<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Map
 Table of Contents
 Report of the dean for researc...
 Faculty list
 Capital improvements
 Grants and gifts
 Report of the administrative...
 Theses and dissertations
 Center for environmental progr...
 Center for rural development
 International programs
 Agricultural engineering depar...
 Agronomy department
 Animal science department
 Biochemistry department
 Botany department
 Dairy science department
 Editorial department
 Entomology and nematology...
 Food and resource economics...
 Food science department
 Forest resources and conservation...
 Fruit crops department
 Microbiology department
 Ornamental horticulture depart...
 Plant pathology department
 Poultry science department
 Soil science department
 Statistics department
 Vegetable crops department
 Veterinary science department
 Belle Glade agricultural research...
 Bradenton agricultural research...
 Homestead agricultural research...
 Lake Alfred agricultural research...
 Quincy agricultural research and...
 Sanford agricultural research and...
 Apopka agricultural research...
 Brooksville beef cattle research...
 Dover agricultural research...
 Fort Lauderdale agricultural research...
 Fort Pierce agricultural research...
 Hastings agricultural research...
 Immokalee agricultural research...
 Jay agricultural research...
 National Weather Service
 Lakeland agricultural research...
 Leesburg agricultural research...
 Live Oak agricultural research...
 Marianna agricultural research...
 Monticello agricultural research...
 Ona agricultural research...
 Index


UF FLAG



Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005147/00008
 Material Information
Title: Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Abbreviated Title: Annu. res. rep. Inst. Food Agric. Sci., Univ. Fla., Gainesville, Fla.
Physical Description: v. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida>
Place of Publication: <Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: 1975
Publication Date: 1968-
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Agriculture -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Food -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Biological abstracts
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1968-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000429247
oclc - 01408984
notis - ACH8451
lccn - 73646057 //r862
issn - 0071-609X
System ID: UF00005147:00008
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual report.
Succeeded by: Annual research report of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Title Page
        Title page
    Map
        Map
    Table of Contents
        Table of contents
    Report of the dean for research
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Faculty list
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Capital improvements
        Page 32
    Grants and gifts
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Report of the administrative manager
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Theses and dissertations
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Center for environmental programs
        Page 65
    Center for rural development
        Page 66
    International programs
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Agricultural engineering department
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Agronomy department
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Animal science department
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
    Biochemistry department
        Page 110
    Botany department
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
    Dairy science department
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
    Editorial department
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
    Entomology and nematology department
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
    Food and resource economics department
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
    Food science department
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
    Forest resources and conservation department
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
    Fruit crops department
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
    Microbiology department
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
    Ornamental horticulture department
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
    Plant pathology department
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
    Poultry science department
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
    Soil science department
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
    Statistics department
        Page 236
    Vegetable crops department
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
    Veterinary science department
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
    Belle Glade agricultural research and education center
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
    Bradenton agricultural research and education center
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
    Homestead agricultural research and education center
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
    Lake Alfred agricultural research and education center
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
    Quincy agricultural research and education center
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
    Sanford agricultural research and education center
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
    Apopka agricultural research center
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
        Page 317
    Brooksville beef cattle research station
        Page 318
    Dover agricultural research station
        Page 319
        Page 320
        Page 321
    Fort Lauderdale agricultural research station
        Page 322
        Page 323
        Page 324
        Page 325
        Page 326
    Fort Pierce agricultural research station
        Page 327
        Page 328
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
        Page 332
        Page 333
        Page 334
        Page 335
    Hastings agricultural research station
        Page 336
        Page 337
        Page 338
    Immokalee agricultural research station
        Page 339
        Page 340
        Page 341
    Jay agricultural research station
        Page 342
        Page 343
        Page 344
        Page 345
        Page 346
        Page 347
        Page 348
    National Weather Service
        Page 349
    Lakeland agricultural research station
        Page 349
    Leesburg agricultural research station
        Page 350
        Page 351
        Page 352
        Page 353
        Page 354
        Page 355
    Live Oak agricultural research station
        Page 356
        Page 357
        Page 358
    Marianna agricultural research station
        Page 359
        Page 360
        Page 361
    Monticello agricultural research station
        Page 362
        Page 363
        Page 364
        Page 365
    Ona agricultural research station
        Page 366
        Page 367
        Page 368
        Page 369
        Page 370
        Page 371
        Page 372
    Index
        Page 373
        Page 374
        Page 375
        Page 376
        Page 377
Full Text







ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT

of the

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida


1975















ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT


of the


Institute of Food and Agricultural; Sciences

University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida



1975


This public document was promulgated at an annual cost of
$11,110 or $3.70 per copy to provide a summary of research
conducted during 1975 by the University of Florida Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.


The use of trade names in this publication is solely for the
purpose of providing specific information. It is not a guarantee
or warranty of the products named and does not signify that they
are approved to the exclusion of others of suitable composition.













A UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

[ AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND
EDUCATION CENTERS
1. Belle Glade (cattle, forage crops, sugarcane,
vegetables)
2. Bradenton (cut flowers, vegetables)
3. Homestead (ornamentals, subtropical fruits,
vegetables)
4. Lake Alfred (citrus)
5. Quincy (cattle, field crops, fruit crops, tobacco,
vegetables)
6. Sanford (field crops, ornamentals, vegetables)

O AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTERS
1. Apopka (foliage plants, ornamentals)
2. Brooksville (Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station,
USDA)
3. Dover (strawberries, vegetables)
4. Ft. Lauderdale (animal diseases, aquatic weed control,
ornamentals, turfgrass)
5. Ft. Pierce (citrus, vegetables, forage and pasture crops)
6. Hastings (cabbage, potatoes)
7. Inimokalee (forage and pasture crops, vegetables)
8. Jay (cattle, field crops, fruits, nuts)
9. Lakeland (National Weather Service)
10. Leesburg (grapes, watermelons)
11. Live Oak (field crops, fruits, swine, tobacco)
12. Marianna (field crops, swine)
13. Monticello (fruits, nuts)


Leesburg

@ 6J Sanford
Brooksville Apo
D Q Apopka
Dover @
Sver Lake Alfred
Lake-
land
@ Ona
Bradenton Ft.
SPierce
V 4 A









CONTENTS



Report of the Dean for Research . . .
Faculty List . . . . .
Capital Improvements . . . .
Grants and Gifts . . . .
Report of the Administrative Manager . .
Theses and Dissertations . . . .
Center for Environmental Programs . . .
Center for Rural Development . . .
International Programs . . . .

PROJECT REPORTS

MAIN STATION
Agricultural Engineering Department . .
Agronomy Department . . . .
Animal Science Department . . . .
Biochemistry Department . . . .
Botany Department . . . . .
Dairy Science Department . . . .
Editorial Department . . . .
Entomology and Nematology Department . .
Food and Resource Economics Department . .
Food Science Department . . . .
Forest Resources and Conservation Department .
Fruit Crops Department . . . .
Microbiology Department . . . .
Ornamental Horticulture Department . .
Plant Pathology Department . . .
Poultry Science Department . . .
Soil Science Department . . . .
Statistics Department . . . .
Vegetable Crops Department . . .
Veterinary Science Department . . .

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTERS
VBelle Glade . . . . .
Bradenton . . . . . .
vHomestead . . . . . .
Lake Alfred . . . . .
Quincy . . . . . .
Sanford . . . . . .

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTERS
Apopka . . . . . .
Brooksville
(Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station, USDA)
Dover . . . . . .
SFort Lauderdale . . .. . .
vFort Pierce . . . . .
Hastings . . . . . .
vInmokalee . . . . . .
Jay . . . . . .
Lakeland (National Weather Service, USDC, NOAA) .
Leesburg . . . . . .
Live Oak . . . . . .
Marianna . . . . . .
Monticello . . . . .
Ona . . . . . .


Index . . . . . . 373


Page

S 1
S 3
. 32
* 33
S53
. 55
* 65
. 66
. 67


S. 313

S. 318
S. 319
S. 322
S. 327
S. 336
S. 339
S. 342
S. 349
S. 350
S. 356
S, 359
S. 362
S. 366







REPORT OF THE DEAN FOR RESEARCH


Agricultural Research is one of the three major divisions of the
University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
(IFAS). All research is closely coordinated with the extension and
resident instruction divisions, the other two main divisions of IFAS.
The agricultural research program is a statewide responsibility that
no other university has in Florida. IFAS research faculty members
have responsibilities in the graduate research programs both on and
off the Gainesville campus. Research faculty also cooperate with the
extension division to extend the new research knowledge and information
to all segments of industry and society.

Within the IFAS research program there are 20 departments at the
University of Florida in Gainesville and 21 research centers located
throughout the state. The many locations make possible research on
different soils, under varying climatic conditions, and on many commod-
ities such as citrus, vegetables, field crops, pastures, livestock, orna-
mentals, tropical fruits, forests and others. While production research
receives the most attention, time also is devoted to research in processing,
handling, marketing, utilization, engineering, and economics, including
basic research in all disciplines. Environmental and human resource
research is being given increasing attention.

A statewide program, planning and budgeting system (PPBS) is in
operation for the entire research program. This Research Program Planning
Memorandum has been developed around major crops, commodities and services,
rather than disciplines, and provides a guide for program direction to all
research units.

The entire research program of the Florida Agricultural Experiment
Stations is planned and conducted by use of formal written and approved
projects which document all research. The research program is primarily
a mission-oriented effort aimed at solving the problems of agriculture.
As problems arise new projects are initiated. When problems are solved
projects are terminated. At the present time there is a continuing trend
toward greater team effort than in the past. Problems are more difficult
and require the interdisciplinary approach for best results. As new
problems arise and new projects are planned they are carefully screened
and reviewed before activation. Maximum coordination now is achieved by
close working relations within the entire system of campus departments and
research centers located throughout the state.

The current research is reported to the public in many ways, primarily
through published articles, bulletins and books. In addition, much research
is reported at conferences and meetings. Within the organization many field
days, short courses and conferences are held to which the public is invited.
These are held throughout the year by departments, and at research
centers throughout the state.

A brief report is included here of all projects on which research
w.s performed in 1975. Projects reported here are arranged by departments
and centers. The reader is referred to the index in order to obtain
complete and detailed information on a given question, topic, commodity or
process.

We hope you will find this report informative and useful.



John W. Sites
Dean for Research








Faculty List

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences:
College of Agriculture
Agricultural Experiment Stations
Cooperative Extension Service
University of Florida, Gainesville 32611
JANUARY, 1976
ADMINISTRATION

OFFICE OF PRESIDENT
226 Tigert Hall 32611
1 R. Q. Marston, Ph.D., President of Univ.
(904-392-1311) (Suncom 322-1311)

OFFICE OF VICE PRES. FOR AGRICULTURAL AFFAIRS
1008 McCarty Hall 32611
123 K. R. Tefertiller, Ph.D., Vice Pres. Agr. Affairs
(904-392-1971) (Suncom 322-1971)
123 A. F. Cribbett, M.S., Dir. Spec. Prog.
123 W. J. Messina, M.S., Dir. Prog. Develop.
(904-392-1975) (Suncom 322-1975)
23 V. C. McKee, Ph.D., Dir. Plan. and Bus. Affairs
(904-392-1347) (Suncom 322-1347)
12 H. L. Popenoe, Ph.D. Dir. International Prog.
(904-392-1965) (Suncom 322-1965)

OFFICE OF DEAN FOR RESIDENT INSTRUCTION
1001 McCarty Hall 32611
1 C. B. Browning, Ph.D., Dean for Resident Instr.
(904-392-1961) (Suncom 322-1961)
1 D. 0. Spinks, Ph.D., Assoc. Dean for Resident Instr.
1 J. L. Fry, Ph.D., Asst. Dean for Resident Instr.

OFFICE OF DEAN FOR RESEARCH
1022 McCarty Hall 32611
29 J. W. Sites, Ph.D., Dean for Res. & Dir. of Agr.
Expt. Sta. (904-392-1784) (Suncom 322-1784)
2 S. H. West, Ph.D., Asst. Dean for Res.
2 H. H. Wilkowske, Ph.D., Asst. Dean for Res.
2 G. R. Freeman, M.S.A., Asst. Dir. of Agr. Expt. Sta.

OFFICE OF DEAN FOR EXTENSION
1038 McCarty Hall 32611
3 J. N. Busby, Ph.D., Dean for Ext.
(904-392-1761) (Suncom 322-1761)
3 J. T. McCown, Ed.D., Assoc. Dean for Ext.
(904-392-1762) (Suncom 322-1762)
3 R. C. Andrew, Ph.D., Asst. Dean of Pers.
(904-392-4777) (Suncom 322-4777)
1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 8 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence 6 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TB, M-S Program







3 J. L. App, Ph.D., Asst. Dean Agr. Prog.
(904-392-1763) (Suncom 322-1763)
3 B. B. Archer, Ph.D., Asst. Dean 1890 FAMU Prog.
(904-222-5405) (Suncom 286-5405)
3 J. J. Brasher, Ph.D., Asst. Dean and Chm. 4-H &
Other Youth Prog. (904-392-1744)
(Suncom 322-1744)
3 Olive L. Morrill, Ed.S., Asst. Dean and Chmn., Home
Econ. Prog. (904-392-1779) (Suncom 322-1779)
3 F. E. Myers, M. Agr., Asst. to Dean for Ext.

Supervision
3 Pauline Calloway, Ed.D., Dist. Agt. (904-392-1781)
(Suncom 322-1781)
3 E. M. Kelly, Ph.D., Dist. Agt.
3 W. H. Smith, D.Ed., Dist. Agt.
3 J. R. Strayer, Ph.D., Dist. Agt.

Program Evaluation
and Organizational Development
3 A. A. Straughn, Ph.D., Dir. Prog. Eval. and Org.
Dev. (392-0386) (Suncom 322-0386)
3 Emily E. King, Ph.D., Prog. Spec.
3 R. W. Seiders, Ph.D., Prog. Spec.
3 C. L. Taylor, Ph.D., Prog. Spec.

OFFICE OF PLANNING AND BUSINESS AFFAIRS
2002 McCarty Hall
23 V. C. McKee, Ph.D., Dir. Plan. and Bus. Affairs
(904-392-1347) (Suncom 322-1347)

CENTERS
2014 McCarty Hall
123 J. F. Gerber, Ph.D., Dir. Center for Env. Programs
and Nat. Resources (392-2357 and 392-2358)
(Suncom 322-2357)
123 M. L. Upchurch, Ph.D., Acting Dir. Center for Rural
Dev. Programs (392-1718 and 392-1719)
(Suncom 322-1718)
2001 McCarty Hall
12 H. L. Popenoe, Ph.D., Prof. and Dir., Center for
Tropical Agriculture (904-392-1965)
(Suncom 322-1965)

FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION
(SCHOOL OF)
305 Rolfs Hall 32611
123 J. L. Gray, D.F., Dir.
(904-392-1792) (Suncom 322-1792)
12 W. H. Smith, Ph.D., Asst. Dir. for Research
3 T. G. Herndon, M.S.F., Asst. Dir. for Extension






FIELD SERVICES
1021 McCarty Hall 32611
2 G. R. Freeman, M.S.A., Asst. Dir. of Agr. Expt. Sta.
(904-392-1748) (Suncom 322-1748)

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS
2001 McCarty Hall 32611
123 H. L. Popenoe, Ph.D., Prof. (Soils) and Dir.
(904-392-1965) (Suncom 322-1965)
123 A. S. Muller, B.S.A., Vis. Assoc. Intl. Programs
6 J. L. Bieber, Ph.D., Asst. Res. Sci., Coop.
USAID/El Salvador
6 J. P. Bishop, Ph.D., Asst. Res. Sci., Coop.
INIAP/Ecuador
123 F. J. Calhoun, Ph.D., Asst. Prof., Coop. USAID/El
Salvador
6 J. K. Dow, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof., Coop.
INIAP/Ecuador
4 J. E. Ross, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof.
6 M. Schwartz, Ph.D., Asst. Res. Sci., Coop.
INIAP/Ecuador
6 J. Velez-Fortuno, Ph.D., Res. Sci., Coop.
USAID/El Salvador
6 B. H. Waite, Ph.D., Res. Sci., Coop. USAID/E1
Salvador

FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION
(SCHOOL OF)
305 Rolfs Hall 32611
123 J. L. Gray, D.F., Prof. and Dir.
(904-392-1792) (Suncom 322-1792)
6 G. W. Bengtson, Ph.D., Adjunct Assoc. Prof. TVA,
Muscle Shoals, Ala.
5 R. H. Brendemuehl, Ph.D., Adjunct Assoc. Prof. -
SE For. Exp. Sta., Marianna, Fla.
23 D. R. Crowe, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Ext. For.)
12 K. C. Ewel, Ph.D., Asst. Res. Sci. (Ecol.)
12 R. E. Goddard, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (For. Genet.)
12 L. D. Harris, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Wildlife Ecol.)
3 T. G. Herndon, M.S.F., Assoc. Prof. (Ext. For.)
12 D. H. Hirth, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Wildlife Ecol.)
12 C. A. Hollis, III, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (For. Physiol.)
12 J. B. Huffman, D.F., Assoc. Prof. (Wood Technol.)
3 A. S. Jensen, M.S.F., Asst. Prof. (Ext. For.)
12 C. M. Kaufman, Ph.D., Prof. (Silvic.)
12 W. R. Marion, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Wildlife Ecol.)
12 J. W. Miller, Jr., M.A.S., Prof. (Logging and
Sawmilling)
12 D. M. Post, M.S.F., Asst. Prof. (Harvesting)
12 D. L. Rockwood, Asst. Prof. (For. Genet.)
12 R. A. Schmidt, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (For. Path.)
2 J. V. Shireman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Fisheries Sci.)
12 W. H. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (For. Nutr.)
5 A. E. Squillace, Ph.D., Adjunct Prof. SE For.
Exp. Sta., Olustee, Fla.
12 E. T. Sullivan, D.F., Assoc. Prof. (For. Econ.)
12 L. D. White, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Range Ecol.)








DEPARTMENTS

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
9 Frazier Rogers Hall 32611

123 G. L. Zachariah, Prof. and Chairman of Dept.
(904-392-1864) (Suncom 322-1864)
12 L. 0. Bagnall, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Ag. Proc.)
12 C. D. Baird, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Ag. Proc.)
3 L. B. Baldwin, M.S.A., Asst. Prof. (Pollution
Control)
25 E. K. Bowman, B.S., Assoc. Prof. Indus. Engin.
(Citrus and Veg. Handling)
12 D. E. Buffington, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Env. Housing Engin.)
2 K. L. Campbell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Water Mgt.)
12 R. E. Choate, M.S.A., Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Soil and Water Engin.)
3 R. P. Cromwell, M.E., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Agr. Mach.)
3 J. G. Erisman, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Safety)
12 R. C. Fluck, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Agr. Mach. and Syst.)
25 J. J. Gaffney, M.S.A.E., Asst. in Agr. Engin.
(Citrus and Veg. Handling)
23 D. S. Harrison, M.S.A., Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Water Mgt.)
2 D. T. Hill, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Waste Mgt.)
25 F. E. Henry, B.I.E., Asst. Prof. Indus. Engin.
(Citrus and Veg. Handling)
2 C. V. Khe, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Energy and Proc.)
2 E. P. Lincoln, Ph.D., Visiting Res. Sci.
(Algae Prod.)
2 J. M. Myers, M.S.A., Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Water Mgt.)
12 R. A. Nordstedt, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Waste Mgt.)
12 A. R. Overman, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Water Mgt. and Pollution Control)
1 C. J. Rogers, M. Agr., Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Ag. Mechanics)
25 J. S. Rogers, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Soil and Water Mgt.)
3 P. S. Shackelford, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ag. Engin.
(Energy)
12 L. N. Shaw, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ag. Engin.
(Ag. Mach.)
3 T. C. Skinner, M.Agr., Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Ag. Structures)
25 J. M. Stanley, M.S., Prof. Agr. Engin. (Insect Attr.)
25 W. K. Turner, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Insect Attr.)






25 J. C. Webb, M.S., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Insect Attr.)

AGRICULTURAL & EXTENSION EDUCATION
160 Building E
1 C. E. Beeman, Ed.D., Assoc. Prof. and Chmn. of
Dept. (904-392-0502) (Suncom 322-0502)
1 W. S. Farrington, Ph.D., Asst. Prof.
1 J. G. Cheek, Ph.D., Asst. Prof.
1 M. B. McGhee, Ph.D., Asst. Prof.

AGRONOMY
304. Newell Hall 32611
123 C. Y. Ward, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(904-392-1811) (Suncom 322-1811)
2 L. H. Allen, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Physiology)
12 K. J. Boote, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Plant Physiol.)
23 F. Clark, M.S.A., Prof. (Flue Cured Tob. Mgt.)
23 W. L. Currey, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Weed Sci.)
12 C. E. Dean, Ph.D., Prof. (Clover, Tob. Genet. and
Brdg.)
3 W. G. Duncan, Ph.D., Prof. (Theoretical
Crop. Hush.)
12 J. R. Edwardson, Ph.D., Prof. (Cytogenet.)
12 G. J. Fritz, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Physiol.)
12 L. A. Garrard, Ph.D., Res. Assoc. (Plant Physiol.)
25 M. H. Gaskins, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Physiol.)
12 V. E. Green, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. (Sorghum and Rice)
2 W. T. Haller, Interim Asst. Prof. (Aquatic Weeds)
25 K. Hinson, Ph.D., Prof. (Soybean Genet. and Brdg.)
123 E. S. Horner, Ph.D., Prof. and Asst. Chrmn.
(Corn Genet. and Brdg.)
23 D. W. Jones, M.S., Prof (Forage Crop Mgt.)
12 F. leGrand, M.S. Assoc. Prof. (Sugarcane and
Theoretical Crop Hush.)
2 D. E. McCloud, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Physiol.)
12 G. 0. Mott, Ph.D., Prof. (Tropical Forage
Crop Mgt.)
123 A. J. Norden, Ph.D., Prof. (Peanut Genet. Brdg.)
2 W. R. Ocumpaugh, Ph.D., Asst. Research Scientist
(Tropical Pasture Mgt.)
2 A. J. Oswald, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Mgr. Fla. Fdn. Seed
Assoc.)
12 P. L. Pfahler, Ph.D., Prof. (Genet.)
12 G. M. Prine, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Field Crop Ecol.)
2 K. H. Quesenberry, Ph.D., Asst. Prof.
(Plant Brdg.)
12 E. G. Rodgers, Ph.D., Prof. (Weed Sci.)
12 0. C. Ruelke, Ph.D., Prof (Forage Crop Ecol.)
12 S. C. Schank, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Forage Brdg.
and Genet.)
12 V. N. Schroder, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Crop Nutr.)
12 R. L. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Forage Genet.
and Brdg.)
2 R. J. Varnell, Ph.D., Asst. Research Scientist
(Plant Physiol.)
2 H. E. Warmke, Ph.D., Prof. (Cytogenet.)






2 J. B. White, B.S.A., Assoc. Prof. (Crop Mgt.)
23 E. B. Whitty, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Field Crop Mgt.)
12 M. Wilcox, Ph.D., Prof. (Herbicide Biochem.)

ANIMAL SCIENCE
2103 McCarty Hall 32611
123 Harold D. Wallace, Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(904-392-1911) (Suncome 322-1911)
12 C. B. Ammerman, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr.
12 L. R. Arrington, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr.
(Laboratory Animals)
12 R. L. Asquith, DVM, Assoc. Prof., Equine Health
12 F. W. Bazer, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Physiol.
12 J. W. Carpenter, Ph.D., Prof. Meat Sci.
12 G. E. Combs, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Swine)
12 J. H. Conrad, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Tropical)
Animal Science)
3 B. H. Crawford, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr.
(Horse)
2 G. K. Davis, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr.
3 K. L. Durrance, M. Agr., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Husb.
(Swine)
2 J. F. Easley, M.S., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr.
12 J. P. Feaster, Ph.D., Prof. Biochem.
2 K. R. Fick, Ph.D., Asst. Res. Scientist
12 M. J. Fields, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Physiol.
12 D. E. Franke, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Genet.
1 D. D. Hargrove, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ani. Sci.
12 J. F. Hentges, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Beef)
2 R. H. Houser, Ph.D., Asst. Res. Scientist
3 A. F. Jilek, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Extension Beef
Spec., Quincy)
12 Marvin Koger, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Genet.
12 Sandi Lieb, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Horse)
12 P. E. Loggins, M.S., Prof. Anim. Husb. (Sheep)
12 J. K. Loosli, Ph.D., Visiting Prof., Anim. Nutr.
12 L. R. McDowell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr.
(Tropical Animal Science)
12 J. E. Moore, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr.
12 E. A. Ott, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Horses)
3 J. E. Pace, M.S.A., Prof. Anim. Husb. (Beef)
123 A. Z. Palmer, Ph.D., Prof. Meat Sci.
123 R. L. Reddish, Ph.D., Prof. Meat Sci.
3 R. S. Sand, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Husb. (Beef
and Horses)
12 D. C. Sharp, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Physiol.
(Horse)
12 R. L. Shirley, Ph.D., Prof, Animal Nutr.
12 D. L. Wakeman, M.S.A., Prof. Anim. Husb.
12 H. D. Wallace, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Swine)
123 A. C. Warnick, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Physiol.
12 R. L. West, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Meat Sci.

