, Diseases of Irish Potatoes; No. 76, Insecticides and Fung-
icides, a joint publication with the Department of Entomology.
Buildings.-The old greenhouse having become entirely unfit
for plant work, has been remodeled and put in excellent condition.
We now have a thoroughly modern greenhouse, in every respect
well suited to the work of the Department. With the addition of
a double span vegetable house of about fifty feet run, we would
be as well equipped in this respect as any similar institution in
the country.






FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.


--2 Citrus Work.-During the year, considerable attention, has
been given to the cultivation of Citrus Groves in the State. The
summary of this work is given in Bulletin No. 69, prepared and
published during the year.
In co-operation with Mr. G. L. Taber, of Glen St. Mary,
Florida, a considerable number of crosses were made between the
Triumph pomelo and Citrus trifoliata. Mr. J. P. Abel, a student
in the Department, lent efficient aid in this work. From these
crosses we obtained several seedlings, which are now growing on
the Station grounds. Many show distinct intermediate character-
istics. They should be given good care, as something desirable for
the colder regions of the State may result from these hybrids.
Pineapple Investigations.-These investigations have been car-
ried on with assistance of the Chemical Department along the lines
already laid down. In May-June, 1903, the first crop of pineap-
ples from the experimental plots was secured. Many interesting
variations due to the action of different fertilizers have developed
and much valuable information and data have been secured. Re-
sults of this first year's work with fertilizers have been prepared
and published. The investigations on varieties have been com-
pleted and published as noted above.
The winter of 1903-04 has been favorable to the development
of pineapples and a second crop of fruit has been secured from
the co-operative experimental plots. The conclusions reached dur-
ing the first year have been amply justified by the results of the
second.
In connection with this work we desire to express our appre-
ciation of the active and hearty co-operation of the Chemical De-
partment and Hardee Bros., Jensen, Florida.
Plant Diseases.-Just before harvesting the Irish potato crop
of 1903, Late Blight, a fungous disease caused by Phytopthora
infestanss, made serious inroads. The loss was variously estimated
at from 30 to 50 per ,ent of the crop.
In response to the urgent request of the growers, experi-
ments in connection with the various potato diseases were insu-







REPORT FOR FINANCIAL YEAR.


tuted, with the co-operation of Air. C. G. White, Hastings, Fla.
The results of these experiments together with the recommenda-
tion for the control of the potato diseases prevalent in the State
are given in Bulletin No. 75 of the Station.
Just about the time of gathering the crop, a serious disease
appeared on pomelo fruit. Requests for an immediate investiga-
tion of the disease were made by a number of growers. This was
done and the disease found to be due to a fungus, Cladosporiumo
gleosporiaides Penzig. Recommendations were made which en-
abled the growers to successfully combat the disease, but unfor-
tunately considerable loss had already lten suffered. A deserip-
tion of the disease and methods of controlling it were published in
the Bulletin No. 74.
Ever since our first connection with the Station it has been ob-
served that the pomelo is slightly attacked by "Scab" identical
with that which affects the lemon and sour orange. During the
last two years, the disease has become decidedly more prevalent
and it would be well for growers to be on the lookout for it. It is
very probable that some varieties are m,.re susceptible to it than
others. The King mandarin has also been found severely injured
in a number of cases. It may be the fungus is changing its habits
and that it will become still more common in the future. Fortu-
nately it yields readily to treatment with the common fungicides.
Vegetable Work.-Experimental work with vegetables has
been confined almost entirely to the celery crop. In connection
with this work an investigation in varieties in relation to their
susceptibility to pithiness was undertaken. Seed of twenty-three
self-blanching varieties was supplied by the U. S. Department of
Agriculture for co-operative testing. While great care was exer-
cised in selecting' only self-blanching varieties still a few green
varieties were unknowingly included. In all these green varieties
pithiness developed, while the self-blanching varieties remained
free from it. Hence the experiment was worthless. as the greev
varieties are totally unsuited to our conditions.
It has been argued that pithiness is hereditary in the seed and






4 FLORIDA AGCUI/URAL EXPERIMENT STATION.

while this may be true, it is doubtless due as well to climatic con-
ditions. In the course of our investigations during the past three
or four years, we have determined that extreme variations in tem-
perature, in moisture, or in any condition which may change the
normal condition of the plant, will cause the disorder. Further
investigation in connection with this trouble is necessary.
Respectfully submitted,
H. HAROLD HUME,
Botanist and Horticulturist.






REPORT POR FINANCIAL YEAR.


REPORT OF THE VETERINARIAN.


