Group Title: Report for financial year ending June 30th, Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Title: Report for financial year ending June 30th
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 Material Information
Title: Report for financial year ending June 30th
Physical Description: 7 v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Print Co.>
Place of Publication: <Florida
Publication Date: 1903
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1898-1904.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00005154
Volume ID: VID00005
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AMF8111
oclc - 12029597
alephbibnum - 002452806
 Related Items
Preceded by: Report to the President
Succeeded by: Report for the fiscal year ending June 30th

Full Text



FLORIDA

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT

STATION.



Report for Financial Year
ENDING JUNE 30,
1903.


T. H. TAIIAFERRO, Director.









BOARD OF TRUSTEES.


GEO. W. WILSON, President ................. Jacksonville.
F. E. HARRIS, Vice-President..................... Ocala.
J. D. CALLAWAY. Secretary................... Lake City.
C. A. CARSON, Chairman Executive Committee, Kissimmee.
J. R. PARROTT ............................ Jacksonville.
E. D. BEGGS ........................ ....... Pensacola.
L. HARRISON ........ .......... ............ Lake City.


STATION STAFF.

T. H. TALIAFERRO, C. E., Ph. D ...... ........ .. Director.
H. K. MILLER, M. S............ Vice-Director and Chemist.
H. A. GOSSARD, M. S..................... Entomologist.
H. HAROLD HL ME. B. Agr., M.S., Botanist and Horticulturist.
CHAS. F. DAWSON, M. D., D. V. S............... Veterinarian.
*CHAS. M. CONNER, B. S ..................Agriculturist.
A. W. BLAIR, M. A................... Assistant Chemist.
LUCIA MCCULLOCH, B. S., Asst. Biologist and Asst. Librarian.
W. P. JERNIGAN ................ Auditor and Bookkeeper.
A. L. CLAYTON ............. Stenographer and Librarian.
Louis DEGOTTRAU .............. Supt. Citrus Experiments.
JOHN F. MITCHELL ............ Foreman of Station Farm.
JoHN H. JEFFERIES.. Gardener in Horticultural Department.
G. F. MITCHELL, B. S..... Asst. Agricultural Experiments.


*Superintendent of Farmers' Institutes.



















LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL.

Ilon. W. S. Jennings, Governor of Florida:
Smr: I have the honor to transmit herewith the Annual
Report of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station for the
year ending June 30, 1903. I am, sir,
Very respectfully yours.
T. H. TALIAFERRO,
Director.
Lake City, Fla., July 31, 1903.










REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR.


GENERAL REMARKS.

Again the Director feels that it is necessary for him to
recommend that such funds be appropriated by the Legislature
as will enable the Board of Trustees to retain the services of
efficient Station workers, for the menace of losing members of
the staff, trained in Florida conditions, becomes greater each
year, and whenever one leaves to accept a more lucrative posi-
tion elsewhere, the State loses far more than the amount neces-
sary to retain his services.
Funds should be appropriated, also. for more Assistants
at the Station. and for the providing of better buildings and
equipment, of which the Station stands sadly in need. For
instance. during the past year, many valuable plants, etc.. were
lost, owing to the insecure and inefficient condition of the green-
house.
Fully recognizing the deep and sincere interest the Chief
Executive of our State is taking in the work of the Station, the
Director cannot lose this opportunity to express his gratitude
to the Governor for his strong support at all times.
The Director and his staff desire further to express their
full confidence in the Board of Trustees, whose untiring devo-
tion and invaluable suggestions have been of the greatest assist-
ance, and to thank them for the interest manifested in the work
of this Station.
The Director also wishes to state that the success of the
past year has been due to the ready and cordial support given
by the members of the Staff in the furtherance of the work.







CHANGES IN THE STATION STAFF.

In accordance with the recommendation o0 the Director,
on September 18, 1903, H. K. Miller, M. S., was appointed
Vice-Director, in addition to his position of Chemist.
By an act of the Legislature, passed June 3. 1903, the Vet-
erinarian, C. F. Dawson, M. D., D. V. S., was appointed State
Veterinary Agent. which appointment greatly enlarges the
scope of his work in the State.
Lucia McCulloch, B. S., Assistant Biologist and Assistant
Librarian, resigned on June 30, 1903. The Director wishes to
take this opportunity on behalf of the Board of Trustees, his
colleagues and himself, to express the appreciation in which her
services were held, and the deep regret at losing her valuable
assistance.
The resignation of C. S. Brock. as Stenographer and
Librarian, was accepted April 30, 1903, he having obtained a
more profitable position. A. L. Clayton was appointed to fill
the vacancies, and has filled them satisfactorily.
G. F. Mitchell, B. S., was appointed on February I, 1903,
to the position of Field Assistant in Agriculture. He resigned
within a few weeks to enter upon Tea Culture, under the
auspices of the United States Government.

