<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Map
 Introduction
 Table of Contents
 Faculty list
 Theses and dissertations
 International programs
 Capital improvements
 Grants and gifts
 Report of the administrative...
 Agricultural engineering depar...
 Agronomy department
 Animal science department
 Biochemistry department
 Botany department
 Dairy science department
 Editorial department
 Entomology and nematology...
 Food and resource economics...
 Food science department
 Forest resources and conservation...
 Fruit crops department
 Microbiology department
 Ornamental horticulture depart...
 Plant pathology department
 Poultry science department
 Soil science department
 Statistics department
 Vegetable crops department
 Veterinary science department
 Belle Glade Agricultural Research...
 Bradenton Agricultural Research...
 Homestead Agricultural Research...
 Lake Alfred Agricultural Research...
 Quincy Agricultural Research and...
 Sanford Agricultural Research and...
 Apopka Agricultural Research...
 Brooksville Beef Cattle Research...
 Dover Agricultural Research...
 Fort Lauderdale Agricultural Research...
 Fort Pierce Agricultural Research...
 Hastings Agricultural Research...
 Immokalee Agricultural Research...
 Jay Agricultural Research...
 National Weather Service
 Lakeland Agricultural Research...
 Leesburg Agricultural Research...
 Live Oak Agricultural Research...
 Marianna Agricultural Research...
 Monticello Agricultural Research...
 Ona Agricultural Research...
 Index


UF FLAG



Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005147/00006
 Material Information
Title: Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Abbreviated Title: Annu. res. rep. Inst. Food Agric. Sci., Univ. Fla., Gainesville, Fla.
Physical Description: v. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida>
Place of Publication: <Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: 1973
Publication Date: 1968-
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Agriculture -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Food -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Biological abstracts
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1968-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000429247
oclc - 01408984
notis - ACH8451
lccn - 73646057 //r862
issn - 0071-609X
System ID: UF00005147:00006
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual report.
Succeeded by: Annual research report of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Title Page
        Title page
    Map
        Map
    Introduction
        Introduction
    Table of Contents
        Table of contents
    Faculty list
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Theses and dissertations
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    International programs
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Capital improvements
        Page 44
    Grants and gifts
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Report of the administrative manager
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Agricultural engineering department
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Agronomy department
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Animal science department
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Biochemistry department
        Page 85
    Botany department
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    Dairy science department
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Editorial department
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
    Entomology and nematology department
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
    Food and resource economics department
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
    Food science department
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
    Forest resources and conservation department
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
    Fruit crops department
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
    Microbiology department
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
    Ornamental horticulture department
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
    Plant pathology department
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
    Poultry science department
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
    Soil science department
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
    Statistics department
        Page 185
    Vegetable crops department
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
    Veterinary science department
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
    Belle Glade Agricultural Research and Education Center
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
    Bradenton Agricultural Research and Education Center
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
    Homestead Agricultural Research and Education Center
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
    Lake Alfred Agricultural Research and Education Center
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
    Quincy Agricultural Research and Education Center
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
    Sanford Agricultural Research and Education Center
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
    Apopka Agricultural Research Center
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
    Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station
        Page 258
        Page 259
    Dover Agricultural Research Center
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
    Fort Lauderdale Agricultural Research Center
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
    Fort Pierce Agricultural Research Center
        Citrus section
            Page 268
            Page 269
            Page 270
        Vegetable-agronomy center
            Page 271
            Page 272
            Page 273
            Page 274
    Hastings Agricultural Research Center
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
    Immokalee Agricultural Research Center
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
    Jay Agricultural Research Center
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
    National Weather Service
        Page 288
    Lakeland Agricultural Research Center
        Page 288
    Leesburg Agricultural Research Center
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
    Live Oak Agricultural Research Center
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
    Marianna Agricultural Research Center
        Page 297
        Page 298
    Monticello Agricultural Research Center
        Page 299
        Page 300
    Ona Agricultural Research Center
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
    Index
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
Full Text








ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT

of the

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida


1973















ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT


of the


Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida



1973


This public document was promulgated at an annual cost
of $8,076.60 or a cost of $2.69 per copy to provide a
summary of research conducted during 1973 by the Uni-
versity of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences.



The use of trade names in this publication is solely
for the purpose of providing specific information. It
is not a guarantee or warranty of the products named and
does not signify that they are approved to the exclusion
of others of suitable composition.














S UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA Hastings

D AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND Leesburg
EDUCATION CENTERS
1. Belle Glade (cattle, forage crops, sugarcane, Sanford
vegetables)
2. Bradenton (cut flowers, vegetables) Brooksville
3. Homestead (ornamentals, subtropical fruits, Dover Apopka
vegetables) Lake Alfred
4. Lake Alfred (citrus) Lake-
5. Quincy (cattle, field crops, fruit crops, tobacco, lande
vegetables)
6. Sanford (field crops, ornamentals, vegetables) ( Ona
Bradenton Fi
0 AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTERS Pi
1. Apopka (foliage plants, ornamentals) Bel
2. Brooksville (Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station, l
USDA) G
3. Dover (strawberries, vegetables) Immokalee
4. Ft. Lauderdale (animal diseases, aquatic weed control,
ornamentals, turfgrass) F
5. Ft. Pierce (citrus, vegetables, forage and pasture crops) LU
6. Hastings (cabbage, potatoes) d"
7. Immokalee (forage and pasture crops, vegetables) Ho
8. Jay (cattle, field crops, fruits, nuts) Horn
9. Lakeland (National Weather Service)
10. Leesburg (grapes, watermelons)
11. Live Oak (field crops, fruits, swine, tobacco) *
12. Marianna (field crops, swine)
13. Monticello (fruits, nuts)











INTRODUCTION

Agricultural Research is one of the three major divisions qo
University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural
dances (IFAS). All research is closely coordinated with the
mansion and resident instruction divisions, the other two main
visions of IFAS. The agricultural research program is a
tewide responsibility that no other university has in Florida.
S research faculty members have responsibilities in the
duate research programs both on and off the Gainesville
pus. Research faculty also cooperate with the extension
Lsion to extend the new research knowledge and information to
S segments of industry and society.
Within the IFAS research program there are 20 departments at
University of Florida in Gainesville and 23 research centers
i ated throughout the state. The many locations make possible
search on different soils, under varying climatic conditions,
on many commodities -- citrus vegetables field crops
.ures, livestoc, ornamentals, tropical fruits, forests ano
srs. While production research receives the most attention,
much time also is devoted to research in processing, handling,
marketing, utilization engineering, and economics, including
basic research in all disciplines. Environmental and human
resource research is being given increasing attention.
A statewide program, planning and budgeting system (PPBS)
was extensively revised in 1972 for the entire research program.
A Research Program Planning Memorandum has been developed around
major crops, commodities, and services rather than disciplines
which provides a guide for program direction which was not
previously possible.
The entire research program of the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Stations is planned and conducted by use of formal
written and approved projects which document all research. The
research program is primarily a mission-oriented effort aimed at
solving the problems of agriculture. As problems arise new
projects are initiated. W en problems are solved projects are
terminated. At the present time there is a continuing trend
toward greater team effort than in the past. Problems are more
difficult and reguire the interdisciplinary approach for best
results. As new problems arise and new projects are planned, they
are carefully screened and reviewed before activation. Maximum
coordination now is achieved by close working relations within
the entire system of campus departments and research centers
located throughout the state.
The current research is reported to the public in many ways,
primarily through published articles, bulletins, and books. In
addition much research is reported at conferences and meetings.
Within the organization many field days, short courses, and
conferences are held to which the public is invited. These are
held throughout the year by certain departments and at research
centers throughout the state.
A brief report is included here of -all projects on which
research was performed in 1973. Projects reported here are
arranged by departments and centers. The reader is referred to
the index in order to obtain complete and detailed information on
a given question, topic, commodity, or process. We hope you will
find this report informative and useful.


John W. Sites
Dean for Research and
Director of Florida
Agricultural Experiment Stations







CONTENTS
It


ADMINISTRATION
Faculty List . . .
Theses and Dissertations . .
International Programs . .
Capital Improvements . .
Grants and Gifts . . .
Report of the Administrative Manager

DEPARTMENTS
Agricultural Engineering . .
Agronomy . . . .
Animal Science . . .
Biochemistry . . .
Botany . . . .
Dairy Science . . .
Editorial . . . .
Entomology and Nematology . .
Food and Resource Economics .
Forest Resources and Conservation
Fruit Crops . . .
Microbiology . . .
Ornamental Horticulture . .
Plant Pathology . . .
Poultry Science . . .
Soil Science . . .
Statistics . . . .
Vegetable Crops . . .
Veterinary Science . . .


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
Belle Glade .
Bradenton .
Homestead .
Lake Alfred .
Quincy . .
Sanford . .


EDUCATION
* .
. .
. .
. .


CENTERS
. .
. .
* .
. .


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTERS
Apopka . . . .
Brooksville
(Brooksville Beef Cattle Research
Dover . . . .
Fort Lauderdale . . .
-Fort Pierce
Citrus Section . . .
Vegetable-Agronomy Section .
Hastings . . . .
vImmokalee . . . .


Jay . .
Lakeland (National
Leesburg . .
Live Oak . .
Marianna . .
Monticello .
Ona . .


* .
Weather
. .
. .
* .
. .


. .
Service
. .
* .
. .
. .
* .


Station, USDA)


, USDC,


. .
* .


NOAA)


INDEX . . . . . . .


Page

1
30
37
44
44
55


57
63
75
85
86
89
97
122
128
147
154
157
160
165
171
175
185
186
192


197
209
219
225
239
247






FACULTY LIST

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences:
College of Agriculture
Agricultural Experiment Stations
Cooperative Extension Service
University of Florida, Gainesville 32611

JANUARY, 1974

ADMINISTRATION

1 E. T. York, Jr., Ph.D., Interim Pres. of Univ. (904-392-1311)
123 K. R. Tefertiller, Ph.D., Vice Pres. Agr. Affairs
(904-392-1971)
123 A. F. Cribbett, M.S., Dir. Spec. Prog.
123 J. F. McGuire, M.S., Asst. Dir. Spec. Prog.
23 V. C. McKee, Ph.D., Dir. Plan. and Bus. Affairs
123 D. R. Bryant, Jr., A.B., Admin. Asst. III

Resident Instruction

1 C. B. Browning, Ph.D., Dean for Resident Instr.
(904-392-1961)
1 D. 0. Spinks, Ph.D., Assoc. Dean for Resident Instr.
1 J. E. Reynolds, Ph.D., Asst. Dean for Resident Instr.

Research

29 J. W. Sites, Ph.D., Dean for Res. (904-392-1784)
2 E. T. Smerdon, Ph.D., Asst. Dean for Res.
2 S. H. West, Ph.D., Asst. Dean for Res.
2 H. H. Wilkowske, Ph.D., Asst. Dean for Res.
2 G. R. Freeman, M.S.A., Asst. Dir. of Agr. Expt. Sta.

Extension

3 J. N. Busby, Ph.D., Dean for Ext. (904-392-1761)
3 J. T. McCown, Ed.D., Assoc. Dean for Ext.
3 R. C. Andrew, Ph.D., Asst. Dean of Pers.
3 B. B. Archer, Ph.D., Asst. Dean 1890 FAMU Prog.
3 J. J. Brasher, Ph.D., Asst. Dean and Chmn. 4-H & Other
Youth Prog.
3 Olive L. Morrill, Ed.D., Asst. Dean and Chmn. Home
Econ. Prog.
3 F. E. Myers, M.Agr., Asst. to Dean for Ext.
3 J. E. Ross, Ph.D., Asst. Dean Agr. Prog.

Supervision
3 Pauline Calloway, Ph.D., Prog. Spec.
3 E. M. Kelly, Ph.D., Dist. Agt.
3 W. H. Smith, D.Ed., Distr Agt.
3 E. R. Wheaton, D.Ed., Dist. Agt.

1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR, M-S Program

1





Program Evaluation and Organizational
Development

3 A. A. Straughn, Ph.D., Dir. Prog. Eval. and Org. Dev.
(392-0386)
3 S. E. Grigsby, Ph.D., Prog. Spec.
3 Emily E. King, Ph.D., Prog. Spec.


Centers
2014 McCarty Hall
123 J. F. Gerber, Ph.D., Dir. Center for Env. Programs and
Nat. Resources (392-2357 and 392-2358)
123 B. R. Eddleman, Ph.D., Dir. Center for Rural Dev.
Programs (392-1718 and 392-1719)

International Programs
2001 McCarty Hall
123 H. L. Popenoe, Ph.D., Prof. and Dir. (392-1965)
123 Mason E. Marvel, Ph.D., Prof. Veg. Crops and Asst. Dir.
Forest Resources and Conservation (School of)
305 Rolfs Hall
123 J. L. Gray, D.F., Dir. (392-1792)
12 K. R. Swinford, Ph.D., Asst. Dir. Res. Inst.
12 W. H. Smith, Ph.D., Asst. Dir. for Research
3 T. G. Herndon, M.S.F., Asst. Dir for Extension

DEPARTMENTS

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
9 Frazier Rogers Hall 32611
12 R. E. Choate, M.S.A., Prof. and Acting Chmn.
of Dept. (904-392-1864)
12 L. 0. Bagnall, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Agr. Mach.)
12 C. D. Baird, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Agr. Proc.)
3 L. B. Baldwin, M.S.A., Asst. Prof. (Pollution Control)
25 E. K. Bowman, B.S., Assoc. Prof. Indus. Engin.
(Citrus and Veg. Handling)
12 D. E. Buffington, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Env. Housing Engin.)
2 K. L. Campbell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Water
Mgt.)

3 R. P. Cromwell, M.E., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Agr.
Mach.)
12 R. C. Fluck, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Agr.
Mach. and Syst.)
25 J. J. Gaffney, M.S.A.E., Asst. in Agr. Engin. (Citrus
and Veg. Handling)
3 D. S. Harrison, M.S.A., Prof. Agr. Engin. (Water Mgt.)
25 F. E. Henry, B.I.E., Asst. Prof. Indus. Engin. (Citrus
and Veg. Handling)
2 D. T. Kinard, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Engin. (Elec. Power
and Proc.)

1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program






12 J. M. Myers, M.S.A.. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Water Mgt.)
12 R. A. Nordstedt, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Waste Mgt.)
2 A. R. Overman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Water Mgt.
and Pollution Control)
3 A. M. Pettis, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Farm
Elec. Safety)
1 C. J. Rogers, M.Agr., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Agr.
Mach.)
25 J. S. Rogers, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Engin. (Soil and
Water Mgt.)
12 L. N. Shaw, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Agr. Mach.)
3 T. C. Skinner, M.Agr., Prof. Agr. Engin. (Agr. Struct.)
25 J. M. Stanley, M.S., Prof. Agr. Engin. (Insect Attr.)
25 W. K. Turner, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Insect
Attr.)
25 J. C. Webb, M.S., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Insect
Attr.)