Dr. T. 1H. Taliaferro, Director.
Sir: I heg to submit herewith the annual report of the work
of the Department of Veterinary Science, covering the period from
July 1, 1903, to June 30, 1904.
The major work of this department for the past year may be
classified under two heads, namely: the protective inoculation of
imported Cattle against Texas eat le fever. and the suppression
of equine glanders. The minor work, while time-consuming, has
consisted in answering correspondents, and prescribing for sick
animals in neighborhoods where the services of a veterinarian were
unobtainable. This latter work is not considered an official duty,
but the demands have been met because I felt a kind of moral res-
ponsibility in the matter. Many animals, whose owners could ill
afford to lose them, have been saved or benefited, and this fact is
stated with a certain amount of pride, even though it would seem
that it has been done at the expense of the more scientific side of
the work.
In pursuance with directions from the Board of Trustees, this
department has prepared for the public fifteen press bulletins upon
veterinary subjects, at opportune seasons, since its establishment.
In December request was made by Mr. S. H. Gaitskill, of Mc-
Intosh, that I immunize twenty-five head of high-grade, shorthorn
heifers against Texas fever, which he had just shipped in from
Kentucky. In a letter just received. Mr. Gaitskill states that none
have died, and that all have been infested with the cow tick, which
is the cause of the disease. A yearling bull purchased by the
Station in Kentucky was immunized also about the same time.
He has been severely infested ith ticks twice and has shown
himself immune. He is now running with the dairy herd, and






PLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.


seems in perfect health. The loss from this artificial immuniza-
tion is generally about 4 per cent., and a further loss occurs when -
the animals are turned out on ticky pastures. The very favorable
results this year are due to the fact that the animals were yearlings,
that they arrived in the State at the proper time, at the beginning
of cold weather, and that they were properly handled and not
allowed to become ticky too soon after the blood inoculations were
made.
The work in glanders has consisted in visiting various points
in the State, taking full charge of the suspected animals, destroying
the affected ones and disinfecting the stables. Mallein tests were
made in all cases where circumstances warranted it.
The following points were visited as a result of reports having
been made of suspicious disease in horses or mules: Zolfo, Conant,
Leesburg, Oxford, Miami, \Wellborn, Sanford, Monticello, Tampa
(twice) and Winter Park. Twenty-six cases were found visibly
affected, and four cases which responded to the mallein test.
The Florida Legislature enacted the following law empowering
this University to deal with communicable animal diseases:

The Law,
Chapter 5261 (No. 156.)
An Act to Provide for the Investigation of Diseases Among Do-
mestic Animals, and to Prevent the Spread of Contagious Dis-
eases Among Such.
Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:
Section 1. The Board of Trustees of the Uniersity of Florida
is hereby authorized and empowered to investigate diseases among
domestic animals, to prescribe rules and regulations for such in-
vestigations, and to adopt such methods as will prevent the spread
of contagious diseases among such. Said Board is hereby authorized
to employ an agent, to .be known as "veterinarian," who shall be a
graduate of a veterinary college, and have had at least five years'
experience in the practice of veterinary medicine, and who has







REPORT FOR FINANCIAL YEAR.


made original investigations in veterinary science, to require of
such veterinarian such duties as in the judgment of said Board will
promote the welfare of the domestic animals of the State of Flor-
ida, and to aid in the dissemination of knowledge of veterinary
science.
Sec. 2. The said Board of Trustees shall have the same power
to promulgate rules and regulations and to enforce the same con-
rning segregation and quarantine of domestic animals when they
reason to believe they are infected with any contagious dis-
a. in any danger of conveying it to other animals, as is now
by la onferred upon the State Health Officer concerning persons.
The du sand powers of said Board of Trustees and said veterina-
rian sha e regulated and controlled by the laws regulating the
powers atn duties of the State Board of Health and State health
officers, in so a as such rules and regulations may be applicable to
the duties herein posed.
Sec. 3. This shall take effect upon its approval by the
Governor.
Approved June 3, 1903.
The Board of Trustees, at a special meeting, formulated the
following Rules and Regulations, under the powers given them by
the above legislative act:

Rules and Regulations.
Adopted at a meeting held on the 8th day of September. 1903,
by the Board of Trustees of the University of Florida. for the
guidance of the veterinarian of the university in the treatment or
destruction of animals affected with a contagious disease, in accord-
ance with the provisions of an act passed by the State Legislature
of Florida, entitled An Act to Provide for the Investigation of
Diseases among Domestic Animals, and to Prevent the Spread of
Contagious Diseases among Such." Approved June 3, 1903.
Rule 1. Dr. C. F. Dawson, the professor of veterinary science
in the University of Florida. situated at Lake City, Fla., is hereby
employed as agent of the Board of Trustees of the University of






FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.