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT.

No new buildings were added to the Station Department,
although a small barn was erected upon its premises, to enable
the Veterinarian to carry on his work in immunizing cattle
against Texas fever.
Only a few essential articles of equipment were added to
the Station Departments.








PUBLICATIONS AND CORRESPONDENCE.

During the year, eight Bulletins were issued, dealing with
the following subjects: No. 61, Two Peach Scales: No. 62,
The Peen-to Peach Group; No. 63, Diagrams for Packing
Citrus Fruits; No. 64, Texas Cattle Fever and Salt-Sick; No.
65. The Kumquats: No. 66. The Mandarin Orange Group; No.
67, White Fly; No. 68, Pineapple Culture, i, Soils. Twelve
Press Bulletins were issued, and, as usual. they were written
upon subjects pertinent to the welfare of the farmers, and other
people in the State. The increase in the demand for Bulletins
has become so large that it will soon be necessary to add to the
number of Bulletins in each edition.
The amount of necessary correspondence has also increas-
ed. The increase in the amount of correspondence, and in the
demand for Bulletins, seems to indicate that the Station is
gradually extending its sphere of usefulness, and becoming, as
it should be. a boon to the people of the State.

THE COLLEGE FARM.

Full possession of the College or "Model" Farm, pur-
chased by the Board of Trustees, was obtained on January I,
.1903. Since that time work has been done in clearing some of
the land, cleaning it. repairing fences, preparing a portion of it
for gardens, etc.. and planting various crops. The prospect for
obtaining some return during the next fiscal year is bright,
although largely dependent upon the season. The outlook for
the gradual development of the property into a "model" is
good. but funds are badly needed in this, as in other work.

FARMERS' INSTITUTES.

On account of the interest felt generally throughout the
country, the subject of Institutes is here touched upon by the








Director. Institutes were held wherever desired, if dates could
be arranged. There were twenty-one meetings. in different
counties. The estimated attendance was about two thousand,
and ranged from twenty-five to five hundred people at an Insti-
tute. The expense was, approximately, sixteen hundred
($i,6oo) dollars.
A report of the Farmers' Institutes, containing the majority
of the addresses delivered, was published and has proved very
popular. It is to be regretted, in view of the increasing interest
in the Institutes, that the Legislature should have failed to make
an appropriation for their continuance. The University, how-
ever, will carry them forward so long as it has any funds avail-
able for that.purpose.


FINANCIAL REPORT.


This report covers the financial year ending June 30, 1903,
arkd for purposes of comparison the expenditures for the year
ending June 30, 1902, are given.








FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE FLORIDA AGRICL'L-
TURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.

For the year ending June 30, 1902-1903.
1901-1902 1902-1903
Salaries, ........................ $ 6263 035 $ 7845 36
Labor .... ...... ...... ........ 3714 68 2592 45
Publications, ...... ... ........... 1124 20 762 32
Postage and Stationery, ........ ... 347 42 225 16
Freight and Express ..... ......... 218 75 253 79
Heat, Light, Water and Power, . . 322 6o 447 69
Seeds, Plants and Sundry Supplies. 489 43 468 85
Chemical Supplies, .............. 37 78 117 62
Fertilizers, ...... ..... ......... 304 08 646 39
Feed Stuffs ........ .......... . 1321 69 1032 57
Library .... ...... .... .......... 137 93 66 21
Tools. Implements and Machinery, .. 203 25 270 88
Furniture and Fixtures, ....... 10 75 oo
Scientific Apparatus, ..... .......... 8 07 315 lo
Live Stock. ...... .... .......... 397 93 105 oo
Traveling Expenses ..... .... ..... 303 97 345 82
Contingent Expenses, ............ 125 36 42 o10
Buildings and Repairs, ..... ........ 390 8 546 44

Total ...... ...... .......... $15721 12 $16083 75







BULLETINS OF THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION

NO. AUTHOR. .TITLE. DATE.