AGRICULTURAL & EXTENSION EDUCATION
160 Building E

1 W. T. Loften, M.A.E., Prof. Agr. Educ. and Chmn. of
Dept. (904-392-0719)
1 C. E. Beeman, Ed.D., Asst. Prof. Educ.
1 H. E. Peirce, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof.

AGRONOMY
304 Newell Hall 32611

123 D. E. McCloud, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(904-392-1811)
2 F. T. Boyd, Ph.D., Prof. (Forage Crop Brdg. and
Mgt.)
2 F. Clark, M.S.A., Prof. (Flue Cured Tob. Mgt.)
3 W. L. Currey, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Weed Sci.)
12 C. E. Dean, Ph.D., Prof. (Clover, Tob. Genet. and
Brdg.)
2 W. G. Dunean, Ph.D., Prof. (Theoretical Crop. Husb.)
12 J. R. Edwardson, Ph.D., Prof. (Cytogenet.)
3 C. E. Freeman, M.S., Instr. (Sugarcane)
2 G. J. Fritz, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Physiol.)
2 L. A. Garrard, Ph.D., Res. Assoc. (Plant Physiol.)
25 M. H. Gaskins, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Physiol.)
12 V. E. Green, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. (Sorghum and Rice)
25 K. Hinson, Ph.D., Prof. (Soybean Genet. and Brdg.)
12 E. S. Horner, Ph.D., Prof. (Corn Genet. and Brdg.)
3 J. T. Johnson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Crop Mgt.)
3 D. W. Jones, M.S., Prof. (Forage Crop Mgt.)
2 G. B. Killinger, Ph.D., Prof. and Asst. Chmn. of Dept.
(Forage and New Crops Mgt.)
12 F. leGrand, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Sugarcane and
Theoretical Crop Husb.)
12 G. 0. Mott, Ph.D., Prof. (Tropical Forage Crop Mgt.)
12 A. J. Norden. Ph.D., Prof. (Peanut Genet. Brdg.)
8 A. J. Oswald, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Mgr. Fla. Fdi. Seed
Assoc.)

1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extenson Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program






2 P. L. Pfahler, Ph.D., Prof. (Genet.)
2 G. M. Prine, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Field Crop EcoL)
12 E. G. Rodgers, Ph.D., Prof. (Weed Sci.)
12 0. C. Ruelke, Ph.D., Prof. (Forage Crop Ecol.)
12 V. N. Schroder, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Crop Nutr.)
12 D. A. Sleper, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Genet.)
12 R. L. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Forage Genet. and
Brdg.)
2 Vimla Vasil, Ph.D., Res. Assoc. (Plant Physiol.)
25 H. E. Warmke, Ph.D., Prof. (Cytogenet.)
3 E. B. Whitty, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Field Crop Mgt.)
2 M. Wilcox, Ph.D., Prof. (Herbicide Biochem.)




ANIMAL SCIENCE
2103 McCarty Hall 32611

123 T. J. Cunha, Ph.D., Distinguished Service Prof. Anim.
Nutr. & Chmn.of Dept. (904-392-1911)
12 C. B. Ammerman, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr.
12 L. R. Arrington, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr.
(Laboratory Animals)
12 F. W. Bazer, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Physiol.
12 J. W. Carpenter, Ph.D., Prof. Meat Sci.
12 G. E. Combs, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Swine)
12 J. H. Conrad, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Tropical
Animal Science)
3 B. H. Crawford, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr.
(Horse)
2 G. K. Davis, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Dir.
Sponsored Res. Div.)
3 K. L. Durrance, M.Agr., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Husb.
(Swine)
2 J. F. Easley, M.S., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr.
12 J. P. Feaster, Ph.D., Prof. Biochem.
12 M. J. Fields, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Physiol.
12 D. E. Franke, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Genet.
12 J. F. Hentges, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Beef)
12 Marvin Koger, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Genet.
12 P. E. Loggins, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Husb. (Sheep)
12 L. R. McDowell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr.
(Tropical Animal Science)
12 J. E. Moore, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr.
12 E. A. Ott, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Horses)
3 J. E. Pace, M.S.A., Prof. Anim. Husb. (Beef)
12 A. Z. Palmer, Ph.D., Prof. Meat Sci.
3 R. L. Reddish, Ph.D., Prof. Meat Sci.
3 R. S. Sand, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Husb. (Beef
and Horses)
12 D. C. Sharp, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Physiol. (Horse)
12 R. L. Shirley, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr.
12 Jenny E. Thomas, M.S., Asst. in Ani. Sci. (Tropical
Animal Science)
12 D. L. Wakeman, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Husb.
12 H. D. Wallace, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Swine)
12 A. C. Warnick, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Physiol.
12 R. L. West, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Meat Sci.


1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extenion Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program






BOTANY
2175 McCarty Hall 32611

12 W. W. Payne, Ph.D., Prof. Bot. and Chmn. of Dept.
(904-392-1894)
1 H. C. Aldrich, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.
1 D. S. Anthony, Ph.D., Prof. Bot.
1 G. Bowes, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Bot.
1 J. S. Davis, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.
1 J. J. Ewel, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Bot.
1 D. G. Griffin, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.
1 M. M. Griffith, Ph.D., Prof. Bot.
12 T. E. Humphreys, Ph.D., Prof. Bot. and Biochem.
12 J. W. Kimbrough, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.
1 T. W. Lucansky, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Bot.
1 A. E. Lugo, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Bot.
12 J. T. Mullins, Ph.D., Prof. Bot.
1 L. Shanor, Ph.D., Prof. Bot.
1 R. C. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.
1 I. K. Vasil, Ph.D., Prof. Bot.
12 D. B. Ward, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.


DAIRY SCIENCE
106 Dairy Science Bldg. 32611

123 H. H. Van Horn, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. and
Chmn. of Dept. (904-392-1981)
12 K. C. Bachman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Biochem. (Foods)
3 Barney Harris, Jr., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Nutr.
12 H. H. Head, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Physiol.
(Lactation)
12 W. A. Krienke, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Dairy Technol.
12 S. P. Marshall, Ph.D., Prof. Dairy Nutr.
12 L. E. Mull, Ph.D., Prof. Microbiol. (Foods)
3 R. L. Richter, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Dairy Technol.
12 K. L. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Microbiol. (Foods)
12 W. W. Thatcher, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Physiol.
(Reproduction)
3 D. W. Webb, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Dairy Mgt.)
2 J. B. White, B.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Dairy Husb.
12 C. J. Wilcox, Ph.D., Prof. Genetics
12 J. M. Wing, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr.


EDITORIAL
G022 McCarty Hall 32611

23 M. H. Sharpe, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(904-392-1772)
3 D. L. Buck, M.Agr., Asst. Prof. (TV)
3 D. W. Poucher, M.A.J.C., Assoc. Prof. (Radio-TV)*
3 R. C. Smith, Jr., B.A., Asst. Prof. (Radio)
3 Alma Warren, M.A., Asst. Prof. (Press)
2 Mary C. Williams, M.A., Asst. Prof. (Pub.)
2 C. T. Woods, Jr., M.A.J.C., Asst. Prof. (Press)
*leave of absence

1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence a Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. hl-S Program






ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY
3103 McCarty Hall 32611

123 W. G. Eden, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(904-392-1901,02,03)
27 G. E. Allen, Ph.D., Prof. (Aquatic Ent.)
15 D. L. Bailey, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
17 W. M. Beck, Jr., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Aquatic Ent.)
12 F. S. Blanton, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.)
3 J. E. Brogdon, M.S., Prof. (Extension)
15 W. F. Buren, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.)
12 J. F. Butler, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Vet. Ent.)
15 A. K. Burditt, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 P. S. Callahan, Ph.D., Prof. (Behavioral)
15 D. Carlson, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 D. L. Chambers, Ph.D., Prof. (Behavioral Pest
Management)
15 J. L. Coffelt, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Stored Products)
15 M. M. Cole, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
12 H. L. Cromroy, Ph.D., Prof. (Radiation Biology)
15 D. A. Dame, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
17 G. W. Dekle, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Taxonomy)
Fla. Div. Plant Industry
17 H. A. Denmark, M.S., Prof. (Acrology)
Fla. Div. Plant Industry
23 D. W. Dickson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Extension
Nematology)
17 R. P. Esser, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Nematology)
Fla. Div. Plant Industry
18 A. G. Fairchild, Ph.D., Prof. (Taxonomy) U.S. Army
15 S. M. Ferkovich, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Behavioral)
15 H. S. Gouck, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
12 D. H. Habeck, Ph.D., Prof. (Immatures)
3 F. A. Johnson, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Extension)
12 S. H. Kerr, Ph.D., Prof. (Economic Ent.)
1 Sol Kramer, Ph.D., Prof. (Behavioral)
123 L. C. Kuitert, Ph.D., Prof. (Economic Ent.)
15 N. C. Leppla, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Attractants)
15 G. C. LaBrecque, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 W. J. Lewis, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Ent. Ins. Biocontrol)
Tifton, Ga.
15 P. D. Lingren, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Pest Management)
Quincy, Fla.
12 J. E. Lloyd, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Systematics)
15 C. S. Lofgren, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 R. E. Lowe, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 F. 0. Marzke, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Stored Products)
15 M. S. Mayer, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Biophysics)
17 F. W. Mead, Ph.D., Prof. (Systematics)
Fla. Div. Plant Industry
16 E. P. Merkel, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Forest Ent.)
U.S. Forest Service
1 D. R. Minnick, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Economic Ent.)
15 E. Mitchell, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Behavioral)
15 P. B. Morgan, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 G. A. Mount, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
123 Milledge Murphey, Ph.D., Prof. (Apiculture)
12 J. L. Nation, Ph.D.,.Prof. (Physiology)


1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR, M-S Program

6





15 J. H. O'Bannon, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Nematology)
Orlando
15 Herbert Oberlander, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Endocrinology)
127 C. W. O'Brian, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Aquatic)
15 R. S. Patterson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 D. B. Perkins, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Aquatic)
12 V. G. Perry, Ph.D., Prof. (Nematology)
127 W. L. Peters, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Aquatic Ent.)
Fla. A & M Univ., Tallahassee
123 F. A. Robinson, M.S., Prof. (Apiculture)
15 A. J. Rogers, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.)
Panama City, Fla.
12 R. I. Sailer, Ph.D., Grad. Res. Prof. (Biological Control)
8 Harry Samol, M.S., Asst. Prof., Fla. Sugarcane League,
Belle Glade, Fla.
15 J. A. Seawright, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Genetics)
123 E. Short, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Extension)
15 D. L. Silhacek, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Stored Products)
12 G. C. Smart, Ph.D., Prof. (Nematology)
15 B. J. Smittle, Ph.D., Prof. (Radiation Biology)
5 N. R. Spencer, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Biocontrol)
13 J. R. Strayer, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Extension)
15 T. E. Summers, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Biocontrol)
17 A. L. Taylor, M.S., Prof. (Nematology)
15 J. H. Tumlinson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Behavior)
15 K. W. Vick, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Physiology)
2 R. E. Waites, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Economic Ent.)
12 T. J. Walker, Ph.D., Prof. (Ecology)
17 H. V. Weems, Ph.D., Prof. (Taxonomy) Fla. Div. Plant
Industry
15 D. E. Weidhaas, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.)
1 M. J. Westfall, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Taxonomy)
12 W. H. Whitcomb, Ph.D., Prof. (Taxonomy)
12 R. C. Wilkinson, Ph.D., Prof. (Forest Ent.)
18 W. W. Wirth, Ph.D., Prof. (Taxonomy) U.S. National
Museum
15 B. R. Wiseman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Plant Resistance)
Tifton, Ga.
17 R. E. Woodruff, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Economic Ent.)
Fla. Div. Plant Industry



EXTENSION COUNTY SUPERVISION
2002 McCarty Hall 32611

3 F. S. Perry, M.Agr., Dist. Agt. (904-392-1781)
3 E. M. Kelly, Ph.D., Dist. Agt.
3 W. H. Smith, D.Ed., Dist. Agt.
3 E. R. Wheaton, D.Ed., Dist. Agt.



FIELD SERVICES

2 W. H. Jones, Jr., M.Agr., Mtn. and Constr. Supt.
IFAS (904-392-1984)


1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program






FOOD & RESOURCE ECONOMICS
1157 McCarty Hall 32611


123 Leonidas Polopolus, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. and
Chmn. of Dept. (904-392-1826)
23 C. L. Anderson, M.S.A., Asst. Prof. (Area Agr. Econ.) -
Lake Alfred
12 C. 0. Andrew, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Trade and
Devlpmt.)
12 D. L. Brooke, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Farm Mgt. &
Mktg.)
27 T. L. Brooks, Jr., B.S., Statis. (Fla. Dept. of Citrus)
3 J. A. Brown, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Area Devlpmt.
Spec.) Live Oak
3 J. C. Cato, M.S., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Marine Econ.)
13 H. B. Clark, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Mktg.)
13 C. D. Covey, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Mktg.-Ext.
Coord.)
12 C. G. Davis, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Res. Econ.)
2 J. K. Dow, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. Columbia
3 R. A. Eastwood, Ph.D., Prof. (Mktg. Spec.)
12 B. R. Eddleman, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Res. Econ.)
3 V. L. Elkins, M.S., Prof. (Area Prof. Spec.) -
Tallahassee
12 R. D. Emerson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Res.
Econ.)
27 G. R. Fairchild, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Fla.
Dept. of Citrus)
1 E. Finlayson, M.S., Asst. Agr. Econ. (Farm Mgt.)
12 K. C. Gibbs, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Nat.
Res.)
3 K. M. Gilbraith, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. (Mktg. Spec.)
12 R. E. Greene, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Farm Mgt.)
25 G. T. Harris, M.S., Asst. in Agr. Econ.
13 John Holt, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Farm Mgt. Spec.)
12 M. R. Langham, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. i
(Econometrics)
27 W. B. Lester, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Fla.
Dept. of Citrus)
3 R. A. Levins, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Area Agr. Econ.) -
Bradenton
12 Edna T. Loehman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Nat. Res. and Policy)
3 D. E. Long, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Area Devlpmt. Spec.)
3 J. C. McCall, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Area Devlpmt. Spec.) -
Marianna
12 W. W. McPherson, Ph.D., Grad Res. Prof. (Econ.
Devlpmt. and Policy)
13 W. K. Mathis, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Mktg. Spec.)
3 C. C. Moxley, Ph.D., Prof. Rural (Devlpmt. and
Policy)
12 C. E. Murphree, D.P.A., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Prod.
Econ. and Policy)
2 L. A. Murray, Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. Tallahassee
12 L. H. Myers, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Mktg.)
25 J. L. Pearson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Mktg.)