BOTANY
2177 McCarty Hall 32611
12 W. W. Payne, Ph.D., Prof. Bot. and Chmn. of Dept.
(904-392-1891) (Suncom 322-1891)






1 H. C. Aldrich, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.
1 D. S. Anthony, Ph.D., Prof. Bot.
1 G. Bowes, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Bot.
1 J. S. Davis, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.
1 J. J. Ewel, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Bot.
1 J. F. Gamble, Assoc. Research Scientist
1 D. G. Griffin, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.
1 M. M. Griffith, Ph.D., Prof. Bot.
2 T. E. Humphreys, Ph.D., Prof. Bot. and Biochem.
12 J. W. Kimbrough, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.
1 T. W. Lucansky, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Bot.
1 A. E. Lugo, Ph.D., Prof. Bot.
2 J. T. Mullins, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Bot.
1 L. Shanor, Ph.D., Prof. Bot.
1 R. C. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.
1 I. K. Vasil, Ph.D., Prof. Bot.
2 D. B. Ward, Ph.D., Prof. Bot.

DAIRY SCIENCE
106 Dairy Science Bldg. 32611
123 H. H. Van Horn, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. and
Chmn. of Dept. (904-392-1981)
(Suncom 322-1981)
12 K. C. Bachman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Biochem. (Foods)
3 Barney Harris, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Nutr.
12 H. H. Head, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Physiol.
(Lactation)
12 S. P. Marshall, Ph.D., Prof. Dairy Nutr.
12 L. E. Mull, Ph.D., Prof. Microbiol. (Foods)
13 R. L. Richter, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Dairy Technol.
12 K. L. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Microbiol. (Foods)
12 W. W. Thatcher, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Physiol.
(Reproduction)
13 D. W. Webb, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Dairy Mgt.)
12 C. J. Wilcox, Ph.D., Prof. Genetics
12 J. M. Wing, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr.

EDITORIAL
G022 McCarty Hall 32611
123 M. E. Morris, Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(904-392-1771) (Suncom 322-1771)
3 M. H. Breeze, M.A., Asst. Prof. and Ext. Comm.
Spec. (Radio & TV)
2 Mary L. Cilley, M.A., Asst. Prof. (Pub.)
3 T. M. Leahy, Jr., M.A., Asst. in Edit. and Ext.
Marine Advisory Comm. Spec.
3 J. M. Nehiley, M.A., Int. Asst. in Edit.
(Multi-Media)
23 Jo Ann Pierce, M.A., Asst. Prof. and Ext. Pub. Spec.
(Pub.-News)
23 M. H. Sharpe, Ph.D., Prof. and Ext. Comm. Spec.
3 R. C. Smith, Jr., B.A., Asst. Prof. and Ext. Radio
Spec. (Radio)
23 R. E. Thomas, M.A., Asst. Prof. and Comm. Spec.
3 J. W. Thorne, Jr., Int. Asst. in Agr. Educa. and Ext.
Comm. Spec. (Photography)
2 C. T. Woods, Jr., M.A., Asst. Prof. (Press)






ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY
3103 McCarty Hall 32611
123 F. G. Maxwell, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(904-392-1901, 02, 03) (Suncom 322-1901)
15 H. R. Agee, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Physiology)
27 G. E. Allen, Ph.D., Prof. (Aquatic Ent.)
15 D. W. Anthony, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 T. R. Ashley, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Behavioral)
15 D. L. Bailey, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
17 W. M. Beck, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Aquatic Ent.)
1 Lewis Berner, Ph.D., Prof. (Ecology)
3 J. E. Brogdon, M.S., Prof. (Extension)
23 W. F. Buren, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.)
12 J. F. Butler, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Vet. Ent.)
15 A. K. Burditt, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 P. S. Callahan, Ph.D., Prof. (Behavioral)
15 D. Carlson, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 D. L. Chambers, Ph.D., Prof. (Behavioral Pest
Management)
15 J. L. Coffelt, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Stored Products)
12 H. L. Cromroy, Ph.D., Prof. (Radiation Biology)
15 D. A. Dame, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 Dean Davis, Ph.D., Prof. (Toxicology)
17 G. W. Dekle, B.S., Assoc. Prof. (Taxonomy)
Fla. Div. Plant Industry
17 H. A. Denmark, M.S., Prof. (Acarology) Fla. Div.
Plant Industry
12 D. W. Dickson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Extension
Nematology)
3 R. A. Dunn, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Ext. Nematology)
18 A. G. Fairchild, Ph.D., Prof. (Taxonomy)
15 S. M. Ferkovich, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Behavioral)
15 P. D. Greany, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Behavioral)
17 Eric Grissel, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Taxonomy)
12 D. H. Habeck, Ph.D., Prof. (Immatures)
15 D. Hagstrum, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Stored Products)
12 D. W. Hall, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 M. D. Huettle, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Behavioral)
23 F. A. Johnson, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Extension)
12 S. H. Kerr, Ph.D., Prof. (Economic Ent.)
23 P. Koehler, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Extension)
1 Sol Kramer, Ph.D., Prof. (Behavioral)
2 L. C. Kuitert, Ph.D., Prof. (Economic Ent.)
15 N. C. Leppla, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Attractants)
15 G. C. LaBrecque, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 W. J. Lewis, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Ent. Ins.
Biocontrol) Tifton, Georgia
15 P. D. Lingren, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Pest
Management) Quincy, Fla.
12 J. E. Lloyd, Ph.D., Prof. (Systematics)
15 C. S. Lofgren, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 R. E. Lowe, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 M. S. Mayer, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Biophysics)
15 J. R. McLaughlin, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Behavioral)
17 F. W. Mead, Ph.D., Prof. (Systematics)
Fla. Div. Plant Industry
6 E. P. Merkel, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Forest Ent.)
U.S. Forest Service






12 D. R. Minnick, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Economic Ent.)
15 E. Mitchell, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Behavioral)
15 P. B. Morgan, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 G. A. Mount, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
1 Milledge Murphy, Ph.D., Prof. (Apiculture)
2 C. Musgrave, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Physiology)
12 J. L. Nation, Ph.D., Prof. (Physiology)
15 J. K. Nayer, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Vero Beach)
15 J. H. O'Bannon, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Nematology)
Orlando
15 Herbert Oberlander, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof.
(Endocrinology)
127 C. W. O'Brian, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Aquatic Ent.)
15 R. S. Patterson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 D. B. Perkins, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Aquatic Ent.)
12 V. G. Perry, Ph.D., Prof. (Nematology)
127 W. L. Peters, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Aquatic Ent.)
Fla. A&M Univ. Tallahassee
12 S. L. Poe, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Acarology)
23 F. A. Robinson, M.S., Prof. (Apiculture)
15 A. J. Rogers, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.) Panama City
Fla.
12 R. I. Sailer, Ph.D., Grad. Res. Prof. (Biological
Control)
8 Harry Samol, M.S., Asst. Prof., Fla. Sugarcane
League, Belle Glade, Fla.
15 J. A. Seawright, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Genetics)
123 D. E. Short, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Extension)
15 D. L. Silhacek, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Stored
Products)
12 G. C. Smart, Ph.D., Prof. (Nematology)
15 B. J. Smittle, Ph.D., Prof. (Radiation Biology)
15 L. L. Sower, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Pheromones)
17 D. Stokes, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Nematology)
15 T. E. Summers, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Biocontrol)
17 A. L. Taylor, M.S., Prof. (Nematology)
15 J. H. Tumlinson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Behavior)
15 K. W. Vick, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Physiology)
2 R. E. Waites, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Economic Ent.)
12 T. J. Walker, Ph.D., Prof. (Ecology)
17 H. V. Weems, Ph.D., Prof. (Taxonomy) Fla. Div.
Plant Industry
15 D. E. Weidhass, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.)
1 M. J. Westfall, Ph.D., Prof. (Taxonomy)
12 W. H. Whitcomb, Ph.D., Prof. (Taxonomy)
12 R. C. Wilkinson, Ph.D., Prof. (Forest Ent.)
18 W. W. Wirth, Ph.D., Prof. (Taxonomy) U.S.
National Museum
15 B. R. Wiseman, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Plant
Resistance) Tifton, Ga.
17 R. E. Woodruff, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Economic Ent.)
Fla. Div. Plant Industry

FOOD & RESOURCE ECONOMICS
1157 McCarty Hall 32611
123 Leonidas Polopolus, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. and
Chmn. of Dept. (904-392-1826)
(Suncom 322-1826)






3 B. Abbitt, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Comm. & Rural
Devlpmt.)
12 C. 0. Andrew, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Internat.'l
Trade & Devlpmt. and Mktg.)
2 D. L. Brooke, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Farm Mgt.
& Mktg.)
27 T. L. Brooks, Jr., B.S., Statis, Fla. Dept. of Citrus
(Citrus Mktg.)
3 J. C. Cato, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Marine
Econ.)
13 H. B. Clark, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Mktg., Coop.
Credit)
23 K. C. Clayton, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Land Use Plan.)
23 W. Arden Colette, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Community and Rural Devlpmt.)
23 R. O. Coppedge, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Human Res.
Devlpmt.)
13 C. D. Covey, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. & Ext.
Coord. (Mktg. and Pub. Policy)
12 C. G. Davis, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Human
Res. Devlpmt., Econ. Devlpmt. & Policy)
2 J. K. Dow, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Internat.'l Trade & Mktg.)
3 R. A. Eastwood, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Mtkg.)
3 V. L. Elkins, M.S., Prof. Area Devlpmt. Spec.
(Comm. and Rural Devlpmt.) Tallahassee
12 R. D. Emerson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Res. Econ.)
27 G. R. Fairchild, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ., Fla.
Dept. of Citrus (Mktg.)
12 E. Finlayson, M.S.A., Assoc. Agr. Econ.
(Farm Mgt.)
4 K. C. Gibbs, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Nat.
Res. and Env. Quality)
25 R. A. Greenhalgh, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Nat.
Res. Econ.)
3 D. L. Gunter, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Production
Economics)
13 J. Holt, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Farm Mgt. Spec.
(Prod. Econ.)
12 C. F. Kiker, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Env. Econ.)
12 M. R. Langham, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Econometrics and Prod. Econ.)
27 W. B. Lester, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ., Fla.
Dept. of Citrus (Mktg., Policy)
12 Edna T. Loehman, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ.
Res. Econ. Devlpmt.)
12 G. D. Lynne, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Nat. Res. Econ.,
Prod, Econ.)
23 V. C. McKee, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. and Director of
Planning (Nat. Res. Econ.)
12 W. W. McPherson, Ph.D., Grad. Res. Prof. (Econ.
Devlpmt., Policy, Gen. Theory, and Lat.
Amer. Prog.)
2 W. K. Mathis, Jr., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. and Dir. of
Agricultural Mrkt. Research Ctr.
3 C. C. Moxley, Ph.D., Prof. (Comm. Res. & Rural
Devlpmt.)






12 L. H. Myers, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Price
Analysis, Mktg.)
3 J. A. Niles, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Mktg.)
23 J. A. Otte, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Farm Mgt.) Bradenton
12 F. J. Prochaska, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Gen. Econ. Theory, Marine Econ. and
Env. Econ.)
23 J. E. Reynolds, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. and
Asst. Dean of Coll. of Agr. (Nat. Res.)
12 C. N. Smith, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Mktg. and
Policy)
25 E. B. Smith, M.S., Instructor Agr. Econ.
(Prod. & Mktg. Econ.)
5 Frederick Steward, Ph.D., Adjunct Asst. Prof.
(Natural Resource Economics)
27 D. S. Tilley, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Mktg. Firm Eff.)
(Fla. Dept. of Citrus)
25 W. C. Walden, M.S., Instructor, Asst. in Agr. Econ.
12 R. W. Ward, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Mktg.
and Industrial Org.)
23 G. 0. Westberry, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Farm Mgt. &
Prod. Econ.)
25 G. A. Zepp, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Prod.
Econ.)

4-H AND OTHER YOUTH PROGRAMS
2039 McCarty Hall 32611
3 J. J. Brasher, Ph.D., Assistant Dean & Chairman of
Department, 4-H & Other Youth Programs
(904-392-1744) (Suncom 322-1744)
3 B. J. Allen, M.A., Assoc. Prof., Ext. 4-H Youth
Specialist
3 L. L. Dearmin, M.S., Assoc. Prof. 4-H-Youth
Specialist
3 T. C. Greenwalt, Ed.D., Assoc. Prof., Ext. 4-H-Youth
Specialist
3 T. T. McKinney, Ph.D., Asst. Prof., Ext. 4-H Youth
Specialist
3 D. Miller, M.S., Asst. Prof., Ext. 4-H Youth
Specialist (904-222-8030)
3 R. L. Milton, M.S., Assoc. Prof., Ext. 4-H-Youth
Specialist
3 J. C. Northrop, Ed., Asst. Prof., Ext. 4-H-Youth
Specialist
3 D. D. Pyle, Ed.D., Asst. Prof. Ext. 4-H-Youth
Specialist

FOOD SCIENCE
367 Food Science Building 32611
123 R. A. Dennison, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(904-392-2022) (Suncom 322-2022)
12 E. M. Ahmed, Ph.D., Prof. Food Psychophys.
12 Howard Appledorf, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Human Nutr.
12 P. E. Araujo, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Human Nutr.
123 R. P. Bates, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Food Proc.
12 J. Deng, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Seafood Technol.






12 F. W. Knapp, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Food Chem.
12 J. A. Koburger, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Food Microbiol.
23 R. F. Matthews, Ph.D., Prof. Food Science
2 H. A. Moye, Ph.D., Prof. Anal. Chem.
12 J. L. Oblinger, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Food Microbiol.
12 R. C. Robbins, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Human Nutr.
12 R. H. Schmidt, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Food Chem.
12 J. G. Surak, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Food Toxicol.
2 N. P. Thompson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Pest. Residue
Anal.
12 W. B. Wheeler, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Toxicol.

FRUIT CROPS
1172 McCarty Hall 32611
123 R. H. Biggs, Ph.D., Biochem., Professor and
Chairman of Dept. (904-392-4711)
(Suncom 322-4711)
12 J. F. Bartholic, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Climatol.
12 D. W. Buchanan, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Decid. Fruit)
3 T. E. Crocker, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort.
25 T. T. Hatton, Jr., Prof. Hort. Orlando
23 L. K. Jackson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Citric. Spec.)
12 A. H. Krezdorn, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
3 R. L. Phillips, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort.
3 J. W. Sauls, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.
12 W. B. Sherman, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Decid. Fruit
Brdg.)
12 James Soule, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
3 D. P. H. Tucker, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Citric. Spec.)
Lake Alfred
3 W. F. Wardowski, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Citric. Spec.)
Lake Alfred
12 W. J. Wiltbank, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort.
12 M. J. Young, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.
125 R. H. Young, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort. Orlando
13 L. W. Ziegler, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.

HOME ECONOMICS
1041 McCarty Hall 32611
3 Olive L. Morrill, Ed.D., Prof. Asst. Dean for Ext.
and Chmn. of Dept. (904-392-1778)
(Suncom 322-1778)
3 R. Nadine Hackler, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Clothing Spec.
3 Robert H. Hall, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Home Furn. Spec.
3 Marie S. Hammer, M.H.E., Assoc. Prof. Home Econ.
(ENP)
3 Mary N. Harrison, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Consum. Educ.
Spec.
3 Mary L. Lambing, Ph.D., Asst. Prof., Health
Education Specialist
3 Vervil L. Mitchell, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Home Mgt. and
Fam. Econ. Spec.
3 Lizette L. Murphy, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Consum. Educ.
Spec.
3 Faye A. Plowman, M.A., Asst. Prof. Housing Spec.
3 Evelyn A. Rooks, M.H.E., Asst. Prof. Human Dev.
Spec.






23 Patricia A. Wagner, Ph.D., Asst. Prof., Ext.
Nutrition Specialists
3 Yancey B. Walters, M.H.E., Prof. Home Econ.
(ENP)
3 Glenda L. Warren, M.S., Asst. Prof. Food and Nutr.
Spec. (ENP)

LIBRARY-HUME LIBRARY
McCarty Hall 32611
123 A. C. Strickland, M.S., Librarian and Head
(904-392-1934) (Suncom 322-1934)
123 Lenora M. Calfee, M.S., Asst. Libr.
123 Ann H. King, M.S., Asst. Libr.
123 G. T. Kovalik, M.A., Asst. Libr.
123 Lawan V. Orser, M.S., Assoc. Libr.
123 Siew P. Su, M.A., Asst. Libr.
123 W. B. Weaver, M.S., Assoc. Libr.

MICROBIOLOGY
1053 McCarty Hall 32611
12 P. H. Smith, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(392-1906) (Suncom 322-1906)
12 P. M. Achey, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Bact. Microbiol.
Proc.)
12 A. S. Bleiweis, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Bact. Physiol.)
12 D. E. Duggan, Ph.D.;Assoc. Prof. (Bact. Microbiol.
Proc.)
12 E. M. Hoffman, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Bact. Immunol.)
12 L. 0. Ingram, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Bact. Microbiol.
Proc.)
12 G. A. Olson, D.M.V., Asst. Prof. (Vet. Microbiol.)
12 J. F. Preston, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Bact. MicrobioL
Proc.)
12 E. P. Previc, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Bact. Metabol.)
12 M. E. Tyler, Ph.D., Prof. (Bact. Microbiol. Proc.)

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
105 Rclfs Hall 32611
123 W. J. Carpenter, Ph.D., Professor and Chrmn.
of Dept. (904-392-1831) (Suncom 322-1831)
3 B. J. Black, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Ext. Urban
Horticulturist)
12 A. E. Dudeck, Assoc. Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Turf)
23 D. F. Hamilton, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Rural Dev.)
3 R. W. Henley, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Foliage Extension and Research)
12 C. R. Johnson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Nursery)
12 J. N. Joiner, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Flor.)
12 D. B. McConnell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Nursery)
2 S. E. McFadden, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Nursery)






23 H. G. Meyers, M.S.A., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Turf)
3 J. T. Midcap, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Woody
Ornamental Specialist)
1 M. R. Sheehan, M.S., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Flor.-Design-Illus.)
12 T. J. Sheehan, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort.
23 B. 0. Tjia, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Ext. Floriculture
Specialist)
123 W. T. Whitte, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Flor.)


PLANT PATHOLOGY
Building 164 (Plant Virus Lab)

123 L. H. Purdy, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. and Chmn. of
Dept. (904-392-1861) (Suncom 322-1861)
2 J. A. Bartz, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Post
Harvest Diseases)
2 R. D. Berger, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path. (Plant
Disease Epidemiology)
2 Raghaven Charudattan, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant
Path. (Pathogens of Water Weeds)
2 K. E. Conway, Ph.D., Post Doc. Assoc. (Pathogens
of Water Weeds)
12 A. A. Cook, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Bac. Plant
Pathogens)
2 Phares Decker, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Diseases
of Fruits)
2 T. E. Freeman, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Turfgrass
Diseases and Pathogens of Water Weeds)
12 Ernest Hiebert, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Virology)
3 T. A. Kucharek, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
(Extension, Field Crop Diseases)
25 H. H. Luke, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Cereal
Diseases)
2 H. N. Miller, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Diseases of
Ornamentals)
12 D. J. Mitchell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
(Diseases of Field Crops; Bio. of Soil-borne
Pathogens)
3 R. S. Mullin, Ph.D., Plant Path. (Extension,
Ornamentals and Vegetables)
2 M. Abo Eli-Nil, Ph.D., Post-Doc. Assoc. (Tissue
Culture Research, Virology)
25 D. R. Pring, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
(Physiology of Corn Diseases)
12 D. E. Purcifull, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Virology)
12 D. A. Roberts, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Virology)
12 N. C. Schenck, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Soil-borne
Pathogens)
12 R. E. Stall, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Bac. Plant
Pathogens)
2 F. W. Zettler, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Virology)






POULTRY SCIENCE
Mehrhof Building, 1FAS 32611
123 R. H. Harms, Ph.D., Prof. Poultry Nutr. and Chmn.
of Dept. (904-392-1931) (Suncom 322-1931)
123 A. Arafa, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Poultry Prod. Tech.)
3 R. B. Christmas, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Random Test
Supvd.), Chipley (904-638-0588)
12 B. L. Damron, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Poultry Nutr.)
123 C. R. Douglas, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Ext.
Poultryman)
12 D. M. Janky, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Poultry Prod.
Tech.)
3 L. W. Kalch, M.Agr., Assoc. Prof. (Ext.
Poultryman)
12 R. A. Voitle, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Poultry Physiol.)
123 H. R. Wilson, Ph.D., Prof. (Poultry Physiol.)

SOIL SCIENCE
106 Newell Hall 32611
123 C. F. Eno, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Microbiology and Chmn.
of Dept. (904-392-1804) (Suncom 322-1804)
12 W. G. Blue, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Soil
Fertility Pastures)
12 H. L. Breland, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Analytical Research Laboratory)
12 R. E. Caldwell, Ph.D., Prof. Pedology (Genesis and
Classification)
6 F. G. Calhoun, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Taxonomy
(Genesis and Mineralogy) U.S. Aid/El Salvador
12 V. W. Carlisle, Ph.D., Prof. Pedology (Genesis and
Classification)
27 C. L. Coultas, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Genesis and Classification) Coop Fla.
A&M Univ.
12 J. M. Davidson, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Physics
(Soil-Water Relations)
12 J. G. A. Fiskell, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Biochemistry (Soil
Fertility Vegetables)
12 N. Gammon, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Micronutrients)
12 D. A. Graetz, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Environmental
Quality (Soil and Water Pollution)
12 M. A. Granger, Ph.D., Visiting Asst. Prof. Soil
Taxonomy (Genesis and Mineralogy)
123 L. C. Hammond, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Physics (Water
Relations)
3 J. H. Herbert, Jr., M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Extension
Soils (Soil Conservation)
2 C. C. Hortenstine, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Environmental Quality)
12 D. H. Hubbell, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Microbiology
(Rhizophere)
12 R. S. Mansell, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Physics
(Water and Pesticide Movement)
12 H. L. Popenoe, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Tropical
Soils, Director Center for Tropical Agriculture)






26 D. H. Marx, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Microbiology
(Soil-borne Organisms) Coop US Forest Service
12 W. L. Pritchett, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Forest
Soils)
2 W. K. Robertson, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Soil
Fertility Agronomic Crops)
12 D. F. Rothwell, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Microbiology
(Graduate Coordinator)
123 J. B. Sartain, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Fertility
(Fertilizer and Lime Technology)
12 B. G. Volk, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Organic Matter)
2 T. L. Yuan, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Acidity
and Amorphous Clays)

STATISTICS
524 Nuclear Science Bldg. 32611
12 William Mendenhall, III, Ph.D., Prof. Statis. and
Chmn. of Dept. (904-392-1941)
(Suncom 322-1941)
2 J. A. Cornell, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Statis.
2 R. C. Littell, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Statis.
2 F. G. Martin, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Statis.

VEGETABLE CROPS
3206 McCarty Hall 32611
123 J. F. Kelly, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. (904-392-1794)
(Suncom 322-1794)
12 M. J. Bassett, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort. (Brdg.)
12 D. J. Cantliffe, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort. (Seed
Physiol.)
12 D. D. Gull, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Postharvest
Physiol.)
2 C. B. Hall, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Physiol.)
2 L. H.Halsey, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Culture)
12 L. C. Hannah, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort. (Biochem.
Genet.)
3 S. R. Kostewicz, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Veg. Crops
Spec.)
12 S. L. Locascio, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Herbic. Nutr.)
3 G. A. Marlowe, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Veg. Crops -
Bradenton
3 M. E. Marvel, Ph.D., Prof. Veg. Crops Spec.
3 James Montelaro, Ph.D., Prof. (Veg. Crops Spec.)
2 T. J. Schueneman, Ph.D., Post-Doc. Res. Assoc.
12 J. R. Stang, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort. (Veg. Prod.)
23 R. K. Showalter, M.S., Prof. Hort. (Postharvest)
3 J. M. Stephens, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. (Veg. Crops
Spec.)
12 B. D. Thompson, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Physiol.)

VETERINARY SCIENCE
Veterinary Science Research Lab. 32611
123 C. E. Cornelius, D.V.M., Ph.D., Prof. Physiol. Chmn.
of Dept. and Dean Col. Vet. Med.
(904-392-1841) (Suncom 322-1841)







2 H. N. Becker, D.V.M., M.S., Assoc. Prof. Vet.
12 R. E. Bradley, Sr., D.V.M., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof.
Parasitol.
2 P. T. Cardeilhac, D.V.M., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof.
Pharmacol.
12 G. T. Edds, D.V.M., Ph.D., Prof. Toxicol.
2 D. J. Forrester, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Parasitol.
2 J. M. Gaskin, D.V.M., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Virol.
12 J. A. Himes, V.M.D., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof., Dir. Office
of Vet. Med. Educ.
2 K. D. Ley, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Virol.
3 G. W. Meyerholz, D.V.M., Prof. Vet.
12 F. C. Neal, D.V.M., M.S., Assoc. Prof. Vet.
2 J. T. M. Neilson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Parasitol.
12 W. P. Palmore, D.V.M., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Physiol
2 J. A. Popp, D.V.M., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Path.
123 C. F. Simpson, D.V.M., Ph.D., Prof. Path., Asst.
Dean for Res.
2 F. H. White, Ph.D., Prof. Bact.