Florida, and is designated as the "veterinarian," and is author-
ized and directed to carry out the provisions of this act, and the
rules and regulations of the Board of Trustees of the University
of Florida pertaining thereto.
Rule 2. The provisions of this act shall apply to the follow-
ing diseases: Glanders and farcy in horses, mules and asses; tuber-
culosis, Texas cattle fever, blackleg, hog cholera, swine plague,
sheep scab, mange in sheep, mange in dogs, rabies, distemper in
dogs, anthrax, foot and mouth disease, deer and cattle disease,
surra, dourine.
Rule 3. All animals shipped, driven or otherwise brought into
this State may be subject to inspection, on arrival, by the "veteri-
narian," or he may, at his discretion, detain any animal or animals
being brought into this State, while in transit, for a sufficient
length of time to make an inspection of the same.
Rule 4. All persons who intend to ship or otherwise bring
into this State any animal or animals may be required to notify the
"veterinarian" of such intention two days in advance of their
shipment.
Rule 5. The "veterinarian" may make tuberculin and mal-
lein tests or other scientific tests on animals, at any time, for the
purpose of diagnosis.
Rule 6. The "veterinarian" shall have power to quarantine
any animal or animals affected with any of the diseases mentioned
in Rule 2. He shall also have power to quarantine any premises
on or in which the said diseased animals are, or have been kept,
and to post notice of such quarantine. He may forbid the removal
of quarantined animals except as he may direct in writing.
Rule 7. The "veterinarian" may require any animals af-
fected with a contagious disease to be destroyed, and may direct
the manner in which the carcass shall be disposed of.
Rule 8. The "veterinarian" may destroy or cause to be de-
stroyed any bedding, harness, stable utensils, drinking troughs,
or any material which, in his judgment, will serve as a source of
infection or further spread of a contagious disease.







REPORT FOR FINANCIAL YEAR.


Rule 9. The "veterinarian" may forbid persons to enter prem-
ises which are in quarantine, and also the use of said premises for
healthy animals for such length of time as he may deem necessary
to prevent the spread of disease.
Rule 10. The "veterinarian" shall have the right to enter
suits in the courts of this State against any person, who in any
way attempts to interfere with him in the performance of his
duties as prescribed in this act. or in the rules and regulations of
the Board of Trustees of the University of Florida, or who shall
fail to carry out the rule of this Board or "veterinarian."
Rule 11. The necessary expenses incurred by the "veterina-
rian" in the discharge of the duties prescribed in this act and in
the rules and regulations pertaining thereto, shall be paid from
the funds of the University of Florida, except that the expense of
the quarantine, the care and feed of the animals, shall be borne by
the owner.
Rule 12. The foregoing rules and regulations shall be appli-
cable also for the guidance of the assistant or assistants of the
"veterinarian" when appointed. and said rules and regulations
shall take effect when adopted by the Board of Trustees of the Uni-
versity of Florida, and shall remain in force until amended or
changed by the said Board.
Notice.-For fines, penalties and infractions of these rules,
see act creating the State Board of Health referred to in the act
giving powers to this board.
BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA:
GEO. W. WILSON, President.
C. F. DAWSON, Veterinarian.
(SEAL.)
Attest: F. L. STRINGER, Secretary.
By recent mutual agreement between the State Board of
Health and the Board of Trustees, the Veterinarian was appointed
Veterinarian to the State Board of Health. Under this agreement
the State Board of Health assumes the responsibility and expenses






FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.


incident to the work, which is now prosecuted under the follow.
ing law, being a part of the "Public Health Laws of Florida";

Chapter 435L
An Act to prohibit the introduction into this State and the sale
therein of horses, mules, cattle, hogs, or other domestic ani-
mals which may be or are at the time of their introduction
or sale suffering from diseases known as glanders, farcy, chol-
era, Texas fever or other virulent, infectious or contagious
diseases, or which were known at the time of such introduction
or sale to have been in contact with any such animals having
had any of such diseases, and prescribing penalties for the
violation of this act.
Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:
Section 1. That hereafter it shall be unlawful for any person
to bring into this State or to offer for sale therein any horses,
mules, cattle, hogs, or other domestic animals, knowing at the
time of such introduction or offering for sale of any such animals
that they are. suffering from diseases known as glanders, farcy,
cholera, Texas fever or other virulent, contagious or infectious dis-
eases.
Sec. 2. That any person who shall knowingly violate the
first section of this act shall be guilty of a felony, and upon con-
viction thereof shall be imprisoned in the State penitentiary for
a term of not less than two years nor more than four years, or
shall be fined in a sum of not less than five hundred dollars or
more than one thousand dollars, or by both such fine and imprison-
ment.
Approved May 25th ,1895.
Respectfully submitted,
CHAS. F. DAWSON,
Veterinarian.







REPORT FOR FINANCIAL YEAR.


REPORT OF THE AGRICULTURIST.