1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence S Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR, M-S Program

8






13 G. R. Perkins, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Farm Mgt. Spec.)
12 A. A. Prato, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Cons.
Econ.)
12 F. J. Prochaska, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Marine Econ.)
12 J. E. Reynolds, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Also
Dean Res. Inst.)
2 G. N. Rose, B.S., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Farm Mgt.)
3 S. E. Rosenberger, Ph.D., Prof. (Mktg. Spec.)
12 C. N. Smith, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Mktg. and
Policy)
23 Charles Walker, M.E., Asst. Prof. (Area Agr. Econ) -
Belle Glade
2 L. A. Ward, B.S., Int. Asst. Agr. Econ. (Marketing)
27 R. W. Ward, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Fla.
Dept. of Citrus)
23 G. 0. Westberry, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Area Asst. Farm
Mgt. Spec.) Quincy
25 G. A. Zepp, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Labor
and Policy)


FOOD SCIENCE
367 Food Science Building 32611

123 R. A. Dennison, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(904-392-1991)
12 E. M. Ahmed, Ph.D., Prof. Food Psychophys.
12 Howard Appledorf, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Human Nutr.
123 R. P. Bates, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Food Proc.
12 F. W. Knapp, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Food Chem.
12 J. A. Koburger, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Food Microbiol.
23 R. F. Matthews, Ph.D., Prof. Food Sci.
3 W. E. McCullough, M.S., Asst. Prof. Seafood Specialist
12 H. A. Moye, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anal. Chem.
12 J. L. Oblinger, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Food Microbiol.
123 F. T. Orthoefer, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Food Chem.
12 R. C. Robbins, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Human Nutr.
12 N. P. Thompson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Pestic. Residue
Anal.
12 W. B. Wheeler, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Toxicol.



FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION
(SCHOOL OF)
305 Rolfs Hall 32611

12 J. L. Gray, D.F., Prof. and Dir. (904-392-1792)
6 G. W. Bengtson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. TVA, Muscle
Shoals, Ala.
5 R. H. Brendemuehl, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. SE For. Exp.
Sta., Marianna, Fla.
3 D. R. Crowe, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Ext. For.)
12 P. W. Frazer, M.F., Assoc. Prof. (Dendrol.)
12 R. E. Goddard, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (For. Genet.)
12 L. D. Harris, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Wildlife Ecol.)
1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extenuion Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program







3 T. G. Herndon, M.S.F., Assoc. Prof. (Ext. For.)
12 D. H. Hirth, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Wildlife EcoL)
2 C. A. Hollis, Ph.D., Int. Asst. Prof. (For. Physiol.)
12 J. B. Huffman, D.F., Assoc. Prof. (Wood Technol.)
3 A. S. Jensen, M.S.F., Asst. Prof. (Ext. For.)
12 C. M. Kaufman, Ph.D., Prof. (Silvic.)
12 J. W. Miller, Jr., M.A.S., Prof.
12 D. M. Post, M.S.F., Asst. Prof.
12 R. A. Schmidt, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (For. Path.)
2 J. V. Shireman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Fisheries Sci.)
12 W. H. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (For. Nutr.)
2 S. C. Snedaker, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Ecology)
5 A. E. Squillace, Ph.D., Prof. SE For. Exp. Sta.,
Olustee, Fla.
12 R. G. Stanley, Ph.D., Prof. (For. Physiol.)
12 R. K. Strickland, M.S.F., Int. Inst. in For. Genet.
12 E. T. Sullivan, D.F., Assoc. Prof. (For. Econ.)
12 K. R. Swinford, Ph.D., Prof. (For. Recr.)
12 L. D. White, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Range Ecol.)


4-H AND OTHER YOUTH PROGRAMS
2039 McCarty Hall 32611

3 J. J. Brasher, Ph.D., Asst. Dean & Chmn. of Dept.
4-H & Other Youth Programs (904-392-1744)
3 B. J. Allen, M.A., Assoc. State 4-H Club. Agt.
3 Linda L. Dearmin, M.S., Asst. State 4-H Club Agt.
3 G. M. Godwin, M.Agr., Assoc. State 4-H Club Agt.
3 T. C. Greenawalt, Ph.D., Assoc. State 4-H Club Agt.
3 D. Miller, M.S., Asst. State 4-H Youth Dev. Spec.
3 Ruth L. Milton, M.S., Assoc. State 4-H Club Agt.


FRUIT CROPS
1172 McCarty Hall 32611

123 A. H. Krezdorn, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Fruit Crops) and
Chmn. of Dept. (904-392-1996)
12 J. F. Bartholic, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Climatol.
12 R. H. Biggs, Ph.D., Prof. Biochem.
12 D. W. Buchanan, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Decid. Fruit)
3 T. E. Crocker, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.
5 T. T. Hatton, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Hort. Orlando
13 L. K. Jackson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Citric. Spec.)
3 F. P. Lawrence, M.Agr., Prof. (Citric. Spec.)
2 R. H. Sharpe, M.S., Prof. (Decid. Fruit. Brdg.)
23 W. B. Sherman, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Decid. Fruit
Brdg.)
12 James Soule, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
23 D. P. H. Tucker, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Citric. Spec.) -
Lake Alfred
23 W. F. Wardowski, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Citric. Spec.) -
Lake Alfred
12 W. J. Wiltbank, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort.
2 H. W. Young, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Decid. Fruit)
1 L. W. Ziegler, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program






HOME ECONOMICS
3041 McCarty Hall 32611

3 Olive L. Morrill, Ed.D., Asst. Dean for Ext. and Chmn. of
Dept., Prof. (904-392-1778)
3 Sandra A. Claybrook, M.S., Asst. Prof. Ext. Home Econ.,
ENP
3 Charla J. Durham, M.S., Asst. Prof. Home Mgt. and Fam.
Econ. Spec.
3 Ruth N. Hackler, M.S., Asst. Prof. Clothing and
Textiles Spec.
3 Roberta H. Hall, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Home Furn. Spec.
3 Marie S. Hammer, M.H.E., Asst. Prof. Ext. Home Econ.
ENP
3 Mary N. Harrison, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Consum. Educ. Spec.
3 Lora A. Kiser, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Ext. Home Econ. Prof.
Devlpmt.
3 Vervil L. Mitchell, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Home Mgt. and
Fam. Econ. Spec.
3 Elizabeth L. Mumm, M.P.H., Asst. Prof. Health Educ. Spec.
3 Faye A. Plowman, M.A., Asst. Prof. Housing Spec.
3 Evelyn A. Rooks, M.H.E., Asst. Prof. Human Devlpmt.
Spec.
3 Beth H. Walsh, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Foods Spec.
3 Yancey B. Walters, M.H.E., Assoc. Prof. Home Econ.
Prog., ENP
3 Glenda L. Warren, M.S., Asst. Prof. Food and Nutr. Spec.,
ENP




INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS
2001 McCarty Hall 32611 Centrop.

123 H. L. Popenoe, Ph.D., Prof. and Dir. (Soils)
(904-392-1965)
123 M. E. Marvel, Ph.D., Prof. and Asst. Dir. (Veg. Crops)
6 J. P. Bishop, Ph.D., Vis. Asst. Prof. Coop. INIAP/
Ecuador
6 M. A. Boone, Ph.D., Vis. Prof. Coop. USAID/Vietnam
6 J. K. Dow, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Coop. INIAP/Ecuador
6 D. D. Hargrove, Ph.D., Vis. Prof. Co'op. Gov. of Brazil
6 P. E. Hildebrand, Ph.D., Vis. Prof. Coop. USAID/
El Salvador
6 R. H. Houser, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Coop. Gov. of Brazil
6 A. F. Jilek, Ph.D., Vis. Asst. Prof. Coop. Gov. of Brazil
6 G. A. Marlowe, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Coop. USAID/
Vietnam
123 L. R. McDowell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Animal Nutr.
6 R. G. Poultney, Ph.D., Vis. Prof. Coop. INIAP/
Ecuador
6 C. W. Reaves, M.S.A., Prof. Coop. USAID/
El Salvador
6 S. C. Schank, Ph.D., Prof. Coop. Gov. of Brazil
6 Michael Schwartz, Ph.D., Int. Asst. Prof. Coop.
INIAP/Ecuador
1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program





6 F. J. Southcombe, Ph.D., Vis. Prof. Coop. INIAP/
Ecuador
6 E. P. Stephens, Ph.D., Vis. Assoc. Prof. Coop.
USAID/Vietnam
6 L. E. Tergas, Ph.D., Vis. Assoc. Prof. Coop. INIAP/
Ecuador
2 J. E. Thomas, M.S., Asst. in Animal Science
6 B. H. Waite, Vis. Prof. Coop. USAID/El Salvador


LIBRARY HUME LIBRARY
McCarty Hall 32611

123 A. C. Strickland, M.S., Librarian and Head
(904-392-1934)
123 Betty J. Blakslee, M.A., Asst. Libr.
123 Ann H. King, M.S., Asst. Libr.
123 G. T. Kovalik, M.A., Asst. Libr.
123 Lawan V. Orser, M.S., Asst. Libr.
123 Siew P. Su, M.A., Asst. Libr.
123 W. B. Weaver, M.S., Assoc. Libr.


MICROBIOLOGY
1053 McCarty Hall 32611

12 P. H. Smith, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(904-392-1906)
12 A. S. Bleiweis, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Bact. Physiol.)
12 D. E. Duggan, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Bact. Microbiol.
Proc.)
12 E. M. Hoffmann, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Bact. Immunol.)
12 L. 0. Ingram, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Bact. Microbiol. Proc.)
12 J. F. Preston, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Bact. Microbiol. Proc.)
12 E. P. Previc, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Bact. Metabol.)
12 M. E. Tyler, Ph.D., Prof. (Bact. Microbiol. Proc.)


ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
105 Rolfs Hall 32611

123 J. W. Strobel, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. and Chmn.
of Dept. (904-392-1831)
12 R. D. Dickey, M.S.A., Prof. Ornam. Hort. Emeritus
(Nursery)
12 G. C.Horn, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Turf)
12 C. R. Johnson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Nursery)
12 J. N. Joiner, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Flor.)
3 R. W. Henley, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Foliage) Apopka
12 D. B. McConnell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Nursery)
3 E. W. McElwee, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Nursery)
2 S. E. McFadden, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Nursery)
1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other GovL Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program






3 H. G. Meyers, M.S.A., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Turf)
12 T. J. Sheehan, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Flor.)
3 G. S. Smith, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Home Grounds)
3 W. T. Witte, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Flor.)



PLANT PATHOLOGY
Building 833 32611

123 L. H. Purdy, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. and Chmn.
of Dept. (904-392-1861)
2 J. A. Bartz, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Post
Harvest Diseases)
12 Ragahaven Charudattan, Ph.D., Post Doct. Assoc.
(Pathogens of Water Weeds)
12 A. A. Cook, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Bac. Plant
Pathogens)
2 Phares Decker, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Diseases
of Fruits)
12 T. E. Freeman, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Turfgrass
Diseases and Pathogens of Water Weeds)
2 Ernest Hiebert, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
(Virology)
2 Frederick Knuhtsen, Ph.D., Res. Assoc.
3 T. A. Kucharek, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
(Extension, Field Crop Diseases
25 H. H. Luke, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Cereal Diseases)
2 H. N. Miller, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Diseases of
Ornamentals)
2 D. J. Mitchell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
(Diseases of Field Crops; Bio. of Soil-borne
Pathogens)
3 R. S. Mullin, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Extension,
Ornamentals and Vegetables)
5 D. R. Pring, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
(Physiology of Corn Diseases)
2 D. E. Purcifull, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Virology)
12 D. A. Roberts, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Virology)
2 N. C. Schenck, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Soil-borne
Pathogens)
12 R. E. Stall, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Bac. Plant
Pathogens)
12 F. W. Zettler, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Virology and Pathogens of Water Weeds)


POULTRY SCIENCE
Mehrhof Building, IFAS 32611

123 R. H. Harms, Ph.D., Prof. Poultry Nutr. and Chmn.
of Dept. (904-392-1931)
3 R. B. Christmas, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Random Test
Supvr.), Chipley (904-638-0588)
12 B. L. Damron, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Poultry Nutr.)
123 C. R. Douglas, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Ext. Poultryman)
1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR, M-S Program





123 J. L. Fry, Ph.D., Prof. (Poultry Prod. Tech.)
3 L. W. Kalch, M.Agr., Assoc. Prof. (Ext. Poultryman)
12 D. A. Roland, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Poultry Mgt.)
12 R. A. Voitle, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Poultry Physiol.)
123 H. R. Wilson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Poultry Physiol.)



SOIL SCIENCE
106 Newell Hall 32611

123 C. F. Eno, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Microbiology and Chmn.
of Dept. (904-392-1804)
12 W. G. Blue, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Soil Fertility
Pastures)
12 H. L. Breland, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Analytical Research Laboratory)
12 R. E. Caldwell, Ph.D., Prof. Pedology (Genesis and
Classification)
12 F. G. Calhoun, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Taxonomy
(Genesis and Mineralogy)
12 V. W. Carlisle, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Pedology (Genesis
and Classification)
27 C. L. Coultas, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Genesis and Classification) Coop Fla. A&M Univ.
12 J. G. A. Fiskell, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Biochemistry (Soil
Fertility Vegetables)
12 N. Gammon, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Micronutrients)
12 D. A. Graetz, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Environmental
Quality (Soil and Water Pollution)
12 L. C. Hammond, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Physics (Water
Relations)
3 J. H. Herbert, Jr., M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Extension
Soils (Soil Conservation)
2 C. C. Hortenstine, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Environmental Quality)
12 D. H. Hubbell, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Microbiology
(Rhizosphere)
12 R. S. Mansell, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Physics.
(Water and Pesticide Movement)
3 J. NeSmith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Extension Soils
(Soil Testing)
12 H. L. Popenoe, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Tropical
Soils, Director Center for Tropical Agriculture)
6 D. H. Marx, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Microbiology
(Soil-borne Organisms) Coop US Forest Service
12 W. L. Pritchett, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Forest
Soils)
2 W. K. Robertson, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Soil
Fertility Agronomic Crops) -
12 D. R. Rothwell, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Microbiology
(Graduate Coordinator)
12 B. G. Volk, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Organic Matter)
12 G. M. Volk, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Soil
Fertility Turf)
2 T. L. Yuan, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Acidity and
Amorphous Clays)
12 L. W. Zelazny, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Mineralogy)
1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program






STATISTICS
G175 McCarty Hall 32611

1 William Mendenhall, III., Ph.D., Prof. Statis. and
Chmn. of Dept. (904-392-1941)
2 J. A. Cornell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Statis.
2 R. C. Littell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Statis.
2 F. G. Martin, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Statis.
2 J. F. Schreckengost, M.S., Res. Asst. Statis.
2 J. T. Thornby, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Statis.




VEGETABLE CROPS
3026 McCarty Hall 32611

123 J. F. Kelly, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. (904-392-1794)
2 M. J. Bassett, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort. (Brdg.)
24 D. D. Gull, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Postharvest
Physiol.) El Salvador
2 C. B. Hall, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Physiol.)
2 L. H. Halsey, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Culture)
23 J. R. Hicks, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Postharvest Spec.)
3 S. R. Kostewicz, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Veg. Crops Spec.)
12 S. J. Locascio, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Herbic., Nutr.)
34 G. A. Marlowe, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Veg. Crops Vietnam
3 M. E. Marvel, Ph.D., Prof. Veg. Crops Spec. (Asst.
Dir., Tropical Agr.)
3 James Montelaro, Ph.D., Prof. (Veg. Crops Spec.)
12 V. F. Nettles, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Grad. Coord.)
23 R. K. Showalter, M.S., Prof. Hort. (Postharvest)
3 J. M. Stephens, M.S.A., Asst. Prof. (Veg. Crops. Spec.)
12 B. D. Thompson, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Physiol.)




