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Title: Report of the president
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 Material Information
Title: Report of the president
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Agricultural College
Publisher: The College
Place of Publication: Lake City, Fla
Lake City, Fla
Publication Date: 1896-1897
Frequency: annual
regular
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Subject: Agricultural colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Lake City   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Lake City   ( lcsh )
College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Lake City   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
Periodicals   ( lcsh )
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Statement of Responsibility: The Florida Agricultural College.
General Note: Description based on: 1896-7.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00005153
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 51158438
lccn - 2002229302
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Preceded by: President's annual report of the Florida Agricultural College for the year ...

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    Financial report of the Florida Agricultural College for the year ending June 30, 1896
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Full Text

The


FLORIDA


Agricultural College,


Lake City,




Report of the


Florida.




President.


O. CLUTE.


1896=7.

DELAND, FLA.
E. O. PAINTER & CO.
1897.









The Florida Agricultural College.




Report of the President.

To THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES,
Florida State Agricultural College.
Sirs.-The college year of 1896-7, which is now drawing to a
close, has been one of success and progress in all lines of work.
The general health of the students and faculty has been good.
But very few members of the faculty have been absent from a
day's duty on account of health, and there have been few absen-
tees from any cause. During the winter a visitation of grippe
attacked many students and professors, but it was of a mild type.
and yielded readily to treatment. There has been no other gen-
eral attack of disease during the year.
ATTENxDANCE.--The enrollment of students for the year is
197. Of this number 151 are males, and 46 are females. The
enrollment shows the whole number of students attending at any
time during the year, and is, of course, always larger than the
actual attendance at any particular time. The attendance during
this, the last term of the year, is o09 males, and 38 females: total
147. The attendance at the same period of the year in 1896 was
116 males and 33 females; total 149.
The exceptionally close times for money, the excitement
and interest due to the presidential campaign, and the great de-
vastation wrought by the storm of last September have made
the attendance at the college this year smaller than it would
otherwise have been. And there have been some other influences
at work which have probably made the attendance smaller than







it would have been. But in spite of all difficulties the enrollment
is only two less than in 1895-6 when it was 199 at this period of
the term. About May ist last year there were some additions
to our list of students, as the high school in Lake City closed,
and the whole enrollment for the year reached 203, being two
less than in the previous year, when it was 205, which is the
largest enrollment the college has had.
In nearly all schools in all parts of the country the enroll-
ment of students this year has been smaller than in some previ-
ous years. In some schools the enrollment has been much
smaller than formerly. The excellent enrollment at our school,
in spite of all untoward influences, speaks well for the general
prosperity of Florida, and for the confidence in our school which
the people of Florida begin to feel.
Comparing the present enrollment of students with that of
the year before the present board of trustees assumed control of
the college shows a most encouraging increase. The enrollment
for several years is as follows,-the year 1892-3 being the one
preceding the administration of the present board:-
1892-3 .................... .. ............ ........ 83
1893-4 ......... .. .. ........ ......... ... .......... 187
1894-5 ............. .... ............ .............. 205
1895-6 ........... ........ .......... ............. 203
1896-7 ................... ........... ............. 197
An Analysis of the Attendance.
SESSION 1896-7.
Graduate Students ................................... 2
Seniors .......................... ......... ..... 7
Juniors ......... ....... .......... .............. To
Sophomores .......... ...... .......... ............ 16
Freshm en ............... ...... ....... ............ 46
Business .................. ........ ....... .......... 35
Preparatory ................ .............. ......... 57
Specials .......... ...... ... ... ........ ............. 24

T otal ............ ........ ...... ................. 97






Men students ............ ............... .......... 151
W omen students .............. ........ ............. 46

Total ......... ........ ......... ................. 197
Counties of Florida, and States and Countries Represented


Alachua County ......
Bradford County ......
Brevard County .......
Citrus County .......
Columbia County ....
Dade County ... ....
DeSoto County ... ..
Duval County .. .....
Escambia County ...
Franklin County .. .. ..
Gadsden County ......
Hamilton County ......
Hernando County .....
Hillsborough County ..
Lafayette County .....
Lake County .. .. ....
Leon County ... ......
Levy County ... .. ....
Madison County . . ..
Manatee County .. .. ..
Marion County .....
Monroe County ... ....
Nassau County .... ..


Orange County ........ .
Polk County .......... 3
Putnam County ...... .o
St. Johns County ...... 4
Sumter County ....... .
Suwannee County ....... 2
Volusia County ..... .. 2
Walton County ........ 2
Washington County ... I
Alabama, State ... ..... 2
Georgia ............. 2
Indiana . .... .... .... I
New York .. ........ I
North Carolina ........ 1
South Carolina ........ .
Kentucky ....... .. .
M ississippi ... .... .. I
Massachusetts .... . . 2
Virginia ... ....... .. .
Mexico ........... .. .
Cuba .................. 2

Total ........... .. 197


It will be seen by examining the above analysis that we
have 69 students from Columbia county, Florida, in which coun-
ty the college is located. It is, of course, grateful to the author-
ities to have the people among whom the college is located show
their confidence in the school by sending their boys and girls to
receive its training. But whether this large number of students
from Lake City and Columbia county is altogether for the best
is a question that should receive consideration. In as far as stu-
dents from this section are prepared to enter the regular classes,







in the four-year college courses, there is at present no serious
objection to their admission, though the time will doubtless
come when more numerous applications from other counties
will make it necessary to curtail the too large proportionate
number from Columbia county. But in regard to our prepara-
tory school, conditions are somewhat different. The prepara-
tory school is especially intended to prepare for the college class-
es those students who come from sections of the state where
there are no good preparatory schools. It was not intended that
our preparatory school should take the place of the public school
in Lake City, and, by giving a good course of training to the
boys and girls of the city and county, save to the city and coun-
ty expense of erecting buildings and paying a full corps of
teachers, for a first-rate school of their own. But the people of
Lake City were not slow to discover the excellence of our pre-
paratory school and the economy of sending to it, hence the
large number of students from this city in our school and the
corresponding small number in its grammar school and high
school, for which the city supplies but few teachers, and gives to
them most inferior buildings, and most meagre equipment.
A further matter of importance in this connection is the ele-
ment of disorder introduced into college discipline by so large a
number of students who do not room in the college barracks,
and who for a good part of the 24 hours cannot be under the di-
rect supervision of college authority. Upon this point I will not
now dwell, but will only say that a very large part of the friction
as to control of students comes from those students who do not
room in the barracks, but who have their rooms with their
parents or with others in the city.