Dr. T. H. Taliaferro, Director.
Sir: I submit herewith the annual report of the Agriculturist
for the Florida Experiment Station for the year ending June 30,
1904.
The work has progressed materially over last year. We are
now getting some stock on hand suitable for experiment work;
also, the fields are getting in better shape.
During last winter a horse feeding experiment was conducted,
using home-grown feed stuffs, in place of corn and oats. The re-
sults are published in bulletin No. 72.
An experiment to determine the digestibility of beggarweed,
Mexican clover and cassava was conducted also. The results of this
experiment are not yet ready for publication.
The pig feeding experiments were continued, using cassava
and sweet potatoes as against corn.
The work for the coming year will be along lines outlined in
last report, cassava, sweet potatoes, beggarweed and velvet beans
being the main lines followed with field crops.
The Station has added a trio of pure bred Berkshire hogs.
Data are being collected relative to the value of crossing the Berk-
shire on native stock.
A silo is being erected for the dairy. Experiments will be
conducted with regard to milk production.
Respectfully submitted,
C. M. CONNER,
Agriculturist.










The following publications of the Florida Experiment Sta-
tion are available for free distribution, and may be secured by
addressing the director of the Experiment Station, University of
Florida, Lake City, Fla.:


2a Fertilizers.......................... pp.48
24 Annual Report .................. 32
25 Leeches and Leeching ........... 17
28 BigHead............... ......" 19
27 Pineapple ............... ...... 1
28 Liver Fluke Southern Cattle
Fever........................... 15
29 The San Jose Scale................ 28
30 The Culture of Tobacco.......... 28
82 Cotton and Its Cultivation ........" 4
38 Orange Groves....................." 833
34 Insect Enemies ..................." 9
86 Insects Injurious to Grain ........ 31t
87 Pineapple ....................... 15
38 Tobacco in Florida................ 63
89 Strawberries ...................... 48
40 The Fall Army Worm ............. 8
41 The San Jose Scale ............... 30
42 Some Strawberry Insects...... .. 55
43 A Chemical Study of Some Typi-
cal Florida Soils................. 128
51 Some Common Florida Scales.... 4
52 Baking Powders ................... 16
53 Some Citrus Troubles............. 35


51 Pecan Culture........... . pp. 81
55 Feeding With Florida Feed Stuffs 95
56 The Cottony Cushion Scale....... 48
57 Top-working of Pecans........... 124
8 Pomelos........................... 43
59 Cauliflower......................... 20
60 Velvet Beans ...................... 24
61 Two Peach Scales. ................* 32
62 Peen-to Peach Group ......... .... 22
63 Packing Citrus Fruits.............. Folio
64 Texas Fever and Salt Sick....... pp. 31
65 The Kumquats...................... 14
66 The Mandarin Orange Group ....'* 32
67 The White Fly ...................." 94
68 Pineapple Culture. L Soils...... 35
69 Cultivation of Citrus Groves...... 30
70 Pineapple Culture. IL Varieties" 82
71 Japanese Persimmons............ 48
72 Feeding Horses and Mules on
Home-Grown Feed-Stuffs..... 16
73 The Honey Peach Group.......... 20
74 Anthracnose of the Pomelo...... 20
75 Potato Diseases ................... 18
76 Insecticides and Fungicides ..... 52


PRESS BULLETINS.


1 Directions for Preparation of Bordeaux
Mixture.
2 Lime and Its Relation to Agriculture.
3 Seed Testing.
4 The White Fly.
5 Basic Slag
6 Nursery Inspection (part 1).
7 Nursery Inspection (part 2).
8 Care of Irish Potatoes Harvested in
the Spring and Held for Fall Planting.
9 Sore Head.
10 Plants Affected by Root Knot.
11 Vinegar
12 Seed Beds and Their Management.
13 Treatment for San Jose Scale.
14 Beef from Velvet Beans and Cassava.
15 and 16 Some Poultry Pests.
17 Preservatives in Canned Goods
18 Cantaloupe Blight.
19 Cut Worms.
20 Hog Cholera and Swine Plague.
21 Parturient Paralysis.
22 Nitrogen as a Fertilizer,
23 Protection Against Drought.
24 Orange Mites.
25 Roup.


26 Lnmpy Jaw.
27 Cover Crops.
28 Moon Blindness.
29 Food Adulteration.
30 Dehorning Cattle.
31 Coffee.
32 Foot and Mouth Disease.
33 Red Soldier Bug or Cotton.Stalner.
34 Ox Warbles.
35 Butter.
36 Book Worms In Cattle.
37 Velvet Bean.
38 Practical Results of Texas Fever Inoc-
ulations.
89 Long Worms in Swine.
40 and 41 Glanders.
42 Food Adulterations-Spices and. Con-
diments.
43 How to Feed a Horse.
44 Tree Planting.
45 The Sugar-cane Borer.
46 Selecting Seed Corn.
47 The Rabid Dog.
48 Adulterated Drugs and Chemicals.
49 Saw Palmetto Ashes.
50 Insect Pests to Live Stock.




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