VETERINARY SCIENCE
Veterinary Science Research Lab. 32611

123 C. E. Cornelius, D.V.M., Ph.D., Prof. Physiol. Chmn.
of Dept. and Dean Col. Vet. Med. (904-392-1841)
12 R. E. Bradley, D.V.M., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Parasitol.
12 P. T. Cardeilhac, D.V.M.,Ph.D., Assoc. Prof.
Pharmacol.
2 W. S. Cripe, D.V.M., Assoc. Prof. Vet.
12 G. T. Edds, D.V.M., Ph.D., Prof. Toxicol.
12 D. J. Forrester, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Parasitol.
12 J. E. Gaskin, D.V.M., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Virol.
12 J. A. Himes, V.M.D., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Physiol.
12 K. D. Ley, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Virol.
3 G. W. Meyerholz, D.V.M., Assoc. Prof. Ext. Vet.
12 F. C. Neal, D.V.M., M.S., Assoc. Prof. Vet.
12 J. T. M. Neilson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Parasitol.
12 C. F. Simpson, D.V.M., Ph.D., Prof. Path.
12 F. H. White, Ph.D., Prof. Bact.


1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program







AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND
EDUCATION CENTERS


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER
P. O. Drawer A, Belle Glade 33430

2 D. W. Beardsley, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. and Ctr.
Dir. (305-996-3062)
2 R. J. Allen, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Pasture)
2 R. D. Berger, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Veg. Crops)
2 H. W. Burdine, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Physiol.
(Veg. Crops)
25 J. E. Clayton, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Sugarcane)
2 S. W. Coleman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr.
(Beef Cattle)
2 J. R. Crockett, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Genet.
(Beef Cattle)
25 J. L. Dean, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path. (Sugarcane)
3 C. E. Freeman, M.S., Asst. in Agron. (Sugarcane)
2 G. J. Gascho, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agron. (Sugarcane
Nutr.)
2 W. G. Genung, M.S., Prof. Ent. (Veg. Crops)
2 V. L. Guzman, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Veg. Crops)
25 L. P. Hebert, Ph.D., Prof. Agron. (Sugarcane)
25 N. I. James, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agron. (Sugarcane)
2 M. J. Janes, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ent. (Veg. Crops)
25 J. D. Miller, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Genet. (Sugarcane)
2 J. R. Orsenigo, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Physiol. (Weed
Control)
2 F. M. Pate, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Beef
Cattle)
25 E. R. Rice, B.S.A., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Sugarcane)
28 H. H. Samol, M.S., Asst. Prof. Ent. (Fla. Sugarcane
League, Inc.)
2 G. H. Snyder, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chem.
25 T. E. Summers, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ent.
3" C. Walker, M.S., Asst. Prof. Econ.
2 R. L. Walker, B.S., Int. Assoc. Agron. (Sugarcane)
2 E. A. Wolf, M.S., Prof. Hort. (Veg. Brdg.)
2 T. A. Zitter, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Veg. Crops)


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER
5007 60th St. E., Bradenton 33505

2 W. E. Waters, Ph.D., Prof. and Ctr. Dir.
(813-755-1568)
2 D. S. Burgis, M.S.A., Prof. Hort. (Veg.)
2 J. P. Crill, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path. (Veg.)
2 A. W. Engelhard, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Ornam.)


1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extenion Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program






2 C. M. Geraldson, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chem. (Veg.)
2 J. L. Green, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Ornam.)
2 J. P. Jones, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Veg.)
23 R. A. Levins, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Farm Mgt. Spec.)
2 R. 0. Magie, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Ornam.)
25 F. J. Marousky, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Ornam.)
2 Amegda J. Overman, M.S., Prof. Nematol. (Ornam.
Veg.)
2 S. L. Poe, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent. (Ornam. Veg.)
2 G. J. Wilfret, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Genet. (Ornam.)
2 S. S. Woltz, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Physiol. (Ornam. Veg.)



AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER
18905 S. W. 280 Street, Homestead 33030

2 R. A. Conover, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. and Ctr. Dir.
(Veg. and Subtropical Fruits) (305-247-4624)
2 R. M. Baranowski, Ph.D., Prof. Ent. (Fruit Fly Res.
Biol. Control; Taxon-Hemiptera)
2 H. H. Bryan, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Veg.)
2 C. W. Campbell, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Subtropical
Fruits)
2 C. H. Doty, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Weed Control)
2 S. E. Malo, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Subtropical
Fruits)
2 R. B. Marlatt, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Ornam. Dis.)
2 R. T. McMillan, Jr., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Veg. and Subtropical Fruits)
2 P. G. Orth, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chem. (Veg. and
Subtropical Fruits)
2 R. B. Volin, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Veg.)
2 D. 0. Wolfenbarger, Ph.D., Prof. Ent. (Veg. and
Subtropical Fruits)
2 T. W. Young, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Subtropical Fruits)



AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER
P. O. Box 1088, Lake Alfred 33850

2 H. J. Reitz, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. and Ctr. Dir.
(813-956-1151)
2 L. G. Albrigo, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.
2 J. C. Allen, Ph.D., Asst. in Ent.
2 C. A. Anderson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chem.
23 C. L. Anderson, M.S.A., Asst. Prof. (Farm Mgt. Spec.)
27 J. A. Attaway, Ph.D., Prof. Chem. Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
2 C. R. Barmore, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.
27 R. W. Barron, B.A., Asst. in Chem. Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
27 J. G. Blair, B.S.M.E., Assoc. Prof. (Mech. Engin.) -
Fla. Dept. of Citrus
2 R. J. Braddock, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Food Sci.

1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program







2 R. F. Brooks, Ph.D., Prof. Ent.
27 G. E. Brown, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path. -
Fla. Dept. of Citrus
27 B. S. Buslig, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Biochem. Fla. Dept.
of Citrus
2 A. F. Camp, Ph.D., Dir. Emer. Hort.
27 G. E. Coppock, M.S., Prof. Agr. Engin. Fla. Dept.
of Citrus
27 M. H. Dougherty, B.S., Asst. Prof. Chem. Engin. -
Fla. Dept. of Citrus
2 E. P. DuCharme, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path.
2 G. J. Edwards, B.A., Asst. Prof. Biochem.
2 A. W. Feldman, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path.
27 P. J. Fellers, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Food Tech. Fla.
Dept. of Citrus
2 Francine E. Fisher, M.S., Asst. Prof Plant Path.
27 J. F. Fisher, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Chem. Fla. Dept.
of Citrus
2 H. W. Ford, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
2 Dennis Gonsalves, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
2 William Grierson, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
2 R. W. Hanks, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Physiol.
2 F. W. Hayward, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Biochem.
2 Pamela K. Hearon, B.S., Asst. Libr.
25 S. L. Hedden, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
27 E. C. Hill, B.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Bact. Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
27 R. L. Huggart, B.S., Assoc. Prof. Chem. Fla. Dept.
of Citrus
27 M. A. Ismail, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort. Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
2 R. B. Johnson, Ph.D., Prof. Ent.
2 J. W. Kesterson, M.S., Prof. Chem.
2 R. C. J. Koo, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
2 C. D. Leonard, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
2 S. K. Long, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ind. Bact.
27 A. A. McCornack, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Hort. Fla. Dept.
of Citrus
2 C. W. McCoy, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ent.
27 M. D. Maraulja, B.S., Asst. in Chem. Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
27 E. L. Moore, Ph.D., Prof. Chem. Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
2 W. F. Newhall, Ph.D., Prof. Biochem.
2 R. W. Olsen, B.S., Prof. Biochem.
27 D. R. Petrus, M.S., Asst. in Chem. Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
2 R. L. Phillips, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort.
2 A. P. Pieringer, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort.
2 R. L. Reese, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.
2 A. H. Rouse, M.S., Prof. Chem.
2 Ivan Stewart, Ph.D., Prof. Biochem.
25 H. R. Sumner, M.S., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
2 A. C. Tarjan, Ph.D., Prof. Nematol.
2 W. L. Thompson, Ph.D., Ent. Emer.
27 S. V. Ting, Ph.D., Prof. Biochem. Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
23 K. G. Townsend, B.S.A., Asst. in Ent.
23 D. P. H. Tucker, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Area Citrus
Spec.)

1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence S Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program





23 W. F. Wardowski, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort. (Area
Citrus Spec.)
2 F. W. Wenzel, Ph.D., Prof. Emer. in Chem.
2 T. A. Wheaton, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort.
2 J. 0. Whiteside, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path.
2 J. D. Whiteney, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
27 W. C. Wilson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Physiol. Fla.
Dept. of Citrus
27 R. W. Wolford, M.A., Prof. Chem. Fla. Dept. of
Citrus

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER
P. O. Box 470, Quincy 32351

2 W. H. Chapman, M.S., Prof. Agron. and Ctr. Dir.
(904-627-9236)
2 F. S. Baker, J., M.S.A., Prof. Anim. Husb. (Beef
Cattle)
2 J. L. Baker, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Shade Tob.
Brdg.)
2 R. D. Barnett, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Small
Grains Brdg.)
2 G. L. Greene, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ent. (Field Crops.)
2 F. M. Rhoads, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chem. (Shade
Tob.)
2 G. E. Sanden, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Field
Crops)
2 R. L. Stanley, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Forage
Crops)
2 W. B. Tappan, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Ent. (Shade Tob.)
23 G. 0. Westberry, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Farm Mgt. Spec.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER
P. O. Box 909, Sanford 32771

2 J. R. Darby, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. and Ctr. Dir.
(Dis. Veg.) (305-322-4134)
2 W. H. Denton, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent. (Veg. Crops)
2 R. B. Forbes, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chem. (Veg.
Crops)
2 H. L. Rhoades, Ph.D., Prof. Nematol. (Veg. Crops)
2 W. T. Scudder, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Herbic.)
2 L. R. Sinclair, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Hydrology)
2 J. 0. Strandberg, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Veg. Crops)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND
EDUCATION CENTER
Florida A & M University, Tallahassee 32307

237 R. G. Seals, Ph.D., Ctr. Dir. (904-222-8030)
(Also Dean for School of Ag. & Home Ec.)
27 J. M. Axelson, M.S., Food Sci.
27 W. M. Beck, Jr., M.S., Prof. Ent.
1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program







27 C. L. Coutlas, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chem. (Genesis
and Classification)
27 J. S. Dhillon, Ph.D., Rural Devlpmt.
27 J. L. Heinis, Ph.D., Agron.
27 C. W. O'Brien, Ph.D., Prof. Ent.
27 C. B. Owens, Ph.D., Prof. Agron.
27 W. L. Peters, Ph.D., Prof. Ent. (Res. Coord.-CSRS
Programs)


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTERS


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Rt. 1, Box 980, Apopka 32703

2 C. A. Conover, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
and Ctr. Dir. (305-889-4161)
2 R. A. Hamlen, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent.
23 R. W. Henley, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
2 J. F. Knauss, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
2 R. T. Poole, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Physiol.


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station, USDA
P. O. Box 246, Brooksville 33512

25 W. C. Burns, M.S., Prof. Anim. Husb. and Ctr. Dir.
(904-796-3385)


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Rt. 2, Box 629, Dover 33527

2 E. E. Albregts, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soils (Veg.)
(813-752-7649)
2 C. M. Howard, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Veg.)


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
3205 SW 70th Ave.,Ft. Lauderdale 33314
(305-584-6990)

2 B. L. James, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. and Ctr. Dir.
(305-584-6992)
25 R. D. Blackburn, M.S., Assoc. Bot. (Submersed Weed
Control) (305-583-5541)
2 E. 0. Burt, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Turf Tech)
2 A. E. Dudeck, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Turf Brdr.)
2 R. E. McCoy, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Turf
and Ornam.)
2 P. L. Neel, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
25 B. D. Perkins, Ph.D., Asst. Ent. (Aquatic Weeds)

1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program






2 J. A. Reinert, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent. (Turf and
Ornam.)
25 K. K. Steward, Ph.D., Asst. Plant Physiol. (Aquatic
Weeds)
2 D. L. Sutton, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Aquatic
Weeds)
2 D. L. Thomas, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
(Turf and Ornam.)
2 J. H. Tsai, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent.

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P. O. Box 248, Ft. Pierce 33450

2 J. B. Brolmann, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Legume
Brdr.)
2 R. C. Bullock, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ent. (Citrus)
2 D. V. Calvert, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chem. (Citrus)
2 Mortimer Cohen, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Citrus)
(305-461-4371 & 464-6017)
2 N. C. Hayslip, B.S.A., Prof. Ent. (Veg. Crops)
(305,461-6193)
2 A. E. Kretschmer, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Agron. (Pasture)
2 H. Y. Ozaki, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Veg. Crops)
6656 167 Place South, Delray Beach 33444
(305-278-7612)
2 R. M. Sonoda, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Veg.
Crops)
25 E. H. Stewart, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Soil Physiol.,
USDA

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P. O. Box 728, Hastings 32045

2 D. R. Hensel, Ph.D., Prof. and Ctr. Dir. (Soils, Veg.)
(904-692-1792)
2 J. R. Shumaker, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Hort, Veg.)
2 D. P. Weingartner, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Plant Path.,
Veg.)
2 R. B. Workman, Ph.D., Assoc..Prof. (Ent., Veg.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Rt. 1, Box 2G, Immokalee 33934

2 P. H. Everett, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chem. (Veg.)
(813-657-2835)
2 C. H. Blazquez, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Veg.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Rt. 3, Box 575, Jay 32565

2 H. A. Peacock, Ph.D., Agron. and Ctr. Dir. (Plant Breed.)
(904-994-5215 & 904-994-7373)
2 J. E. Bertrand, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. An. Sci. (Anim. Nutr.)
2 L. S. Dunavin, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agron. (Forage Crop
Mgt.)
1 College Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extension Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program







2 R. A. Kinloch, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Nematol. (Field Crop)
2 M. C. Lutrick, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Sci. (Fert.)
2 R. L. Smith, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Agron. (Field Crop Mgt.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P. O. Box 1068, 6 USDC, NOAA, National Weather
Service, Lakeland 33802

6 J. G. Georg, M.S., Meteorol. and Ctr. Dir.
(813-682-4221)
6 L. L. Benson, B.S., Asst. Meteorol.
6 R. C. Holm, B.S., Asst. Meteorol.
6 G. W. Leber, Asst. Meteorol.
6 W. F. Mincey, Asst. Meteorol.
6 J. 0. Thach, Asst. Meteorol.