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND
EDUCATION CENTERS
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER
P. O. Drawer A, Belle Glade 33430
2 D. L. Myhre, Ph.D., Professor, Soil Science and
Ctr. Dir. (305-996-3062)
2 R. J. Allen, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Pasture)
2 H. W. Burdine, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Physiol.
(Veg. Crops)
25 J. E. Clayton, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Sugarcane)
2 S. W. Coleman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr.
(Beef Cattle)
2 J. R. Crockett, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Genet.
(Beef Cattle)
25 J. L. Dean, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Sugarcane)
25 B. R. Eiland, M.S., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Sugarcane)
2 G. J. Gascho, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agron. (Sugarcane
Nutr.)
2 W. G. Genung, M.S., Prof. Ent. (Veg. Crops)
2 V. L. Guzman, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Veg. Crops)
3 L. A. Halsey, M.S., Asst. Prof. Econ.
25 N. I. James, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agron. (Sugarcane)
2 M. J. Janes, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ent. (Veg. Crops)
3 G. Kidder, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Extension Sugarcane)
Specialist)
2 P. M. Lyrene, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Brdg.
(Sugarcane)
25 J. D. Miller, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Genet.
(Sugarcane)
2 J. W. Mishoe, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Veg.
Mech.)
2 H. Y. Ozaki, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Veg. Crops)

19






2 F. M. Pate, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Beef
Cattle)
25 E. R. Rice, B.S., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Sugarcane)
2 G. H. Snyder, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chem.
25 T. E. Summers, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ent.
(Sugarcane)
2 R. L. Tate, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Microbial Ecology)
2 E. A. Wolf, M.S., Prof. Hort. (Veg. Brdg.)
2 T. A. Zitter, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path. (Veg.
Crops)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER
5007 60th St. E., Bradenton 33505
2 W. E. Waters, Ph.D., Prof. and Ctr. Dir.
(813-755-1568) (Suncom 339-1134)
2 J. J. Augustine, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Genet. (Veg.)
2 D. S. Burgis, M.S.A., Prof. Hort. (Veg.)
2 A. W. Engelhard, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Ornam.)
2 C. M. Geraldson, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chem. (Veg.)
2 B. K. Harbaugh, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Ornam.)
2 J. P. Jones, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Veg.)
2 R. F. Lucas, B.S., Interim Asst. in Agr. Eng.
(Veg. Ornam.)
2 R. 0. Magie, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Ornam.)
23 G. A. Marlowe, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. (Ext. Veg. Spec.)
25 F. J. Marousky, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Ornam.)
2 Amegda, J. Overman, M.S., Prof. Nematol. (Ornam.
Veg.)
23 J. Otte, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Farm Mgt. Spec.)
2 D. J. Schuster, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Entomol.
(Ornam. Veg.)
2 G. J. Wilfret, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Genet. (Ornam.)
2 S. S. Woltz, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Physiol. (Ornam.
Veg.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER
18905 S. W. 280 Street, Homestead 33030
2 A. A. Duncan, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. and Ctr. Dir.
(Veg. Crop Prod.) (305-247-4624)
(Suncom 451-5059)
2 R. M. Baranowski, Ph.D., Prof. Ent. (Fruit Fly
Res. Biol. Control; Taxon-Hemiptera)
2 H. H. Bryan, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Veg.)
2 C. W. Campbell, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Subtropical
Fruits)
2 R. A. Conover, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Veg.
and Subtropical Fruits)
2 T. L. Davenport, Ph.D., Post Doc. Fellow (Plant
Physiology-Bio. Chemistry)
2 C. H. Doty, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Weed Control)
2 S. E. Malo, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Subtropical
Fruits)








2 R. B. Marlatt, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path.
(Ornam. Dis.)
2 R. T. McMillan, Jr., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Veg. and Subtropical Fruits)
2 P. G. Orth, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chem. (Veg. and
Subtropical Fruits)
2 R. B. Volin, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Veg.)
2 V. H. Waddill, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent. (Veg.)
2 T. W. Young, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Subtropical
Fruits)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER
P. O. Box 1088, Lake Alfred 33850
2 H. J. Reitz, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. and Ctr. Dir.
(813-956-1151) (Suncom 333-1215)
2 E. P. DuCharme, Prof., Plant Path. and Asst.
Ctr. Dir.
2 L. G. Albrigo, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort.
2 J. C. Allen, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent.
2 C. A. Anderson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chem.
27 J. A. Attaway, Ph.D., Prof. Chem.-Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
2 C. R. Barmore, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Physiol.
27 R. W. Barron, B.A., Asst. in Chem.-Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
27 Margaret H. Bennett, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Chem.-
Fla. Dept. of Citrus
27 J. G. Blair, B.S.M.E., Assoc. Prof. Mech. Engin.-
Fla. Dept. of Citrus
2 R. J. Braddock, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Food Sci.
2 R. F. Brooks, Ph.D., Prof. Ent.
27 G. E. Brown, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.-Fla.
Dept. of Citrus
27 B. S. Buslig, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Biochem.-Fla. Dept.
of Citrus
2 A. F. Camp, Ph.D., Dir. Emer. Hort.
27 G. E. Coppock, M.S., Prof. Agr. Engin.-Fla. Dept.
of Citrus
2 P. G. Crandall, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Food Sci.
27 M. H. Dougherty, B.S., Asst. Prof. Chem. Engin.-
Fla. Dept. of Citrus
2 B. A. Eagerman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Food Sci.
2 G. J. Edwards, B.A., Asst. Prof. Biochem.
2 A. W. Feldman, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path.
27 P. J. Fellers, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Food Tech.-Fla.
Dept. of Citrus
2 Francine E. Fisher, M.S., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
27 J. F. Fisher, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Chem.-Fla. Dept.
of Citrus
2 H. W. Ford, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
2 Dennis Gonsalves, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
2 William Grierson, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
2 R. W. Hanks, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Physiol.
2 Pamela K. Hearon, B.S., Asst. Libr.
25 S. L. Hedden, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
27 E. C. Hill, B.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Bact.-Fla. Dept. of
Citrus







27 R. L. Huggart, B.S., Assoc. Prof. Chem.-Fla. Dept.
of Citrus
27 M. A. Ismail, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.-Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
2 R. B. Johnson, Ph.D., Prof. Ent.
2 J. W. Kesterson, M.S., Prof. Chem.
2 R. C. J. Koo, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
2 C. D. Leonard, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
27 A. A. McCornack, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Hort.-Fla.
Dept. of Citrus
2 C. W. McCoy, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ent.
27 M. D. Maraulja, B.S., Asst. in Chem.-Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
2 W. M. Miller, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
27 E. L. Moore, Ph.D., Prof. Chem.-Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
2 W. F. Newhall, Ph.D., Prof. Biochem.
2 H. N. Nigg, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent.
2 R. W. Olsen, B.S., Prof. Biochem.
27 D. R. Petrus, M.S., Asst. in Chem.-Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
2 A. P. Pieringer, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort.
2 R. L. Reese, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.
2 A. H. Rouse, M.S., Prof. Chem.
27 R. L. Rouseff, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Chem.-Fla. Dept.
of Citrus
2 W. A. Simanton, Ph.D., Prof. Emer. in Ent.
2 Ivan Stewart, Ph.D., Prof. Biochem.
25 H. R. Sumner, M.S., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
2 A. C. Tarjan, Ph.D., Prof. Nematol.
27 S. V. Ting, Ph.D., Prof. Biochem.-Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
23 K. G. Townsend, B.S.A., Asst. in Ent.
23 D. P. H. Tucker, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Area Citrus
Spec.)
2 M. A. Vitelli, Ph.D., Asst. in Ent.
23 W. F. Wardowski, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Area
Citrus Spec.)
2 F. W. Wenzel, Ph.D., Prof. Emer. in Chem.
2 T. A. Wheaton, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort.
2 J. 0. Whiteside, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path.
2 J. D. Whitney, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
27 W. C. Wilson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Physiol.-
Fla. Dept. of Citrus

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER
P. O. Box 470, Quincy 32351

2 W. H. Chapman, M.S., Prof. Agron. and Ctr. Dir.
(904-627-9236) (Suncom 221-3230)
2 F. S. Baker, Jr., M.S.A., Prof. Anim. Hush. (Beef
Cattle)
2 R. D. Barnett, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Small
Grains Brdg.)
2 G. L. Greene, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ent. (Field Crops)
23 A. F. Jilek, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Area Livestock
Spec.)








2 K. J. McVeigh, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron.
(Forage Crops Brdg.)
2 F. M. Rhoads, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chem.
(Shade Tob.)
2 G. E. Sanden, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Field
Crops)
2 R. L. Stanley, Jr., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agron.
(Forage Crops)
2 W. B. Tappan, M.S.A., Prof. Ent. (Shade Tob.)
23 G. 0. Westberry, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Farm Mgt.
Spec.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER
P. O. Box 909, Sanford 32771
2 J. F. Darby, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. and Ctr. Dir.
(Dis. Veg.) (305-322-4134)
2 W. H. Denton, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent. (Veg. Crops)
2 R. B. Forbes, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chem. (Veg.
Crops)
2 H. L. Rhoades, Ph.D., Prof. Nematol. (Veg. Crops)
2 W. T. Scudder, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Herbic.)
2 L. R. Sinclair, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Hydrology)
2 J. 0. Strandberg, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Veg. Crops)
2 J. M. White, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort. (Veg. Crops)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER
Florida A & M University, Tallahassee 32307
Vacant, Ctr. Dir., (904-222-8030)
27 J. M. Axelson, M.S., Food Sci.
27 W. M. Beck, Jr., M.S., Prof. Ent.
27 E. R. Gross, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chem.
27 W. L. Kruczynski, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Marine Biol.
27 C. F. Savoy, Ph.D., Res. Assoc., Microbiology

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER
Welaka 32093
(904-467-2388)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTERS

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Rt. 3, Box 580, Apopka 32703
2 C. A. Conover, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ornam. Hort. and
Ctr. Dir. (305-889-4161)
2 R. A. Hamlen, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent.
23 R. W. Henley, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
2 J. F. Knauss, Ph.D., Assoc. Plant. Path.
2 R. T. Poole, Ph.D., Assoc. Plant. Physiol.







AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station, USDA
P. O. Box 246, Brooksville 33512
25 W. C. Burns, M.S., Prof., Research Animal Scientist
Geneticist and Ctr. Dir. (904-796-3385)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Rt. 2, Box 629, Dover 33527
2 E. E. Albregts, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soils (Veg.)
(813-752-7649)
2 C. M. Howard, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Veg.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
3205 S. W. 70th Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale 33314
2 W. B. Ennis, Jr., Ph.D., Professor (Agron.) &
Center Director (305-584-6990)
(Suncom 451-5022)
2 E. 0. Burt, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Turf Tech.)
2 R. E. McCoy, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Turf
and Ornam.)
2 P. L. Neel, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
25 B. D. Perkins, Ph.D., Asst. Ent. (Aquatic Weeds)
2 J. A. Reinert, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent. (Turf and
Ornam.)
25 K. K. Steward, Ph.D., Asst. Plant Physiol. (Aquatic
Weeds) (305-583-5541)
2 D. L. Thomas, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Turf
and Ornam.)
2 J. H. Tsai, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent.
23 V. V. Vandiver, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Extension &
Aquatic Weeds Spec.

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P. O. Box 248, Ft. Pierce 33450
2 N. C. Hayslip, B.S.A., Prof. Ent. and Center
Director (305-461-4371 & 464-6017)
(Suncom 451-5035)
2 J. B. Brolmann, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Legume
Brdr.)
2 R. C. Bullock, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ent. (Citrus)
2 D. V. Calvert, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chem.
(Citrus)
2 Mortimer Cohen, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Citrus)
2 A. E. Kretschmer, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Agron.
(Pasture)
2 R. M. Sonoda, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path. (Veg.
Crops)
25 E. H. Stewart, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Soil Physiol.,
USDA

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P. O. Box 728, Hastings 32045
2 D. R. Hensel, Ph.D., Prof. and Ctr. Dir. (Soils, Veg.)
(904-692-1792)







2 J. R. Shumaker, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Hort. Veg.)
2 D. P. Weingartner, Ph.D., Assoc. Path. (Plant Path.,
Veg.)
2 R. B. Workman, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Ent., Veg.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Rt. 1, Box 2G, Immokalee 33934
2 P. H. Everett, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chem. (Veg.)
(813-657-2835) (Suncom 352-7380)
2 C. H. Blazquez, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Veg.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Rt. 3, Box 575, Jay 32565
2 H. A. Peacock, Ph.D., Agron. and Ctr. Dir. (Plant
Breed.) (904-994-5215 & 904-994-7373)
2 J. E. Bertrand, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. An. Sci. (Anim.
Nutr.)
2 B. J. Brecke, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Weed
Sci.)
2 L. S. Dunavin, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agron. (Forage
Crop Mgt.)
2 R. A. Kinloch, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Nematol. (Field
Crop)
2 M. C. Lutrick, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Sci. (Fert.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P. O. Box 1068, USDC, NOAA, National Weather
Service, Lakeland 33802
6 J. G. Georg, M.S., Meteorol. and Ctr. Dir.
(813-682-4221)
6 L. L. Benson, B. S., Asst. Meteorol.
6 V. Carreras, B.S., Asst. in Meteorology
6 W. F. Mincey, Asst. Meteorol.
6 J. R. Noffsinger, M.S., Asst. Meteorol.

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P. O. Box 388, Leesburg 32748
2 J. M. Crall, Ph.D., Prof. and Ctr. Dir. (Watermelon
Brdg. and Dis.) (904-787-3423)
2 W. C. Adlerz, Ph.D., Prof. (Virus Transmission,
Watermelon and Grape Ins.)
2 G. W. Elmstrom, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Cucurbit
Growth and Devlpmt.)
2 D. L. Hopkins, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Watermelon and
Grape Dis.)
2 J. A. Mortensen, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Grape Brdg.
and Genet.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P. O. Box 657, Live Oak 32060
2 J. T. Johnson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. and Ctr. Dir.
(904-362-1725)
2 D. L. Hammell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Swine Nutrition)

25







AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Route 3, Box 383, Marianna 32446
2 D. W. Gorbet, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Peanuts)
(904-594-3241)
2 V. D. Leibbrandt, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Animal Nutri.
(Swine)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Rt. 3, Box 213B, Monticello 32344
2 C. E. Arnold, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. and Ctr. Dir.
(Hort.) (904-997-2597)
2 C. P. Andrews, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.
2 J. C. Ball, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent.
2 W. J. French, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Path.
2 D. M. Weatherspoon, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Route 1, Ona 33865
2 H. L. Chapman, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. and
Ctr. Dir. (813-735-3121)
2 L. F. Caswell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr.
(Waste management)
2 C. L. Dantzman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chem.
(Soil Fert.)
2 E. M. Hodges, Ph.D., Prof. Agron. (Pasture and
Forage Crops)
2 R. S. Kalmbacher, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron.
(Range Management)
2 P. Mislevy, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Pasture
and Forage Crops)
2 F. M. Peacock, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Husb.
(Beef Cattle)






STAFF CHANGES, 1975

NEW APPOINTMENTS

Charles P. ANDREWS, Assistant Professor, ARC, Monticello, December 22, 1975

Richard L. ASQUITH, Associate Professor, Animal Science Department, November 3, 1975

Jimmy J. AUGUSTINE, Assistant Professor, AREC, Bradenton, July 1, 1975

Fouad M. BASIOUNY, Post Doctoral Fellow, Fruit Crops Department, February 28, 1976,
Courtesy

Charles F. BISIHP, Visiting Professor, Vegetable Crops Department, September 8,
1975, Courtesy

Barry J. BRECKE, Interim Assistant Professor, ARC, Jay, November 22, 1975

Michael L. BRUSS, Assistant Professor, Veterinary Science Department, March 15,
1975, Courtesy

George B. BUCK, Jr., Interim Assistant Professor, Food and Resource Economics
Department, March 24, 1975

William J. CARPENTER, Professor and Chairman, Ornamental Horticulture Department,
August 2, 1975

Larry F. CASWELL, Assistant Professor, ARC, Ona, November 17, 1975

Kenneth C. CLAYTON, Assistant Professor, Food and Resource Economics Department,
January 1, 1975

William A. COLETTE, Assistant Professor, Food and Resource Economics Department,
September 1, 1975

Philip G. CRANDALL, Assistant Professor, AREC, Lake Alfred, October 1, 1975

Andrew A. DUNCAN, Professor and Center Director, AREC, Homestead, January 1, 1975

Thomas C. EMMEL, Associate Professor, Entomology Department, April 1, 1975, Courtesy

Michael A. GRANGER, Visiting Assistant Professor, Soil Science Department, March 1, 1975

Richard E. GREEN, Professor, Soil Science Department, September 1, 1975, Courtesy

Donald W. HALL, Assistant Professor, Entomology Department, January 1, 1975

Brent K. HARBAUGH, Assistant Professor, AREC, Bradenton, August 1, 1975

Don D. HARGROVE, Associate in Animal Science, Animal Science Department, August 16, 1975

James E. HEATH, Professor, Entomology Department, October 1, 1974, Courtesy

David T. HILL, Assistant Professor, Agricultural Engineering Department, October 1, 1975

Robert S. KAIMBACHER, Assistant Professor, ARC, One, December 1, 1975

Freddy J. LEAL, Associate Professor, Fruit Crops Department, September 1, 1975, Courtesy

Vernon D. LEIBBRANDT, Assistant Professor, AREC, Quincy, September 1, 1975

Edward P. LINCOLN, Visiting Research Scientist, Agricultural Engineering
Department, July 1, 1975

John K. LOOSLI, Visiting Professor and Acting Department Chairman, Animal
Science Department, September 10, 1975

Becky J. MAICO, Interim Assistant in Statistics, Forestry Department, January 6, 1975

William M. MILLER, Assistant Professor, AREC, Lake Alfred, October 1, 1975

Jerome W. MILLIMAN, Affiliate Professor, Food and Resource Economics, November 8, 1975

Susan K. MURPHY, Assistant. Professor, Fruit Crops Department, May 24, 1975, Courtesy

Donald L. MYHRE, Professor and Center Director, AREC, Belle Glade, December 15, 1975








Jai K. NAYAR, Associate Professor, Entomology Department, January 1, 1975, Courtesy

Kenneth H. QUESENBERRY, Assistant Professor, Agronomy Department, April 12, 1975

Mohammad G. RABBANI, Assistant Research Scientist, Entomology Department, November 10,
1975

Richard M. RAMER, Visiting Associate Research Scientist, Entomology Department,
April 12, 1975

David J. SCHUSTER, Assistant Professor, AREC, Bradenton, March 13, 1975

Lonnie L. SOWER, Assistant Professor, Entomology Department, April 1, 1975, Courtesy

Fred J. STEWART, Assistant Professor, Food and Resource Economics Department,
February 17, 1975, Courtesy

Robert L. TATE, III, Assistant Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, September 1, 1975

Van H. WADDILL, Assistant Professor, AREC, Homestead, January 1, 1975

Richard H. WHALEN, Visiting Associate Professor, Vegetable Crops Department,
January 1, 1975, Courtesy

Martin D. YOUNG, Visiting Research Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine,
November 1, 1975, Courtesy

Gerald L. ZACHARIAH, Professor and Chairman, Agricultural Engineering Department,
January 31, 1975

Stephen F. ZITZER, Interim Assistant in Soil Science, Soil Science Department,
April 14, 1975


TERMINATIONS


Michael G. BAUSHER, Jr., Visiting Assistant Research Scientist, Fruit Crops
Department, December 5, 1975

W. Kenneth BOUTWELL, Associate Professor, Food and Resource Economics Department,
July 1, 1975, Courtesy

George B. BUCK, Jr., Interim Assistant in Agricultural Economics, Food and
Resource Economics Department, August 29, 1975

Daniel J. COTTRELL, Assistant in Ecological Research, Forestry Department,
December 12, 1975

Frederick S. DAVIES, Assistant in Fruit Crops, Fruit Crops Department, May 30, 1975

Jogindar S. DHILLON, Assistant Professor, Food and Resource Economics Departmen
July 1, 1975, Courtesy

William G. DUNCAN, Interim Visiting Professor, Agronomy Department, January 17, 1975

Bobby R. EDDLEMAN, Professor and Director, Center for Rural Development, August 20, 1975

James L. GREEN, Assistant Professor, AREC, Bradenton, February 18, 1975

Richard E. GREEN, Professor, Soil Science Department, December 31, 1975

Edward R. GROSS, Assistant Professor, Department of Soil Science, June 30, 1975,
Courtesy

John D. JANSMA, Visiting Professor, Food and Resource Economics Department, June 30, 1975

Pamela A. MARSHALL, Interim Assistant in Horticulture, Ornamental Horticulture
Department, August 29, 1975

Richard M. RAMER, Visiting Associate Research Scientist, Entomology Department,
July 10, 1975

Richard L. STANFORD, Assistant in Ecological Research, Forestry Department,
October 17, 1975






Albert R. THORNHILL, Visiting Assistant Professor, Agricultural Engineering
Department, August 1, 1975

Posey E. VIPPERMAN, Assistant Professor, ARC, Marianna, May 30, 1975

Carol A. WETTSTEIN, Interim Assistant in Soil Science, Soil Science Department,
February 15, 1975

Stephen F. ZITZER, Interim Assistant in Soils, Soil Science Department, August 1, 1975



CHANGES IN TITLE


Daniel W. BEARDSLEY, Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, July 1, 1975

Robert H. BIGGS, Professor and Acting Chairman, Fruit Crops Department,
November 1, 1975

Lawrent L. BUSCHMAN, Visiting Associate in Entomology, Entomology Department,
July 1, 1975

Rush E. CHOATE, Professor, Agricultural Engineering Department, January 31, 1975

Robert A. CONOVER, Professor, AREC, Homestead, January 1, 1975

Dennis J. DeFRANCESCO, Visiting Assistant in Soils, Soil Science Department,
July 1, 1975

Bradley A EAGERMAN, Assistant Professor, AREC, Lake Alfred, March 24, 1975

Michael A. GRANGER, Visiting Assistant Professor, Soil Science Department, March 1, 1975

John M. HICKEY, Visiting Assistant in Soils, Soil Science Department, July 1, 1975

Don D. HARGROVE, Assistant Professor, Animal Science Department, September 15, 1975

Jasper N. JOINER, Professor, Ornamental Horticulture Department, August 4, 1975

Alfred H. KREZDORN, Professor, Fruit Crops Department, November 1, 1975

Jonq-Ying LEE, Visiting Assistant Research Scientist, Food and Resource Economics
Department, July 1, 1975

W. Kary MATHIS, Associate Professor and Director, Agricultural Marketing Research
Center, Food and Resource Economics, November 1, 1975

Kevin J. McVEIGH, Assistant Professor, AREC, Quincy, March 29, 1975

Vernon G. PERRY, Professor and Acting Chairman, Entomology Department, August 2, 1975

Robert A. SUTHERLAND, Visiting Assistant Research Scientist, Center for
Environmental Programs, April 12, 1975

Donald L. ROCKWOOD, Visiting Assistant Professor, Forestry Department, July 1, 1975

Albert R. THORNHILL, Visiting Assistant Professor, Agricultural Engineering, July 1, 1975

M. Louis UPCHURCH, Acting Director, Center for Rural Development, September 1, 1975

Emil A. WOLF, Professor and Acting Director, AREC, Belle Glade, July 1, 1975


PROMOTIONS


Charles L. ANDERSON, Associate Professor, Food and Resource Economics Department,
July 1, 1975

Ronald D. BARNETT, Associate Professor, AREC, Quincy, July 1, 1975

Jerry A. BARTZ, Associate Professor, Plant Pathology Department, July 1, 1975

Robert J. BRADDOCK, Associate Professor, AREC, Lake Alfred, July 1, 1975

Charles A. CONOVER, Professor, ARC, Apopka, July 1, 1975

29







Timothy E. CROCKER, Associate Professor, Fruit Crops Department, July 1, 1975

Wayne L. CURREY, Associate Professor, Agronomy Department, July 1, 1975

Carlton G. DAVIS, Associate Professor, Food and Resource Economics Department, July 1,197'

Daniel W. GORBET, Associate Professor, ARC, Marianna, July 1, 1975

Norman C. HAYSLIP, Professor and Center Director, ARC, Ft. Pierce, August 2, 1975

Charles C. HORTENSTINE, Professor, Soil Science Department, July 1, 1975

J. Troy JOHNSON, Associate Professor, ARC, Live Oak, July 1, 1975

Thomas A. KUCHAREK, Associate Professor, Plant Pathology Department, July 1, 1975

Ramon C. LITTELL, Associate Professor, Statistics Department, July 1, 1975

Edna T. LOEHMAN, Associate Professor, Food and Resource Economics Department, July 1,1975

Dennis B. McCONNELL, Associate Professor, Ornamental Horticulture Department, July 1, 197'

Roger A. NORDSTEDT, Associate Professor, Agricultural Engineering Department, July 1,1975

Findlay M. PATE, Associate Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, July 1, 1975

Richard T. POOLE, Professor, ARC, Apopka, July 1, 1975

Frederick J. PROCHASKA, Associate Professor, Food and Resource Economics
Department, July 1, 1975

Dan E. PURCIFULL, Professor, Plant Pathology Department, July 1, 1975

James A. REINERT, Associate Professor, ARC, Ft. Lauderdale, July 1, 1975

David A. ROLAND, Associate Professor, Poultry Science Department, July 1, 1975

Donald E. SHORT, Associate Professor, Entomology Department, July 1, 1975

John R. STRAYER, Professor, Entomology Department, July 1, 1975

David L. SUTTON, Professor, ARC, Ft. Lauderdale, July 1, 1975

Bob G. VOLK, Associate Professor, Soil Science Department, July 1, 1975

Donald L. WAKEMAN, Professor, Animal Science Department, July 1, 1975

Daniel B. WARD, Professor, Botany Department, July 1, 1975

Ronald W. WARD, Associate Professor, Food and Resource Economics Department,
July 1, 1975

David P. WEINGARTNER, Associate Professor, ARC, Hastings, July 1, 1975







RETIREMENT


William G. EDEN, Professor and Chairman, Entomology Department, August 31, 1975
Emeritus

Percy W. FRAZER, Associate Professor, Forestry Department, July 3, 1975, Emeritus

Robert E. L. GREENE, Professor, Food and Resource Economics Department,
May 6, 1975, Emeritus

Frederick W. HAYWARD, Associate Professor, AREC, Lake Alfred, December 5, 1975

Gordon B. KILLINGER, Professor and Assistant Chairman, Agronomy Department,
May 30, 1975, Emeritus







Clyde E. MURPHEE, Associate Professor, Food and Resource Economics Department,
May 5, 1975

Victor F. NETTLES, Professor, Vegetable Crops Department, June 30, 1975, Emeritus

Ralph H. SHARPE, Professor, Fruit Crops Department, November 20, 1975, Emeritus

Kenneth R. SWINFORD, Professor, Forestry Department, July 4, 1975, Emeritus



RESIGNATIONS


David L. DREW, Interim Assistant in Soil Science, Soil Science Department,
January 8, 1975

Billy B. RHODES, Assistant Professor, Vegetable Crops Department, May 15, 1975

David A. ROLAND, Associate Professor, Poultry Science Department, December 24, 1975








CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS


As of December 1975, the following major buildings were either
complete or under contract:


Forest Resources & Conservation
Gainesville, Florida

Animal Science Department
Gainesville, Florida


Office/Labs

Purebred Beef
Relocation


90% complete


100% complete







GRANTS AND GIFTS


1975



Commercial grants and gifts accepted as support for existing
programs during the year ending December 31, 1975. Financial
assistance is hereby gratefully acknowledged.