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION.-The agricultural and mechani-
cal colleges in all the states are founded on the grants of land
and of money made to the states by congress. The first grant
was of laflds under the Morrill bill in 1862. Section 4 of this bill
says that the proceeds of the lands shall be inviolably appropri-
ated "to the endowment, support and maintenance of at least
one college, where the leading object shall be, without exclud-







ing other scientific and classical studies, and including military
tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agri
culture and the mechanic arts."
The Morrill bill of 1890 grants money to the several states for
the additional endowment of the schools of agriculture and the
mechanic arts. This fund began at $15,ooo a year, increases at
the rate of $1,ooo a year, until it reaches the amount of $25,ooo
a year, at which point it remains a permanent endowment. The
Morrill bill giving this sum declares that the money shall "be
applied only to instruction in agriculture, the mechanic arts, the
English language, and the various branches of mathematical,
physical, natural, and economic science, with special reference
to their applications in the industries of life, and to the facilities
for such instruction." Both the "Land Scrip Act," of 1862, and
the "Morrill Bill," of 1890, declare that no moneys accruing
from said acts "shall be applied, directly or indirectly, under any
pretense whatever, to the purchase, erection, preservation, or re-
pair of any building or buildings."
It is clear to any reader of these bills that congress intended
that the money granted by them should be inviolably used for
the purposes designated in the bills, as quoted above, and that
none of the money should in any way be used for building pur-
poses.
Your honorable board of trustees has endeavored to con-
form honorably to the requirements of the laws under which the
Florida State Agricultural College receives the grants from the
National Government. Hence you have authorized the follow-
ing courses of instruction:-
THE AGRICULTURAL COURSE.-In our Florida Agricultural
College the first course of instruction offered is the "Agricul-
tural." It embraces careful instruction in those sciences on
which a thorough practical knowledge of agriculture must al-
ways be based, viz: physics, chemistry, botany, anatomy, physi-
ology, zoology, entomology, and geology. But in order to pur-
sue these sciences with any degree of success. a student must
have a somewhat complete training in the English language; in
elementary mathematics; in drawing, and in logic, and psychol-







ogy. Hence these studies appear in the "Agricultural Course."
It is, perhaps, best to call attention to the fact that this
course, as laid down in our college, is essentially the same as the
agricultural courses prescribed in all of the best agricultural col-
leges in America. During the last 35 years a good deal of at-
tention by the ablest educators has been given to this subject,
and they have marked out such studies as seem to them best
fitted to give a knowledge of agriculture. The course in agricul-
ture,' as laid down in our Florida College, follows, in the main,
the studies which these able educators have indicated.
Any college can offer a course of instruction, may put em-
phasis upon that course, and endeavor to have students enter
upon and complete it. But no college can compel students to
take any particular course. Of the different courses offered by a
college students select that one which they and their parents de-
sire.
In the present condition of education and of agriculture in
America, the number of parents who desire their sons to take a
course in agriculture is not large. 'I cannot here go into a state-
ment of the causes which lead to this lack of interest in agricul-
tural education, but the fact that there is little general interest in
such education is clear to all observers. This lack of interest
leads to small attendance at those colleges that teach only agri-
culture, and to small enrollment in the classes in agriculture in
those colleges which offer other courses.
In our college the enrollment of students in agriculture is
small. We can do no more than give good instruction to the
few who apply, endeavor to show the advantages of such educa-
tion, and await the time when a more prosperous condition of
the agriculture of the whole country, and a higher appreciation
of agriculture as an honorable and profitable pursuit, shall bring
a larger number of students into the agricultural course.
THE MECHANICAL COURSE.-The "Land Scrip Bill," of
1862, puts "the mechanic arts" on an equality with agriculture
as to the ends to which the money, accruing from the grants of
lands, is to be applied; and the "Morrill Bill," of 1889, does the
same as to the money it grants. The mechanic arts are given







a place in the courses of instruction in the schools, founded on
these grants, not by sufferance, but by right. They are in the
course because their friends have the right to demand that they
shall be given equal opportunities with agriculture. The college
not giving such equal right to the mechanic arts is violating the
laws through which it receives its funds.
Recognizing this fact the Florida Agricultural College has
prepared a "Mechanical Course" to which it attaches the same
importance and the same honor as to the agricultural course.
This mechanical course includes training in mathematics and its
applications in the theoretical mechanics, and careful training in
those sciences that have direct bearing on mechanics, and in
free-hand and mechanical drawing. It assumes, as a matter of
course, that the trained mechanist is a trained man, and hence
gives thorough culture in the English language and in mental,
ethical and political science. In order to educate the hand as
well as the head, and to enable the student to work as well as to
think, we have a well-equipped shop, supplied with tools and
machinery or doing work in wood and iron. This shop is the
laboratory of the mechanical department, as it supplies to the
students in the mechanical course facilities similar to those of-
fered in other courses by the chemical, physical, and biological
laboratories.
Since its first organization the mechanical course has been
popular with parents and with students. The class-room work
introduces students to fascinating subjects of study, and the
work-shop gives them not less fascinating employment in learn-
ing to use tools and machines. As to numbers this course is
much better patronized than the agricultural. The reasons for
this popularity are not difficult to point out, but I will not here
enlarge upon them.
It should be the policy of the college to improve the equip-
ment of the Mechanical Department as rapidly as conditions will
permit.
LATIN SCIENTIFIC COURsiE.-The land scrip act of 1862, in
speaking of the instruction to be given in the schools to be
founded under its provisions and of the subjects to be taught,