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P. O. Box 388, Leesburg 32748

2 J. M. Crall, Ph.D., Prof. and Ctr. Dir. (Watermelon
Brdg. and Dis.) (904-787-3423)
2 W. C. Adlerz, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Virus Transmission,
Watermelon and Grape Ins.)
2 G. W. Elmstrom, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Cucurbit
Growth and Devlpmt.)
2 D. L. Hopkins, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Watermelon
and Grape Dis.)
2 J. A. Mortensen, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Grape Brdg.)
and Genet.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P. O. Box 657, Live Oak 32060

2 H. W. Lundy, B.S.A., Assoc. Prof. and Ctr. Dir.
(904-362-1725)
2 D. L. Hammell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Swine Nutrition)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P. O. Box 878, Marianna 32446

2 D. W. Gorbet, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Peanuts)
(904-594-3241)
23 J. C. McCall, M.A.E., Asst. Prof. (Area Rural Dev.
Spec.)
2 P. E. Vipperman, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr.
(Swine)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Rt. 3, Box 213B, Monticello 32344

2 C. E. Arnold, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. and Ctr. Dir. (Hort.)
(904-997-2597)
2 S. S. Fluker, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent.
2 W. J. French, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Path.
1 Collee Staff 2 Station Staff 3 Extenson Staff
4 Leave of Absence 5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency
7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others 9 A-TR. M-S Program






AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Route 1, Ona 33865

2 H.L. Chapman, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. and
Ctr. Dir. (813-735-3121)
2 C. L. Dantzman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chem. (Soil
Fert.)
2 E. M. Hodges, Ph.D., Agron. (Pasture and Forage
Crops)
2 P. Mislevy, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Pasture and
Forage Crops)
2 F. M. Peacock, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Husb.
(Beef Cattle)








NEW APPOINTMENTS


Herndon R. AGEE, Associate Entomologist, Entomology Department,
September 10, 1973, Co.urtesy
Joa C. ALLEN, Assistant Professor, AREC, Lake Alfred, September
1, 1973
Thpmas H. ATKINSON, IV, Assistant Professor, Entomology
Department, September 1, 1973
Fouad B. BASIOUNY, Assistant Professor, Fruit Crops Department,
September 1, 1973
William BECK, Jr., Associate Professor, Entomology Department,
April 1, 1973, Courtesy
W.D. BELL, Assistant Prpfessor, Fruit Crops Department, January
22, 1973
Avinash P. BHATKAa, Post Doctorate in Entomology, Entomology
Department, September 17, 1973
Dale E. BRABHAM, Assistant Professor, Fruit Crops Department, Bay
1, 1973
Lawrence A. BURNS, Research Assistant, Forestry Department, July
1, 1973
D.A. CARLSTON Assistant Professor, Entomology Department,
January 2, 1973, Courtesy
Victor CHEW Associate Professor, Statistics Department, August
6, 1973, Courtesy
Samuel W. COLEMAN, Assistant Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, June
15, 1973
Charles L. COULTAS, Visiting Associate Professor, Soil Science
Department, September 1, 1973
William H. DENTON, Assistant Professor, AREC, Sanford, August 30,
1973
C.H. DOTY, Assistant Prpfessor, AREC, Homestead, January 15, 1973
Jack H. GASKIN Assistant Professor, Veterinary Science
Department, August 15, 1973
Murray H. GASKINS, Professor, Agronomy Department, July 1, 1973,
Courtesy
James L. GREEN, Assistant Professor, AREC, Bradenton, July 1,
1973
Edward E. GRISSELL, Assistant Entomologist, Entomology
Department, September 30, 1973, Courtesy
David HAGSTRUM, Assistant Professor, Entomology Department,
December 8, 1973, Courtesy
Ronald A. HAMLEN, Assistant Professor, ARC, Apopka, April 30,
1973
David L. HAhMELL, Assistant Professor, ArC, Live Oak, April 14,
1973
Julius L. HEINIS, Associate Professor, Microbiology Department,
September 1, 1973, Courtesy
David H. HIRTH, Assistant Professor, Forestry Department, August
6, 1973
John N.C. HSU, Assistant Professor, Food Science Department,








September 1, 1973, Courtesy
*Charles R. JQHNSON, Assistant Professor, Ornamental Horticulture
Department, June 1, 1973
(Leslie P. KISH Associate Professor, Entomology Department,
March 17, 1973
Helmut H. KRAUSE, Visiting Associate Professor, Soil Science
Department, September 1, 1973
Norman C. LEPPLA Assistant Professor, Entomology Department,
January 1, 1973, Courtesy
Richard A. LEVINS, Assistant Professor, AREC, Bradenton, August
6, 1973
David L. HAYS, Associate Professor, Entomology Department,
September 3, 1973
D.K. McCALLUH Associate Professor, Entomology Department,
January 10, 1973
Charles W. O'.BRIEN, Associate Professor, Entomology Department,
April 1, 1973, Courtesy
Hugh A. PEACOCK Professor and Center Director, ARC, Jay,
September 1, 1973
H.T. PHUNG Post Doctoral Fellow, Fruit Crops Department, Januarf
22, 1973
P.F. RANDEL, Visiting Professor, Soil Science Department,
February 17, 1973
Reece I. SAILER, Graduate Resident Professor, Entomology
Department, Hay 1, 1973
aupert G. SEALS, Professor and Center Director, AREC,
Tallahassee, September 1, 1973, Courtesy
Jerome V. SHIHBEAN, Assistant Professor, Forestry Department,
June 9, 1973
L.R. SINCLAIR, Assistant Professor, AREC, Sanford, march 1, 1973
D.A. SLEPER Assistant Professor, Agronomy Department, February
1, 1973
S.C. SNEDAKER, Assistant Professor, Forestry Department, April 1,
1973, Courtesy
James H. STANLEY Professor, Agricultural Engineering Department,
July 1, 1973, Courtesy
)onald E. STOKES, Assistant Professor, Entomology Department,
December 15, 1973, Courtesy
Fa~zi A. TAHA, Assistant Professor, Ornamental Horticulture
Department, September 1, 1973
John 0. THACH, Assistant in Meterology, NWS, ARC, Lakeland, June
1, 1973, Courtesy
James H. TSAI, Assistant Professor, ARC, Ft. Lauderdale,
September 1, 1973
)an M. WEATHERSPOON, Interim Assistant Professor, ARC,
Monticello, August 1, 1973.
leil L. WOODIEL, Associate Professor, ARC, Ft. Lauderdale,
October 1, 1973






TITLE CHANGES

Katherine C. EWEL, Interim Assistant Professor, Veterinary
Science Department, September 5, 1973
Richard LEVY, Associate Professor, Entomology Department,
September 1, 1 73
G.E. SANDEM, Assistant Professor, AREC, Quiacy, July 1, 1973
Ralph L. SMITH, Associate Professor, ARC, Jay, September 1, 1973
Harold W. YOUNG, Associate Professor, Fruit Crops Department,
August 13, 1973

EitoqMTIONS


Esam B. AHIED, Professor, Food Science Department, July 1, 1973
Earl E. ALBREGTS, Associate Professor, ARC, Dover, July 1, 1973
Charles L. ANDERSON Associate Professor, Food and Resource
Economics Department, July 1, 1973
Calvin E. ARNOLD, Assistant Professor and Center Director, ARC,
Honticello, August 13, 1973
Carl D. BAIRD, Assistant Professor, Agricultural Engineering
Department, June 15, 1973
Fuller U. BAZEa, Associate Professor, Animal Science Department,

David W. BUCHANAN, Assodiate Professor, Fruit Crops Department,
July 1, 1973
Donald S. BORGIS, Professor, AREC, Bradenton, July 1, 1973
John A. CORNELL Associate Professor, Statistics Department,
July 1, 1973
Jerry P. CHILL, Asspciate Professor, AREC, Bradenton, July 1,
1973
Wyland S CRIPE, Associate Professor and Assistant Dean for
StUaent and Pablic Sdrvice, College of Veterinary Medicine,
July 15, 1973
Harold A. DENMARK, Professor, Entomology Department, July 1,
1973, Courtesy
Albert E. DUDECK, Associate Professor, AREC, Ft. Lauderdale, July
1, 1973
Carroll R. DOUGLAS, Associate Professor, Poultry Science, July
1, 1973
Jose K. DOW, Associate Professor, Food and Besource Economids
Department, July 1, 1973
Donald J. FORRESTER Associate Professor, Veterinary Science
Department, July 1, 1973
Donald E. FRANKE Associate Professor, Animal Science Department,
July 1, 1973
Gary J. GASCHO, Asspciate Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, July 1,
1973
Harry K. GOUCK, Associate Professor, Entomology Department, July
1, 1973, Courtesy
Dale H. HABECK, Professor, Entomology Department, July 1, 1973
Charles H. HOWARD, Associate Professor, ARC, Dover, July 1, 1973








David H. HUBBELL., Associate Professor, Soil Science Department,
July 1, 1975
John A. KOBURGBER Associate Professor, Food Science Department,
July 1, 1973
Germain LaBRECUUE, Professor, Entomology Department, July 1,
1973, Courtesy
Roaald E. LONE Associate Professor, Entomology Department, July
1, 1973, Courtesy
Robert S. MANSELL, Associate Professor, Soil Science Department,
July 1, 1973
Marion S. MAYER, Associate Professor, Entomology Department,
March 1, 1973, Coustesy
Robert T. McHILLAN, Jr., Associate Professor, AREC, Homestead,
July 1, 1973
Frank W. HEAD, Associate Professor, Entomology Department, July
1, 1973, Courtesy
John E. MOORE, Professor, Animal Science Department, July 1, 1973
Gary A. HOUNS, Asspciate Professor, Entomology Department, July
1, 1973, Courtesy
John T. IULLINS& Professor, Botany Department, July 1, 1973
John T. NEILSQN, Associate Professor, Veterinary Science
DepaDtment, July 1, 1973
Amegda J. OVERMAN, Professor, AREC, Bradenton, July 1, 1973
Richard S. PATTERSON, Associate Professor, Entomology Department,
July 1, 1973, Courtesy
William L. PETERS, Professor, Eqtomology Department, February 1,
1973, Courtesy
Leonidas POLQPOLUS, Professor and Department Chairman, Food and
Resource Econpmics, July 1, 1973
Harlan L. RHOADES, Professor, AREC, Sanford, July 1, 1973
Frederick H. RHOADS, Associate Professor, AREC, Quincy, July 1,
1973
Frank A. ROBINSON, Professor, Entomology Department, July 1,
1973
Robert A. SCHMIDT, Associate Professor, Forestry Department, July
1, 1973
James R. SHUMAKER, Associate Professor, ARC, Hastings, July 1,
1973
G.C. SMART, Jr., Professor, Entomology Department, July 1, 1973
Rex L. SMITH, Associate Professor, Agronomy Department, July 1,
1973
George H. SNYDER, Associate Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, July 1,
1973
J.O. STRANDBERG, Associate Professor, AREC, Sanford, July 1, 1973
A.C. STRICKLAND, Librarian, Hume Library, July 1, 1973
Thpmas E. SUMMER'S, Professor, Entomology Department, March 1,
1973, Courtesy
Howard V. WEEBS Jr., Professor, Entomology Department, July 1,
1973, Courtesy









Minter J. WESTFALL, Professor, Entomology Department, February 1,
1973, Courtesy
Jack 0. WHITESIDE, Professor, AREC, Lake Alfred, July 1, 1973
Merrill WILCOX, Professor, Agronomy Department, July 1, 1973
W.C. WILSON, Associate Professor, AREC, Lake Alfred, July 1, 1973
William J. WILTBANK, Associate Professor, Fruit Crops Department,
July 1, 1973
Robert E. WOODRUFF, Associate Professor, Entomology Department,
July 1, 1973, Courtesy

RETIREaENTS


Daniel E. ALLEGBH, Associate Professor, Food and Resource
Economics, February 2, 1973, Emeritus
Ralph D. DICKEY, Ornamental Horticulture Department, January 30,
1973, Emeritus
William A. SICANTON, Professor, AREC, Lake Alfred, October 8,
1973, Emeritus
Alviri H. SPURLOCK, professor, Food and Resource Economics, August
31, 1973, Emeritus
Leonard G. THOMPSON, JrA, Professor, Soil Science Department,
June 30, 1973
F.W. WENZEL, Professor, AREC, Lake Alfred, January 31, 1973

TBRMINATIONS


Barry J. BLIGHT, Visiting Professor, Statistics Department, June
15, 1973
John R. BROOKER, Instructor, Food and Resource Economics
Department, November 10, 1973
Jimmie L. BURLESON, Assistant in heterology, NWS, ARC, Lakeland,
June 29, 1973
J.R. CONNER Assistant Professor, Food and Resource Economics,
March 30, 1973
Frederick L. CROSBY Assistant in Meterology, ARC, Lakeland,
August 20, 1973
James M. DAVIDSON Misiting Associate Professor, Soil Science
Department, July 20, 1973
Ben W. HAYES, Assistant Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, January 29,
1973
Thpaas B. HURT, Assistant Professor, Forestry Department, August.
3, 1973
Kenneth M. LABAS, Assistant in Heteroloyy, ARC, Lakeland, August
28, 1973
Joe E. MULLIN, Professor, Food and Resource Economics, June 30,
1973
Charles BOBEBSON, Assistant in Administration Editorial
Department, November 21, 1973









RESIGNATIONS


J.B. AITKEN, Assistant Professor, AREC, Quincy, April 16, 1973
Ross A. ARNETT, Jr., Professor, Entomology Department, June 30,
1973
Jerry L. BAKER, Assistant Professor, AREC, Quincy, December 21,
1973
William D. BELL, Assistant Professor, Fruit Crops Department,
October 13, 1973
James T. BRADLEY, Assistant Meterologist, NWS, ARC, Lakeland,
December 1, 1973
Theron W. CASSELAAN, Associate Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, July
25, 1973
Douglas L. DEASON, Assistant Professor, AREC, Lake Alfred, August
10, 1973
William W. DEEN, Jr., Assistant Professor, AREC, Belle Glade,
October 2, 1973
Sam S. FLUKER, Assistant Professor, ARC, aonticello, December 21,
1973
Irwin H. GILBERT, Professor, Entomology Department, June 30, 1973
Robert N. HENDRICKSON, Assistant Professor, Entomology
Department, July 18, 1973
S.R. JOHNSON, Assistant Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, March 5,
1973
David K. HcCALLUM, Associate Professor, Entomology Department,
August 3, 1973
Percy L. NEEL, Assistant Professor, ARC, Ft. Lauderdale, October
10, 1973
Frank T. ORTHOEFER Assistant Professor, Food Science Department,
December 17, 1973
Edward A. PEREZ, Assistant Professor, Entomology Department,
August 14, 1973
Anthony A. PRATO Assistant Professor, Food and Resource
Economics, december 31, 1973
James C. RAULSTON, Associate Professor, AREC, Bradenton, January
11, 1973
John I. THORNBY Associate Professor, Statistics Department,
September i, 1973
Charles H. VAN MIDDELEM, Professor, Food Science Department,
August 31, 1973
Darrell L. WILLLAMSON, Associate Professor, AREC, Quincy, August
31, 1973