ABBOTT LABORATORIES
Agronomy--$350
Entomology & Nematology--$250
Entomology & Nematology--$250
AREC, Belle Glade-$500
AREC, Bradenton--$1,000
AREC, Bradenton--$250
AREC, Bradenton--$3,500
AREC, Quincy--$500
ARC, Apopka--$250
ARC, Hastings--$500
ARC, Ona--$1,500


ACME HAMILTON CORPORATION
(through Redland Supply Co., Homestead, Fla.)
AREC, Homestead--$50,000


AMCHEM PRODUCTS, INC.
Agronomy--$250
Fruit Crops--$4,850
AREC, Homestead--$250


AMERICAN CYANAMID COMPANY
Agronomy--$1,000
Entomology & Nematology--$1,400
Veterinary Science--$3,447
Veterinary Science--$1,723
Veterinary Science--$4,000
AREC, Bradenton--$500
AREC, Homestead--$1,000
ARC, Live Oak--$700


Publications Committee of the
AMERICAN HIBISCUS SOCIETY
Ornamental Horticulture--$1,000









AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HEATING,
REFRIGERATING AND AIR-CONDITIONING
ENGINEERS, INC.
Agricultural Engineering--$10,450


AQUATROLS CORPORATION OF AMERICA
ARC, Apopka--$100


A. T. S. LABORATORIES, INC.
Entomology & Nematology--$1,000


MR. GEORGE AVERY
Botany--$255


MR. & MRS. L. M. BALTZELL
Botany--$3,400


S. J. BARONE
FOLIAGE PLANTS, INC.
ARC, Apopka--$250


CAPT. JOHN BREWSTER, INC.
AREC, Lake Alfred--$2,000


H. K. BROOKS
Botany--$1,000


MR. NEAL (PAL) BROOKS
AREC, Homestead--$2,000


MR. WILLIAM C. BRUMBACH
Botany--$7,576


BRUNSWICK PULP LAND COMPANY
Forest Resources & Conservation--$3,500
Soil Science--$4,200


THE BUCKEYE CELLULOSE CORPORATION
Forest Resources & Conservation--$3,500
Soil Science--$4,200
Soil Science--$1,500









LEO E. BURT, DEVELOPER
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$250


CASSIA GARDEN CIRCLE of the
Fort Lauderdale Garden Clubs, Inc.
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$25


DR. & MRS. J. V. CHANEY
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$10,000


CHEMAGRO AGRICULTURAL DIVISION,
Mobay Chemical Corporation
Agronomy--$350
Agronomy--$250
Entomology & Nematology--$500
Entomology & Nematology--$626
Food Science--$250
AREC, Belle Glade--$300
AREC, Bradenton--$150
AREC, Homestead--$350
AREC, Homestead--$150
AREC, Homestead--$150
AREC, Lake Alfred--$350
AREC, Lake Alfred--$300
AREC, Lake Alfred--$1,100
AREC, Quincy--$300
AREC, Quincy--$150
AREC, Quincy--$150
AREC, Sanford--$350
AREC, Sanford--$300
ARC, Hastings--$300


CHEVRON CHEMICAL COMPANY
Agronomy--$1, 000
Food Science--$90
Plant Pathology--$500
AREC, Bradenton--$3,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
AREC, Quincy--$200
AREC, Quincy--$400
ARC, Apopka--$1,000
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$500
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$500
ARC, Monticello--$600
ARC, Monticello--$300
ARC, Monticello--$200
ARC, Monticello--$500
ARC, Ona--$1,000






Agricultural Division,
CIBA-GEIGY CORPORATION
Agronomy--$10,000
AREC, Belle Glade--$1,000
AREC, Bradenton (Immokalee)--$1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$2,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$2,500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$6,400
AREC, Sanford--$750
AREC, Sanford--$1,000
ARC, Apopka--$750
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$750

CITRUS CENTRAL, INC.
AREC, Lake Alfred--$650


COMMERCIAL SOLVENTS CORPORATION
Poultry Science--S1,500


COMMONWEALTH INSTITUTE OF BIOLOGICAL CONTROL
Entomology & Nematology--$2,500


CONTAINER CORPORATION OF AMERICA
Forest Resources & Conservation--$3,500
Soil Science--$4,200


CONTINENTAL CAN COMPANY, INC.
Forest Resources & Conservation--$3,500
Soil Science--$4,200


MRS. JEAN CUNKLE
Veterinary Science--$350


DADANT & SONS, INC.
Entomology & Nematology--$250


THE ELSWORTH DAVIS FAMILY FOUNDATION
Veterinary Science--$500


DR. & MRS. H. A. DAVIS
Botany--$400


MR. T. M. DEAL
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$2,500


MR. CHARLES H. DENNY, III
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$825







DIAMOND SHAMROCK CHEMICAL COMPANY
& DIAMOND SHAMROCK CORPORATION
Animal Science--$8,440
Animal Science--$2,000
AREC, Belle Glade--$1,500
AREC, Lake Alfred (Ft. Pierce)--$1,500
AREC, Quincy--$500
ARC, Apopka--$1,000
ARC, Apopka--$500
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$500
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$1,200


DIXIE AG/CHEM
ARC, Ft. Pierce--$500


DOW CHEMICAL U.S.A.
Entomology & Nematology--$500
Veterinary Science--$5,085
Veterinary Science--$6,780
AREC, Belle Glade--$1,200
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$1,600
ARC, Apopka--$3,000
ARC, Apopka--$500
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$700
ARC, Hastings-$500
ARC, Jay--$700


E. I. DU POINT DE NEMDURS & COMPANY
Agronomy-$1,500
Agronomy--$1,500
Agronomy-$500
Food Science--$350
Food Science--$150
Fruit Crops--$300
AREC, Belle Glade--$1,000
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
AREC, Bradenton--$500
AREC, Bradenton--$3,500
AREC, Bradenton (Imokalee)--$500
AREC, Homestead--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$1,500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred-$2,100
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
AREC, Sanford--$500
AREC, Sanford--$500
ARC, Apopka--$500
ARC, Monticello--$500








E. M.,LABORATORIES, INC.
Vegetable Crops--$3,000


FLORIDA CITRUS COMMISSION
Statistics and Food & Resource Economics--$8,500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$79,172


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE & CONSUMER SERVICES
Agronomy--$13,000
Agronomy & Agricultural Engineering--$15,000
Agronomy, Entomology & Nematology,
Food Science, Plant Pathology
and AREC, Quincy--$49,700


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Agronomy--$32,276
Entomology & Nematology--$10,902
Entomology & Nematology--$23,530
Entomology & Nematology--$19,917
Forest Resources & Conservation--$29,671
Forest Resources & Conservation--$16,002
Plant Pathology--$9,603
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$27,998
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$28,817


FLORIDA FOLIAGE BUYERS GUIDE TRUST
ARC, Apopka--$8,750


FLORIDA FOUNDATION SEED PRODUCERS, INC.
Research Administration--$19,755
AREC, Homestead--$650
AREC, Quincy--$2,016
ARC, Ft. Pierce--$534
ARC, Jay--$5,307
ARC, Ona--$1,130


FLORIDA GAME & FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION
Forest Resources & Conservation--$30,000
Statistics--$5,822
S tatistics--$3,482
Veterinary Science--$12,000


FLORIDA LIME ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE
AREC, Homestead--$40,000







FLORIDA PEANUT COMPANY
Agronomy--No monetary value claimed


FLORIDA POTTING SOILS, INC.
ARC, Apopka--$250


FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
Forest Resources & Conservation--$90,279


FLORIDA SUGAR CANE LEAGUE, INC.
AREC, Belle Glade--$5,356
AREC, Belle Glade--$13,144


FLORISTS' TRANSWORLD DELIVERY ASSOCIATION
Ornamental Horticulture and ARC, Apopka--$12,000


FMC CORPORATION
Agronomy--$600
Entomology & Nematology--$750
Vegetable Crops--$500
AREC, Belle Glade (Ft. Pierce)--$5,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$5,000
AREC, Sanford--$3,000
ARC, Hastings--$700
ARC, Hastings--$2,000


FOREMOST-McKESSON FOUNDATION, INC.
Poultry Science--$3,000


GARDINIER, INC.
Soil Science and ARC, Ona--$21,200


GENERAL FOODS CORPORATION
AREC, Belle Glade--$750
AREC, Sanford--$500


THE GILMAN PAPER COMPANY St. Marys Kraft Division
Forest Resources & Conservation--$3,500


GOLD KIST, INC.
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$445
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$7,000








GRAND ISLAND BIOLOGICAL COMPANY
ARC, Apopka--$500


GULF COAST RESEARCH LABORATORY
MISSISSIPPI SEA GRANT CONSORTIUM
Forest Resources and Conservation--$355


GULF OIL CHEMICALS COMPANY
Agronomy--$600
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$700
ARC, Ft. Pierce--$500


GULF STATES PAPER CORPORATION
AREC, Bradenton--$1,000


HAPPY VALLEY FEEDS, INC.
Veterinary Science--$149
Veterinary Science--$59


THE JACOB HARTZ FOUNDATION, INC.
Agronomy--$5,000


MR. W. PAUL HAYMAN
HAYMAN'S SEVEN ELEVEN RANCH
AREC, Belle Glade--$2,000


HERCULES INCORPORATED
AREC, Lake Alfred (Ft. Pierce)--$500
ARC, Apopka--$750


MR. LEVERT HERRINGTON
AREC, Belle Glade--No monetary value claimed


HLR SCIENCES, INC.
AREC, Lake Alfred-$500
ARC, Apopka--$1,000


HOFFMANN-LA ROCHE INC. and
ROCHE CHEMICAL DIVISION, HOFFMANN-LA ROCHE, INC.
Poultry Science--$4,500
Poultry Science--$2,000
Poultry Science--$1,000








HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC.
Agricultural Engineering--$500
ARC, Apopka--$10,000
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$500


HUDSON PULP AND PAPER CORPORATION
Forest Resources & Conservation--$3,500
Soil Science--$4,200


ICI UNITED STATES INC.
Entomology & Nematology--$1,000
Entomology & Nematology--$1,000
Entomology & Nematology--$600
AREC, Homestead--$1,000
AREC, Quincy--$1,000
AREC, Sanford--$1,000
ARC, Apopka--$1,000
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$200


DR. FREDERICK A. INGLE
Veterinary Science--$50


INTERGOVERNMENTAL PROGRAM OFFICE
ARC, Jay--$36,949


INTERNATIONAL MINERALS & CHEMICAL CORPORATION
Animal Science--$3,000
Poultry Science--$3,000


INTERNATIONAL PAPER COMPANY
Soil Science--$4,200


THE ITT RAYONIER FOUNDATION
Forest Resources & Conservation--$600


ITT RAYONIER INCORPORATED
Forest Resources & Conservation--$3,500
Soil Science--$4,200


JARDINES DORADO, INC. and MRS. CARMEN VILA
ARC, Apopka--$100








JOHN'S INC. "DEWKIST" NURSERIES
ARC, Apopka--$500


S. C. JOHNSON & SON, INC.
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$1,000


MR. DALE KNISELY
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$6,000


MRS. DORIS LeCLAIRE
Animal Science, Pine Acres Research Farm--$1,000


LILLY RESEARCH LABORATORIES
Division of Eli Lilly and Company
Agronomy--$1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$3,200
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$500
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$558
ARC, Monticello--$1,000


LOOP'S NURSERY AND GREENHOUSES, INC.
ARC, Apopka--$500


LORD AND BURNHAM DIVISION, BURNHAM CORPORATION
ARC, Apopka--$3,000


McLAUGHLIN GORMLEY KING COMPANY
AREC, Homestead and AREC, Belle Glade--$1,000


MALLINCKRODT, INC.
Agronomy--$1,000
AREC, Belle Glade (Ft. Pierce)--$827
ARC, Apopka--$500


MANHATTAN RYEGRASS GROWERS ASSOCIATION
AREC, Quincy--$500


MARKETING AND RESEARCH SERVICES, INC.
AREC, Homestead--$300


MERCK CHEMICAL DIVISION, MERCK & CO., INC.
AREC, Quincy--$500








MERCK, SHARP & DOHME RESEARCH LABORATORIES,
Division of Merck & Company, Inc.
AREC, Bradenton--$250


MICROLIFE TECHNICS
AREC, Sanford--$600


MOBIL CHEMICAL COMPANY
Agronomy--$750
Entomology & Nematology--$2,400
AREC, Belle Glade--$350
AREC, Bradenton--$750
AREC, Quincy--$350
AREC, Sanford--$750
ARC, Apopka--$250
ARC, Apopka--$500
ARC, Hastings--$500
ARC, Jay--$500


MONSANTO AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS COMPANY
Fruit Crops--$500
Vegetable Crops--$500
AREC, Belle Glade--$1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500


MOORMAN MANUFACTURING COMPANY
Animal Science--$3,000


DR. G. 0. MOTT
Agronomy--$600


NATIONAL FEED INGREDIENTS ASSOCIATION
Animal Science--$3,000


NOBA, INC.
AREC, Belle Glade--$2,694


0. J. NOER RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC.
Soil Science--$1,500


NOR-AM AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS, INC.
AREC, Belle Glade--$300
AREC, Bradenton--$300
AREC, Quincy--$500







OCCIDENTAL CHEMICAL COMPANY
AREC, Belle Glade--$1,000


OWENS-ILLINOIS, INC.
Forest Resources & Conservation--$3,500
Soil Science--$4,200


THE PALM SOCIETY
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$300


PARKER WHOLESALE FLORIST, INC.
ARC, Apopka--$100


S. B. PENICK & COMPANY
Entomology & Nematology--$1,000
Entomology & Nematology--$500
ARC, Apopka-$1,000


PENNWALT CORPORATION, Agehem-Decco Division
AREC, Homestead--$500
AREC, Quincy--$500
AREC, Quincy--$500
ARC, Monticello--$800


PERDUE INCORPORATED
Poultry Science--$4,500


PFIZER INC.
Veterinary Science--$3,000
Veterinary Science--$500
ARC, Live Oak--$2,500


PITMAN-MDORE, INC.
Veterinary Science--$2,500


POTASH INSTITUTE
Soil Science--$1,500
Soil Science--$1,000


PPG INDUSTRIES, INC.
AREC, Quincy--$500







THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY
AREC, Lake Alfred--$1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$5,300
AREC, Lake Alfred--$650
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$1,000

RACHELLE LABORATORIES, INC.
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale-$500


REASONER' S TROPICAL NURSERIES
Ornamental Horticulture--$1,000


R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY
Agronomy and Agricultural Engineering--$5,000


RHODIA, INC. Chipman Division
Plant Pathology--$350
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
AREC, Bradenton--$500
AREC, Bradenton (Dover)--$350
ARC, Leesburg--$350
ARC, Monticello--$2,000


MR. L. L. RITTER
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$7,500
Horse Research Unit, Ocala-$8,500


ROHM AND HAAS COMPANY
Agronomy--$750
AREC, Homestead--$500
AREC, Quincy-$750
AREC, Sanford--$700


ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY
Forest Resources & Conservation--$3,500
Soil Science--$4,200


ST. REGIS PAPER COMPANY
Forest Resources & Conservation-$3,500
Soil Science--$4,200








SANDOZ-WANDER, INC.
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500


SCOTT PAPER COMPANY, Southern Operations
Forest Resources & Conservation--$3,500
Soil Science--$4,200


0. M. SCOTT & SONS COMPANY
Vegetable Crops--$2,500


SEE-PAK PLANT COMPANY
AREC, Bradenton--$25,000


PROF. FRANK C. SEYMOUR
Botany--$1,005
Botany--$153


SHELL CHEMICAL COMPANY
AREC, Sanford--$900


SHELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY
Agronomy--$1,300
Entomology & Nematology--$500
AREC, Homestead--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$375
AREC, Quincy--$300
AREC, Sanford--$500
AREC, Sanford--$200
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$300
ARC, Hastings--$200


SIERRA CHEMICAL COMPANY
AREC, BRADENTON--$1,000
ARC, Apopka--$1,000


SIMTRAC INC.
ARC, Apopka--$2,000


MR. MURRAY SIPPRELL
Veterinary Science--$3,600


SMITH DOUGLASS/Div. of Borden Chemical, Borden, Inc.
Poultry Science--$2,000







SOUTH FLORIDA VEGETABLE EXCHANGE
AREC, Homestead--$1,500


STAUFFER CHEMICAL COMPANY
Entomology & Nematology--$500
Entomology & Nematology--$300
Fruit Crops--$500
Vegetable Crops--$1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$500


MR. GEORGE M. STEINBRENNER and KINSMAN STUD FARMS
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$20,000


SWIFT CHEMICAL COMPANY
Soil Science--$2,000


THOMPSON-HAYWARD CHEMICAL COMPANY
AREC, Lake Alfred--$4,800
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500


TRAYLOR CHEMICAL & SUPPLY COMPANY
AREC, Bradenton (Immokalee)--$1,000


TROPIC GREENHOUSES, INC.
ARC, Apopka--$1,000


TROPICAL PLANT INDUSTRY EXHIBITION, INC.
ARC, Apopka--$359


UNION CAMP CORPORATION
Soil Science--$4,200


UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION
Entomology & Nematology--$2,500
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
AREC, Homestead--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$2,000
AREC, Sanford--$500
AREC, Sanford--$500
ARC, Apopka--$1,500
ARC, Hastings--$750







UNIROYAL CHEMICAL COMPANY
Division of Uniroyal, Inc.
AREC, Lake Alfred--$750
AREC, Lake Alfred (Ft. Pierce)--$750
AREC, Quincy--$200
ARC, Live Oak--$250


U. S. BORAX RESEARCH CORPORATION
Agronomy--$1,000


U. S. SUGAR CORPORATION
Animal Science--$2,000


THE UPJOHN COMPANY
Veterinary Science--$1,000
Veterinary Science--$1,500
ARC, Live Oak--$5,000
ARC, Live Oak--$1,000


VELSICOL CHEMICAL CORPORATION
AREC, Belle Glade--$400
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$200
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$200
ARC, Monticello--$300


MR. KAY B. WALKER
AREC, Homestead--$1,600


WALLACE HATCHERY, INC.
Poultry Science--$3,000


WILSON & GEORGE MEYER & COMPANY
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500


MRS. ESTELLE WOLFSON
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$2,500


G. T. WOODS COMPANY
AREC, Homestead--$3,936


THE FLOYD L. WRAY MEMORIAL FOUNDATION, INC.
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$3,000







MR. J. J. WYNN
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$4,750


ZOECON CORPORATION
Entomology & Nematology--$2,000




Grants were accepted from other agencies as follows:


ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION
Agronomy-$7,858
Botany--$45,000
Entomology & Nematology--$31,500


ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Food Science--$29,841
Forest Resources & Conservation-$4,251
Soil Science--$40,000
Soil Science--$37,971
Soil Science--$57,521


STATE OF FLORIDA BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT
TRUST FUND
Forest Resources & Conservation--$3,500


FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
Food Science--$1,374


INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY
Entomology & Nematology--$9,930


NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
Fruit Crops--$74,998


NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF HEALTH
Animal Science (IFAS) and Medicine--$29,730
Microbiology--$37,979
Microbiology--$34,802
Veterinary Science--$38,658
Veterinary Science--$9,382
Veterinary Science--$31,294
University of Miami (Subcontract)
Veterinary Science--$15,223








NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
Botany--$30,000
Entomology & Nematology--$66,000
Entomology & Nematology--$55,000
Microbiology--$40,000
Plant Pathology--$40,000
Soil Science--$42,200


TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY
Soil Science--$13,750


UNITED STATES ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS
WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION
Forest Resources and Conservation--$34,000


UNITED STATES ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
Entomology & Nematology--$34,801


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Agricultural Marketing Service
Agronomy--$500

Agricultural Marketing Service and Agricultural Research Service
Animal Science--$14,900

Agricultural Research Service
Agricultural Engineering--$6,798
Agricultural Engineering and AREC, Lake Alfred--$560
Agricultural Engineering and AREC, Lake Alfred--$2,776
Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy, AREC, Lake Alfred
and ARC, Ft. Pierce--$33,194
Agronomy--$13,000
Agronomy--$15,000
Agronomy and Plant Pathology--$36,904
Agronomy, Agricultural Engineering and Microbiology--$27,376
Entomology & Nematology--$173,403
Entomology & Nematology--$82,000
Entomology & Nematology--$4,500
Entomology & Nematology--$12,000
Entomology & Nematology--$16,000
Entomology & Nematology--$71,276
Entomology & Nematology--$17,494
Entomology & Nematology--$16,090
Fruit Crops--$71,730
Plant Pathology--$16,960
Soil Science and Agronomy--$17,088
Statistics--$17,914
AREC, Homestead--$35,000
ARC, Brooksville--$32,254








Cooperative State Research Service
Agronomy--$1, 793
Agronomy and Animal Science--$180,000
Entomology & Nematology--$181,148
Food Science--$50,000

Economic Research Service
Food & Resource Economics--$13,000
Food & Resource Economics--$5,000
Food & Resource Economics--$7,000

Forest Service Southeastern Forest Experiment Station
Entomology & Nematology--$1,250
Entomology & Nematology--$5,000
Entomology & Nematology--$1,456
Entomology & Nematology--$6,000

State Soil Conservation Service
Soil Science--$195,172

Alachua County
Soil Science--$5,700

Duval County
Soil Science--$4,370

Hernando County
Soil Science--$3,340

Leon County
Soil Science--$3,000

Martin County
Soil Science--$3,577

Osceola County
Soil Science--$1,000

St. Lucie County
Soil Science--$3,750

Volusia County
Soil Science--$3,000


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
Forest Resources & Conservation--$7,832








Additional contributions accepted through our SHARE program are
listed below:

Agronomy--$400
Ornamental Horticulture--$1,000
Vegetable Crops--$4,000
Veterinary Science--$2,472
AREC, Homestead--$10,600






REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER

Summary of Expenditures of Federal Funds 1974-1975


Regional Total
Hatch Research Mclntire Federal
Funds Funds Stennis Funds

Salaries & Wages 777,628.66 119,746.75 87,910.59 985,286.00

Travel 4,870.74 5,352.24 5,312.60 15,535.58

Transportation & Communication 769.71 6,759.67 8,220.19 15,749.57

Utilities 1,365.42 13,952.22 11,963.66 27,281.30

Printing 1,850.24 864.93 819.64 3,534.81

Repairs & Maintenance 5,992.53 2,334.68 5,158.96 13,486.17

Contractual Services 3,655.06 1,341.12 3,023.60 8,019.78

Rentals 160.60 6,151.47 1,015.64 7,327.71

Other Current Charges & Obligations 111.00 1,391.40 100.75 1,603.15

Materials & Supplies 65,664.66 41,200.55 23.357.94 130,223.15

Equipment 95,580.95 9,635.02 12,703.88 117,919.85

Land & Buildings 1.633.97 681.78 961.80 3.277.55

Total Federal Expenditures 959,283.54 209,411.83 160,549.25 1,329.244.62





REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER

Summary of Expenditures of State Funds 1974-1975


Fla. Agricultural
Experiment Station Incidental Grants and Total
General Revenue Funds Funds Donations Funds State Funds

Salaries, Wages & Fringe Benefits 14,768.444.51 230,054.65 1,794.570.09 16,793,069.25

Travel 225,204.83 39,777.10 154,681.01 419,662.94

Transportation & Communications 172,826.40 28,829.58 12,231.47 213,887.45

Utilities 395,901.29 78,768.41 9,244.78 483,914.48

Printing 125,493.32 2,390.79 12,150.87 140,034.98

Repairs & Maintenance 96,403.94 41,773.47 24,336.42 162,513.83

Contractual Services 113,865.09 46,081.71 44,792.68 204,739.48

Rentals 66,975.70 49,325.18 40,888.18 157,189.06

Other Current Changes & Obligations 15,066.82 10,666.61 12,012.11 37,745.54

Supplies and Materials 1,098,531.71 1,045,743.82 322,461.95 2,466,737.48

Equipment 629,917.99 176,225.36 326,459.24 1,132,602.59

Land and Buildings 179,116.00 48,706.51 67,209.23 295,031.74

Transfers ( Rev. Fund) 0 50,000.00 0 50,000.00

Special Appropriation-Building Fund 0 0 0 0


TOTAL STATE FUNDS 17,887,747.60 1,848,343.19 2,821,038.03 22,557,128.82







THESES AND DISSERTATIONS


Agronomy Department

Martin B. Adjei. "Establishment Techniques for Perennial
Peanuts." M.S.A. Thesis. Dr. G. M. Prine, Chairman.