expressly says "not excluding other scientific and classical
studies, and including military tactics." If "other scientific and
classical studies" are not to be excluded, then evidently they are
to be included. In carrying out this provision of the law we
have established the "Latin Scientific" course, in which a part
of the instruction in English, in mathematics, and in science,
found in the agricultural and mechanical courses, is replaced
with the study of the Latin language. Many years of attention
to Latin in most of the great schools of America and Europe has
so trained public opinion as to education that a course of in-
struction including Latin is much in demand. In our college
some of our most efficient students, both among young men and
young women, seek this course. The results shown in their
training by the time they have reached graduation day prove
that the course is a most excellent one.
WOMEN'S COURSE.-In the fall of 1893 women were first
admitted as students. They are allowed to take any course that
the college offers, no restrictions as to courses being put upon
them other than we put upon young men. This open door for
women has been entered by more than was anticipated. The en-
rollment of women the first year was 54; the next year it was
49; the next it was again 54; and the present year it is 46. When
hard times make it difficult for parents to send their children to
college, and either boys or girls rlust be denied the privilege, it
is very apt to be the girls who are kept at home. The boys are
to be the bread winners, and their education seems the most es-
sential. This probably accounts for the decrease in women stu-
dents during the past year.
Recognizing the fact that many women desire an education
that shall fit them for the duties of wives, mothers, workers in
education, in society, and in the church I arranged a "Women's
Course," that includes English, mathematics, science, modern
languages, and somewhat of manual training, psychology,
ethics, and logic. This course should include thorough training
in Domestic Economy, that is in housekeeping, cooking, the
making of garments, sewing, embroidery, lace-making, the care
of the sick, home-making, and all the duties that devolve upon







the mistress of the home and the Christian woman in society.
But thus far our income has not rendered it possible for us to
perfect this "Women's Course" in these directions. I hope that
these financial limitations may at some time be removed, and
that a complete course for women who expect to become wives,
mothers, and home-makers may be offered.
Our women students, in the regular college classes, have thus
far taken mainly the Latin Scientific Course, only a small minor-
ity preferring the Women's Course. This is doubtless partly
due to the fact that our Women's Course is confessedly incom-
plete, and that a good many young women desire to train them-
selves for teachers. A good many women students are in the
preparatory class, or the courses in business or stenography.
COURSE IN BUSINESS.-In 1893 when the present board of
trustees assumed the control of the college, a Business Course
was inaugurated. This course includes penmanship, commer-
cial arithmetic, commercial law, and book-keeping. It has met
a present need in the education of our young men and women,
a good many of whom take this course and receive in it such
training as fits them for practical commercial, or other business
pursuits.
COURSE IN STENOGRAPHY, TYPE-WRITING AND TELEGRA-
PHY.-Thiscourse was instituted at the same time as that in Bus-
iness. It gives practical training to its students, fitting them for
positions in commercial houses, law offices, telegraph offices,
and other places where their services are needed. It has always
had as many students as the two teachers could well attend to,
and has turned out some well-trained young men and women.
In this course, and in the business course a thorough prep-
aration in elementary studies is essential. Some young students
get the impression that a business course or a course in stenog-
raphy for one year will fit them to earn a fair salary. Such im-
pression is a serious error, unless the student is already well-
trained in English, arithmetic, and penmanship. Such well-pre-
pared students can, in one year, become sufficiently versed in
book-keeping to take care of a simple set of books, and after
some experience can take a more responsible position. No ex-







perienced business man would think of trusting his books in the
hands of an untrained student who has had only the year of edu-
cation in a business course. And no student is competent to
take a position as stenographer simply because he can write
short-hand with some degree of speed. He needs also a thor-
ough knowledge of spelling, grammar, capital letters, and punct-
uation. And he needs that instructive knowledge of the use of
English that comes only with wide reading of the best literature,
and some acquaintance with the more common fields of literary
and scientific thought. An uneducated short-hand writer can-
not do good work in the office of a small business house or law
firm; much less can he report and transcribe an address given
by an able man in some field of thought with which the reporter
has no acquaintance. Many of the students in our courses in
buisness and stenography have been sadly deficient in this ele-
mentary training. But many of -those who had this elementary
training are now occupying good positions in business houses
of various character.
PREPARATORY COURSE.-In some parts of Florida the pub-
lic schools are not able to fit students for our college freshman
class. Hence we have a preparatory school for this purpose.
The studies pursued in the preparatory school are such as every
student needs all his life, even if he does not enter college. Some
students, by the influence of the preparatory school and by as-
sociation with college students and professors during their stay
in the preparatory school, are awakened to an ambition to enter
the college classes and complete the four years of college studies.
In the present condition of education in Florida our prepare
atory school is a necessity. It will be best for it to be continued
for a few years to come. But as the public schools become bet-
ter, even in the remote parts of the state, and as the pressure of
students in our regular college work becomes greater in conse-
quence of the general improvement of education, it will be well
for us to give up our preparatory school, and relegate all pre-
paratory work to the public schools. I have no doubt but the
spirit of the laws, by which congress has given lands and money
to the different states for the support of schools of agriculture