LEAVES OF ABSENCE


S.C. SCHANK Professor Agronomy Department to Brazil, January
20, 1973 to June 30, 1973
Louis N. UPCHURCH, Visitinq Professor, Food and Resource
Economics Department, June 30, 1973 to January 1, 1974








TgSES AND DISSERTATIONS



Aqgonomy Depart3ment
Arno Brune. Physiology of Flowering In Cuwressus arizoa a
Greene Seedlig.s." Ph.D. Dissertation. H.G. tanley
Chairman. 4
Jess M. Van Dyke. "A Nutritional Study of the White Amur
(Ctenon arIvgodon idella Val.) Fed Duckweed (Lemna mine
L. -.-S7.-. Th esis-. .L. Sutton, Chairman.
Ronald Lee Good. "Effects of Normal Cytoplasms oi Resistance to
Southern Corn Leaf Blight and on Other Maize Traitsi"
M.S.A. Thesis. E.S. Horner, Chairman.
Robert Earl Hudgens. "The Compatibility, Persistence and
Nutritive Value of Grass-Legume Associations in the jet-Dry
Tropics of Coastal Bcuador." M.S.A. Thesis. G.O. Mott,
Chairman.
Michael Allen Klock. "Genetic Variation of 1a Vitro Digestion
Among Progeny of Five pigitaria Crosses and IEsIelationshlp
to Plant Mrphology." RI.7S.-Thesis. S.C. Schank, Chairman.
Sheu-Ling Janet Lee. "The Cytology of Another Development in T
Cytoplasmic Male-Sterile and Maintainer Lines of Zea !ayg
L." 1.S.A. Thesis. H.E. Warmke, Chairman.
Eduardo Maldonado. "Morphologic4l and Agronomical Characteristics
of Four Dijitaria Accessions and Their F1 Hybrid Progeny."
a.S.A. Thesis. S.C; Schank, Chairman.
Stanley B. Pollack. "The Bambarra Groundnut: Its Morphology,
Culture and Nutritional Deficiency Symptoms.
M.S.A. Thesis. D.E, McCloud, Chairman.
Charles R. Roland. "Effect of CCC, Light Intensity and Nitrogen
Rate on Cotton (G oss ypIu hicsutua L.),.
Ph.D. DissertationAE.B. Whitty, Cairman.


Animal Science ,Deartment
John Allen Baldwin. "Utilization of Ensiled Water Hyacinths in
Huminant Diets." M.S.A. Thesis. J.F. Hentges, Jr., Chairman.
David howard Bowers. "A Comparison of Selected Procedures Used in
Evaluating Intramuscular Collagen." Ph.D. Dissertation.
A.Z. Palmer, Chairman.
Henry Thomas Byron, Jr. "Nutritive Value of Water Hyacinth Silage
for Cattle and Sheep." M.S.A. Thesis. J.F. Hentges, Jr.,
Chairman.
Fernando Calderon Laguna. "Evaluation of the Nitrogen Fraction of
the Cassava Roots and Factors Affecting Its Biological
Value." ..S.A. Thesis. H.D. Wallace, Chairman.
Thomas Tien Chen. "An Immunological Approach for Studying the
Effect of Porcine Uterine Protein Secretions on Fetal and
Placental Development." M.S.A. Thesis. F.W. Bazer, Chairman.
Lemuel C. Crofton, Jr. "Effect of Hormones on Estrous
Synchronization and Fertility in Crossbred Beef Cows."
M.S.A. Thesis. A.C. Warnick, Chairman.
Teffera Gebre-Meskel. "Reproductive and Weaning Performance of
Angus, Brahman, Hereford and Santa Gertrudis Crossbred and
Straightbred Cattle on Three Clover-Grass Pastures."
M.S.A. Thesis. M. Koger, Chairman.








Seyoum Gelaye. "Reproductive Status in a Herd of Charolais Beef
Cattle." 84S.A. Thesis. A.C. Warnick, Chairman.
Edward J. Golding, III. "Formulation of Hay: Grain Diets Based on
Predicted Qualities of Four Bermudagrass Hays for
Huminants." ..S.A. Thesis. J.E. Moore, Chairman.
William Edwin Maxson. "Digestibility and Net Energy Studies with
Bird-tesistant Sorghum Grain Diets Fed to Steers."
Ph. D. Dissertation. R.L. Shirley, Chairman.
Max Ventura Salgado. "Forage Intake and Its Relation to the
Chemical Composition of the Diet and Some Physiological
Factors in Sheep." Ph.D. Dissertation. J.E. Moore, Chairman.
Samuel Olumuyiwa Sorinmade. "The Influence of Postmortem Chill
Rate of Beef Carcasses on Muscle Quality." M.S.A. Thesis.
A.Z. Palmer, Chairman.
Frederick E. Weller. "Prediction of Voluntary Intake and Nutrient
Digestibility of Warm-Season Grasses b.y Laboratory Methods."
M.S.A. Thesis. J.E4 Moore, Chairman.
William Robert Womble. "Relationship of an In Vitro Measurement
of Thyroid Activity with Breed Composition and Productive
Traits in Beef Cattle." M.S.A. Thesis. M. Koger, Chairman.


Botany_Departmeat
Mark McClellan Brinson. "The Organic Matter Budget and Energy
Flow of a Tropical Lowland Aquatic Ecosystem.
Ph.D. DissertationA A.B. Lugo, Chairman.
Kenneth Edward Conway. "Comparative Ontogeny of Thelebolus,
Lasiobolus, and Thecotheus (Pezizales, Ascaoycte'esTT
FET-.D-. I ertation. J7. --Ki-Eough, Chairman.
Mona Handa. 'Experimental Studies on the Root."
Ph.D. Dissertation. I.K. Vasil, Chairman.
Saeed-Ur-Rehman Khau. "Morphology, Development, and
Ultrastructure of Term~aria sngderi Thaxter."
Ph.D. Dissertations J.W. KiEmrough, Chairman.
Jimmie Ray Norton. "So4l Algae from North Central Florida."
M.S.A. Thesis. J.S. Davis, Chairman.
Rolando T. Parrondo. "Rgle of the Root Tip in Development of
Enhanced Rubidium UptaKe in Washed Excised Corn Root
Tissue." Ph.D. Dissertation. B.C. Smith, Chairman.


DaiJEScience_Dea t~ment
John Robert Chenault. "Transitory Changes in Plasma Progestins,
Estradiol and LH Approaching ovulation and After
Prostaglandin F2a Injection in the Bovine." B.S.A. Thesis.
W.W. Thatcher, Chairman.
Gelana Kejela. "Adrenal Glucocorticoid response to
Adrenocorticotrophin and Plasma Levels of Corticoids,
Estrogen and Progesterone in the Prepartum and Postpartum
Dairy Cow." H.S.A. Thesis. H.H. Head, Chairman.
John Andrews Patterson. "Effect of Age, Diet and Substrate
Infusioqs on Insulin, Glucose and Non-Esterified Fatty Acid
Concentrations in Dairy Calves." M.S.A. Thesis. H.H. Head,
Chairman.
Francisco J. Pinzon. "Effect of Different Dietary Citrus Pulp
Levels on Utilization of High-Urea Rations and Ammonia
Tolerance in iaminants." M.S.A. Thesis., J.M. Wing, Chairman.








Farivar Shayanfar. "Adrenal Glucocorticoid Response to
Adrenocorticotrophin During Lactation in Dairy Cows."
M.S.A. Thesis. H.HL Head, Chairman.
Juan F. Troconiz. "Hormonal Status and Adrenal Function
Associated with the Nymphomaniac Bovine Polycystic Ovarian
Syndrome." u.S.A. Thesis. W.W. Thatcher, Chairman.


Ento molo yand l2iatologqDeEartaent
Emmanuel Olukayode Alade. "Resistance of the German Cockroach
Blatella iermanica (Linne.), to Selected Insecticides."
7T-5-.rsis-S3.--Xerr, Chairman.
Awinash P. Bhatkar. "Confrontation Behavior Between Solenosos_
invicta Buren and Certain Ant Species Native to FlorUia."
FHi.Titissertation. W.H. Whitcomb, Chairman.
John Lee Broln. "Voatia malloi, A Newly Introduced P ralid
(Lepidoptera) ior-she-ConrT ol of Alligatorweed in the united
States. Ph.D. Dissertation. D. Habeck, Chairman.
Yann Jee Chiu. "Biological Half-Life of Cesium-134 in Six Insect
Species." M.S. Thesis. H.L. Cromroy, Chairman.
Richard German Endris. "The Biology and Overwintering of the
Cabbage Looper and Soybean Looper in Florida." M.S. Thesis.
W.H. Whitcomb, Chairman.
Edward George Farnworth. "Flashing Behavior, Ecology and
Systematics of Jamaican Lampyrid Fireflies."
Ph.D. Dissertatioq. J.E. Lloyd, Chairman.
Donald Paris Harlan. "The Host-Parasite Relationship of
GraphogatkAs s a. Larvae and oeoaalectana dutk_ ."
FHT.D. isserfation, W.H. Whitcomb, Chairman.
Lewis Earl MacCarter. "elon Aphid Resistance in Cucurbits."
Ph.D. Dissertation. D.H. Habeck, Chairman.
David A. Nickle. "Striduiatory Apparatus and Frequency Spectra of
Pair-Forming Sounds in Bush Katydids (Orthoptera:
Tettiqoniidae: Phaneropterinae)." M.S. Thesis. .J. Walker,
Chairman.
Kenneth Joe Tennessen. "A Preliminary Report on the Systematics
of Tetragonegria (Odonata: Corduliidae) in the Southeastern
Unite-3taties."-a.S. Thesis. M.J. Westfall, Jr., Chairman.
Luis N. Vasquez G. "Parasitism of Trichogramma evanescegn
Westwood to Exposed Cabbage Looper Eggs on CaDage and Other
Lepidopterous Species." M.S. Thesis. L.C. Kuitert, Chairman.
Richard C. Wilkerson. "The Application of Paper Chromatography.of
Flourescent Compounds to the Systematics of Fireflies
(Coleoptera: Laapyridae)." H.S. Thesis. J.E. Lloyd,
Chairman.
Jeffrey Alexander Zeikus. "Anatomy and Ulstrastructure of
Selected Organs of the Nematode Dolichodorus heterocephalus
Cobb, 1914." N.S. Thesis. VG Perry, Uairman;
H.C. Aldrich, Co-Chairman.


Food_ source a__ EconoaicsDepartment
Ziblim Andan. "Capital Requirements and Crop Combinations for
Specified Income Levels in Ghana." M.S.A. Thesis.
W.W. McPherson., Chairman.
John Raymond Brooker. "Systems Analysis of the United States
Winter Eresh Tomato Industry." Ph.D. Dissertation.
L. Polopolus, Chairman.








James Carey Cato. "The Effects of Resource Investment Programs on
Labor Eaployment." Ph.D. Dissertation. B.R. Eddleman,
Chairman.
Bharat Jhunjhunwala. "Agricultural Mechanization Rural Income
Distribution and Unemployment in Faizabad District, East
Uttar Pradesh." Ph.D. Dissertation. W.W. McPherson,
Chairman.
Clyde Frederick Kiker. "River Basin Simulation as a Means pf
Determining Operating Policy for a Water Control System."
Ph.D. Dissertationa J.R. Conner, Chairman.
Richard Allen Levins. "The Competitive Position of Potato
Producers in the Hastings Area of Florida." M.S.A. Thesis.
M.R. Langham, Chairman.
Robert Glenn McBlroy, II. "Some Environmental Considerations of
Regional Development." B.S.A. Thesis. E.T. Loehman,
Chairman.
Terry Allen Mopre. "Self-Sufficiency in Vegetable Oil Production
in Ecuador -- An Application of Dynamic Linear Programming."
M.S.A. Thesis. J.E. Reynolds, Chairman; J.K. Dow, Co-
Chairman.
Arthur F. Parker, Jr. "An Econometric Analysis of the Florida
Grapefruit Industry." Ph.D. Dissertation. W.W. McPherson,
Chairman; L.H. Myers, Co-Chairman.
Charles Everitt Powe. "A Model for Evaluating Alternative Policy
Decisions for the Florida Orange Subsector of the Food
Industry." Ph.D. Dissertation. M.R. Langham, Chairman.
Charles L. Richardson. "The Advertising Response for Processed
Oranges: A Distributive Lag Approach." H.S.A. Thesis.
R.W. Ward, Chairman.
Joseph Carl Roetheli. "Economic Analysis of Selected Orange
Harvesting Systems in Florida." M.S.A. Thesis. D.L. Brooke,
Chairman.
Jackie Gayle Smith. "Short Run Price Forecasting Model for Canned
Single Strength Grapefruit Juice." M.S.A. Thesis.
L.H. Myers, Chairman.
Chih-huang Tuan. "A Description of the Southeastern Kissimmee-
Everglades Drainage Basin with Emphasis on Hydrologic-
Economic Linkages." M.S.A. Thesis. J. Conner, Chairman.
Sarah Shu-Jen Yany. "Analyses of Family Income Variations in
Florida." a.S.A. Thesis. W.W. McPherson, Chairman.


Food Science neartment
Anne C. Bieler. "Quality Changes in Iced Shrimp." M.S.A. Thesis.
J.A. Koburger, Chairman.
Lawrence John Janicki. "Effect of Broiling, Grill Frying, and
Microwave Cooking on Some Lipid Components of Ground Beef."
M.S.A. Thesis. H. Appledorf, Chairman.
Robert Morris Lapin. "Microbial Aspects of the Controlled
Atmospheric Storage of Shrimp." M.S.A. Thesis.
J.A. Koburger, Chairman.
Amanda Jane McDonald, "The Effect of Thyroxine and Vitamin D2 on
Atherogenesis in the Rat." M.S.A. Thesis. B.C. Robbins,
Chairman.
Thomas E. Wade. "Development and Characterization of a High Speed
Liguid Chromatograph for Carbamate Pesticide Analysis
Utilizing a Fluorometric Enzyme Inhibition Detector."
M.S.A. Thesis. a.A/ Moye, Chairman.









Foest Resources g_d ConseLvation_DeaErtment
Thomas Raymond Centner. "Value Added, Employment and Wage
Measures of the Economic Importance of Florida Forestry and
Forest Products Manufacturing." N.S.F. Thesis.
E.T. Sullivan, Chairman.
Allan Scott Holaday. "Genetic and Fertilizer Effects on Apical
Growth of Slash Pine (Pinus Elliottii Engelm)4"
M.S.F. Thesiss: R.E, Goddard, Chairman.
Sung In Sohn. "Mood Spedific Gravity Variation in Slash Pine and
Optimum Sampling for Determination of Family Means."
M.S.F. Thesis. R.E. Goddard, Chairman.