James B. Barnett. "The Inheritance of Protein and Lysine
in Pearlmillet (Pennisetum typhoides (Burn.) Stapf
and E. C. Hubbard) Grain." Ph.D. Dissertation.
Dr. R. L. Smith, Chairman.

Royal Howard Berg, III. "Morphology and Photosynthesis of
Glycine max (L.) Grown Under Enhanced Ultraviolet-B
Radiation."i M.S.A. Thesis. Dr. L. A. Garrard, Chair-
man.

David E. Chandler. "Techniques for Obtaining Haploid Plant
Tissues in Panicum maximum Jacq. and Nicotiana tabacum
L." M.S.A. Thesis. R. L. Smith, Chairman.

Charles A. Erickson. "Inheritance of Resistance to Southern
Corn Leaf Blight." M.S.A. Thesis. Dr. E. S. Horner,
Chairman.

Luu Truong Kien. "Fertilizer Effects on 'Pangola' and
'Transvala' Digitgrass, and 'Coastcross 1' Bermuda-
grass." M.S.A. Thesis. O. C. Ruelke, Chairman.

Gerzy E. Maraschin. "Response of a Complex Tropical Pasture
Mixture to Different Grazing Management Systems." Ph.D.
Dissertation. G. O. Mott, Chairman.

James Lee Miller. "Tuberization and Tuber Dormancy in
Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle." Ph.D. Dissertation.
L. A. Garrard, Chairman.

Rafael E. Perez-Levy. "Relay Crops after Corn Under Irri-
gation in a Multiple Cropping System." M.S.A. Thesis.
Dr. V. E. Green, Chairman.

Van Khac Thai. "Effects of Solar Ultraviolet Radiation on
Photosynthesis of Higher Plants." Ph.D. Dissertation.
S. H. West, Chairman.

Zin Z. Hj Zakaria. "Soybeans Response to Calcium and Phos-
phorus Under Aluminum Saturation." M.S.A. Thesis.
V. N. Schroder, Chairman.


Animal Science Department

Stephen Michael Abrams. "Availability of Phosphorus in
High Moisture Corn for Swine." M.S.A. Thesis.
H. D. Wallace, Chairman.






Stevan Alex Angalet. "Physical and Microbiological Proper-
ties of Hard-Cooked and Pickled Eggs." Ph.D. Dissertatio
Dr. J. L. Fry, Chairman; Dr. J. L. Oblinger, Co-Chairman

Abelardo Bustillos. "Influence of Nitrogen and Energy Supple-
mentation on the Utilization of Low-Quality Bermuda and
Pangola Hays by Ruminants." M.S.A. Thesis. C. B. Ammer-
man, Chairman.

Surachai Chakriyarat. "Hormonal Changes, Milk Production and
Anterior Pituitary Responsiveness Following Hormone In-
duced Lactation in Intact and Ovariectomized Dairy Cows."
Ph.D. Dissertation. H. H. Head, Chairman.

Maria Ines U. Chavez. "The Effect of Varying Levels of Hya-
cinth in the Diet on Growth, Gestation, and Lactation of
Rats." M.S.A. Thesis. Dr. R. L. Shirley, Chairman.

Tien Thomas Chen. "Studies on the Purple Acid Phosphatase in
Porcine Uterine Flushings." Ph.D. Dissertation. F. W.
Bazer, Chairman.

David Charles Creswell. "Response of Boars, Barrows and Gilts
to Supplemental Lysine and Problems Relating to the Use
of Boars for Meat Production." Ph.D. Dissertation.
H. D. Wallace, Chairman.

Waleed M. El Shorafa. "Ash Content, Breaking Strength and
Cortical Thickness of the Metacarpal Bones of Horses
Relative to Age and Sex." M.S.A. Thesis. J. P. Feaster,
Chairman.

Fausto A. Capote Ferrer. "Voluntary Intake as Affected by
Age and Size of Sheep and Quality of Forage." Ph.D.
Dissertation. J. E. Moore, Chairman.

Samuel Leroy Hansard, II. "Toxicity and Physiological Move-
ment of Vanadium in the Sheep and Rat." Ph.D. Disser-
tation. C. B. Ammerman, Chairman.

Alvaro Castro-Hernandez. "Isolation and Purification of
Bovine Luteal Polypeptides with Relaxin Hormone Activ-
ity." Ph.D. Dissertation. A. C. Warnick, Chairman;
M. J. Fields, Co-Chairman.

Berhane Kiflewahid. "Nutrient Composition and Digestibility
of Water-hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) by Cattle."
Ph.D. Dissertation. J. F. Hentges, Jr., Chairman.

James William Knight. "Conceptus Development in Intact and
Unilaterally Hysterectomized-Ovariectomized Gilts:
Interrelationships Between Hormonal Status, Placental
Development, Fetal Fluids and Fetal Growth." Ph.D.
Dissertation. Dr. F. W. Bazer, Chairman.






Sergio Rafael Lopez. "Concentrations of Iron Copper Zinc,
Potassium and Sodium in Tissues and Fluias at Selected
Stages of the Estrous Cycle and Pregnancy of Gilts."
M.S.A. Thesis. F. W. Bazer, Chairman.

Lethal Conrad Martin. "Utilization of Non-Protein-Nitrogen
by Ruminants Consuming a Low-Quality Forage." Ph.D.
Dissertation. C. B. Ammerman, Chairman.

Jose Rafael Matinez. "Formaldehyde Treated Soybean Meal as
a Protein Supplement for Growing Lambs." M.S.A. Thesis.
C. B. Ammerman, Chairman.

Akuro David Mbah. "Growth Patterns and Efficiency of Rota-
tional Cross-breeding Systems." M.S.A. Thesis. D. E.
Franke, Chairman.

Albert C. Mills, III. "Cyclic Nature of Bovine Uterine
Luminal Proteins and Their Relationship to Peripheral
Plasma Progesterone and Estrogen Levels." Ph.D.
Dissertation. Dr. A. C. Warnick, Chairman.

Eddy Moeljono. "A Study of Prostaglandin F2a as the
Luteolysin in Swine." A. C. Warnick, Chairman.

Oscar Neri-Flores. "Effect of Pelleting and of Forage
Maturity on Quality of Paragrass and St. Augustine
Grass." M.S.A. Thesis. Dr. S. W. Coleman, Chairman.

Jose Thomas Perdomo. "Availability of Nutrient Minerals in
Four Tropical Forages Fed as Soilage to Sheep." Ph.D.
Dissertation. R. L. Shirley, Chairman.

Sharad V. Pilkhane. "The Energetics of Lactobacillus casei."
Ph.D. Dissertation. K. L. Smith, Chairman.

Jerry Silliman Scott. "Indices of Lean, Fat and Bone Percent
among Carcasses from Beef and Dairy-Beef Cross Steers
Fed Varying Lengths of time on Two Planes of Nutrition."
M.S.A. Thesis. A. Z. Palmer, Chairman.

Robert L. Suber. "Blood and Rumen Fluid Profiles in Carbo-
hydrate-Engorged Cattle." M.S.A. Thesis. J. F. Hentges,
Jr., Chairman.

Charles Allen Turner. "Brewers' Dried Grains as a Replace-
ment for Oats in Maintenance Diets for Mature Horses."
M.S.A. Thesis. E. A. Ott, Chairman.


Botany Department

Leslie Paul Kish. "The Biology and Ecology of Nomuraea
rileyi (Farlow) Samson." Ph.D. Dissertation. L. Shanor,
Chairman.






Dairy Science Department


Jose Flores Belisario. "Study of Protein Level and Supple-
mentation With Molasses or Liquid Supplement by Lick-
Wheel in Complete Rations for Lactating Cows." M.S.A.
Thesis. S. P. Marshall, Chairman.

Mekonnen Goshu. "Genetic and Enviromental Factors Affecting
Yield, Composition and Properties of Milk." M.S.A.
Thesis. C. J. Wilcox, Chairman.

Luis Alonso H. Silva. "The Use of Dried Poultry Waste in
Complete Rations for Lactating Dairy Cows." M.S.A.
Thesis. H. H. Van Horn, Chairman.

Thomas Steven Walker. "Economic Analysis of the Domestic
and Foreign Hired Agricultural Labor Market in Florida."
M.S.A. Thesis. C. O. Andrew, Chairman.

Carlos Alfredo Zometa. "Technique for Measurement and Eval-
uation of Metabolizable Protein Concept for Ruminants."
M.S.A. Thesis. H. H. Van Horn, Chairman.


Entomology and Nematology Department

Michael Edward Bledsoe. "Insecticide Screening on the Adult
and Larval Stages of the Lovebug, Plecia nearctica Hardl
(Diptera:Bibionidae)." M.S. Thesis. L. C. Kuitert,
Chairman.

John Francis Carroll. "Biology and Ecology of Ants of the
Genus Aphaenogaster in Florida." Ph.D. Dissertation.
W. H. Whitcomb, Chairman.

Lynn Asa DuBose. "Sugar Feeding and its Relationship to
Regurgitational Feeding in the Stable Fly, Stomoxys
calcitrans (L.)." M.S. Thesis. Dr. J. F. Butler,
Chairman.

Glavis Bernard Edwards, Jr. "Biological Studies on the
Jumping Spider, Phidippus reius C. L. Koch." M.S.
Thesis. W. H. Whitcomb, Chairman.

Donald Elliott Firstenberg. "The Effects of Juvenile Hormont
on Mitochondrial Metabolism in the Indian Meal Moth,
Plodia interpunctella (Hubner)." Ph.D. Dissertation.
D. L. Silhacek, Chairman; J. L. Nation, Co-Chairman.

Ernest Sheridan Del Fosse. "Interaction Between the Water-
hyacinth Mite, Orthogalumna terebrantis Wallwork, and
the Mottled Waterhyacinth Weevil, Neochetina eichhorniai
Warner." Ph.D. Dissertation. D. H. Habeck, Chairman;
B. D. Perkins, Co-Chairman.





Norman Ivan Greer. "Effects of Insect Growth Regulators on
the Bionomics and Control of the Horn Fly, Haematobia
irritans (Linneaeus)." Ph.D. Dissertation. J. F.
Butler, Chairman.

Dale Rey Hamilton. "Host Microflora Relationship of Vectors
of Canine Heartworm Disease." Ph.D. Dissertation.
H. L. Cromroy, Chairman; R. E. Bradley, Sr., Co-Chair-
man.

Elizabeth Mae Handley. "Life Cycle, Host Range and Taxonomic
Intraspecific Status of Trissolcus basalis (Wollaston)."
M.S. Thesis. R. I. Sailer, Chairman.

Robert Edwin Harrison. "The Corky Ringspot Disease of Pota-
toes: Biology of Trichodorus christiei and Trichodorus
proximus and Evidence for the Existence of Unstable
Tobacco Rattle Virus in Corky Ringspot-Infected Potatoes."
Ph.D. Dissertation. G. C. Smart, Chairman.

Jack Myron Heller. "Dietary Amino Acid Requirements of the
Almond Moth, Cadra cautella (Walker), Based on Radio-
metric and Carcass Analysis Techniques." Ph.D. Disserta-
tion. Robert Waites, Chairman.

Michael L. Israel. "Response of Liriomyza sativae Blanchard
(Diptera: Agromyzidae) Larvae to Organic Insecticides."
M.S. Thesis. D. R. Minnick, Chairman.

Freddie Allen Johnson. "The Bermudagrass Mite Eriophyes
cynodoniensis (Sayed) (Acari: Eriophyidae) in Florida
with Reference to its Injury Symptomology, Ecology, and
Integrated Control." Ph.D. Dissertation. Dr. H. L.
Cromroy, Chairman.

John David Knell. "The Separation of Species of Microsporida
using Serology, Microelectrophoresis and Isoelectric
Focusing." Ph.D. Dissertation. W. H. Whitcomb, Chair-
man; S. G. Zam, Co-Chairman.

Richard D. Kramer. "The Dog Follicle Mite (Demodex canis,
Leydig): Its Treatment and Host Response." M.S. Thesis.
Jerry F. Butler, Chairman.

Pauline Olive Lawrence. "Host Parasitoid Relationships
between the Caribbean Fruit Fly, Anastrepha suspense
(Loew) and Biosteres (=Opius) longicaudatus Ashmead, a
Braconid Endoparasitoid." Ph.D. Dissertation. J. L.
Nation, Chairman; R. M. Baranowski, Co-Chairman.

James Robert McGraw. "The Biology of Rh acionia subtropica
Miller (Lepidoptera:Olethreutidae)" Ph.D. Disserta-
tion. R. C. Wilkinson, Chairman.





David L. Mays. "Experimental Analysis of Behavioral Isola-
tion Among Four Sibling Species of Nemobiine Crickets."
Ph.D. Dissertation. Dr. T. J. Walker, Chairman.

Saidu Muhammed. "Stable Fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.),
Pheromones and Their Influence on Male Mating Behavior.
Ph.D. Dissertation. Dr. J. F. Butler, Chairman.

Adrian Mapengo Mwashala. "The Effect of Gamma Radiation on
the Mosquito Anopheles albimanus Wiedemann with Related
Studies on its Mating, Reproduction, and Survival."
M.S. Thesis. Dr. J. F. Butler, Chairman.

Marc J. Olesky. "Low Volume Application of Pyrethrins to
Four Major Agricultural Insect Pests in Homestead,
Florida." M.S. Thesis. S. H. Kerr, Chairman.

William Avery Phillis, III. "Microanatomical Study on Eyes
of the Lone Star Tick and the Screwworm Fly with Re-
lated Electrophysiological Studies." Ph.D. Disserta-
tion. Harvey L. Cromroy, Chairman.

Jonathan Carter Reid. "Larval Development and Consumption
of Soybean Foliage by the Velvetbean Caterpillar
Anticarsia gemmatalis Hubner (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae)
in the Laboratory." Ph.D. Dissertation. G. L. Greene,
Chairman; W. H. Whitcomb, Co-Chairman.

Nguyen Ru. "Ecological and Laboratory Studies for Cabbage
Insects Including their Parasites and Predators." Ph.D.
Dissertation. M. Murphey, Chairman.

Kenneth Eugene Savage. "Nosema algerae Vavra and Undeen, 197
(Protozoa:Microsporida): Its Bionomics and Development
for Use as a Biological Control Agent of Mosquitoes."
M.S. Thesis. J. F. Butler, Chairman.

Jack Clayton Schuster. "Comparative Behavior, Acoustical
Signals, and Ecology of the New World Passalidae
(Coleoptera)." Ph.D. Dissertation. Dr. T. J. Walker,
Chairman.

Kenneth Joseph Tennessen. "Reproductive Behavior and Isola-
tion of Two Sympatric Coenagrionid Damselflies in Florid
Ph.D. Dissertation. D. H. Habeck, Chairman; M. J.
Westfall, Jr., Co-Chairman.

Robert C. Turner, Jr. "A Quantitative Technique for Samplinc
and Counting the Citrus Rust Mite, Phyllocoptruta oleivc
(ASHM), Using the Coulter Counter." M.S. Thesis. Dr. E
Minnick, Chairman.

Frank William Van Essen. "Susceptibility of Non-Target
Organisms to Nosema algerae Vavra and Undeen, a Micro-
sporidian Parasite of Mosquitoes." Ph.D. Dissertation.
J. F. Butler, Chairman; D. E. Weidhaas, Co-Chairman.






Lllen W. Vaughan. "Field Evaluation of Insecticides for Con-
trolling Tea Scale, Fiorinia theae Green, on Camellia
with Observations on Biology, Parasites and Predators."
M.S. Thesis. Dr. D. E. Short, Chairman.

Lniel Phillip Wojcik. "Biology of Myrmecaphodius excavat-
icollis (Blanchard) and Euparia castanea Serville
(Coleoptera: Scarabaiedae) and their Relationships to
Solenopsis spp. (Hymenoptera: Foricidae)." Ph.D.
Dissertation. D. H. Habeck, Chairman.


iod and Resource Economics Department

igadevappa N. Bagali. "Nutritional and Non-nutritional
Components of Demand for Food." Ph.D. Dissertation.
Dr. A. A. Prato, Chairman.

'ank A. Dasse. "Economic Impacts of Frozen Concentrated
Juice Futures Trading on the Florida Orange Industry."
Ph.D. Dissertation. Dr. L. H. Myers, Chairman.

Huu De. "Demand for Food in South Viet-Nam and Projec-
tions for 1980." Ph.D. Dissertation. L. Polopolus,
Chairman.

lomas A. Jennings. "A General Methodology for Analyzing
Demand for Outdoor Recreation with an Application to
Camping in Florida State Parks." Ph.D. Dissertation.
K. C. Gibbs, Chairman.

inq-Ying Lee. "A Study of the Optimum Number, Sizes,
and Locations of Waste Water Treatment Facilities in
Alachua County, Florida." Ph.D. Dissertation.
Dr. M. R. Langham, Chairman.

!nneth B. Wiegand. "The Economic Feasibility of Stabiliz-
ing the Price and Supply of Potatoes in Ecuador."
M.S.A. Thesis. Dr. C. O. Andrew, Chairman.

mes Douglas Wilson. "Mirex: Decision Making Problems in
Pesticide Programs." M.S.A. Thesis. Edna Loehman,
Chairman.

in Lee Yeoh. "Welfare Gains From Supply Stabilization in
the Orange Industry of Florida." Ph.D. Dissertation.
Dr. M. R. Langham, Chairman.


od Science Department

son Gouveia Falcone. "Process Refinement and Storage
Characteristics of Pasteurized-Refrigerated Mango
Slices." M.S.A. Thesis. R. P. Bates, Chairman.






Bader Y. Farhat. "Potential for Aflatoxin Production on
Smoked Mullet." M.S.A. Thesis. J. A. Koburger,
Chairman.

Daniel Lake Fletcher. "Production and Evaluation of Peanut
Protein Fibers." M.S.A. Thesis. E. M. Ahmed, Chair-
man.

William Albert Forsythe, III. "The Effects of Dietary
Thiamin on Lipogenesis in the Rat." M.S.A. Thesis.
H. Appledorf, Chairman.

Jarrett L. Kenyon. "The Application of Structured Protein
Fiber as an Extender in Ground Beef." M.S.A. Thesis.
Dr. R. A. Dennison, Chairman.

Athanasios Labropoulos. "Chemical Composition and Sensory
Evaluation of Fermented Milk: Parboiled Wheat Mixtures."
M.S.A. Thesis. E. M. Ahmed, Chairman.

William James Mauldin. "Production and Evaluation of Cheese-
Like Products from Animal Blood Proteins and Modified
Whey Solids." M.S.A. Thesis. F. W. Knapp, Chairman.

Arthur John Peplow. "Effects of Iced Storage and Thermal
Processing on the Proximate, Mineral, Extractable Protein
and Thiamin Composition of Shrimp." M.S.A. Thesis.
H. Appledorf, Chairman.

John Grant Shoup. "Microbiological Evaluation of Retail
Ground Beef: Centralized Versus Traditional Preparation."
M.S.A. Thesis. Dr. J. L. Oblinger, Chairman.

Karl E. Weingartner. "Effect of Hypochlorite Rinses on Micro-
bial and Bisulfite Levels of Iced Penaeus Shrimp." M.S.A.
Thesis. F. W. Knapp, Chairman.


Forest Resources and Conservation Department

Hal Dexton Bryan. "Enviromental Influences on Xylem Water
Potential of Slash Pine." M.S.F.R.C. Thesis. C. M.
Kaufman, Chairman.

Nicholas Kinloch Fowler. "A Digital Computer Approach to
Facilitate Pedagogic Systems-Simulation." M.S.F.
Thesis. L. D. Harris, Chairman.

Maureen H. McDonough. "Perception and Value of the Wildlife
Resource to North Central Florida People." M.S.F.R.C.
Thesis. L. D. Harris, Chairman.

Rex William Umber. "Impact of Pine Plantation Succession on
Sandhill Wildlife in Central Florida." M.S.F. Thesis.
L. D. Harris, Chairman.






Fruit Crops Department

Josefina Paez de Casares. "Influence of Gibberellic Acid
on the Growth and Anatomy of Citrus Seedlings." M.S.A.
Thesis. A. H. Krezdorn, Chairman.

Edmundo E. Monteverde Soto. "Effects of Several Wound
Dressings on the Healing of Pruned Marsh Grapefruit
Branches." M.S.A. Thesis. A. H. Krezdorn, Chairman.

Juan Manuel Ramirez. "Effect of Dates of Harvest and Spot
Picking on Yield and Quality of Citrus." M.S.A. Thesis.
A. H. Krezdorn, Chairman.

Ralph Steven Scorza. "Cold Hardiness Evaluation of Avocado
(Persea americana Mill). M.S.A. Thesis. W. J. Wiltbank,
Chairman.


Microbiology Department

Frank Bryan Dazzo. "Cross Reactive Antigens and Lectin as
Determinants of Host Specificity in the Rhizobium-
Clover Symbiosis." Ph.D. Dissertation. D. H. Hubbell,
Chairman.

Billy Clinton E. Johnson. "Inhibitors of Calf Thymus RNA
Polymerase II and Escherichia coli RNA Polymerase in
Amanita caesarea and Other Species of Amanita." M.S.
Thesis. J. F. Preston, III, Chairman.


Ornamental Horticulture Department

Albert Jennings Baggott, Jr. "Effect of Selected Chemical
Treatments on Rooting and Abscisic Acid Levels in
Feijoa sellowiana Cuttings." M.S.A. Thesis. J. N.
Joiner, Chairman.

Donald Norton Gower. "Use of Growth Retardants in Increasing
Resistance of Euphorbia pulcherrima and Chrysanthemum
morifolium to Injurious Effects of Air Pollutants."
M.S.A. Thesis. J. N. Joiner, Chairman.

Christopher Ramcharan. "Effects of Ancymidol and N,P,K on
Growth, Appearance and Foliar Content of Ficus elastic
'Decora' and Dieffenbachia picta 'Exotical.I M.S.A.
Thesis. J. N. Joiner, Chairman.


Plant Pathology Department

Clemente R. Larez. "Inheritance of Resistance to Three Virus
Diseases in Capsicum annuum L." M.S.A. Thesis. Dr. A. A.
Cook, Chairman.






Thomas R. Young. "Corn Stalk Rot Incidence, Etiology and
Control in Florida." Ph.D. Dissertation. Dr. T. A.
Kucharek, Chairman.


Poultry Science Department

Jerome Adkins Hogsette, Jr. "Improvement in Energy Utiliza-
tion by Broiler Breeders Through Addition of Sand to
the Diet." M.S.A. Thesis. R. A. Voitle, Chairman.

Winston George Nesbeth. "Influence of Salt Deficiency on
Reproductive Performance of Laying Hens and Its Poten-
tial Use for Force Resting." M.S.A. Thesis. C. R.
Douglas, Chairman.

Nicholas Peter Piesco. "The Relationship of Body Character-
istics, Semen Quality and Fertility in Broiler Breeders.
M.S.A. Thesis. Dr. H. R. Wilson, Chairman.