and the mechanic arts, requires that the funds be used for col-
lege work. When we are able to leave the work of preparing
students for college to the public schools, and to confine our
own labors to college studies, we shall be more thoroughly in
harmony with the spirit of the laws of congress through which
our endowments come to us.
MILITARY TRAINING.-Instruction in military science and
tactics is one of the branches which we are required by the law
of 1862 to give our students. Even if the law did not require it
I believe that it would be wise for us to give it. Where boys and
young men must room in dormitories or "barracks," eat at a
common table, have their sports together on a common play-
ground, and so be associated together intimately every hour of
every day, I am convinced that a military system is essential for
the wisest management of a body of students. We have adopted
a modification of the West Point system, adapting it to the age
and advancement of our students, and to the conditions under
which we must work. So that our military system includes not
only the drill of the parade ground, and the class-room work in
military science, but also the whole routine of work and meals
and play from the time students rise in the morning until they
go to bed at night. In general the system works well. Some
students who come to us from homes where little restraint has
been put upon them, where they have had no regular habits as
to rising, meals, study, work and play, find our system at first
somewhat irksome, and do not like it. If this dislike is fostered
by unwise parents, as is sometimes the case, the result usually is
that the student is soon dismissed, or else leaves of his own de-
sire. But where the student endeavors to obey regulations he
soon comes to see that the regulations serve for his own comfort
and protection, and for his training in habits of order and
promptness. Before long he comes to like the system, and to
enjoy his life in the barracks and class-rooms, on the drill-
ground and campus.
There is no doubt whatever that the general results of our mil-
itary system have thus far been good. More experience with
the system on our part, a more thorough knowledge of it and







obedience to it on the part of students, a wiser appreciation of it
on the part of some parents; joined, at some time, with more
commodious barracks, a good armory, a better drill-ground, and
a more spacious play-ground, will, by and by, give results that
will be ideal.
GRADUATES.-The first diplomas were granted by our col-
lege to a class of three students in 1889. Since then 29 more
have graduated, so that the number of graduates is now 32. The
names of graduates, with their degree, and present residences
and occupations are as follows:-
1889.
Hutchinson J. Cone, B. S., Benton, Fla. Student in U. S.
Naval Academy, Anapolis, Md.
J. C. Getzen, A. B., La Cross, Fla. Turpentine.
J. A. Townsend, A. B., Lake City, Fla. Practicing physi-
cian.
1892.
C. E. Davis, B. S., Madison, Fla. Lawyer.
W. W. Smith, A. B., Anthony, Fla. Teacher.
1893.
M. H. Ayer, B. S., Macon, Ga. Lawyer.
R. L. Borger, A .B., Lake City, Fla. Professor of Mathe-
matics, Florida Agricultural College.
J. E. Futch, A. B., Starke, Fla. Lawyer.
F. M. Oliver, A. B., Macon, Ga. Lawyer.
A. L. Quaintance, B. S., Lake City, Fla. Assistant in Biol-
ogy, Florida Agricultural College.
1894.
J. K .Johnson, B. S., Kissimmee, Fla. Teacher.
E. E. Keller, B. S.
A. A. Simpson, A. B., Kissimmee, Fla. Teacher.
J. P. Davies, B. S., Lake City, Fla. Instructor in Physics,
and assistant in Chemistry, Florida Agricultural College.
1895.
Irvin Morgan, A. B., Lake Butler. Teacher.
E. O. Powers, B. S., Jacksonville, Fla. Electrician.
W. S. Rogers, Jr., A. B., Carabelle. Teacher.





15
Miss Daisy Rogers, B. S., Waynesboro, Ga. Helping her
mother.
W. J. Sears, A. B., Kissimmee. Lawyer.
1896.
Edward A. Bending, B. S., Akron, Ill. Teacher of Me-
chanics.
Dan. N. Cone, A. B., University of Virginia. Student of
Medicine.
N. H. Cox, B. S., Lake City, Fla. Assistant in Mechanics,
Florida Agricultural College.
Hardy Croom, B. S., Brooksville, Fla. Electrician.
Charles T. Curry, A. B., University of Virginia, Law stu-
dent.
Edward B. Drumright. I. S., Sarasota, Fla. Teacher.
R. C. Dunn, A. B., Astatula, Fla. Teacher.
W. W. Flournoy, A. ., Lake City., Fla. Instructor and Li-
brarian, Florida Agricultural College.
J. E. Layne, A. B., Braidentown, Fla. Teacher.
G. R. McKean, A. B., Auburndale, Fla. Teacher.
Maurice M. Scarborough, A. B., Lake City, Fla. Law stu-
dent.
Fred L. Stringer, A. B., Tampa, Fla. Law student.
John W. Williams, A. B., Tampa, Fla. Law student.
A CONSIDERATION OF THE LIST OF GRADUATES.-It will be
seen that the profession of teaching is the one thus far most pop-
ular with our graduates. This is a very common experience
with such schools as ours. The student, just through college, is
often in need of money, his college course has fitted him for
teaching, a position as teacher is not difficult to find, the com-
pensation is fair, the work can be taken up and laid down at
pleasure. Hence to teaching many young graduates resort. Of
our 33 graduates, 18, or about 47 per cent are now engaged in
teaching. The law, as usual, takes the next largest number, nine
of 32 being now lawyers or students of law; more than 28 per
cent of the whole number. Only two are doctors, or students of
medicine; two are electricians; one is a manufacturer of turpen-
tine; one is aiding her mother to make the home; one is a stu-
dent in the Navy.