Fruit Cros Departent
Obed Kofi Atubra. "Growth Regulator Effects on Virus Infected
Citrus Plants." M/S.A. Thesis. Dr. A.H. Krezdorn, Chairman.
David L. Culbert. "Evaluation of H2S as a Citrus Root Toxicant
Using a Maiti-Celled Solution Circulating Apparatus."
H.S.A. Thesis. J.F. Gerber, Chairman.
Terry Warren Edwards Jr. "Inheritance of Fruit Characters and
Plant Vigpr in blueberry." Ph.D. Dissertation. W.B. Sherman,
Chairman.
DomiAqo Harte. "Propagation of Avocado Clones by Stem Cuttings."
U.S.A. Thesis. A.Hi Krezdorn, Chairman.
Clement Imuede Oshogve. "The Influence of Number and Time of
Applications of Gibberellic Acid Sprays on Fruit Size and
Quality in 'Oriando' Tangelo." M.S.A. Thesis. A.H. Krezdorn,
Chairman.
Paul Lamont Ryan. "Intermittent Spray and Soaker Hose Irrigation
of 'Early Amber' Peach Trees to Alter Plant Water Stress and
Fruit Sizes" M.S.A* Thesis. J.F. Bartholic, Chairman.


MlirobiologLDee~arten
Jack T. Crawford. "The Anatomy of the Cell Envelope of a Harine
Vibrio Examined by Freeze-Etching." Ph.D. Dissertation.
N.E. Tyler, Chairman.
Peter John Shuba. "Propionic Acid Fermentation in Sludge."
Ph.D. DissertationU P.H. Smith, Chairman.


Ornaaental _Hrticulture-Department
Mark Patton Bisher. "Viburnum sugsensum Linear Growth and Quality
as Influenced "-y TPropagation Techniques and Holding
Periods." M.S.A. Thesis. J.N. Joiner, Chairman.


Plant Pathologq-qepMataent
Jesse C. LaPrade. "Physical and Chemical Properties of Resistande
Exhibited by Certaiq Genotypes of Aahia hYoPqea to
Invasion by Aflatoxin Producing gAer la1 spp."
Ph.D. Disse.rtatioI, J.A. Bartz, Chairman.
Michael Theodore olexa. "A Survey of Diseases on Ecologically
Important Marine and Coastal Plants of Florida's Gulf
Coast." M.S. Thesis. T.E. Freeman, ChaLrman.
Richard Edward Rintz. "Location, Identification and
Characterization of Pathogens of the Water Ayacinth."








Ph.D. Dissertation. T.E. Freeman, Chairman.'


Poult~_rScience Department
David Paul Eberst. "Performance of Broilers and Turkey Poults as
Influenced by the Interaction of Delactosed Whey and Fish
Meal with Supplemental Biotin." M.S.A. Thesis. B.L. Damron,
Chairman.
Ralph H. Stonerock. "The Effect of Cropectomy on Selected
Reproductive and Physiological Characteristics of Laying
Hens." M.SAA. Thesis. D.A. Boland, Chairman.


Soils_Department,
Bicardo Ah Chu. "A pedological Investigation of Selected Soils in
the Intermediate Savanna of Guyana." Ph.D. Dissertation.
R.E. Caldwell, Chairman; W.G. Blue, Co-Chairman.
William Henry Hawkins. "Physical Chemical, and Mineralogical
Properties of Phpsphatic Clay Slimes From the Bone Valley
Formation." M.S.A. Thesis. L.W. Zelazny, Chairman.
John J. Nicholaides, III. "Soil-Fertilizer Reactions and Plant
Response to Coated and Non-Coated Concentrated
Superphosphate." Ph.D. Dissertation. J.G.A. Fiskell,
Chairman.


Veqejable CroE~p5eartaent
Reginald Leland Brown. !The Effects of Population Density and Row
Arrangement on Yield and Relative Labor requirements for
Multiple Harvest of Summer Squash (CucMrbita Peeo L.)."
B.S.A. Thesis. V.PF Nettles, Chairman.
Walter Moulden Eiker, Jr. "Loss Patterns of Bensulide, Nitralin
and Trifluralin in Sandy Soils." Ph.D. Dissertation.
S.J. Locascio, Chairman.
Denis Roberto Ramirez. "The Effects of Growth Regulators and
Pinching on the Gcowth Characterstics, Flowering, and Yield
of Peppers (.Casicum annuum L.)." M.S.A. Thesis.
V.F. Nettles, Chaisman.
William Martin StalA. "A4 Evaluation of Fruit Detachment
Characters in Peppers (Capsicum annuum L.)."
Ph.D. Dissertation. V.F. Nettles, Chairman.


Veterinary Science Departme t
Albert Otis Bush. "An Ecological Analysis of the Helminth
Parasites of the White Ibis in Florida." M.S. Thesis.
D.J. Forrester, Chairman.
Charles Hill Courtney, III. "Helminth Parasites of the Brown
Pelican in Florida and Lousiana." M.S. Thesis.
D.J. Forrester, Chairman.
Larry Tipton He. "An Edolo ical Study of the Helminth Parasites
of Wild Turkeys in glorida." .S. Thesis. D.J. Forrester,
Chairman.
Jay Barry Klein& "Induction of Morphological Changes in
Microfilariae from Dirofilaria imitis by In itro Culturing
Techniques." M..S. A, T-esis.-E.- B--ra-ey, Chairman.
Nguyen Dinh Nghiem. "Immunological Studies on Strongyloidiasis in
Rabbits." Ph.D. Dissertation. G.T. Edds, Chairman;








J.T. McL. Neilson, Co-Chairman.
Yang-Dar Yuan. "Antigenic and Growth Studies of Edwardsielia
tarda Isolants trom Florida." M.S. Thesis. -FITr wVKe,
CEif man.








INTERNATIONAL PROGaAAS


All activities which build or strengthen the international
dimension of IFAS are administered by the office of International
Programs. Major activities include administration of contract and
grant technical assistance, training o foreign nationals, and
supporting research in tropical agriculture.
The Center for Trogical Agriculture, as a major component of
the office of International Programs assists with policy
determination and is responsible for coordination within IFAS of
tropically-oriented research and service projects. It provides
research and travel grants to faculty and graduate students,
assists academic departments in curricula development, supports
development of library and laboratory facilities, and publishes
and disseminates results of tropical research.
International Programs serves as a liaison office for IFAS
with the State Department of Agriculture and Florida agribusiness
in carrying out international activities that complement State
programs. Projects administered by International Programs develop
technology applicable to Florida attract agriculturally-oriented
industry to the state, open agribusiness investment opportunities
for Florida private enterprise, and expand markets for Florida's
goods and services.
IFAS is increasingly being called on to advise in the
production, marketing, and processing of agricultural products in
the tropics. Participation in international research programs
strengthens expertise in these areas. In solving many of the
problems it is beneficial to use an interdepartmental approach.
or example, in carrying out research on tropical and subtropical
livestock production and pasture improvement scientists from the
Animal Scien.ce, Agrpqomy, Food and Besource Economics, Soils, and
Veterinary Science Departments are cooperating. It is anticipated
that auch of the tropical research in the future will require a
multidisciplinary systems approach. IFAS, through its office 9f
International Programs, is well prepared to accept thAs
challenge.
Research training and technical assistance were provided
through ten contracts and one grant during 1973. Staff froa
almost all units of the Institute participated in some phase of
these activities.
The two contracts with the Agency for International
Development involving technical assistance for educational
institution building in El Salvador and Vietnam were continued. A
research project funded. by the Office of the War on Hunger to
develop feed coaposxtion tables for South and Central America was
completed this year with the publication of the second edition of
the Latin American Feed Composition Tables in English, Spanish,
and Portuguese& Our grant received from the Institutional Grants
Program of the Agency for International Development continued to
provide funds to strengthen the capabilities of the University gf
Florida in ruminant livestock development in the tropics. This
grant involves collaboration between the Universities of
Texas A & 8, Purdue, Florida, and Tuskegee Institute.
Other continuing projects included a small contract with the
Central Bank of Nicaraqua for technical assistance on tropical
crops and beef cattle production and the livestock production and
agricultural economics research programs in Ecuador under loans
frpm the World Bank and Inter-American Development Bank to the
Government of Ecuador.
Under loan funds through the Agency for International
Development to the Government of Brazil a large research program
on the development of livestock and pasture was initiated this
past year. Four University of Florida staff are in residence.in
Brazil, and it is expected that two more will be added in 1974.
Two contracts technical assistance to t e Government of
Guyana for livestpck and pasture development financed by Agency
for International Development grant funds to Gayana and a rural








electrification feasibility contract in Costa Rica and Colombia,
financed directly by the Agency for International Development,
were completed this year.
A new contract with the Mission office of the Agency for
International Development in San Jose, Costa Rica was signed to
develop a food technology laboratory at the University of Costa
Rica. Dr. R.E. Bates of the Institute's Food Science Department
is the specialist parking on this project.
As part of oar continuing effort to establish control
measures for known diseases and pests of agricultural products
before they become a serious threat in the state, much research
effort has been devoted to obtaining a Digitaria grass resistant
to stunt-virus. Due to research efforts in Guyana, Surinam
Guadaloupe, Venezuela, and Puerto Rico, a pangola grass resistant
to stunt-virus and sting nematode was made available early in
1973.
We feel that our continued research on indigenous grasses
and other products grown in the tropical and subtropical areas of
the world is of tremendous importance to the growth and
development of agriculture and agriculturally-related products in
the state. Diseases o4 various grasses oil crops, citrus
etc. can be investigated in the country where they are prevalent
before they become a serious hazard to industry in Florida.


IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A18: VIETNAM (AID/vn-24)
Source of Fuqdsc Agency for International Development
Objectives: To provide technical advice and assistance to the
National Agricultural Center to strengthen the Center and to
insure basic economic and rural development in Vietnam.
Personnel:
Marlowe, G.A. Chief of Party and Vegetable
Crops Specialist
Bopne, N.A. Animal Scientist
Stephens, E.P. Forester
Llewellyn, W.B.. Soils and Horticulture
Specialist
Wing, J.M. Dairy Scientist
Marvel, a.E. Administrative Review
Publications:
Stephens, E.P.., gstablighment of Heod Products Laboratory, June,
1973.
Marlowe, G.A., Jr., Ky, Le Van and Long, La Quang, The Design and
Ana Isis_ _5omeFreaentl _Used Aaiculin3argr=l imenas7
Proposal ThEstablishment of a Wood Industrial. Development
Center ece ber 1973.
LleveIIY57,-...-_ "End of Tour Report March, 1973
Wing, J.M., "All Cpnsultant's Final report," August 31 1973.
Marlowe, G.A., Jr., Vegetabe Technloy Notebook: 1972-1973.
Bopne, N.A., "End o Tour e7or 1"
Boone .A. T he mese oulrry Indiustry ia__ Rerospect and
uturis, Octpb er, 973.
PrQiqtE5 4aaUs and .Accoaplishment Heport, 9th Semi-Annual Report,
January 1-Jane 30, 1973.


IFAS Research Report







PROJECT A23: GUYANA (GOG)
Source of Funds: Ministry of Agriculture, Government of Guyana
Objectives: To provide technical assistance to the Gover4ment of
Guyana in its efforts to diversify and develop its agricultural
economy.
Personnel:
Saxena, G.K. Vegetable Crops Specialist
Hooker, P.J. Chief of Party and
Agricultural Economist
Hison, K. Agronomist
Mott, 6.0. Agronomist and Ebini
Livestock Project Leader
McCown J.T. Extension Administration
Straugin, A.A. Agricultural Extension
Specialist
Marvel M.E. Administrative Review
Gull, D.D. Vegetable Crops Specialist
Koger, M. Animal Scientist
Schoonover, B.C. Agronomist
Grigsby, S.E. Agricultural Education
Specialist
King, Emily Extension Home Economist
Ekr ar, E.K. Editorial Specialist
Adams, D.E. Electrical Engineering
Specialist
Publications:
Saxena G.K., Locascio, S.J., Gull, D.D., and Halsey, L.H.
"Commercial Produation of Vegetables in Selected Areas o
the Coastal and Intermediate Savannah Regions," June, 1973.
Hooker, P.J. "A Prelimnary Study of the Economic Potential for
Beef battle, Grain and Legume-Seed Production in the
Intermediate Savannahs of Guyana Using a Linear Programming
Model July, 1973,
Holder, N.I., Koqer, M/, Dickey, J.RB and de la Torre R.,
angaena ~ fBectson Beef Podiuctionin Guyana, Proceedings
4th Latin Amer-rcan Anlmal Production Conference,
Guadalajara, Mexicp, June 1973.
Holder, N.L., Koger, M., Dickey, J.R* and de la Torre, R., reed,
Age of Da_ and -Lactaton Effect on Beef Production _
uyana, roceedgs aTtin American Proucin
Con erence, Guadalajara Mexico June, 1973.
Holder4 N.L., Ammerman, CB, Mott, G.O., Koger, M and
Fick, K.R,; Sapplemental Feeding of Beef Cattle Grazif_
Pan olarasa -pastares on -te TnegermiaiKa -SaVn s-f
iGuyana, Proceengs th Latin Amer can AnxiaL i roductign
onfere ce, Guadalajara Mexico June, 1973.
Mott, G.O., ojage nd Live ock Production on the Intermedijte
Savannah s a, Groceedings 7tl Annal CUn~erence on
lIvesEocKE a -Potry in Latin America, Gainesville,
Florida Mlay, 19730
Bates R.P., Hi as, V. and Clarke B., "Assistance in the
implementation of food Preservation Programs, Facilities and
Support Systems in Guyana," March 31, 1973.
Grigsby, S., King, E. Erbar, E.K., "Visual Aids Seminar
Workshop," June 1973.
Scott P.A., "An Analysis of the Factors Influencing Retention
Tie in a Cgotinuous Rotary Soil Pulverizer," Abstract pf
M.S. thesis, March 1973.
Adams, Donald Ei, "An Analysis of Electrical Generation,
Electrical Loads and Becommendations for a Primary
Distribution System and Additional Generation Required to
Provide for Present and Forseeable Electrical Loads for
Ebini Research Station, Guyana," July, 1973.
Ah Chu Ricardo, A Pedoioqical Investigation o ele tedSoils i
the In teradate SanafGuana, h.D. dissertation,
Scott, P.A., An-Analsis of_ the_ Factors _Inf S gnc1i_ egtgno
tn9e__n_ _.oarytPE S T- _9K..esis,









IZAS Research Report


PROJECT A24: NIOAB'AGUA (CB)
Source of Fuqds- Central Bank of Nicaragua
Objectives: To provide technical advice and assistance to the
Central Bank pf Nlcaragua in the improvement and/or development
of tropical fruits, investigations on tropical beef cattle and
such additional areas as may be agreed upqn.
Personnel: No activity this year due to aftermath of earthquake.