Soil Science Department

Azhar Bin Amir. "The Effect of Soil pH and Rate of Manganes
Application from Several Sources on the Growth Response
of Two Soybean Cultivars." M.S.A. Thesis. N. Gammon,
Jr., Chairman.

Gustavo E. Garcia. "The Effect of Moisture Variable and
Nitrogen Rates in a Soil from Northwestern venezula on
Urea Nitrogen Utilization by Guineagrass." M.S.A.
Thesis. W. G. Blue, Chairman.

Julian Velez Pelaez. "Lime Interactions in Soils from Costa
Rica and the Eastern Savannas of Colombia." Ph.D.
Dissertation. W. G. Blue, Chairman.

Roylyn Lee Voss. "Potassium Cycling in a Fertilized Slash
Pine (Pinus elliottii var. elliottii engelm) Ecosystem
in Florida." Ph.D. Dissertation. Dr. W. L. Pritchett,
Chairman.


Vegetable Crops Department

Adriano Ariolo Navarro. "Copper Nutrition of Cucumber
(Cucumis sativus L.) as Influenced by Different
Sources and Rates of Phosphorus and Different Fertilizer
Placements." Ph.D. Dissertation. S. J. Locascio, Chair
man.

Le Da Ton. "Quality Changes of Florida Mature-Green Tomatoe
during Marketing, and Consumer Discrimination among
Present U.S. Standards' Grades." Ph.D. Dissertation.
B. D. Thompson, Chairman.







CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS


The Lenter tor Environmental Programs has developed and continued
major trusts in the following areas:

Non-chemacal pest control, recycling municipal wastes in agricul-
tura" systems, abatement of pollution from agricultural and
forest runorf and drainage, aquatic weed control and management,
animal waste disposal and recycling, and assents of both
economic and health risks and benefits from environmental actions
including risks to agricultural producers and workers from
pesticides applied to agricultural crops.

The non-chemical pest-control research is evolving as a component
or pest management. Significant progress has been made in
utilizing the research information in corn, soybeans, peanuts,
citrus, celery, and other vegetable crops.

iA major effort has developed in recycling municipal wastes in
agricultural systems. The thrust is not to demonstrate efficacy
in agriculture, but to develop methods to prevent the entry of
deleterious pathogens and heavy metals into the food chain and
water supply. Animals, swine and beef cattle, have been fed
algested sewage sludge directly to ascertain and/or aggravate any
ueterimentai effects from its use in agriculture. Of special
interest is the effects on the physiology, health, and reproduc-
tion ot the animals as well as residues which may accumulate.

The animal waste management and recycling efforts are closely
aligned with the municipal waste management with major emphasis
on safety in the food chain.

A major symposium on the "Viral Aspects of Recycling Municipal
haste" will be held on June Z8 and 29, 1976, to bring the public
health aspects into perspective for agricultural scientists.

It has been demonstrated that pollution from agricultural
drainage from organic soils can contribute to pollution of lakes,
but that recycling reserviors can be used to influence water
quality.

Aquatic exotic weeds are expanding, especially hydrilla. The
white amur continues to demonstrate utility as a biological
management tool for hydrilla control. Adverse effects appear to
be acceptable. To date no known natural reproduction has occurred
in ilorida. Artificial reproduction has been successful.
insects and pathogens have been used together to reduce the
viomass or water hyacinths.

The risks to agricultural workers from residues of pesticides
appear to have increased because many of the less persistent
pesticides have much higher mammalian toxicity. Precise pesti-
cide decay data are being collected under natural conditions to
assure that no one will be unwittingly exposed to health risks.

An extension component has been developed in the center with main
thrusts in-aquatic weeds, fire ants management, pesticide appli-
cator training, and safety regulations and training.

Lxtramural funding is an important component of the center
support. Approximately $750,000 annually is contributed to the
center's programs from extramural sources.






CENTER FO RURAL DEVELOPMENT


Luring the past year Rural Development research programs pro-
qressed along lines laid out during the previous year. Neither
runas nor personnel were available to initiate substantial new
worL. The major research thrusts continued to emphasize problems
of import to North Central Florida.

a primary research program dealt with efforts to increase
agricultural production for small-scale and limited resource
farmers. This research focused especially on pecans, ornamen-
tals, vegetables, corn, and swine. In general the effort is to
see& out practical production practices for small-scale enter-
prises that can help increase production and incomes. The
Research Center at Monticello is developing production practices
ror pecans adaptable to the small-scale producer and the home
owner who has a few pecan trees. The Vegetable Crops Department
is experimenting with varieties and planting dates of a number of
airreLnt vegetables to find the best types and varieties for the
unique marketing opportunities available to North Florida. The
Ornamental Horticulture Department is developing tillage and
cultural practices for woody ornamentals in the region. The
research Center at Live Oak is refining plans for low capital
cost swine farrowing and feeding buildings and associated ma.iage-
ment practices.

hadreting of small-scale volumes of products out of North Florida
presents unique problems, so marketing research for vegetables
and ornamentals parallels the production research. For vege-
tanles, the problem is to find some gaps in supply to major
markets that can be filled by North Florida production and to
develop ways to effectively structure the marketing practices.For
ornamentals, the chief problem is market access.

A major research thrust is directed toward the need to improve
housing for rural people. A project being conducted by Florida
State University seeks to identify housing needs, the desires of
people ror better housing, and the ability of people to acquire
and Linance housing. This research contributes to a regional
research project for the Southeast.

A third research program deals with the food habits, food
acquisition methods, and nutritional status of the rural poor in
Nortn Florida. The major focus so far has been to determine what
people typically eat and to analyze the nutritional quality of
tneiL foods. This information will contribute to developing
education programs in nutrition for the target population.

Several additional research projects are designed to help answer
questions of importance to rural development programs. For
example, worn is continuing on a project to analyze sources of
tunds and patterns of expenditure for local governments in
kioriaa. Another project deals with the economic alternatives
ror Land use and is developing information to the requirements
rot comprehensive planning. Still another project deals with
ways to classify soils and related information also for land use
planning. One additional project deals with ways to communicate
most etrectively with audiences not normally reached by exten-
sion programs.







INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS


Ali activities which build or strengthen the international
dimension of IFAS are administered by the office of International
programs. Major activities include administration of contract
and grant technical assistance, training of foreign nationals,
Lesearcn and travel grants to faculty and graduate students,
assisting academic departments in curricula development, support-
ing development of library and laboratory facilities, and pub-
lishing and disseminating results of tropical research.

International Programs serves as a liaison office for IFAS with
the Florida Department of Agriculture and agribusiness in carry-
ing out international activities that complement State programs.
projects administered by International Programs develop technolo-
gy appaicajie to Florida, attract agriculturally-oriented indus-
try to tne state, open agribusiness investment opportunities for
liorida private enterprise, and expand markets for Florida's
goons ana services.

IFAS is increasingly being called on to advise in the production,
marketing, and processing of agricultural products in the tro-
pics. Participation in international research programs streng-
thens expertise in these areas. In solving many of the problems
it is beneficial to use an interdepartmental approach. For
example, in carrying out research on tropical and subtropical
livestock production and pasture improvement, scientists from the
Animal Science, Agronomy, Food and Resource Economics, Soils, and
Veterinary Science Departments are cooperating. It is antici-
pated that muca of the tropical research in the future will
require a multidisciplinary approach. IFAS, through its office
or International Programs, is well prepared to accept this
challenge.

hesearch training and technical assistance were provided through
eight contracts and two grants during 1975. Staff from many
units or the Institute participated in some phase of these
activities and in international conferences designed to increase
tneir expertise and knowledge of their field to provide Florida
with the benefits of on-going research around the world.

The contract with the Agency for International Development
involving technical assistance for educational institution build-
ing in El Salvador was continued, but with the fall of South
Vietnam, the contract in Vietnam was terminated. The grant
received in 1973 from the Institutional Grants Program of AID was
continued and is providing funds for the strengthening of
capabilities of the University in ruminant livestock development
in the tropics.

Other continuing projects include a small contract for the
development of a food technology laboratory at the University of
Costa Rica under a contract with the Mission office of the Agency
for international Development in San Jose, the livestock produc-
tion and agricultural economics research programs in Ecuador
under loans from the World Bank and Inter-American Development
banx to the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Agropecuarias
(INIAP), and the mineral research project in Latin America
through the Technical Assistance Bureau of AID.

The international peanut program was implemented with the estab-
lishment or the geraplasm center and has been funded for an
additional year by the Rockefeller Foundation, and the contract
for swine facility program in Honduras under a contract with the
banco Nacional de Romento in Tegucigalpa, Honduras was completed.








The research program for development of livestock and pasture
projects in brazil was terminated in June, 1975.

Ine ortice of International Programs and the Center for Tropical
Agriculture continue to promote the development of Florida
agriculture through research and travel grants for work in the
tropics to provide export markets for Florida-produced goods and
services and to provide Florida agribusiness with the research
and technical information needed for their research and develop-
aent programs. Concerns which have been expressed by farmers,
businessmen, and newspaper articles on the movements of new pests
and diseases from tropical and subtropical areas, only serve to
emphasize the need for Florida researchers to keep abreast of
current problems and controls which are being developed for
detective pest management.


ikAS research Report



PtOJLCT Ab4: BRAZIL

source or funds: Agency for International Development Loan Funds
to brazil

Objectives: To provide professional, technical and administra-
tive services to be extended to the Institution in accordance
with the objectives of its National Agricultural Research Program
and in particular to the National Cattle Project:

kersounel:

harqrove, Don D. Chief of Party and Animal Scientist
Houser, h. H. Animal Scientist
JiieK, Anthony F. Animal Scientist
SchanK, Stanley C. Agronomist

Publications:

Jiie4, a. I., "End of Tour Report," March, 1975.
house, R. H., "End of Tour Report," March, 1975.
Haryrove, D. D., "Final Report," June, 1975.
house, h. h., "Trip report, Brasil," November, 1975.



enOJELT A18: VIETNAM (AID/vn-24)

Source of Funds: Agency for International Development

Objectives: To provide technical advice and assistance to the
National Agricultural Center to strengthen the Center and to
insure basic economic and rural development in Vietnam.

Personnel:

Mariowe, G. A. Chief of Party and Vegetable Crops
Specialist
Wing, J. M. Dairy Scientist

publications:

iing, J. M., "End of Tour Report," March, 1975.
harlowe, G. A., "End of Tour Report," March, 1975.
marlowe, G. A., "Final Report," June, 1975.








knOJ~tT a74: bINERAL RESEARCH (AID-tac-1153)

Source or Funds: Agency for International Development

objectives: To determine the essential mineral supplements for
grazing animal diets and to increase the efficiency of lesser
aeveloped countries' meat and milk production systems with a
resultant increase in quality and quantity of individual diets
and a subsequent increase in employment and income levels.

Personnel;

Amme man, C. B. Animal Scientist
Durrance, K. L. Animal Scientist
Moore, J. E. Animal Scientist
Loosii, J. K. Animal Scientist
House, i. H. Animal Scientist
Conrad, J. H. Animal Scientist
hcDowell, L. h. Animal Scientist
XIck, K. R. Animal Scientist
snirLey, R. L. Animal Scientist

publications:

Loosii, J. K. and McDowell, L. B., "Trip Report-Guatemala, El
Salvador, Costa Rica and Colombia," March 17-28, 1975.
Ammerman, C. B., Pick, K. R., and McDowell, L. B., "Trip
heport-Venezuela, Colombia, Costa Rica and Guatemala,"
November 30- December 17, 1975.
McDowell, L. R. and Moore, J. E., "Trip Report-Ecuador,"
beptemner 8-14, 1975.
McDowell, L. R., "Trip Report-Ecuador," March 29-April 4, 1975.
McDoweil, L. B., "Trip Report-Colombia," September 13-25, 1975.
Ammerman, C. B. and McDowell, L. R., "Trip Report-Colombia,"
June 19-24, 1975.
kick, K. R., "Trip Report-Costa Rica," June 29-August 1, 1975.
Lonrdd, J. H., and Houser, R. H., "Trip Report-Brazil," June
z0-July 19, 1975.



i-OJELT A4z: ECUADOR I

Source or Funds: Inter-American Development Bank

Objectives: To provide technical assistance to the Instituto
Bacional de Investigaciones Agropecuarias (INIAP) in its efforts
to diversify, improve its staff and develop more rapidly its
various research programs.

Personnel:

Dow, J. K. Chief of Party and Agricultural
Economist
Schwartz, M. Agricultural Economist
Matnis, K. Agricultural Economist
Look, A. A. Plant Pathologist
Hinson, K. Agronomist

Publications:

"Semi-Annual Report of Activities, First Semester, 1975," J. K.
Low, June, 1975.
Annual report of Activities, 1975," J. K. Dow, December, 1975.
Dow, J. K., "El Papel del Gobierno en el Sector Agricola
moderno, publicado en "Agricultural Perspectivas Economicas








y Tecnologicas," MAG, USIS, Quito, 1975.
uow, J. K., "Importancia Economica de la Produccion de Semillas
Forrajeras para la Sierra Ecuatoriana," publicado en
"Seminario sobre Produccion de Semiilas," IICA, Quito, Mayo,
1975.
Dow, J. K., "La Ganaderia de Came en Ecuador," Publicacion
hiscelanea No. 26, INIAP, Quito, Noviember, 1975.
Dow, J. K., "Proyeccion de la Produccion de Aceite de Palma
Africana y las Necessidades Futuras de Capacidad de Plantas
hxtractoras," Publicacion Hiscelanea No. 28, INIAP, Quito,
Diciembre, 1975.



PROJECT A48: ECUADOR II

Source of Funds: World Bank

Objectives: To provide international technical services to INIAP
in its efforts to strengthen its research and training facilities
in support of the development of the livestock industries of
Lcuaaor and improving its domestic staff.

'ersouiel:

Bishop, J. P. Animal Scientist
Tergas, Luis E. Agronomist
Poultney, Roland G. Plant Nutritionist
Smith, R. L. Agronomist
hard, C. Y. Agronomist
hcCoy, R. Horticulturist
(rouder, L. V. Agronomist

Publications:

koultney, R. G., "Nutricion Vegetal Estacion Esperimental Santa
Latalina," Reporte Final, Mayo, 1975.
Tergas, L. E., "Establecimiento y Manejo de Praderas Compuestas
ae Asociaciones de Gramineas y Leguminosas," March 10-12,
1975.
Ward, C. Y., "Trip Report," September 2, 1975.
lergas, L. E., "Reporte del Viaje de Consultoria a Ecuador,"
November, 1975.
McCoy, f. h., "Palm Diseases in Ecuador," December, 1975.
crowder, L. V., "Activities Report INIAP Pastures and Forage
Crops review," September 23-October 9, 1975.



nPOJ.LT A79: EL SALVADOR (AID/la-C-1084)

Source or Funds: Agency for International Development

oDjectives: The objectives of this contract during 1975 were to
oring higher incomes and living standards for small and medium
farmers in El Salvador. This objective is to be attained through
increased production and improved marketing of basic grains and
vegetables; the foregoing to be accomplished by providing assis-
tance to the personnel or the Ministry of Agriculture and
Livestock (HAG) and CENTA, the research, extension and education
agency or HAG.

Personnel:

Uull, Uwain D. Chief of Party and Vegetable Crop
Specialist







Waite, Ben H.
Biener, John L.
Lalhoun, Frank J.

burton, Thomas a.
Veiez-Fortuno, Jesus
Nettles, Victor F.
Ward, C.Y.
Andrei, C. 0.
Freeman George
uaranowsxi, R.
Polopolus, Leo
horner, h. S.
bucK, Doug


Plant Pathologist
Agricultural Economist
Chief of Party and Assistant
Professor
Multiple Cropping Specialist
Vegetable Crops Specialist
Vegetable Crops Specialist
Agronomist
Agricultural Economist
Construction Specialist
Fruit Crops Specialist
Agricultural Economist
Agronomist
Media specialist


euolications:


Nettles, V. F., "Review of Recommendations for the General
Vegetable Production Research and the Multiple Cropping in
i- Salvador," April 13-26, 1975.
andrew, L. O., "Administrative Visit to El Salvador to Review
tne Agricultural Economics Program," July 3, 1975.
Wara, C. Y., "Report on Visit to El Salvador AID Project," June
--b, 1975.
Gull, D. D., "Team Progress," February 14, 1975.
harvei, h. h., "Administrative Trip Report to El Salvador,"
August 25-31, 1975.
Waite, b. H., "Period Report," October 1975.
Guil, D. D., "End of Tour Report," June 18, 1973-June 18, 1975.
horner, E. S., "Consultant's Report," September 22-27, 1975.
baranowsxi, a. h., "Trip Report," September 2-6, 1975.
burton, Ihomas, "Success Story Vivamos Mejor," October 31,1975.
AnLual report, November 1974-October, 1975.
Polopolus, Leo, "Consultant's Report," November 3, 1975.



EnOGJoL a6b: LOSTA RICA

Source ot kunds: Agency for International Development

ODjectives: To provide technical advice and assistance in
setting up a Food Technology Laboratory at the University of
Losta bica.

personnel:


bates, n. I.


Food Technologist


ruriications:

uates, A. P., "Trip Report 3/31/75-4/8/75."



PaOJiLT: hONDURAS (Banco Nacional de Fomento)

Source or funds: Banco Nacional de Fomento

Objectives: To provide the services of technical advisory
peLsc.nei in Honduras and supporting services to assist the BNF
in swine nutrition and production, computer formulation of
economic feed rations for swine, field tests on swine nutrition
ana setting up of a pork processing plant.








Personnel:

Conraa, J. H.
Palmer, A. 2.


Animal Scientist
Animal Scientist


Publications:

Conrad, J. H., "Trip Report to Honduras," October 10-11, 1975.



PROJECT: INTERNATIONAL PEANUT PROJECT

Source of Funds: Rockefeller Foundation


Objectives: To work towards a systematic,
aeveopment program and to develop new peanut
soil and climatic adaptation and broad
resistance.

Personnel;


McCioud, D. E.
Varnett, R. J.


world-wide variety
varieties with wide
disease and pest


Agronomist
Agronomist


Publications:

accLoua, D. E., and Varnell, R. J., "International Peanut
program report for 1974-75 Rockefeller Foundation Grant,"
December, 1975.



P"OJECT A62: Grant 211(d) (AID/csd-3684)

Source or funds: Agency for International Development

OLjectives: To strengthen the capabilities in ruminant livestock
aevezopment programs for the tropics with emphasis on nutrition
and lorage production and use.

Personnel:


Conira, J. H.
lick, K. h.
rate, F. A.
harnick, A. C.
Loosii, J. K.
ncDoweil, L. L.
Lnapwan, H. L.
nouser, b. H.
palmer, A. Z.
cunha, i. J.
Moore, J. E.
chest, R. E.
Ammerman, L. B.
Koger, a.
hott, G. O.
Ocumpaugh, Wm.
brolmann, J. b.


Animal Scientist
Animal Scientist
Animal Scientist
Animal Scientist
Animal Scientist
Animal Scientist
Animal Scientist
Animal Scientist
Animal Scientist
Animal Scientist
Animal Scientist
Animal Scientist
Animal Scientist
Animal Scientist
Agronomist
Agronomist
Agronomist


Publications:

z11(d) annual Report, University of Florida, July 1, 1974-June
j1,1975. 975.
Ammeilan, C. B., Fick, K., Conrad, J. H., Araujo, E. C. and






Baker, W. E., "Problems de Fluos en Rumiantes que Reciben
kostatos Grado Fertilizante," Proceedings ALPA Conference,
1975.
Chapman, H. L., J., "Use of Forage and By-Product Feeds in
Tropical Beef Production," in Utilization of Local Ingre-
alents as Animal Feedingstuffs conference in Kingston,
Jamaica, April 14-18, 1975.
Conrad, J. H. and Pate, F. 8., "Trip Report to Mexico."
SeptemDer 27-October 7, 1975.
Conrad, J. H., editor, "Ninth Annual Confer6nce on Livestock and
Poultry in Latin America," University of Florida, May 5-9,
1975.
Conraa, J. H., "What is the Vitamin K, Choline and Vitamin E-
Seienium Situation in Swine Feedings," Proceedings, Florida
nutrition Conference, October 30-31, 1975.
Conraa, J. H., "Use of By-Products in Tropical Swine Produc-
tion," in Utilization of Local Ingredients in Animal Feedin-
gstuffs conference in Kingston, Jamaica, October 14-18,
1975.
Crawrord, b. H., "Relationship Between Form and Function in
horses," Fourth Central American Short Course on Beef and
Dairy Cattle, San Jose, Costa Rica, March 10-11, 1975.
Cunha, T. J., "Mineral Deficiencies and their Relation to Growth
and Reproduction in Cattle," Fourth Central Short Course on
Beef and Dairy Cattle, San Jose, Costa Rica, March 10-11,
1975.
GaLra, T., and Conrad, J. H., "Work Group Report on Pasutres and
forages Nutrition," Proc. Potential to Increase Beef Pro-
auction, CIAT, Pub. CE-No. 10, 1975.
Koger, Marvin, "Importance of Genetics in Beef Cattle Performance
carter weaning," Fourth Central American Short Course on Beef
and Dairy Cattle, San Jose, Costa Rica, March 10-11, 1975.
Lanq, Carlos E., McDowell, L. R., Conrad, J. H., and Fonseca,
hernan, "Estado Mineral del Ganado en Guanacaste, Costa
Rica," Proceedings ALPA conference, 1975.
Loosii, J. K., "Potential for Development of Dairy Production in
the Lower Gulf Coast of Mexico," Consultant Report, February
13-17, 1975.
Loosli, J. K., "Use of By-Products in Tropical Dairy Produc-
tion," in Utilization of Local Ingredients as Animal Feedin-
gstutfs conference in Kingston, Jamaica, April 14-18, 1975.
Marascnin, G. E., "Response of a Complex Tropical Pasture
Mixture to Different Grazing Management Systems," Ph.D.
Thesis, University of Florida, 1975.
aaraschin, G. E., and Mott, G. O., "Resposta de uma complex
mistura de pastagem tropical a diferentes sistemas de manejo
ae pastagem," ALPA conference, Maracay, Venezuela, December,
1975.
McDowell, L. R., Conrad, J. H., Thomas, J. E., Harris, L.
h.,and Martin, F. G., "Composicion Nutricional ae los
Alimentos Energeticos y Proteicos de Latinoamerica," ALPA
conference, Maracay, Venezuela, December, 1975.
McDowell, L. R., Conrad, J. H., Thomas, J. E., and Harris, L.
E., "Latin American Forages," J. Anim. Sci. 41:282, 1975.
McDowell, L. R., Conrad, J. H., Thomas, J. E., and Harris, L.
t., "Nutritional Composition of Latin American Feeds,"
Proceedings of conference on Animal Feeds of Tropical and
Sub- tropical Origin, Tropical Products Institute, London,
Lngland, 1975.
Mott, G. 0., and Moore, J. E., "Existing and Potential Systems
of Finishing Cattle on Forages or Limited Grain Rations in
the Tropical Region of the South," Southern Regional Forage-
fed Beef Research Workshop, New Orleans, La., October, 1975.
Mott, G. O., and Popenoe, H. L., "Ecophysiology of Tropical
Grasslands," International Symposium on Ecophysiology of
Tropical Crops, Manaus, Brazil, 1975.




















PROJECT REPORTS






A1GigCULTgUALgAGINERINGDEPARBTENT


Research was conducted under 14 projects and nonprojected
preliminary research conducted in 10 areas.

Much has been learned during the past several years about
environmental problems relating to agriculture as a result
of research by this Department. Animal and crop production
units have already begun making practical use of these
results. Developments in precooling of fruits and vege-
tables, harvesting and processing aquatic weeds, machinery
for sterilization of potting media, and drip irrigation of
tree and row crops are beginning to serve the needs of
agricultural producers and processors in Florida.

During the past year, the department has greatly accelerated
its research activity on the problems of energy cost and
availability for agricultural operations. The capture and
use of solar energy is receiving the greatest thrust.
Developments relating to the efficiency of solar energy
collecting devices and materials for their construction are
moving along nicely. Technical feasibility on use of solar
heat for greenhouses and corn and soybean drying has been
demonstrated. Practical use is dependent on the cost 'of
alternate energy sources. Growing and harvesting of algae
and the use of animal and other agricultural waste for
methane gas generation are among the other energy related
studies that have been started.

Research facilities were greatly improved with completion of
the $75,000 addition to the laboratory area. We now have
modern laboratories for power and machinery, animal and
plant environment, processing, and soil and water engineer-
ing research studies.

In February, Dr. G. L. Zachariah joined the faculty from
Purdue University to become chairman of the department. Dr.
Chau Van Khe of the Republic of South Vietnam was appointed
assistant professor to conduct research on drying and
storage of grain and seed crops. Dr. David T. Hill from
Cleason University was appointed assistant professor to work
on problems of waste disposal on the farm and at agricultur-
ally related processing plants.