Considering our different courses of instruction it will be
seen that our graduates are all working in lines for which their
college training has specially fitted them. As yet no student has
taken up the work of farming or cultivating the soil in any of its
branches. I know that in some agricultural colleges a good
many of the graduates who begin as teachers become farmers.
gardeners, or fruit growers after they have saved a little money
to begin with. Probably this will be the case with our gradu-
ates. It has been the experience of some other agricultural col-
leges that more students enter the agricultural course after the
general excellence of that course becomes understood, and after
it is learned that there has been a demand for well-trained agri-
cultural graduates, as teachers, as professors in agricultural col-
leges, and as workers in experiment stations.
METHODS.-It has been my purpose to adopt at the college
in all departments the most approved methods of instruction.
In this purpose I have been ably seconded by nearly all mem-
bers of the faculty. Our professors and instructors are nearly
all men and women of careful culture, who are interested in
modern methods of instruction and are competent to put those
methods into practice. Hence, in as far as the conditions under
which we work render possible, we are training our students af-
ter the methods which the ablest educators in Europe and
America recommend.
We train the memory of students, but in no department of
the college does a recitation sink to the level of mere rote work.
We use text-books, but in every department the text-book is
secondary to the living word of the trained teacher and to the
work of student in library and laboratory. We have recitations,
but in the recitation we endeavor that the student shall realize
and assimilate the thought, or the scene, or the character, or the
principle rather than to make him a conduit through which shall
flow a noisy stream of memorized words. With us every class-
room and work-shop is a laboratory, a place for labor, and the
student is taught to do by doing.
It seems to me that we are started in the right direction;







that we are pursuing the best methods. We need to go on.
Perhaps we may not "go on unto perfection," but we can go on
towards perfection. From year to year we can improve our fac-
ulty, add to our equipment, more fully carry out our method, ad-
vance the grade of admission to the freshman class, fill the whole
atmosphere of college life with more stimulating and more in-
spiring ideals. May we not hope that the results in training
young men and women in practical knowledge and in noble
character will abundantly compensate the national government
for the generous endowment it has given, and return a hundred
fold to Florida for its financial aid and its fostering care?
EMPLOYMENT OF OUR OWN GRADUATES.-That we are
finding among our own graduates students who are qualified in
knowledge and character for responsible positions in our faculty
is a happy omen. These young men and women will soon have
the training and the experience to take full professorships with
us, or in other colleges that are fortunate in being more richly
endowed than we are.
Robert L. Borger graduated as A. B., in our college in the
class of 1893. He then took graduate work for a year in John
Hopkins University and received his second degree. Then for
some time he taught mathematics in Indiana, and in 1895-6 was
an emergency teacher with us. At the opening of the present
college year he was made assistant professor of mathematics,
and given full charge of the department.
A. L. Quaintance graduated here as B. S., in the class of
1893. He took graduate work for a year in the Alabama Agri-
cultural College, at Auburn, when he was chosen a member of
our faculty as assistant in Biology, in which position he has since
continued.
J. P. Davies graduated in our class of 1895 as B. S. He re-
turned here as a graduate student in the fall of the year. Our
assistant in chemistry and physics resigned during the year, to
accept a better position in the North Carolina Experiment Sta-
tion, and Mr. Davies was chosen to the vacant place, in which he
still remains.
N. H. Cox graduated from our Mechanical Course as B. S.,







in 1896. He was at once chosen assistant in mechanics. He re-
mained during the summer pursuing graduate studies, and has
for this year been in charge of the work in the work-shop and
assistant in teaching.
W. W. Flournoy graduated in our B. A. course in 1896. He
was chosen librarian, in which work, and as assistant in math-
ematics, he has labored during the present year.
Miss Jennie Abright, of Meridian, Miss., took our course in
stenography and type-writing in 1893, and received the certifi-
cate in that department. In 1896 she was made assistant to the
professor in that department, and has rendered good service
during the present year.
EXPENSES OF A STUDENT.-Our income from the endow-
ments of the general government enables us to make tuition free
to all students from Florida. In order to secure a small fund for
use in repairs of buildings, and for other purposes to which the
laws do not allow us to apply our national income, we charge a
small fee for incidentals, for room rent, and for material con-
sumed in some of the laboratories. The mess hall, and kitchen,
and the larger part of their equipment having been paid for from
funds received from the state of Florida, we are able to offer
board at the rate of $Io per calendar month. For this sum we
are able to provide abundant, wholesome, and well-cooked food.
Students are provided with furnished rooms, but supply their
own bed clothes and room linen. The expenses of a student for
incidentals, room rent, text-books, laboratory fees, board, wash-
ing, lights, traveling fees, and clothing should not be more than
$180 a year. This amount will put an economical student
through the year in very good shape. Some spend consider-
able less than this. Some, whose parents are unwisely generous,
spend more.
IMPROVEMENTS.-The improvements indicated in your re-
port for the year 1896 to the State Superintendent of Public In-
struction are all important for the growth and prosperity of the
college. Of the first importance is the securing of more ample
grounds. It is most unwise to go on erecting expensive build-
ings on the present narrow space. A college having such en-






dowment as ours, with a prosperous future before it, should have
grounds giving sufficient space for all purposes of education,
health, athletics, and beauty. We should have a large area for
drill ground, for all sports for young men and for young women
as well, for target range, for botanic gardens, for an arboretum
in which can be grown every tree and shrub that will thrive in
Florida, and for farm, gardens, orchards, and groves. I am sure
that every thoughtful friend of education who has seen the at-
tractive grounds and gardens and farms of some of the agricul-
tural colleges would deplore the unwisdom of continuing to ex-
pend money on the inferior grounds now occupied by us. Not
until the college has secured a suitable amount of well located
land can it wisely plan for its future growth. To the importance
of this need I have not failed to call your attention on every pos-
sible occasion. If to you my persistence seems excessive I hope
that you will set it down to my interest in the college, and to an
appreciation,-founded on wide observation of other great
schools-of its expanding needs.
SCHOLARSHIPS.-Two years ago the board established
three scholarships, amounting to a student's board and college
fees for the year; one to the student having the best record for
the year in the freshman class, the same in the sophomore and
junior classes. There was the first year a good degree of honor-
able strife to secure these prizes. The same is true of the pres-
ent year.
FINANCES.-You will observe that we are still obliged, as
has formerly happened, to draw upon the resources of next year
to pay a part of the expenses of this year. This necessity should
be in some way overcome. Either we should increase our in-
come or reduce our expenses. Of course the better way for the
growth and improvement of the college is to increase the in-
come. But if this cannot be done we should so arrange our
work and expenses as to bring them strictly within our income,
even though for the present such arrangement will cut off some
important parts of our work. This matter will need considera-
tion at the approaching annual meeting of the Board.
Thelegislature of 1895 gave the college a generous appropri-