1 J. Kost ... ...... ..... General ....... ....... ........ April, 1888. (Out of print).
2 J. Kost..... ....... General ............. .. May and June, 1888.
3 J. Kost...... .......... Agriculture.......... ......... .. September, 1888. (Out of print).
4 Jas. P. DePass........... General..................... .January 189.
5 Jas. P. DePass .......... Analysis of Fertilizer.... ...... April, 1889. (Out of print).
6 Jas. P. DePass.......... General...... ..... ..... July, 1889. (Out of print).
7 Jas. P. DePass......... General ....................... October, 1889. (Out of print).
8 Jas. P. DePass.......... General...................... January, 1890. (Out of print).
9 Jas. P. DePass..... ...... Entomological Notes........... April, 1890. (Out of print).
10 Jas. P. DePass........... Phosphate and Superphosphate.. July, 1890.
11 Jas. P. DePass........... General.............. ... ..... October, 1890.
12 Jas. P. DePass.......... General.............. ... ..... January 1st, 189L
13 Jas. P. DePass........... General.............. ... ..... April, 1891.
14 Jas. P. DePass........... General.............. ... ..... July, 1891 (Out of print).
15 Jas. P. DePass .......... Tobacco and Its Cultivation..... October 1st, 1891.(Out of print).
16 Jas. P. DePass......... General Farm Crops ............ January 1st, 1892.
17 Jas. P. DePass........... General ..... .. ........ ..April, 1892.
18 Jas. P. DePass...... Grasses, Forage Plants and
Tomato Blight.............. July, 1892. (Out of print).
19 Jas. P. DePass............ Tobacco...... ........ ......... October, 1892.
20 A. A. Persons........ ... Soil and Fertilizers...... ..... September, 1893. (Out of print)
21 P. H. Rolfs.......... The Tomato and Some of its
Diseases.................. October, 1893. (Out of print).
22 A. A. Persons........... Fertilizers........ .............. November, 1893.
23 P. H. Rolls.......... .... Insecticides and Fungicides...... December, 1893. (Out of print).
24 0. Clute ............... Annual Report ............... January, 1894.
25 A. W. Bitting.......... Leeches and Leeching ......... September, 1894.
26 A. \V. Bitting .......... Big Head.............. ..... October, 1894.
27 L. A. Washbourne........ Pineapple............ ... ..... November, 1894.
28 A. \V. Bitting .......... Liver Fluke-Southern Cattle
Fever...... ............... December, 1894.
29 P. H. Rolls.............. The San Jose Scale ............ August, 1895.
30 F. B. Moodie........... The Culture of Tobacco........ November, 1896.
31 P. H. Rolls.............. Some Market Vegetables........ December, 1895. (Out of print).
32 A. A. Persons ........... Cotton and its Cultivation........ January, 1896.
33 M. S. Moreman......... Orange Groves .............. February, 1896.
34 A. L. Quaintance........ Insect Remedies .... ........ March, 1896.
35 0. Clute.... .. ..... Cassava............ ..... .....April, 1896. (Out of print).
36 A. L. Quaintance......... Insects Injurious to Grain..... October, 1896.
37 0. Clute, W. A. Marsh... Pineapple .............. ....... November, 1896.
38 F. B. Moodie ........... Tobacco in Florida ............. January. 1897.
39 S. Powers .............. Strawberries .................... July 1897.
40 A. L. Quaintance......... The Fall Army Worm .......... July 1897.
41 P. H. Rolfs............ The San Jose Scale ............ August, 1897.
48 A. L. Quaintance ........ Some Strawberry Insects.... .. \ugust, 1897.
43 A. A. Persons.......... A Chemical Study of Some Typ.
ical Florida Soils.......... September, 1897.
44 H. E. Stockbridge....... Cane, Syrup, Sugar ..... ... ..January, 1898. (Out of print).
46 A. L. Quaintance......... Injurious Insects.......... ...... March, 1898.
46 A. L. Quaintance........ The Strawberry Thrips and the
Onion Thrips.............. July, 1898.
47 P. H. Rolls...... ...... Diseases of the Tomato.......... September, 1898. (Out of print).
48 A. L. Quaintance......... Insect Enemies of the Tobacco
in Florida............ ...... October, 1898.
49 H. E. Stockbridge....... Cassava as a Money Crop........ March, 1899.
60 P. H. Rolfs.............. Pineapple Fertilizers............. May, 1899.
61 H. A. Gossard ..... ..... Some Common Florida Scales... January, 1900.
52 H. K. Miller.......... ... Baking Powders.............. February, 1900.
63 H. Harold Hume..t....... Some Citrus Troubles........... March, 1900.
64 H. Harold Hume......... Pecan Culture..... ............ August, 1900.
55 H. E. Stockbridge....... Feeding with Florida Feed.....
Stuffs ....................... September, 1900.
66 H. A. Gossard............ The Cottony Cushion Scale...... May, 190L