FLA-AG-00001 ZACHARIAH G L

PRELIMINARY AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
A citrus irrigation study revealed orange production was
increased about 15 percent by drip or sprinkler irrigation.
Application of fertilizer through the drip system increased
yields by 29 percent. A combined subsurface irrigation and
drainage system for potatoes has maintained adequate irriga-
tion while lowering the water table in about one-half the
time required by conventional furrows. Data for 2 years
show an overall 48 percent yield increase due to subsurface
drainage and irrigation. A small version of the continuous
soil pasteurizer has been designed and the performance is
satisfactory. Design parameters are being established.
Prelainary research on solar energy applications in agricul-
ture has been conducted on greenhouse heating, space heat-







ing, and crop drying. Technical feasibility of solar energy
applications has been demonstrated; however, economical
feasibility depends on fuel cost. A procedure developed for
evaluating equivalent energy input of labor in agricultural
production showed corn production energy ratios increased
rather than decreased over past 60 years. Energy require-
ments to produce and market Fla. fresh vegetables was
evaluated. A feasibility study on the use of sugarcane
field 6 processing plant residues for energy production was
initiated. Effectiveness of shade structure for dairy cows
was investigated. Tests of acid preservation of large round
bales of Transvala hay were initiated. Requirements for
artificially curing onions using infrared radiation were
determined.


FLA-AG-0150 CHOATE R E

MATER CONTROL FOR FORESTRY PRODUCTION

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Data on tree development on each of the drainage treatments
has been collected from time of seedling planting through
five growing seasons. Statistical.analysis of these data
for significance of drainage treatments, fertilization,
budding and other cultural treatments is in process. A
concluding statement, evaluating each treatment will be
based on these analyses.


FLA-AG-01458 OVERMAN A R

DISPOSAL OF DAIRY FARE MASTE

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/06
Forage crops were irrigated with wastewater from 160-cow
dairy unit on Seranton fine sand at rates of 1/2, 1, 2
inches per week. Growth response appeared equal to standard
fertility practice.


FLA-AG-01478 OVERMAN A R

SYSTEMS FOR TILE DRAIN SLUDGE CONTROL FOR CITRUS WITH HIGH
WATER TABLE IN FLORIDA

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Water evaporation from uniform and layered soils was simu-
lated. It was shown that Lakeland fine sand with depth to
water table of 60 cm could sustain an evaporation rate of
10- cm/day. An Oldsmar sand could sustain equal evapora-
tion with a water table depth of 100 cm.


FLA-AG-01481 BAGNAL L 0

PROCESSED AQUATIC PLANTS FOR ANIMAL NUTRITION

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Aquatic plants, particularly waterhyacinth, are prolific
vegetative resources infesting hundreds of thousands of
freshwater acres in the United States and millions of acres
worldwide. Processes have been developed, under this pro-
ject, to make feed and soil amendments from the plants,







including dry roughage, ensilage, protein-mineral concentr-
ate, and organic potting soil. Silages, made last year,
were evaluated in animal trials. An experimental crimper-
harvester was tested and found not to be as productive or
efficient as more traditional types of harvesters. A
harvester-crimper was designed, built, and tested; the
concept appears to be good, but some components need to be
modified.


FLA-AG-01495 FLUCK B C

CHARACTERIZATION OF THEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF FRUITS AND
VEGETABLES

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
It was found that peak contact force during impact of fruits
and vegetables may be represented as a power function of
velocity at the beginning of impact (F = av(b)). Mean b for
12 fruits and vegetables was 1.16. Therefore peak impact
force is approximately a linear function of impact velocity.
Damage resultant from impact may be represented as a power
function of impact velocity (D = cv(d)) with the exponent d
varying with the method of measuring damage, product and
maturity. Values of d ranged, from 0.64 to 4.08 with a mean
of 1.73. Some impact damage is therefore likely related to
the energy dissipated during impact (d = 2), some to the
impact velocity (d = 1), and some perhaps to other factors.
A predictive equation for damage, dependent on the product,
maturity and method of damage measurement, would be D =
kF(d/b).


FLA-AG-01550 BAIRD C D GAFFNEY J J

FORCED AIR PRECOOLING OF FLORIDA VEGETABLES

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Cooling of fresh vegetables promptly after harvest is a
method of maintaining product quality by limiting the
deteriorating processes aided by warm temperatures. Cooling
tests are being conducted on various products in a research
facility designed specifically for determining and evaluat-
ing design parameters for forced-air precooling systems.
The data collected for each test include: air velocity, air
temperature, relative humidity, temperature distribution
within the individual product and within the bulk load,
static pressure loss through the product, and product
moisture loss during cooling. Output from thermocouples,
air-flow meter, humidity indicator, etc. may be printed on
paper tape or recorded on magnetic tape and processed
through a digital computer to obtain the desired plot of
cooling data. Cooling tests have been conducted on bulk
loads of oranges, grapefruit, snapbeans, bell peppers and
avocados. Cooling tests on avocados using temperatures well
below the recommended storage temperatures resulted in no
chilling injury to the fruit. Using basic heat transfer
theory, a mathematical model describing the temperature
distribution within a bulk load of fruits or vegetables has
been developed and tested for oranges and grapefruit. This
model has been modified to accommodate irregularly shaped
and nonhomogeneous products. A limited amount of hydrocool-
ing tests will be conducted on products in order to make
valid comparisons of air cooling and hydrocooling.






FLA-AG-01572 OVERMAN A R


FERTILIZERS AND ORGANIC WASTES APPLIED TO SOILS IN RELATION
TO ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Laboratory studies are being conducted on the kinetics of
potassium and sodium exchange as related to application of
waste materials to soil. The influence of ionic balance in
waste on the balance of exchangeable ions is being con-
sidered.


FLa-AG-01612 CAMPBELL K L NORDSTEDT R A

ACONOKIC, BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS OF DAIRY-BEEF
CROSSES ON PASTURE AND IN DRYLOT

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Data collection was continued on a monthly basis from a
network of wells and soil solution sampling tubes in the
confinement, semi-confinement, pasture and natural areas.
Water table recorders are operating in each of the study
areas. Soil solution and well samples are being analyzed
for ammonium, nitrate, total nitrogen, phosphate, COD and
specific conductivity. Recording rain gages are operating
in the pasture and confinement areas. Surface runoff
measuring flumes and water samplers are in operation;
however, no significant runoff events have been recorded
thus far because of abnormally dry conditions and low water
tabie levels. The complete confinement facility was com-
pleted. Cows were placed in the confinement and semi-
continement systems in November, 1975. Pump modifications
are being made to accommodate the manure slurry from the
confinement unit with a low-head propeller pump. A study of
ground-water movement around the anaerobic lagoon was con-
ducted using Rhodamine WT, a fluorescent dye tracer. Addi-
tional studies are underway using a chloride tracer.


FLA-AG-01618 OVERRAN A B

RENOVATIO OF MUNICIPAL WASTE WATER AT TALLAHASSEE

khOGESS kEPORT: 75/01 75/12
Tne forage crops Coastal bermudagrass, rye and ryegrass were
irrigated at tour rates with municipal effluent. Dry matter
yields increased with irrigation rate. Chemical composition
of effluent and plant samples is being measured to determine
nutrient recovery and efficiency of renovation. Soil
samples are being analyzed to measure changes in exchangable
ana fixed components.


iLA-AG-01b39 FLUCK R C SHAW L N BAGNALL L O

S S1~MS AND EQUIPMENT FOR VEGETABLE HARVESTING

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Low friction plastic coating on the selective bell pepper
harvester picking fingers appeared to reduce plant damage.
Staggered fingers on the picking combs did not improve fruit
removal efficiency. Low profile catch conveyers were
installed to catch fruit from both sides of the row, and






fruit retrieval was improved. A steerable hitch on the
harvester aided the positioning of the machine on the row
and improved harvester performance. The vertical jerk
shaker developed for peppers was evaluated on tomatoes and
removed 96 percent of the fruit in 10 sec. with a maximum
acceleration of 5.1 g's.



PLA-AG-01649 HORDSTEDT R A


ANIMAL WASTE TREATMENT AND RECYCLING SYSTEMS

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Long-term laboratory anaerobic digestion studies of dairy
manure using nixed and unmixed 10 liter reactors were
terminated. The data is being analyzed to determine the
feasibility of nixed full-scale anaerobic lagoons. The data
will also be analyzed in a mathematical model of anaerobic
digestion. A pilot-scale (240 liter) anaerobic digester and
a second-stage submerged anaerobic filter were successfully
operated using food wastes. A second system with design
improvements is under construction. An overland flow system
for dispersal of polluted runoff from animal facilities was
constructed and is being evaluated. Floating methane gas
collectors were successfully fabricated and installed in
anaerobic dairy and swine lagoons. Data on gas composition
and volume are being collected.


FLA-AG-01669 MYERS J H

MAXIMIZING EFFICIENCY OF FERTILIZER AND WATER USE FOR
VEGETABLES

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
A field plot experiment on strawberry production was con-
ducted with variables of irrigation method, fertilizer
rates, fertilizer application method, and frequency of
fertilizer application. Drip irrigation was evaluated as a
means of improving the utilization efficiency of water and
fertilizer. Production increases of 29 and 27 percent in
number of marketable berries were obtained by drip and
sprinkler irrigation as compared to nonirrigation. Drip
irrigation increased average weight of berries by 10 percent
when compared to sprinkler irrigation and 6 percent when
compared to nonirrigated check. Fertilizer efficiency was
greatly increased by application through the drip irrigation
system. Daily applications of fertilizer through the drip
irrigation system were not superior to weekly applications
in terms of berry production. Water requirements for drip
irrigation were approximately one third of the amount
required for sprinkler irrigation. All irrigation water was
obtained from a pond which was supplied by spring flow and
surface runoff. The drip irrigation system functioned
satisfactorily without significant clogging during the 6
month operating period. A cartridge filter supplied adequ-
ate water filtration for the drip irrigation system. Car-
tridges were changed after about 2500 gallons of flow.



FLA-AG-01702 BUFFINGTON D E







SIMULATION MODELS OF TRANSIENT ENERGY REQUIREMENTS TO HEAT-
COOL RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Simulation models of the transient energy requirements to
heat and cool residential buildings were further developed
and refined to be more applicable. To document the poten-
tial of reducing energy requirements in residential build-
ings, the effectiveness of the following energy conservation
practices were evaluated: amount of ceiling insulation,
amount of wall insulation, amount of duct insulation,
infiltration rate, attic ventilation rate, building orienta-
tion, fenestration treatment, exterior shading, exterior
colors, overhang width and inside temperature setting.
Simulation results were summarized by comparing the energy
requirements for cooling and heating a "low energy" house
and a "high energy" house.


FLA-AG-01755 CAMPBELL K L SEERDON E T

POLLUTION IN RUNOFF FROM NONPOINT SOURCES

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Two agricultural watersheds in Alachua County have been
selected for use in this study. One watershed of about 1080
acres is primarily in native forest cover with some unimpro-
ved pasture. The other watershed of about 513 acres is
primarily in intensive agricultural crop production with
some improved pasture near the stream. This watershed is
immediately downstream from the first one. Streamflow and
precipitation data are being collected for quantitative and
qualitative analysis. Samples are being analyzed for total
nitrogen, ammonium, nitrate, total phosphorus and phosphate.
Small plot experiments (18 ft x 50 ft plots) are in progress
at the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Horticul-
tural Unit near Gainesville. Six plots with treatment of
plastic mulch, no mulch, or split fertilizer applications
with no mulch, replicated twice, on bellpeppers are being
studied to determine the effects of these management prac-
tices on runoff and groundwater quality and quantity. Data
from all sites are presently being analyzed while data
collection continues on a year-round basis.







AG!ONOMY DEPARTMENT


Research on field crops and forage and pasture crops was
intensified in 1975 with greatly increased research on
nitrogen fixation by grasses. Results of a cooperative
project with the Departments of Microbiology and Soil
Science showed that a number of grasses fixed nitrogen
following inoculation of the soil with specific bacteria.
The amount fixed ranged up to 80 pounds per acre under field
conditions. The ultimate goal of this research is to
produce grass-bacteria associations that will fix nitrogen
efficiently and that can be managed in farm systems. This
research was supported in part by grants from US-AID and the
USDA.

Bore than 44 selections of Hemarthria (limpograss) were
evaluated at Gainesville and cooperatively in Venezuela as a
livestock feed. Fifty-three lines of Hemarthria were tested
at Gainesville for digestibility and yield. Twenty-three
superior lines were placed under grazing. Cytological data
were obtained on 34 members of the Hemarthria collection and
controlled crosses were made in the greenhouse. A new
species, gemaEthria unicata, and a number of new genotypes
of BgpEathria altissima were brought into Florida during
1975 to be used in hybridization of limpograss.

A new experimental white clover, FL I P(1), was released for
regional testing. This selection has higher yields and
greater persistence than available commercial varieties. A
technique was developed to identify white clover lines which
are high in hydrogen cyanide.

Collections of seeds and plants of Alyce clover and
birdsfoot trefoil were made throughout Florida for develop-
ing pastures and hay types.

Research was continued to develop a highly rust-resistant
reseeding annual ryegrass. The best of 10,000 spaced plants
were combined for seed production in the next selection
cycle of this promising annual ryegrass. In addition, more
than 400 introductions of winter forage crops were evaluated
for winter forage for livestock and for their reseeding
properties under conditions at Gainesville.

Hay yields up to 12.6 tons per acre were obtained from
guineagrass fertilized at 260 pounds of nitrogen under
non-irrigated conditions. This offers potential as a hay
crop in Florida.

Burning and/or discing of residual sods of joint vetch-
bahiagrass resulted in a four to five-fold increase in
seedling stands of joint vetch (Aeschynomene Americana L.).

1975 marked the first use of a physiological peanut simula-
tion model designed for use on a computer. It is the only
such model known. This model should aid researchers in
predicting the influence of various imposed practices on
peanut yields.

More than 2,800 peanut selections were evaluated in the
peanut breeding program. Superior lines were bulked for
advanced testing next season. Emphasis was placed on
disease resistance and plant type. In addition, a number of








peanut crosses ranging across four generations were studied
for tolerance to molds which produce lethal toxins. Twelve
new peanut crosses were sent to Puerto Rico (USDA Nursery)
to speed up the selection process by obtaining two genera-
tions per season.

Grants from the Rockefeller Foundation supported a program
in which we are cataloguing the world's peanut geraplasm
with the anticipation of establishing an International
Center for Peanut Germplasm at Gainesville.

A survey of variety testing in peanut research in 12 of the
major peanut producing countries was also completed upder
the Rockefeller Grant. A workshop on germplasm resources
brought 22 renowned researchers from all the major peanut
producing countries of the world to Gainesville in July,
1975.

Physiological studies revealed that peanuts have photosyn-
thetic rates comparable to C(4) plants. Placing peanuts
under stress for light and moisture at various populations
revealed that the peanut has considerably more ability to
compensate for stress conditions than do most other crops.
For example, peanut yields were comparable over a wide range
of plant populations.

Studies were made on the rate of fruit growth development in
the Florunner peanut pegs. Measurements were made on dry
weight per pod, kernel weight, shelling percentage, and
shell coloration. Fruit set during the first three weeks of
pegging contributed the majority of the yield. After twelve
weeks of age many fruits dropped from the plants because of
decayed peg attachments.

Studies on peanut seed quality indicate that shelled peanut
seed can be stored for at least nine years without appreci-
able loss in germination when held at temperatures slightly
above and below freezing and when the seed contains no more
than 6% moisture at the time of storage.

An extensive soybean breeding program was continued with the
evaluation in 1975 of more than 600 breeding lines of
soybeans and yield tests primarily designed to select
soybeans with greater yield potential and resistance to
nematodes. In addition, eight selections with tolerance to
velvet bean caterpiller were identified and reselected.

To develop a soybean for late season planting, 72 cultivars
and lines from Maturity Groups 8 and 10 were planted in late
July and again in aid-August. Results indicate that yield
potential of a number of soybean cultivars were very
satisfactory. Research will continue with soybean breeders
to develop lines having seed pods high enough above the
ground for easy combining.

A highly successful technique for direct-seeding of tobacco
was developed during 1975. Incorporating the use of methyl
bromide for control of weeds and nematodes with this
technique permitted the production of a ratoon crop of
tobacco from the original planting which resulted in a yield
of more than 5,000 pounds of tobacco per acre.

Weed control research indicates that post-emergence directed
sprays are needed for weed control in corn, peanuts,







soybeans, tobacco, and sorghum. Combinations of herbicides
best suited for each crop were determined.

A broad-base corn cultivar with good resistance to southern
corn leaf blight was released to private and public industry
as a geraplass source in 1975 under the name FSHaB.


FLA-AX-00001 WARD C I BOOTE K J

MON-PROJECTED AGRONOBIC RESEARCH

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
In research to determine the yield barriers in peanut, leaf
photosynthesis (Pmax) at varying light intensities showed
that the peanut, a C(3) plant, has pmax rates above 50 mg
CO(2) /dm(2)/hr. These rates are similar to those of C(4)
plants. Growth analysis studies using Florunner and UF-
70115 over 7 plant populations ranging from 5 to 50
plants/a(2) showed yields that reached a maximum plateau at
7 1/2 to 22 1/2 plants/m(2) for both of these lines. A
yield compensating effect existed over a very wide range of
plant densities. Strees physiology studies using 75% shad-
ing, applied for 10 days, to determine the critical periods
with respect to peanut yields showed no effect on final pod
yield; the peanut plant compensated for the stress condi-
tions. A survey of most of the peanut producing countries
has been completed, as has an assessment of the world peanut
germplasa resources. An analysis of Florida peanut produc-
tion showed no correlation between a farmer's peanut yield
and the size of his acreage allotment. A cooperative peanut
irrigation study by Agronomy and Soil Science showed that a
20 day drought during the pegging period stopped leaf
expansion, flowering, peg penetration, and increased sucrose
concentration and osmotic potentials in immature fruits. By
the end of the drought period, plants were wilting and had
5-fold higher leaf diffusive resistance. The 20-day drought
period reduced final kernel yield by 17% and delayed fruit
maturation as indicated by a 76% shell-out compared to 80%
for control peanuts. The pod yield of a no-fill (sod-
planting) treatment was only 37% of the control.



FLA-Al-01087 WILCOX A CURREY N L

CHEMICAL CONTROL OF NEEDS IN FIELD CROPS

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
CORN The most successful weed control program continues to
be early cultivation followed with post-directed amotryne.
Other promising treatments post-directed are amotryne +
2,4-D, cyanazine, and cyanazine + 2,4-D. Postemergence
nutsedge control is excellent with post-directed cyperguat
or bentazon and combinations of these with either ametryne
of cyanazine. PEANUTS The full herbicide program of
benefin ppi, alachlor + dinoseb + naptalan at cracking with
one or two applications of 2,4-DB still produces the highest
peanut yields. SOYBEANS The best overall treatment for
soybeans is trifluralin + metribuzin at 0.5 0.38 lb/A ppi.
Post-directed sprays of metribuzin + 2,4-DB can extend
preemergence control later in the season than other treat-
aents. Over-the-top sprays of dinoseb, dinoseb + naptalam
and bentazon successfully controlled 8" cocklebur when








soybeans in 2-3 trifoliate leaf stage. TOBACCO Superior
annual grass control resulted from napropamide at 4 lb/A
applied port-transplant and irrigated in. A second applica-
tion at lay-by did not improve control nor did it injure
oats planted in aid October. SORGHUM The best program at
present Is propochlor granular preemergence and linuron +
2,4-D as a post-directed spray.


FLA-AX-01154 DEAN C E HORNER E S

WHITE CLOVER AMD ALFALFA BREEDING

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
White clover synthetic varieties designated as FS-4 and FS-5
produced more forage from second-year regrowth than did
commercially grown varieties. This difference was due
largely to increased early and late season production,
brought about by improved stolon persistence over the summer
months. A more recent synthetic, FS-6, performed well in
variety trials at Gainesville, Ona, and Immokalee, and was
included with nine other varieties and breeding lines in
regional performance trials for 1976. Continuing studies
into the cyanogenic property in white clover showed cyano-
genic plants to have a larger plant diameter, shorter
height, longer internodes, and fewer days to flowering than
acyanogenic plants. The genetic constitution of each plant
used in this investigation with regard to the genes Ac and
Li was determined. Seed were collected from cyanogenic and
acyanogenic plants in a polycross nursery, and the progeny
will be studied in plots during 1976. Alfalfa breeding was
confined primarily to selection for spotted alfalfa aphid
resistance in the Florida 66 variety. About 22,000 seedl-
ings were screened by Dr. M. W. Nielson, USDA entomolo-
gist in Tucson, Arizona. A total of 180 resistant plants
were found and sent to Gainesville, where they are being
intercrossed to complete the first cycle of selection.
Another cycle will be required to obtain an adequate level
of resistance.


FLA-AX-01167 PRINE G H GREEN V E JR

EVALUATION OF INTRODUCED AND NATIVE PLANT SPECIES FOR
PASTURE, FORAGE AND OTHER USES

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Over 400 plant introductions of winter forage crops were
observed for forage production in a rod-row nursery during
the winter of 1974-1975. The most promising winter forage
crops were then planted in field plots for further evalua-
tion during the fall of 1975. Promising cultivars of
arrowleaf, crimson, Persian, red, subterranium, and white
clovers were planted alone and in various mixtures on a
pasture at the Dairy Research Unit Gainesville, to
evaluate their dependability for reseeding. Mass selection
was continued to develop a rust-resistant, reseeding annual
ryegrass. A spaced plant nursery of 10,000 plants was
divided into 40 plant units for selection. About half of
the plants were rogued before flowering because of poor
growth or disease susceptibility. Seed were harvested from
the best remaining plant of each 40 plant unit. The seed of
each selected plant received a germination test designed to
remove seeds lacking high temperature dormancy. Equal






quantities of the resulting desirable seeds from each
selected plant were combined to form the population for the
next selection cycle.


FLA-AX-01302 GASKINS M H

A BIOCHEMICAL STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENT ON THE
GROWTH OF HIGHER PLANTS

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Pangola and Transvala, inhibited by combined short (9.5 h)
days and cool (10 C) nights, continued to grow slowly if
supplied with adequate water. Gibberellic acis (GA) spray
treatments increased growth rate, but heavy treatments
delayed resumption of normal growth when returned to favor-
able conditions. When GA sprays were repeated and new
growth was removed by clipping, production of new shoots
diminished, and many plants died under these conditions. No
apparent injury resulted when a single GA spray was applied
to accelerate growth under inhibitory conditions, and the
plants were returned to a long-day, warm-night regime 4
weeks after the GA treatment. The experiments suggest that
GA treatments can lengthen the productive season of these
grasses, but depletion of reserves and serious injury may
result from repeated GA applications. When cultures of an
organism tentatively identified as Spirillum lipoferum by
Brazilian researchers were applied to pot-grown Transvala
plants, growth rate and plant protein content increased in
some experiments. Favorable results were not achieved in
all cases, regardless of the experimental conditions used.
Pre-incubation of excised roots under low oxygen conditions,
before determination of nitrogenase activity by acetylene
reduction, produced large, inconsistent errors in assay
results. Investigators are cautioned not to rely on that
method.



FLA-AY-01303 NORDEN A J

VARIETAL IMPROVEMENT OF PEANUTS (ARACHIS HIPOGAEA L.)

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
The results of a two-year study to evaluate the effects of
curing methods on peanut seed quality indicate that seed
from pods cured in ovens at temperatures below 54 C,
especially when left in windows a day or more, germinated
as well or better than those stack-cured. At high oven
temperatures, germination increased with number of days in
windows; however, the % shriveled seed increased somewhat
with increased drying temperatures. Stack curing had the
lowest percent of shriveled seed. Peanuts that were not
placed in windows had heavier seed if stack-cured than if
oven-dried. The results of studies initiated in 1966 with
1965 crop seed indicate that shelled peanut seed can be
stored for at least nine years without an appreciable loss
in germination when held at temperatures slightly above
freezing (2 to 5 C) and below (-4 to -1 C), when the seed
contained no more than 6% moisture at the time of storage.
The mean loss in germination was from 96% to 88%, 92% to 73%
and 94% to 88% for Virginia, Spanish, and Valencia type
seed, respectively. Storage at a controlled temperature of
18 to 21 C kept the seed from deteriorating appreciably for








a four year period, after which time seed viability rapidly
diminished. Seed which had a high moisture content (8% to
11% when stored) had a shorter lifespan, while lower
moisture contents (2% and 6%) improved longevity. The early
maturing high yielding Virginia-bunch line, UF 70115, was
approved as a joint release by Florida and Georgia. Seed of
this new commercial Virginia type peanut will be available
for commercial production in 1978.