ation of $5,000 a year for two years. A large part of this appro-
priation was used for repairs of buildings; some for the erection
of a small barn for the college; some for the payment of general
college expenses, thus kepeing down to a lower figure the over-
draft on the Land Scrip Fund; and some was applied to the
building of the propagating house for the Experiment Station,
and for general expenses of the station. A detailed statement of
the expenditure of this fund is herewith published.
The books of the college have been carefully and accurately
kept. They show to a cent the moneys received from all sources,
and the amounts paid and for what paid. These books are al-
ways open to the inspection of national and state officials, to
members and committees of the legislature, and to other citizens
of the state. A detailed statement of receipts and expenditures
of the different funds for the financial year ending June 30, 1896,
and for the portion of the present financial year ending April,
1897, is published herewith. The usual full report of the present
financial year, ending June 30, 1897, will be published soon after
the end of the year.
In closing this report it is a pleasure to express my thanks
to the faculty of the college for their careful attention to duty
and their willingness to cooperate in all work. And to the board
of trustees my thanks are due for their constant confidence and
generosity.
Very respectfully yours,
0 CLUTE.
President Florida Agricultural College.
Lake City, Fla., April 28, 1897.









Financial Report.






Financial Report of the Florida Agricultural College for the Year

Ending June 30, 1896.

Salaries ........ ........ ......... ............ $16,571.70
Expenses of President ................... ..... 61.65
Expenses of Commandant of Cadets ............. 30.15
Expenses of Chemist ................ ........... 6.25
Expenses of Board of Trustees .................. 213.40
Equipment for Biology ................. ..... 647.60
Equipment for Physics ........................ 157.55
Equipment for Chemistry ....... ................ 280.78
Equipment for Medical Department ............ 1.80
Equipment for Mathematics ............... .... 3.00
Equipment for Mess Hall ....................... 160.35
Repairs for Musical Instruments ............... 8.00
Material and Fuel for Mechanic Arts ............ 253.61
New Machinery and Tools for Mechanic Arts .... 215.52
Apparatus for Stenography, Typewriting and
Telegraphy ............... ................. 121.80
Printing .......... ...... .............. ....... 521.35
Stationery ........................ ............ 258.25
Postage ............. ............... .......... 118.70
Furniture and Equipment ................. .... 1,009.52
M military .......... ...... ...... ... ... ....... 268.89
Com mencement ....... ........ ........ ........ 97.75
Sundry Supplies ......... ....... ...... ........ 5.20
Mess Hall Shortage ................... ......... 725.44
Repairs ............... .......... .............. 2.00
Fuel ............... .................. ........ 194.00
Freight and Express ......... ........ .......... 295.10
W after Supply ........... ......... ............. 320.00
Library ....... ........ ........... ............ 81.73

Amount carried forward .....................$22,631.09






22

Amount brought forward ..................... $22,631.09
Insurance ........ ........ ...... ....... ...... 521.68
Fences, Grounds, and Buildings ................ 4,003.23
Feed .......................... ........ ....... 115.90
Gas and Lights ......... ....................... 109.00
Contingent ................ ......... ..... .... 284.89
Janitors ............ ........ ...... ............ 675.94

Total expenditure for year ending June 30 '96. .$28,341.73
Deficit, July 1, '95 ................... ....... 3,612.24

$31,953.97


$31,953.97


Appropriation Land Grant Fund ...... .........$ 9,107.00
Appropriation Morrill Fund ................... 10,500.00
College Incidental Fees ........ ................ 2,175.72
State Appropriation Fund ..... ......... ....... 6,599.84

Total Income ........ ................... ....$28,382.56
Amount expended over income ...... ......... 3,571.41

$31,953.97 $31,953.97



Financial Report of the Florida Agricultural College from July I, 1896
to May i, 1897.
President ............................. ...... $ 625.00
Commandant of Cadets ........ ................. 450.00
Professor History and English ................. 733.32
Professor Philosophy and Ancient Languages ... 733.32
Professor German and French .................. 600.00
Instructor Spanish ........... ....... .......... 399.96
Professor Chemistry and Agriculture ........... 600.00
Professor Mathematics ...... ............. ..... 499.98
Professor Biology and Horticulture ............ 600.00
Assistant Biology ................... ........... 375.00
Assistant Chemistry and Instructor Physics ..... 240.00
Principal Preparatory School ........ ........... 600.00
Assistant Preparatory School ................... 115.00
Professor Mechanic Arts ................. ..... 733.32
Assistant Mechanic Arts ..... .................. 399.96

Amount carried forward .................... $7,704.86






23

Amount brought forward ............... ...... $7,704.86
Professor Stenography, Typewriting and Teleg-
raphy ........... ..... ......... ............ 600.00
Assistant Stenography, Typewriting and Teleg-
raphy ......... ..... ..... .................. 150.00
Instructor Commercial Department .... ........ 600.00
Auditor, Bookkeeper and Stenographer ......... 252.48
Secretary Board of Trustees .................... 175.00
Commandant of Cadets and Bursar's Clerk ...... 90.00
Librarian .............. ............. .......... 90.00
President's Clerk ........ ....... .............. 99.96
Fireman and Engineer for Mechanic Arts ....... 125.00
College Physician .............................. 399.96
Janitors ......... ........... ..... ............ 539.94
Expenses of President ............ ............. 130.50
Expenses of Board of Trustees .................. 225.55
Equipment for Chemistry ...................... 140.88
Equipment for Biology .......... ......... ..... 58.15
Equipment for Horticulture ................... 7.62
Material and Fuel for Mechanic Arts ............ 144.94
New Machineryand Tools for Mechanic Arts .... 136.41
Apparatus for Typewriting and Telegraphy .... 49.51
Mess Hall Equipment ............... .......... 124.08
Printing .......................... .... ...... 590.71
Stationery ......... ...... ........ ..... ...... 230.90
Postage .............. ...... ...... ..... ...... 141.34
Furniture and Equipment ...... ............... 59.35
Military ................... .......... ....... 79.33
Commencement .................... .......... 25.20
F uel ......... ........... ........ ......... .... 313.75
Freight and Express ........ .................. 79.64
W after Supply ..... ............ ................ 270.00
Library ............ ........ ....... .......... 198.34
Fences, Grounds and Buildings ................. 1,242.08
Feed ............ ........ ...... ............... 91.18
Gas and Lights ........... ........ ............ 133.89
Contingent ................... ............... 507.66
Auditor ............ .......... ......... ........ 60.00
Assistant Stenographers ...... ...... ..... ..... 6.24
Board Scholarships ......... ................... 174.00
Equipment for Physics .............. ........... 45.98