BULLETINS OF THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION

AUTHOR. TITLE. DATE.

67 H. Harold Hume ......... Top-working of Pecans........... June, 1901.
68 H. Harold Hume ......... Pomelos.......... ................ July, 1901.
N9 H. Harold Hume......... Cauliflower..................... October. 1901.
60 H. K. Miller.......... ..Velvet Beans................. January 1902.
61 H. A. Gossard .......... wo Peach Scales................ July. 12.
62 H. Harold Hume......... rhe Peen-to Peach Group...... September. 1902.
63 H. Harold Hume........ Diagrams for Packing Citrus October, 190"2.
64 Chas. F- Dawson........ Fruits......... ...........
65 H. Harold Hume......... Texas Cattle Fever and Salt Sick December, 1902.
66 H. Harold Hnm ........ The Kuniuats ................ February, 1903.
67 H. A. Gossard......... The Mandarin Orange Group .... une. 1901.
68 H. K. Miller............. White Fly.................... June. 1903.
H. llarold Hume...... Pineapple Culture. 1. Soils.... 'July. 1902.

PRESS BULLETINS.


I Il. Harold Ilutme.........
2. H. K. Miller...........


3
4
5
S
7
8


H. Harold Hume........
H. A. Gossard...........
H. K. Miller.............
H. A. Gossard...........
H. A. Gossard...........
J. F. Mitchell..........

Chas. F. lbDw. t.. .
H. Harold Hume........
A. W. Blair.............
John H. Jeffcriez ........
H. A. Gossard............
II. E. Stockbridge.......


15 and 16 Ohls. I. Dawson
17 A. W. Blair...............
18 H. Harold Hume........
19 H. A. Gossard..........
20 Chas. F. Dawson.........
2 Chas. F. Dawson........
22 H K. Miller ..... .....
23 H. E. Stockbridge........
24 H. A. Gossard..........
25 Chas. F. Dawson ........
26 Chas. F. Dawson........
27 H. Harold Hume........
28 Chas. F. Dawson.........
29 A. W. Blair...............
80 Chas. F. Dawson........
31 A. W. Blair............
32 Chas. F. Dawson.........
33 H. A. Gossard ............
34 Chas. F. Dawson........
35 A. W. Blair............
36 Chas. F. Dawson.........
37 Chas. M. Conner .........
38 Chas-. F. Dawson........


Directions for Preparation of
Bordeaux Mixture........ February 1, 1901.
Lime and its Relation to Agri-
culture ........ .......... March 1 1901
Seed Testing ................ April 1, 1901.
The White Fly........ .......... May 1, 1901,
Basic Slag.......... ............ July 1, 1901.
Nursery Inspection (part 1).... August 15, 1901.
Nursery Inspection (part 2)..... September 1, 1901.
Care of Irish Potatoes Harvested
in the Spring and Held for
Fall Planting........ .. September 15, 1901.
sore Head .. October 1, 1901.
Plants Affected lby Rool Knot.. October 15, 190L
Vinegar ..... ................ November 1, 1901.
Seed Beds and Their Manageme November 15, 1901.
Treatment for San Jose Scale.... December 1, 1901
Beef from Velvet Beans and
Cassava.......... ......... December 15. 190L
Some Poultry Pests..... .....J. anuary 1st. & 15th, 1902.
Preservatives in Canned Goods.. February 1, 190I.
Cantaloupe Blight.....-....--..- February 15, 19IS.
Cut Worms .......... ............ March 1. 1901.
Hog Cholera and Swine Plague.. March 15, 1982.
Parturient Paralysis ..... ..... April 15. 1902.
Nitrogen as a Fertilizer........ April 15, 1901.
Protection Against Drought..... May 1, 1902.
Orange Mites........ ........ ... May 10, 190I .
Roup........ ................... June 1, 1902.
Lumpy Jaw............ ...... June 6, 1902.
Cover Crops ...--- ----........ luly L 1902.
Moon Blindness ...... ....J.... uly 15. 190Z.
Food Adulteration. (misbrand- September 1, 1902.
ing. sophistication and fraud).
Dehorning Cattle... .......... October 1, 1902.
Food Adulteration (Coffee)...... November 1, 1902.
Foot and Mouth Diseases...... December 1, 1902.
The Red Soldier Bug or Cotton
Stainer........ ........ ........ January 1, 1903.
Ox Warbles.................... February 1. 1903
Butter......... ......... .....*. March 1, 1903.
Hook Worms in Cattle.......... pril 1, 1901
The Velvet Bean........ .. May 1. 1903.
Practical Results of The Texas
Fever Inoculations ............. June 1. 1903.