FLA-AY-01358 RUELKE O G HOTT G 0

PASTURE AND LEGUME VARIETY EVALUATION

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Bermudagrass (18) selections yielded from 7,540 to 15,310
lbs/A-DR on an upland sand site. Tifton hybrid #6, an
upright growing bermudagrass hybrid, outyielded 'Coastal',
followed by Tifton hybrid #38. Nine new cold hardy bermuda-
grasses hybrids yielded from 8670 to 17,490 Ibs/A-DR.
Tifton hybrid #72-81 outyielded 'Coastal' and 'Coastcross I'
and overwintered with less cold damage. Eight stargrass-
like Cynodon selections yielded from 1,390 to 3,090 Ibs/A-
DH, in two harvests after establishment, outyielding Coastal
and Coastcross I, which produced 1,240 and 1,930 lbs/A
respectively. In response to fertilizer treatments, 'Trans-
vala' digitgrass produced the highest DR/A yield at maximum
rates used (800 Ibs N/A/yr) while at low rates (50 lbs
N/A/yr) Coastcross I produced the highest yield. Early and
late season yields of Pangola were significantly less than
Coastcross I or Transvala. Fertilizer rates over 400 lb
N/A/yr caused bare spots in Pangola and Transvala after
extended production periods. Cold damage and insect damage
was greatest in high N fertilization plots. Limpograss,
Hemarthria spp. (53), selections yielded from 344 to 14,820
Ibs/A-DR on a wet flatwood site. P.I. No. 364888 out-
yielded cultivated varieties 'Big alta', 'Green alta' and
'Red alta'. Highest yield, 21,298 Ibs DH/A, was obtained
when Limpograss was harvested at 10 week; intervals to a
stubble height of 3 inches.


FLA-AY-01359 HINSON K

SOYBEAN BREEDING

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Data were collected on about 600 breeding lines of soybeans
grown in replicated yield-test plots and nematode nurseries
to evaluate their potential for varieties or parents.
Selections from crosses made specifically to combine
increased nematode resistance with high yield and adaptation
to Florida included 250 new breeding lines with indicated
resistance to both Reloidoqyne incognita and Heterodera
glycines, about 1500 individual plants from similar stocks,
more than 2000 F(3) plants with indicated resistance to R.
javanica, about 300 plants with indicated resistance to
sting nematodes, and other plants combining two sources of
resistance to R. incognita. Eight selections with
tolerance to velvetbean caterpillar feeding were identified
and reselected. Lines deriving high protein geraplasm from
low-oil introductions from India were further evaluated and
selected lines were crossed with other high protein stocks.
Tall growing, late maturing lines were selected to evaluate






their potential for late plantings in Florida and for
production at lover latitudes. A backcrossing program to
incorporate small seed size and late flowering into Bragg
and Cobb background line was initiated. Breeding stocks for
other breeding objectives were advanced.


FLA-AY-01375 CLARK F

EFFECT OS CULTURAL MANAGEMENT ON BLACK SHANK AND ON QUALITY
AND QUANTITY OF FLUE-CURED TOBACCO

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
A successful application of direct field seeding of tobacco
was attained during 1975. Success resulted from several
combinations of practices, such as weed control, mulch
cover, fertilizer application, and irrigation techniques.
The standard weed control chemicals such as paarlan, Enide,
and Tilliam did not prove satisfactory. Bethyl bromide was
effective for controlling weed and nematodes for the full
season, which made it possible to grow two crops of tobacco
from one planting in 1975. A combined yield of 5000 pounds
per acre was obtained from this test. Brownspot, (Alter-
naria tenius, nees), continued to cause many growers severe
economic losses during 1975, and the reason for this
unusually high incidence cannot be easily explained. There
are a few tobacco varieties that are rated tolerant to
moderate to the disease; however, the old line, or orinico
varieties, Hicks, N.C. 2326, are classified as moderately
tolerant; Speights 28, 33, 15, 23, 45A, and 47 are tolerant;
N.C. 95, 98, and 89 are tolerant; Coker 258 is moderately
tolerant. These are some varieties that a grower might
choose and reduce his losses. Several Maryland (type 32)
tobacco varieties were tested in 1975. This type of tobacco
can be produced in Florida; however, marketing outlets are
not available at this time. The Regional Sucker Control
tests were continued for the second year with poor results.


FLA-AY-01377 PFAHLER P L

QUANTITATIVE GENETIC STUDIES IN HIGHER PLANTS

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Surface relief patterns of various cells and tissues are of
significant value in many morphological and evolutionary
studies among species. However, considerable genetic varia-
tion was found within species. Various maize endosperm
mutants altered the surface relief pattern of the pericarp
surrounding the endosperm. The pericarp is maternal tissue
and differs from endosperm tissue in ploidy level and in
most cases, genotype. Apparently, the endosperm mutants
affect not only the morphology and biochemistry but also the
surface of the endosperm, and these differences are trans-
mitted through the pericarp. Variation in surface relief
patterns was not limited to those produced by endosperm
mutants. A survey of various normal starchy maize cultivars
indicated significant variation in surface relief patterns.
#These differences were so pronounced that surface relief
patterns were suggested as a method of distinguishing
individual kernels of different cultivars. Apparently,
surface relief is under quantitative genetic control. Hori-
zontal resistance to diseases is a very desirable, stable
form in which the resistant host is susceptible to all races








of the parasite and thus is unaffected by the evolution of
new races. However, infection occurs late in the life cycle
of the host so that grain production is relatively unchanged
by the disease. Studies with oats crown rust have indicated
that horizontal resistance is controlled by a small number
of genes with high heritability.


FLA-AX-01444 WILCOX M

BIOCHEMISTRB OF HERBICIDES

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
The citrus abscission agent (Pik-Off, glyoxime, 881, or
CGA22911) discovered under this project has performed in
such a manner that an experimental label is expected from
EPA in a few days and full registration for commercial use
is expected next season. Plant growth regulators invented
under this project which are dinitroanilines of somewhat
unusual structure have continued to completely control
tobacco suckers. One of these compounds is scheduled for
inclusion in the regional Tobacco Growth Committee tests in
the upcoming season. A sugar cane ripener will be evaluated
in Hawaii. Other new compounds invented under this project
are being evaluated here and elsewhere.


FLA-AI-01475 MOTT G 0

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROPERTIES OF SOUTHERN FORAGES AND
ANIlAL RESPONSE

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Ten tropical grasses were harvested at 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks
of age (40 samples) in sufficient quantity to feed six sheep
in an intake and digestion trial. These ten tropical
forages include Digitaria decumbens (cv Transvala and Slen-
derstea), four hybrid Digitaria sp. (X46-2, X215-3, X124-4,
and X50-1), Paspalum notatum (cv Argentine, Paraguay 22, and
Pensacola) and Cynodon dactylon (cv Coastcross 1). The
intake and digestion trials are now being conducted. Six of
these forages (X46-2, X215-3, X124-4, Argentine, Paraguay
22, and Pensacola) and one genotype of Hemarthria altissima
(P.1. 299995) were harvested at weekly intervals for 18
consecutive weeks (126 samples) for in vitro organic matter,
digestibility, crude protein, acid detergent fiber, neutral
detergent fiber, and acid detergent lignin analyses. These
samples are now being analyzed.


FLA-AY-01478 ALLEN L H JR

SYSTEMS FOR TILE DRAIN SLUDGE CONTROL FOR CITRUS WITH HIGH
WATER TABLk IN FLORIDA

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Two-year old budded citrus seedlings (Marsh grapefruit and
Pineapple sweet orange) were planted in November 1970 on
spodosols with three soil treatments: shallow tilled (ST),
deep mixed to 107 cm (DT), and deep mixed to 107 cm plus 56
MT/ha of lime incorporated (DTL). Each of the nine 1-ha
plots has subsurface drains. Rainfall, irrigation, subsur-
face drain outflow, surface runoff, and water table eleva-
tion data were used to compute evapotranspiration (ET) of







the developing citrus grove (including bahiagrass cover)
from water balances for 1972, 1973, and 1974. During 1973
when the rainfall was 137.4 cm, ET was 112.8, 103.1, and
75.7 cm for DTL, DT, and ST plots, respectively. ET values
were lower in 1972 and higher in 1974. Differences in ET
among plots was inversely related to the differences in
water discharged through subsurface drains. As a corollary,
differences in computed ET were greatest in high rainfall
months of the summer. Excessive subsurface drainage appears
to occur in ST during the summer.


FLA-AY-01511 SMITH B L

FORAGE GRASS GENETICS AND BREEDING PRIMARILY PANICUMS

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Nitrogen fixation by grass-Spirillum lipoferun associations
was studied in extensive field tests. Four rates of
nitrogen fertilizer were superimposed on Spirillum inoc-
ulated and uninoculated plots. Two grasses gave signifi-
cantly higher yields due to inoculation; Pennisetum ameri-
canum at 40 and 80 kg N/ha and the Panicus maximum at 40 kg
N/ha. In these tests, N inoculation replaced an equivalent
of 40 kg fertilizer N/ha. Over 200 genotypes in 10 grass
species were screened for nitrogenase activity by acetylene
reduction. Of these Zea mays, Sorghum spp. and ameri-
canum had highest activity. (up to 2000 n moles/g x hr.).
Forage grasses had lower activities Chloris (180), Cench-
rus (160), P. maximum (115), Diqitaria (32), Heaarthria and
Paspalum (16). Cytological examination of roots using
fluorescent antibodies and other techniques revealed that
Spirillum enter root cells. This supports the associative
symbiosis hypothesis of N2 fixation in these grasses.
Forage yields up to 24.7 MT/ha of DM were obtained from
fertilized (300 kg N/ha) unirrigated plots of P. maximum.
Broad leaved types were higher yielding than fine leaved
types and suffered less damage from army worms. Preliminary
results indicate that alcohol dehydrogenase induction may be
used as an indicator for flooding tolerance in bermudagrass.
Electophoresis techniques work well for these studies.


FLA-AY-01556 WILCOX M

HERBICIDE MOVEMENT FROM APPLICATION SITES AND EFFECTS ON
NON-TARGET SPECIES

PBOGBESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
It is suspected that impurities of 3,3', 4,4'-
tetrachloracorbanilide or norneburon give antibacterial
activity to technical or formulated neburon, as this activi-
ty is lacking in purified neburon. This may explain plant
growth enhancement by neburon. A search is underway for a
derivatizing agent which will allow VPC analysis for these
substances.


FLA-AY-01569 DEAN C E CLARK F

GENETIC IMPROVEMENT OF TOBACCO

PhOGhESS hRPORT: 75/01 75/12
Tobacco breeding lines have been developed with resistance






to TEV, PVI and TMV, as well as black shank and the southern
root knot nematode. Intensive individual plant inoculations
provided critical disease conditions from which individual
plant selections were made. Selections for brown spot
tolerance of resistance were also made. Examinations of
roots of each selected plant showed a high level of black
shank resistance in an area of heavy disease infestation.
Initial steps in a monosonic analysis involving V-20, the
source of TEV resistance, to determine the chromosome upon
which the gene for resistance is located indicated that
chromosome E is the probable location. Other genetic tests
to substantiate this location are underway.


FLA-AX-01571 HOBRERB S EDWARDSON J R

BREEDING FOR RESISTANCE TO SOUTHERN CORN LEAF BLIGHT

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
A broad-base corn population with good resistance to sou-
thern corn leaf blight (SCLB) has been developed. It was
released to private and public corn breeders as a germplasa
source under the name FSHaB in 1975. Work in 1975 was
devoted mainly to extracting inbred lines from FSHaR for use
in Project AI 1714 and to incorporation of genes for
resistance to SCLB in two advanced populations, Fla. Syn.
7B and Fla. Syn. 51. The latter synthetics have good
combining ability but are only moderately resistant to SCLB.
Several hundred new S2 lines were developed from crosses
between these synthetics and FSHaR. They will be screened
for resistance to SCLB, northern corn leaf blight, and stalk
rot in 1976. The best lines will be incorporated in Project
1714, a breeding study designed to develop lines suitable
for use in commercial hybrids. Cytological studies have
shown some inbreds with normal cytoplasm contain normal and
abnormal mitochondria, while other inbreds contain only
normal mitochondria. A similar condition exists among lines
containing different sterile cytoplasms. The behavior of
the abnormal mitochondria is being examined with electron
microscopy in various hybrids.



FLA-AX-01573 PRINE G H SCHRODER V N

MINIMIZING HAZARDS AND INCREASING POTENTIALS FOR SOUTHERN
SOYBEAN PRODUCTION

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Cobb and a late selection of Jupiter soybeans were again
planted July 11 and August 1 as a second warm season crop
after early-and medium-maturing corn. Under irrigation, the
seed yield of the corn and soybean crops combined has
exceeded 12 mt/ha; soybean seed yields of 4 mt/ha have been
obtained. The need for better cultivars for off season
plantings was evident in earlier seasons, so 72 soybean
cultivars and lines in maturity groups 8 to 10 were
evaluated when planted July 22 and August 8. Results
indicate it is feasible to develop soybean cultivars for
planting in July and August which will both yield satisfac-
torily and have the seed pods high enough above ground for
easy combining. Bragg and Cobb soybeans shaded at 0, 50 and
75% of incident light for 5-day intervals showed critical
periods just prior and at the start of flowering and just







after end of flowering when low light intensities reduced
the number of seed developing per plant. Shading just prior
to flowering resulted in lodging, which may have caused the
reduction in seed yield. Shading during late pod filling of
Bragg soybeans reduced seed weight and had the most dele-
terous effects on seed yield.


FLA-AX-01590 GREEN V E JR WHITTY E B HORNEB E S

FIELD CHOP VARIETY TESTING

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Forty-nine commercial corn hybrids were grown at six loca-
tions. Coker 77 and Dekalb XL-95 performed exceptionally
well with average yields of 115 and 114 bushels per acre,
respectively. Of the 26 hybrids tested in both 1974 and
1975, 19 are being recommended to farmers. Uniform tests of
sorghum and pearlmillet were grown at several locations in
the state. At Gainesville, 33 grain sorghums had a range in
seed yield of 3620 to 6550 pounds per acre, averaging 5180.
The 23 pearlmillet and sorghum x sudangrass varieties
averaged 7000 pounds of dry digestible forage per acre, and
the 17 silage sorghum varieties averaged 2160 pounds of
grain and 7590 pounds of dry forage per acre. Peanut
varieties were tested at three locations. Florunner con-
tinued to be the highest yielding commercial runner type
variety with an average yield of 4400 pounds per acre. An
experimental Virginia bunch type variety, UF70115, averaged
4800 pounds, while Florigiant averaged 3800 pounds per acre
at the three locations. UF70115 has outyielded Florigiant
by an average of 14% at Gainesville during the past four
years. The four most productive soybean varieties at four
North Florida locations were Hutton, Cobb, Ransom, and
Bragg, with average yields of 42.8, 42.0, 41.5, and 41.4
bushels per acre, respectively. All of these except Ransom
are resistant to Heloidogyne incognita. Forrest, a Group V
variety resistant to both 8. incognita and Heterodera
glycines, averaged 29.1 bushels, while a Group VI line with
similar resistance averaged 37.4 bushels.


FLA-AX-01600 SCHANK S C QUESENBERRY K H

FORAGE GRASS CYTOGENETICS AND BREEDING, PRIMARILY DIGI-
TARIAS, BRACBIARIAS AND HEMARTHRIAS

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Twenty-six digitgrass lines were compared with four commer-
cial cultivars of digitgrass and bermudagrass in Brazil to
determine dinitrogen fixation rate, nitrogen content, In
Vitro organic matter digestibility, and yield. Accumulative
dry matter (oven-dried) of the lowest yielding line was
16,711 kg/ha/yr and the highest line yielded over 30,000
kg/ha/yr. Commercially available cultivars were intermedi-
ate in production. In Vitro organic matter digestibility
(IVOMD) on all 30 lines for each of 13 harvests during the
year showed significant differences between lines and harv-
est dates. Nitrogenase activity by acetylene reduction, a
measure of dinitrogen fixed on roots, was monitored with
rates of over 500 g/N/ha/day possible under favorable
conditions. Cytological study of 32 previously unreported
limpograss, Hemarthria altissima, introductions showed 25
diploids, 2n=18; six tetraploids, 2n-36; and one hexaploid,







2n=54. The 25 diploid introductions showed nine (9) biva-
lents exclusively at metaphase I with mean pollen stainabi-
Lity ot 95% except for one introduction, P.I. 364866, which
had only 32% stainable pollen. The tetraploid introductions
also exhibited a high frequency of bivalent associations;
however, the presence of occasional quadravalents resulted
in mean pairing frequency of 17.45 bivalents and 0.28
quadravalents in 141 cells. Pollen stainability of the
tetraploids was more variable than the diploids with a range
of b5 to 94%. The one hexaploid showed only 27 bivalents in
19 cells which were analyzed.


FLA-AY-0160B EDWARDSON J R WARMKE H'E PRING D'R

CYTOPLASM GENE INTERACTIONS IN HIGHER PLANTS

khOGAESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Interspecific Petunia crosses are being studied in attempts
to resynthesize cytoplasmic sterility. Viable offspring
have been obtained from the cross Petunia parodii x tobacco.
Variegations in petunia and tobacco are being investigated
in attempts to locate sites of sterility factors. Studies
of dominant male sterility and its suppression in corn are
continuing. Cytological studies of the fertilization pro-
cess in tobacco are continuing. Cytological studies of
viruses and their inclusions are continuing. Modification
of sterility factors in corn with chemical mutagens is being
attempted. Cytoplasmic spherical bodies have been asso-
ciated with male sterility in Vicia faba. Improved methods
have been developed for preparing and staining 1-micron
sections of plant materials for the light microscope.
Stains are sharp and intense, precipitates do not form, and
sections are flat and do not loosen during preparation
procedures. Using these techniques and adjacent thin sec-
tions for the electron microscope, ultra-structural compari-
sons of organelle development in fertile and cytoplasmic
male-sterile corn and sorghum are being made. The mito-
chondreal DNA's of normal and male-sterile corn lines were
shown to be distinguishable when digested with restriction
enaonucleases and electrophoresed in agrose gels.


FLA-AY-0161z MOTT G 0

ECONOMIC, BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS OF DAIRY-BEEF
ChOSSES ON PASTURE AND IN DRYLOT

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Sampling of the pastures in this research program was not
started during the 1975 season because of lack of facilities
ana labor. A new plan of sampling is being developed for
1976.


FLA-AY-01622 SCHANK S C

"NzW PLANTS" THEIR INTRODUCTION, MULTIPLICATION, EVALUA-
TION, AND PRESERVATION

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Scientists in Agronomy continued to receive and evaluate
introductions from Southern Regional Plant Introduction
Station. Many P.I's of tropical forage grasses were eva-







luated in 1975 at the Ona-ARC for winter hardiness. One of
the new Florida releases was 'McCaleb' stargrass, originated
trom P.i. 224152. Another forage grass is being proposed
tor release Irom P.I. 224566; P.I. 225957 also has been
very vigorous. The four highest yielding entries in a trial
or 30 introductions of Bromus willdenowii at Jay-ARC were
304864, 185500, 189612, and 197849. In Lolium perenne
340108 and 340110 were best among eight introductions, but
neither appears to perenniate. The highest yielding intro-
duction or Lolium multiflorum tested was P. I. 343156
which out-yielded 'Gulf', 'Florida Rust Resistant' and 'Mag-
nolia' cultivars. Trofolium alexandrinum P. I.'s 378129
and 3B3769 looked good during the relatively warm winter of
74-75 in unclipped observation rows. At Gainesville, intro-
ductions of various grasses were grown to test for nitrogen
fixation after inoculation with Spirillum lipoferum in field
trials. Sixty-three lines of Zea, 45 of Sorghum, 7 of
Pennisetum, 250 of Panicum maximum, 153 of Chloris, 82 of
Cenchrus cillarus, 55 of Hemarthria altissima, 15 of Paspa-
lum notatum, and 60 of Digitaria were inoculated during
summer 1975. Results of the tests and P. I.'s used will be
reported next year.


FLA-AY-01646 PRINE G M RUELKE 0 C

ECOLOGY OF FIELD AND FORAGE CROPS

PROGRESS hktORT: 75/01 75/12
Experiments were conducted in growth chambers to measure the
etrects or spray applications of 0, 50, and 200 g/A of
gioberellic acid (GA) applied to 'Pangola' digitgrass grown
at 30C day temperatures with high (30C) and low (10C) night
temperatures each at long (14 hr) and short (10 hr)
daylengths. Reducing night temperatures from 30 to 10 C
reduce dry matter (DM) yield 50%, while changing from long
days to short days, at 10C night temperature, had little
effect on D.M. yield over all GA rates. Dry matter yields
of Pangola grown at 30/10 C short days was increased 25% by
addition of 200 g/a of GA. Dry matter yields of subsequent
harvests were depressed by GA. Light intensities of 1500
toot-candles in growth chambers were sub-optimum to sustain
Pangola. Spring burning and discing residual sod of joint
vetch bahiagrass resulted in a 586% and 400% increase,
respectively, in seedling stands of joint vetch, Aes-
chynomene americana L. 'Pioneer 3369A' received 75% shading
in the field for 5-day intervals over much of the growing
season. Results suggest that this single-eared corn variety
has a critical period near silking when low light intensi-
ties can drastically reduce the number of kernels occurring
per ear.


FLA-AY-01658 FRITZ G J

THE ROLE OF OXYGEN FIXATION IN LIGNIN BIOSYNTHESIS IN FORAGE
PLANTS

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Work during the past year was directed toward elucidating
the role of oxygen fixation in the biosynthesis of lignin.
The most important advance was the experimental finding that
phenolic acids (p-coumaric, ferulic, sinapic) which serve as
precursors of lignin can be isolated from all other conta-







miiating substances (atter preliminary purification by thin
layer chromatography) through the use of gas chromatography.
by using a gas chromatograph (GC) connected directly to the
inLet system of a mass spectrometer (MS) the identity of
p-coumaric acid isolated from green maize seedlings was
confirmed by comparing its mass spectrum (after passage
through GC) with that of authentic p-coumaric acid. Similar
results were obtained with ferulic acid isolated from green
maize seedlings. The critical oxygen-18 experiments are now
underway, the object being to demonstrate conclusively by
the GC-MS technique that atmospheric oxygen is incorporated
(by oxygen fixation reactions) into the hydroxyl atoms of
these phenolic acids. The significance of this work is to
locus attention on the indispensability of oxygen gas in the
biosynthesis of precursors of lignin. With increased know-
ledge of the mechanismaof lignin biosynthesis, information
may become available for regulating the iignin content of
forage grasses and thereby increase their palatability.


FLA-AY-01681 LE GRAND F SCHRODER V N

MHAAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR EFFICIENT USES OF FERTILIZERS AND
MOISTURE IN COAN PRODUCTION

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
Experimentation with programmed applications of nitrogen and
potassium continued. Increased quantities of nitrogen and
potassium above the optimum of last year did not result in
significant yield increase. Nitrogen and potassium uptake
was optimized with the applied fertilization. Therefore,
possible increase for yield can only be obtained by greater
plant density per ha.


FLA-AY-01714 HORNER E S

GENETIC IMPROVEMENT OF CORN

PaOGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
A new selection experiment was initiated to evaluate two
breeding methods: reciprocal recurrent selection with
inbred testers, and selection based on S2 progeny perfor-
mance. A population that is highly resistant to southern
corn leaf blight (SCLB) was divided according to ancestry
into two groups, A and B. A line from each group was chosen
as a tester to evaluate lines from the other group. Over
100 testcrosses and their sibbed S2 parents from each group
were grown in 1975 at two locations. Yield of testcrosses
was positively correlated with yield of inbreds in each
group (r = 0.61 for Group A and r = 0.35 from Group B). The
top 10 testcrosses in each group averaged about 15% more
grain yield than the two commercial hybrid checks, and
compared favorably with the checks for other traits. In
Group A the inbred parents of the selected testcrosses
averaged 55% as much grain yield as their hybrids, while in
Group B they averaged only 36% as much as their hybrids.
Innreds selected only on the basis of their own performance
yielded 64% of the best hybrids in Group A and 55% in Group
B. These preliminary results indicated that the SCLB-
resistant population developed under Project Pla-AY-1571
will be a good source of commercially acceptable lines and
hybrids, and that, in general, the higher yielding inbred
lines produce the higher yielding hybrids. A critical







comparison of the two breeding methods cannot be made until
several cycles of selection have been completed.


FLA-AY-01735 BOOTE K J

PHYSIOLOGICAL BASIS FOR PRODUCTIVITY OF PEANUTS AND SOYBEANS

PROGRESS REPORT: 75/01 75/12
In a peanut fruit growth study, newly penetrated peanut pegs
of 'Florunner' peanut were tagged at seven consecutive
weekly intervals after pegging commenced, and fruits were
harvested biweekly. Dry weight per pod, kernel weight,
shelling percentage, and shell coloration are presently
being measured to determine individual fruit growth rates
and duration of fill for early, medium and late-formed
fruits. Individual fruit growth rates and yield components
of 9 peanut genotypes planted July 25 in 45.7 cm rows were
evaluated. The first 5 pegs per plant were tagged and pods
harvested on four dates. Kernal yield on November 24 for
the best two cultivars was 3228 and 3085 kg/ha for UF70115
and Florunner, respectively. UF70115 had 5 penetrated pegs
per plant at 39-40 days, as early as Spanish and Valencia
types and 2 to 3 days earlier than other Virginia or Runner
types. Photosynthesis of peanut leaves was measured on
control plants with and without fruits and on plants which
were continuously pruned of vegetative apices and pegs to
allow only two main laterals and fruits on none, one or both
main laterals. Removal of vegetative apices did not affect
photosynthesis per unit leaf weight provided fruits were
present. By 80 to 95 days, photosynthesis was reduced 10%
by fruit removal and 25% by fruit and vegatative apices
removal.