Amount carried forward ....... .............$16,302.76








Amount brought forward ......... ........ .... $1,302.76
Professor Music ................... ....... .... 133.32
Insurance ......... ....... ...... ......... ...... 488.60
interestt ........ ...... ..... ........ ........... 6.00
Equipment for Commercial Department ......... 15.75

Total expenditures ............ ........ .......$16,946.43
Deficit, July 1, '96 ............................ 3,571.41
Balance on hand May 1, '97 ...... .... ...... :.S83.66 $24,401.50



RESOURCES.

Agricultural College Fund ...... ....... ........$ 9,107.00
M orrill Fund ....... ..... ...... .............. 11,023.61
College Incidental Fund ........ ..... ........... 1,741.28
State Appropriation Fund ............. ....... 2,549.61 $24,401.50





Financial Report of the Florida Experimental Station for the Year
Ending June 30, 1896.

LAKE CITY MAIN STATION.

Salaries ................... ...... .............$ 4,034.5:
Labor .......... ....... ....... ....... ....... 2,722.94
Publications .............. ..... ................ 1.995.14
Postage and Stationery ................... .... 116.53
Freight and Express .......... ...... ........... 204.77
Heat, Light and Water .............. .......... 198.60
Chemical Supplies ............... .............. 104.34
Seeds, Plants and Sundry Supplies .............. 68:.70
Fertilizers .............. ................ ...... 459.97
Feeding Stuffs ......... ........ ................ 365.31
Library ......... ...... ...... .. .... ......... 108.27
Tools, Implements and Machinery ...... ........ 109.09
Furniture and Fixtures ..... ................... 17.05
Scientific Apparatus...... .......... .... ....... 1.00
Live Stock ....... ....... 95.00
Traveling Expenses.... .................. .... 682.0:
Contingent.... ............... ............... 19.06
Building and Repairs.... ......... ........... 1,087.38 $13,004.71










25

DE FUNIAK SUB-STATION.

Salary of Supreintendent .... ................. $
Labor........................................
Publications..... ........... ...... ....
Postage and Stationery.... ...................
Freight and Express........ ....... ..... ....
Seeds, Plants and Sundry Supplies.... .........
Fertilizers ........ .......... ........ ..... ...
Feeding Stuffs...... ........ .... ... .........
Tools. Implements and Machinery .............
Buildings and Repairs........................

FORT MYERS SUB-STATION.

Salary of Superintendent....................
Labor.... .... ...... .. . .......... ....
Postage and Stationery.......................
Freight and Express...... ...... ...... .....
Seeds, Plants and Sundry Supplies ..............
Fertilizers............ .. ... .. .. .....
Feeding Stuffs...... .... ........ .... ......
Tools, Implements and lMachinery..... ........
Contingent........ ...... ... . .... ......
Building and Repairs...... ..... ............

Total expenditure for the year ending June
30, 1896........ ...... .... .............

Deficit, July 1, 1895 ........ .....................

Experiment Station Incidental Fund on hand


550.00
495.10
1.90
4.80
14.58
67.27
21.00
61.49
22.15
34.36


$ 1,272.65


550.00
411.63
6.15
41.18
213.03
169.79
100.10
10.00
138.60
31.41 $ 1,671.89



$15,949.25

33.97
$15,983.22
217.75

$16,200.97


RECEIPTS.

Appropriation Experiment Station Fund ........$15,000.00
State Appropriation Fund ..... ...... ......... 900.16
Experiment Station Incidental Fund (sales) .... 300.81 $16,200.97








26

Financial Report of the Florida Agricultural Experimental Station
From July I, 1896, to May 1, 1897.
Director ................ ............. ....... $ 12,99.98
Chemist ......... ........ ...... ............... 300.00
Botanist, Entomologist and Horticulturist ...... 400.00
Assistant Chemist ......... ...... ..... ....... 120.00
Assistant Botanist and Entomologist ............ 237.50
Secretary Board of Trustees .................... 200.00
Auditor, Bookkeeper and Stenographer ..... .... 202.48
Labor for Farm and Garden .................... 2,351.30
Publications ......... ...... ........ ........... 631.10
Postage ................ ................ ...... 73.76
Freight and Express .......... ......... ........ 222.42
Equipment for Chemical Department ........... 210.75
Equipment for Botanical and Entomological De-
partment ....... ...... ..... ........ ........ 193.03
Equipment for Horticultural Department ....... 459.18
Expenses of Director .......... ........ ........ 181.00
Expenses of Botanist and Entomologist ......... 53.60
Expenses of Horticulturist ..................... 41.70
Expenses of Board of Trustees ................. 62.05
Library ............... .............. ........ 106.15
Water Supply ................................. 60.00
Trees, Seeds and Plants ............. ........... 377.64
Farm Equipment ................. ........... 58.84
Buildings and Repairs ............ ....... .... 781.81
Tools ......... ........ ....... .......... ... . 38.36
Miscellaneous ........ ...... ...... ... ....... 330.51
Fertilizers ......... ......... .......... ........ 298.77
Feed .......... ......... ....... ....... ...... 345.45
Stock ........ ........... ............ ........ 20.00
Fuel ........... ....... ....... ................ 54.50
Gas and Lights .......... ........... ........ .. 16.43
Assistant Stenographers ....................... 74.66
Auditor ........... ...... .............. ....... 30.00
Interest .............. ... ..................... 24.39
Sundry Supplies ............. .... ...... .... 83.17
Tobacco Experiment .......... ....... ........ 75.00
Stationery ........ ............ ...... ......... 119.30
Insurance ....... ..... .... .... .. .............. 103.12 $10,237.95











DEFUNIAK SPRINGS SUB-STATION.