REPORT OF THE CHEMIST

Dr. T. H. Taliaferro, Director:
SIR: The following report of the work done by the
Chemical Department for the year ending June 30, 1903, is
herewith submitted.
Owing to the increased demand on my time for giving
instruction in the University, it has been necessary to reduce
the scope of my work. Our pineapple investigations have
assumed such proportions that it has been necessary to devote
the greater portion of my time to this line of work. The dif-
erent lines of work which have engaged my attention during
the year may be summarized as follows: Investigating pineap-
ple soils; fertilizer experiments with the pineapple plant;
chemical study of the pineapple; chemical analysis of different
Florida fruits; miscellaneous analyses. In addition to the above
considerable time was given to studying methods for determin-
ing the available fertilizer constituents in soils. This was done
in co-operation with the Department at Washington.
The work on the pineapple soils has been completed and
the results have been published in bulletin 68, which was
recently issued by the Horticultural and Chemical Depart-
ments.
The fertilizer experiment has demanded considerable at-
tention and has been in progress for two years. The first crop
of fruit was gathered in June, and it is my purpose to issue a
bulletin giving the results obtained by the experiment some time
during the coming year.
The analysis of different varieties of pineapples which was
begun last year, has been completed and the results will be pub-
lished in a short time. It is my purpose to make a chemical
study of a number of fruits which are grown in Florida. A
few have already beeni analyzed and effort will be made to push
this work more rapidly another year.
It was not possible to conduct a study of certain feed stuffs








which were taken up last year, but I hope to resume this work
later. A number of miscellaneous samples have been analyzed,
but work of this character is becoming less every year, as I
do not think it justifiable.
The following table includes the different materials which
have been analyzed during the past twelve months:


Kumquats ..............
Lime, ..................
Cottonseed Meal. ........
Iron Ore ................
Soils and Sub-soils. ......
Dissolved Bone, ...........
Sulphate of Potash, ......
Castor Pomace, .........
Bone M eal, ............
Camphor Plants. ........
Vinegar ............. .
Beggar Weed, .........


121 Pineapples, ...........
I Pawpaw .............
5)Phosphate, ..... .......
i jThomas Slag, ...........
571 Acid Phosphate. ........
i IMuriate of Potash .......
21Kainit, ...............
i Dried Blood, ..........
i Nitrate of Soda, ........
21Fertilizers ............
i Palmetto Root, .........
I Beggar Weed Root, .....


In closing, I wish to call attention again to the small
amount of room available for carrying on the work of the
Chemical Department, and urge that more roomy quarters be
provided as soon as practicable. I also request that an addi-
tional assistant be appointed as the amount of work on hand is
too great to be successfully carried on by the present Chemical
force. Respectfully submitted,
H. K. MILLER, Chemist.

REPORT OF THE ENTOMOLOGIST.

Dr. T. H. Taliaferro, Director:
SIR: I beg to submit herewith the following report of
work done by the Division of Entomology during the fiscal
year which closed June 30, 1903.
Two regular bulletins have been prepared and issued by








me during the year, one upon Two Injurious Peach Scales, and
one upon the Orange White Fly. The latter is a very impor-
tant publication, and will do much toward reducing our annual
loss of over a quarter of a million dollars from the ravages of
this insect.
Investigations have also been conducted with pecan insects
and a bulletin treating of them will be prepared during the
coming year. An inquiry into the insecticidal practice of Flor-
ida farmers and fruit growers has been made preparatory to
the publication of a bulletin on Insecticides and Spraying which
should-be issued in the near future.
I have addressed several farmers' institutes during the
year and made a number of journeys of investigation. My
correspondence has been greater than in any previous year.
indicating an increased tendency to consult the Station re-
garding agricultural matters.
A small orchard has been planted out for entomological
experimentation and an excellent force pump has been pur-
chased.
The financial policy recently adopted by the Station will
enable me to make some needed additions to the library and to
build up the insect collection, both exceedingly important
matters.
Comparatively speaking. the outlook for increased effi-
ciency in my department is distinctly encouraging.
Respectfully submitted.
H. A. GOSSARD, Entomologist.

REPORT OF THE BOTANIST AND HORTICUL-
TURIST.

Dr. T. H. Taliaferro. Director:
SiR: The report of the work of the Department of
Botany and Horticulture from June 30, 1902, to July 1, 1903,
i< herewith submitted.








The correspondence of the Department has increased about
one-third over that of last year and greater interest is being
taken in the work than heretofore by the people of our State.
The work of the Department has progressed along the
lines laid down a year ago. The investigations being confined
to, citrus fruits, pineapples, vegetables and plant diseases.
Publications.-During the year the following publications
have been issued by the Department: Bulletins No. 62. The
Peen-to Peach Group; No. 63. Packing Diagrams for Citrus
Fruits; No. 65, Kumquats; No. 66, The Mandarin Orange
Group, and No. 68. Pineapple Culture, i. Soils, the last being
a joint publication with the Department of Chemistry.
Citrus Work.-Particular attention has been given during
the year to the methods of cultivation of citrus proves and a
bulletin has been prepared for publication, which will be issued
soon. The citrus fruit investigation carried on during the
winter has been a study of lemons, limes and citrons, upon
which a publication will also be prepared for the ensuing year.
Pineapple Investigations.-The work on the pineapples
has gone forward satisfactorily, and, as noted above, one pub-
lication has been isslied. The first crop of fruit has been
secured from the pineapple fertilizer experiments, and a publi-
cation on this section of the work is now in preparation. This
work is being carried on in conjunction with the Chemical
Department.
The study of pineapple varieties has been completed and
a publication will be issued on that subject.
Vegetable Work.-In vegetable work the energy of the
Department has been centered upon the celery industry, and
the investigations are now nearly completed.
Plant Diseases.-The worst outbreak in plant diseases
during the year has been that effecting the potato crop of the
State. A preliminary investigation shows that four important
diseases have been instrumental in materially lessening the out-
put of the potato. These are Early blight. Macrosporium








solani; Late blight, Phythopthora infestans; Potato scab,
Oospora scabies; and the Sterile fungus, Rhizoctonia. A pre-
liminary publication on these diseases will be issued before 'he
spring planting, and experiments looking to the controlling of
them will be instituted during the coming season.
Respectfully submitted,
H. HAROLD HUME, Botanist and Horticdlturist.

REPORT OF THE VETERINARIAN.

Dr. T. H. Taliaferro, Director:
SIR: I beg to submit herewith the annual report of the
work of the Department of Veterinary Science, covering the
period from July i, 1902, to June 30, 1903.
The major work of this department for the past year may
be classified under three heads:
First. The protective inoculation of cattle against Texas
cattle fever. The work consists in inoculating into susceptible
animals the parasitic protozan which causes the fever. All
southern cattle carry this protozoan in their blood, and being
themselves immune to its disease-producing qualities, gives us
reason for supposing its transference from southern to north-
ern cattle would also produce a like immunity in them. The
work wa.s carried out on 26 Short-horn cattle from Kentucky.
In the latter State, the disease does not exist naturally, hence.
Kentucky cattle, like all other Northern cattle, when brought
into Florida, and other Southern States, must be immunized
against the disease. The operation consists in injecting the
blood from the Florida animal into the Northern animal. As a
rule, a non-fatal attack of Texas fever occurs, which produces
a degree of immunity against a future fatal attack. The work
resulted in the fortification of 25 head of animals against the
disease. Without this fortification, a large per centage would
have died.
Second. Uncinariasis, "Salt-sickness," the "Sick," is the