Salary Superintendent ..... ...... ............. $ 550.00
Trees, Seeds and Plants ....................... 2.00
Building and Repairs ......... .. ..... ....... 69.23
Equipment ........ ...... ................ ..... 26.95
Miscellaneous ....... ............ ...... ....... 7.00
Freight and Express ................. ......... 9.31
Fertilizers ................ ..................... 57.00
Feed ........... ......... ...... .... ........ 50.42
Postage and Stationery ........ .............. 6.50
Farm Labor ................. ......... ....... 518.05
Sundry Supplies ............ ................ . 2.75

FORT MYERS SUB-STATION.


1,299.21


Salary Superintendent ......... .......... ......$ 550.00
Trees, Seeds and Plants ........................ 22.10
Building and Repairs .......................... 68.93
Equipment .................. .................. 23.09
Miscellaneous .............. ....... .......... 7.23
Freight and Express ............. ............ 27.08
Fertilizers .................................... 206.23
Feed ......... ......... ....................... 74.30
Postage and Stationery ........................ 7.03
Stock ...... ......... ...... ..... ..... ....... 100.00
Farm Labor .............. ................... 385.78
Sundry Supplies ............... ............... 56.45
Repairs ............... .................. ..... 1.25 $ 1,529.47

Total expenditures ................... ...... .$13,066.63
Deficit. July 1, '96 .......... .................. 33.97
2,479.25

Balance on hand May 1, '97 .................... $15,579.83

RESOURCES.
Experiment Station Fund ......................$15,000.00
Sales from farm ................... ............ 524.90
State Appropriation Fund ...... ............... 54.95. $15,579.85






28

Disbursements of State Appropriation Fund for Agricultural
College, July I, 1895, to March i, 1897.

President ...... ...... ................. ....... 416.66
Commandant of Cadets ...... ........ ...... .. 50.00
Expenses of President ......... ......... ....... :10.00
Professor Philosophy and Ancient Languages ... 122.22
Professor German and French .................. 83:.33
Instructor Spanish ..... ...... ............... .. 50.00
Equipment for Chemistry ........... .......... 1.30
College Physician ........ ........ .. ....... 66 .66
Medical Equipment ............... ............. .60
Material and Fuel Mechanic Arts ................ 8.05
New Machinery and Tools Mechanic Arts ....... 13.50
Professor Stenography, Typewriting and Teleg-
raphy ......... ............ ..... ... ........ 100.00
Assistant Stenography, Typewriting and Teleg-
raphy ................... ..... ............. 25.00
Apparatus Stenography, Typewriting and Teleg-
raphy ........ ...... ..... .... ............... 88.00
Professor Bookkeeping and Penmanship ........ 111.11
Auditor ......... ....... ......... ........ ... 3:0.00
Bookkeeper and Stenographer ..... ............ 94.16
Assistant Bookkeeping and Penmanship ......... 50.00
Assistant Stenographers ...... ...... ..... .... 11.60
Printing .......... ....... ................ .... 132.65
Professor Music .............................. 133.32
Stationery ....... .......................... 68.40
Furniture and Equipment ....... .............. 513.83
Military ............................. ......... 75.43
Mess Hall Equipment .......................... 159.59
Postage ................ ...................... 45.94
Freight and Express ...... .................... 166.73
Water Supply ................ ................. 90.00
Librarian .......... ....... ...... ............. 35.00
Library ................ ....... ................ 15.70
Secretary Board of Trustees .................... 75.00
Fences, Grounds and Buildings ................. 4,586.78
Insurance .............. ..... .. ....... ...... 788.60
Feed ....... .......... .................. ...... 53.32
Gas and Lights ............ ........ ........... 32.69

Amount carried forward ............. ........ 8,325.17
















Amount brought forward .... .... ..... ..... ..$
Contingent ........ ....... .......... ........
Jainitors .............. ...... ....................
Commandant of Cadets and Bursar's Clerk ......
Expenses Board of Trustees ....................
Equipment for Biology ......... ......... ......
Fuel .......... .... ..................... .. ...

EXPERIMENT STATION.

Labor ..... ....... ................. ..........
Publications ............ .....................
Postage and Stationery ................... ..
Freight and Express ........ .......... .. .......
Heat, Light and Water ......... ...... ........
Chem ical Supplies .......... ......... ..... .....
Seeds, Plants and Sundry Supplies ...... ........
Feeding Stuffs ......... ........ ...... ........
Library ............ .... .... ........ .......
Tools, Implements and Machinery ......... .....
Furniture and Fixtures ........ ....... .........
Scientific Apparatus ..........................
Traveling Expenses ............. .............
Contingent ........ ....... ......... ....... ....
Building and Repairs ............ ....... ......
Equipment Horticultural Department ..........


8,325.17
114.09
159.55
30.00
156.65
3.15
243.50


$ 9,032.11


48.95
138.84
29.65
41.51
.40
.85
67.98
9.00
4.75
7.45
.25
1.00
5.55
4.15
544.28
50.50 $ 955.11

$ 9,987.22




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