most troublesome disease of cattle in Florida at the present
time. This disease has held the attention of the Department
continuously since its organization. Efforts have been, and are
now being made to discover a proper method of treatment.
While some success has been attained, it must be admitted that
a "sure cure" has not been found, nor can the promise be made
that it will be in the future. A distinct advance was made in
our knowledge of its cause, when it was discovered that animals
suffering from true "salt-sickness" are infested with a para-
sitic intestinal worm belonging to the genus Uncinaria, the
Uncinaria radiata.
Treatment consists in using remedies which kill the worm,.
and those which have for their object the rebuilding of the
blood, and tonic effect upon the digestive system.
Third. This Department is clothed with authority by the
State of Florida to investigate, segregate. or destroy domes-
ticated animals afflicted with certain communicable diseases.
The date of this report precludes a statement of the work that
is being done in this direction.
Following is a copy of the law giving powers above re-
ferred to:

CHAPTER 5261 (No. 156).

"An Act to Provide for the Investigation of Diseases Among
Domestic Animals, and to Prevent the Spread of Conta-
gious Diseases Among Such.
"Be it Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:
"SECTION i. The board of trustees of the University of
Florida is hereby authorized and empowered to investigate dis-
eases among domestic animals, to prescribe rules and regula-
tions for such investigations, and to adopt such methods as
will prevent the spread of contagious diseases among such.
Said board is hereby authorized to employ an agent to be







known as "Veterinarian," who shall be a graduate of a veter-
inary college, and have had at least five years' experience in
the practice of veterinary medicine, and who has made original
investigations in veterinary science, to require of such veter-
inarian such duties as in the judgment of said board will pro-
mote the welfare of the domestic animals of the State of Flor-
ida, and to aid in the dissemination of knowledge of veterinary
science.
"SEc. 2. The said board of trustees shall have the same
power to promulgate rules and regulations and to enforce the
same concerning the segregation and quarantine of domestic
animals when they have reason to believe they are infected
with any contagious disease or in any danger of conveying it to
other animals, and is now by law conferred upon the State
Health Officer concerning persons. The duties and powers of
said board of trustees and said veterinarian shall be regulated
and controlled by the laws regulating the powers and duties of
the State Board of Health and State health officers, in so far as
such rules and regulations may be applicable to the duties
herein imposed.
"SEC. 3. This act shall take effect upon its approval by the
Governor.
"Approved June 3, 1903."
Respectfully submitted,
CHARLES F. DAWSON, Veterinarian.

REPORT OF AGRICULTURIST.

Dr. T. H. Taliaferro, Director:
Sm : I herewith submit the annual report of the Agricul-
turist of the Florida Experiment Station for the year ending
June 30, 1903.
I took charge of the work Sept. I, 1902. There being no
records of the experiment work being carried on, it was neces-
sary to start new experiments. This, of course, is slow work









at first, and owing to the fact that it is necessary to duplicate
the work somewhat before the results are published, it will be
some time before this department will have much to publish.
The lines of work being carried on are about as follows:
Field Work. The field work is confined largely to velvet
beans, cow peas. cassava and sweet potatoes. We will try to
increase the productiveness of the velvet bean and also select
for early varieties so that they may be grown farther north.
Cow peas are used as a source of protein for feeding cattle and
hogs. The beggar weed is also used for this purpose. when
possible. Data are being collected as to the relative value of
these two plants. Cassava and sweet potatoes are grown as a
source of carbohydrates for cattle and hog feeding. Data are
being collected as to the relative cost of producing a pound of
pork and beef with cassava and sweet potatoes.
Fertilizer experiments are also being carried on with
these two plants.
Several varieties of cotton are being tested for the L'. S.
Department of Agriculture.
Grasses are receiving some attention. We are trying to
find a grass that is suitable for pasture and at the same time
does not cost too much per acre to get a stand.
We expect. soon. to start some co-operative experiments
with fertilizers.
Live Stock. The Station has just purchased some regis-
tered Short-horn cattle with the idea of crossing on the native
cattle and study the value of such crosses for range purposes.
Some feeding experiments were carried on last winter to
determine the relative value of cassava and sweet potatoes.
Hogs and steers, both, were used in this work. This work will
be duplicated the coming winter.
Respectfully submitted,
C. M. CONNER, Agriculturist.




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