IFAS Research report


PROJECT A31: FEPD COMPOSITION STUDX (AID/csd-2498)
Source of Fuadst Agency for International Development
Objectives: to find low cost feeds--(1) survey of existing data
ana analysis oI feeds, fodder and agricultural by-products; (2)
analysis of other available feeds; and (3) development of cattle
feeding trials and systems utilizing indigenous feeds to fill in
the gaps of existing research.
Personnel:
McDowell L.B. Animal Scientist
Conrad, J.H. Animal Scientist
Amaerman C.B. Animal Scientist
Thpaas, J. Assistant in Animal Scientist
Harris, L.E. Consultant on Feed
Compilation Tables
Travel included: Venezuela, Brazil, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia and
Costa Rica.
Publications:
Christiansen M.C. L.B. HcDowell, J. Eggleston, and F.E. Weller.
1973 Latin ameridan Livestock Fee Composition Project. p.
401-4106. University of Florida Symposium Effect pf
prcessinq on the nutritional value of feeds. National
Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C.
McDowell, Lee R.., Joe Ha Conrad, Tony J. Cunha, Hugh Popenoe and
J.W. Sites 1973. Determination of mineral deficiencies and
toxicities for cattle in Latin America. A research proposal
submitted to the Agency for International Development.


IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A33: EL SALVADQR (AID/la-586)
Source of Funds: Agency for International Development
Objectives: The objectives of this contract during 1973 were to
(I assist the Natipgal Center of Agricultural Technology (CENTI)
with the iapleaentatlo0 of agricultural production programs for
selected grain and vegetable crops, (2) continue on-going sector
analyses, investigaions and evaluations in the agricultural
field and (3) through this assistance continue to help CENIA
develop as a ipastitution.
Personnel:
Pierce, H.E. Chieg of Party and








Education Specialist
Beinhart, E.G. Agronomist
Hildebrand B.&E Agricultural Economist
Reaves, C.4. Dair.y Scientist
Waite, B.H. Plant Pathologist
alo, S.E. Horticulturist
Andrew, C.O. Agricultural Ecqnomist
Rogers, C.J. Agricultural Engineer
Gull, D.D. Chief of Party and
Vegetable Crop Specialist
Purdy, L.H. Plant Pathologist
Marvel, N.E. Administrative Review
Publications:
Purdy L.H. "AID Project Consultant's Report (Plant Pathology,"
June, 19734
Rogers, C.J., "AID Project Consultant's Report and Attached
Recommendations for CBETA Vehicle Maintenance Shop Facility
and Tool and Equipment List for Shop," June, 1973.
Bradfield, Bichird, "AID Project Consultants RepQrt: Increasing
Food ProductL.pa in El Salvador by Multiple Cropping," Apnil,
1973.
Reaves, C.V., "End pf Tpur Report," December 1973.
Pierce, H.E. "BEd of Tpur Report," June, 1973.
Bejnhart, EG. End of Tour Report November, 1973.
Prpgress Repqrt, University of florida/&ID Project in El
Salvador, December) 1973.
Marvel, LE., ".rip Repprt."


IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A42: ECUADOR
Source of Funds: Inter-American Development Bank
Objectives: To provide technical assistance to Instituto Nacional
de Investig-acioqes Agsopecuarias (INIAP) in its efforts to
diversify, improve its staff and develop more rapidly its various
research programs.
Personnel:
Dow, J.K. Chief of Party and
Agridultural Economist
Schwartz Michael Agricultural Economist
Mathis Lary Agridultural Economist
Reyqolds, J.E. Agricultural Ecqnouist
Weigard, K. Agricultural Economist
Publications:
Dow, J.K., "knaul Repost," January, 1973.
Schwartz, Michael, 1 gso.e Pesupsto e la Planificacion. e
Fincas, BoAetLa Teenico No. 7, January,1973


IFAS Research Report


PRBJBCT A48: ECUADOR
Source of Fuqdss World Bank
Objectives: To provide international technical services to INIAP
in its efforts to strengthen its research and training facilities
in support of the development of the livestock industries pf
Ecuador and improving its domestic staff.
Personnel:









Bishop, J.P. Animal Scientist
Tergas, L. Agronomist
Southcombe F.L. Agronomist
Poultney, R.G. elant Nutritionist
Mott, G.O. Agronomist
McCloud, D.E. Agronomist
Koger. Animal Scientist
Conrad, J.H. Animal Scientist
Cripe, W.E. Veterinarian
Publications:
Bishop, J.P., "Activity Report," 1973.
Hudgens, R. Tergas, Lo and ott, G., "La Compatilidad,
Persistencia y Valor Nutritivo de Asociaciones de Gramineas
y Leguminosas en el Tropico Ecuatoriano," 1973.


IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A52: RURAL ELECTRIFICATION (AID/csd-3594)
Source of Funds: Agency for International Development
Objectives: To assist AID in its efforts to determine the social,
cultural and economic effects of rural electrification in areas
of Latin America.
Personnel:
Ross, J.E. Agricultural Economist
Moses, G.C. Agricultural Economist
Davis, J.M. Sociologist
Saunders, J.V. Sociplogist
Publications:
Davis J. Michael Saunders John Moses, Galen C., and
Ross, James E., RiIAL _ELECTRIFICATIgO; A.n evalation of
effects _o_ ec mia ndsoc s_n Cosa t a a~
oIofflE71 ug usE I,73. IFinal ReporE)


IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A64: BRAZIL
Source of Funds: Agency for International Development Loan Funds
to Brazil
Objectives: To provide for supportive professional, technical and
administrative services to be extended to the Institution in
accordance with the objectives of its National Agricultural
Research Program and in particular to the National Cattle
Project.
Personnel:
Hargrove, D.D. Chief of Party and
Animal Scientist
Schank, S.C. Agronomist
Jilek, A.F. Animal Scientist
Houser R.H. Animal Scientist
Webb, I.E. Seed Technologist
Harder, J. English Language Specialist
Cunha, T.J. Animal Scientist
Mott, G.O. Agronomist
Conrad, J.H. Animal Scientist
Publications:






43


Mebb, T.E. "Consultants Report: Forage Crop Seed Production in
Brazil," May, 1973.


IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A68: COSTA RICA (AID-515-242-T)
Source of Funds: Agency for International Development
Objectives: To provide technical advice and assistance in setting
up a Food Technology Laboratory at the University of Costa Rica.
Personnel;
Bates, R.E. Food Technologist
Publications:
Bates, R.E., "Trip Report," June, 1973.









CAPITAL IPROVEsENTS


As of December 1973, the following major buildings were either
complete or under cpAtract:


Agricultural Research
Center
Marianna, Florida Swine Buildings 80% complete
Horse Research Center
Lowell, Florida Barns 80% complete
Poultry Department
Gainesville, Florida Processing Lab 100% complete



GRANTS AND GFTS
1973

Commercial grants and gifts accepted as support for existing
programs during the year ending December 31, 1973. Financial
assistance is hereby gratefully acknowledged.
ABBOTT LABORATORIES
Agronomy--$300
AREC, Bradenton--$200
KREC, Quincy--$300
ANCHEM PRODUCTS, INC.
Fruit Crops--$250
AREC, Lake Alfred--S2,400
ABEC, Lake Alfred--$1,200
AREC, Lake alfred--52,400
AMERICAN CIANAMID COMPANY
Agronomy--$750
Entomology and Nematology--$500
Poultry Sceance--$2,000
Poultry Science--$ 1000
Veterinary Science- $1,370
ABC, Jay--$750
HB. & MRS. THOMAS H.. ATKINSON
Botany--S100
BR. GEORGE AVERY
Botany--$47A
MR. & MRS. L.M. BAITZELL
Botany--$2,035
MS. JESSIE LINN BARNARD
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$1,500
BEHRENS NURSERY CORPORATION
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$260
bILTHORE HEIGHTS GARDEN CLUB
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$25
MR. WILLIAM C. BRUMBACH
Botany--$2,264
BRUNSWICK PULP AND PAPER COMPANY
Forest Resources and Conservation--$2,500
Soil Science--$3,000









CAPITAL IPROVEsENTS


As of December 1973, the following major buildings were either
complete or under cpAtract:


Agricultural Research
Center
Marianna, Florida Swine Buildings 80% complete
Horse Research Center
Lowell, Florida Barns 80% complete
Poultry Department
Gainesville, Florida Processing Lab 100% complete



GRANTS AND GFTS
1973

Commercial grants and gifts accepted as support for existing
programs during the year ending December 31, 1973. Financial
assistance is hereby gratefully acknowledged.
ABBOTT LABORATORIES
Agronomy--$300
AREC, Bradenton--$200
KREC, Quincy--$300
ANCHEM PRODUCTS, INC.
Fruit Crops--$250
AREC, Lake Alfred--S2,400
ABEC, Lake Alfred--$1,200
AREC, Lake alfred--52,400
AMERICAN CIANAMID COMPANY
Agronomy--$750
Entomology and Nematology--$500
Poultry Sceance--$2,000
Poultry Science--$ 1000
Veterinary Science- $1,370
ABC, Jay--$750
HB. & MRS. THOMAS H.. ATKINSON
Botany--S100
BR. GEORGE AVERY
Botany--$47A
MR. & MRS. L.M. BAITZELL
Botany--$2,035
MS. JESSIE LINN BARNARD
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$1,500
BEHRENS NURSERY CORPORATION
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$260
bILTHORE HEIGHTS GARDEN CLUB
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$25
MR. WILLIAM C. BRUMBACH
Botany--$2,264
BRUNSWICK PULP AND PAPER COMPANY
Forest Resources and Conservation--$2,500
Soil Science--$3,000








BUCKEYE CELLULOSE CORPORATION
Forest Resources and Conservation--S2,500
Soil Science--$3,000
BURGER KING CORPORATION
Food Science--$6,000
MR. NORMAN CASSE (CARDINAL HILL FARM)
Horse Research Uqit, Qcala--$150
ME. PAUL M. CASSEN
Botany--$1,050
CENTRAL FLORIDA AGBICULOURAL INSTITUTE
AREC, Saqfond--$10,000
CHBMAGRO
Agropomy-$1.00
Agronomy--$275
AREC, Sanford--$500
ARC, Hastings--$400
CHEROKEE PRODUCTS, INC.
AREC, Bradenitoe--$175
CHEVRON CHEMICAL COMPANY
AREC, Belle Glade (Bt. Pierce)--$500
AREC, Brade4ton--$500
AREC, Bradenton (Iaokalee)--$500
AREC, Quincy--$500
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$500
ARC, Leesbarg--$500
CIBA-GEIGY CORPORATEQN
Agronomy--10 000
Entomoloqy and lematology--$6,820
AREC, Belle Glade--2,000
AREC, Homestead--$1S000
AREC, Homestead--$750
AREC, Homestead--$1000
AREC, Lake Alfred--,1 000
AREC, Lake Alfred-- 2,000
AREC, Lake Alfred-- 1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$2,400
AREC, Saqford--$1,000
ARC, ApopkaW-$500
CITIES.SERVICE COMPANY
AREC, Belle Glade--$1.000
AREC, Homestead--$1000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
COBB BREEDING CORPORATION
Poultry Science--$2,000
CONTAINER CORPORATION OS AMERICA
Forest Resources and Conservation--$2,500
Soil Science--$3,000
CONTINENTAL CAN COMPANY INC.
Forest Respurces and Copservation--$2,500
Soil Science--$3,000
COOPER USA, INC.
Entomology and Nematology--$2,000
Veterinary Science--$3,000
COUNCIL FARMS INC.
AREC, Bradenton--$3S500
DADE COUNTY, COUNCIL OF GARDEN CLUB PRESIDENTS
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$25
DELTONA CORPORATION
Agricultural Engineering--$1,400









DIAMOND SHAMROCK CHEMICAL COMPANY
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--54,600
ARC Apo ka--$500
ARC, Hastings--$500
ARC, Hastings--$500
ARC, Jay--$750
WALT DISNEY WORLD COMPAIL
Research Administration--$7,450
DISTILLERS FBED RESEARCH COUNCIL
Poultry Science--$3,000
DOVER CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING COMPANY
Ornamental Horticulture--$500
DO CHEMICAL COdPANI
Entomology and Nematology--$500
Poultry Science--$1 112
AREC, Belle Glade--S500
ARC, Apopka--$3,000
ARC, Jay--$500
ARC, Ona--$500
D.i. DU POINT DE NEMOURS & COMPANY
Agronomy--$500
Entomology and Nematology--$500
Vegetable Crops--$1.000
AREC, Belle Glade--S500
AREC, Bradenton--$1,000
AREC Bradeaton--$1,000
AREC, Bradeneton--$2 000
AREC, Homestead--S500
AREC, Homestead--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$750
AREC, Lake Alfred--$750
AREC, Saqford--$500
ARC, Leesburg--$500
ARC, Leesbnrg--$500
ARC, Monticello--$500
MRS. SUZANNE DUTTENHOFER
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$3,500
DUVAL SALES CORPORATION
Soil Science--$1,000
PAUL ECKE, INC.
AREC, Bradenton--$995
ELI LILLY AND COMPANY
Agronomy--$1,000
Vegetable Ccops--$750
ENVIRONMENTAL ENlINEERING INC.
Poultry Science--$9 500
AREC, Lake Alfred--S3,000
FARNAM COMPANIES, INC.
Entomology and Nematology--$1,000
MR. ACE C. FESSENDEN
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$10,G00
FINANCIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LQAN ASSOCIATION
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$100
FLAVOR PICT INC.
AREC, Belle Glade (st. Pierce)--$258
FLORIDA CITRUS COMMISSION
AREC, Lake Alfred--$31,100
AHEC, Lake Alfred--$57,100
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE & CONSUMER SERVICES








Agronomy--$8 000
Agronomy--$.11 750
Agronomy and food Science--$18,800
ABC, Ona--$2,500
Division of Forestry
Forest Resources and Conservatio--$2,500
Forest Resources and Conservation--$12,500
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Agricultural Engineering--$6,210
Agronomy--$6,329
Agronomy--$6,329
Entomology and Nematology--$78 124
Entomology and Nematology--$20,722
Bntomology and Nematology--$16,218
Soil Science--$5,240
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$19,713
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$42,240
Division of Recreation and Parks
Forest Resources and Conservation--$9,000
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT QF TRANSPORTATION
Ornamental Hort4culture--$4 800
Ornamental Horticulture--$33,610
FLORIDA FLOWER ASSOCIATION
Manatee Fruit Company
AREC, Bradenton--$250
Mazzoni Farms, Inc.
AREC, Bradenton--$500
FLORIDA FOUNDATION SEED PRODUCERS, INC.
Agronomy--$,145
Research Adalnistration--$14,344
AREC, Quincy--$2,990
FLORIDA GAME & HBESII WATER EISH COMMISSION
Food Science--$10,000
Forest Resources and Conservation--$800
Veterinary Science- $12,00
FLORIDA HEART ASSOCIATION INC.
Veterinary Science--$10,000
FLORIDA LEMON GROWERS
AREC, Lake Alfred--$2,400
ABEC, Lake Alfred--$1,000
FLORIDA MOLASSES EXCHANGE, INC.
Dairy Scieace--$3,500
FLORIDA PEACH CORPORATION OE AMERICA
Fruit Crops'-$200
FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION
Forest Resources and Conservation--$98,015
Forest Resources and Conservation--$37,209
Forest Respurces and Conservation--$23,755
FLORIDA SUGAR CANE LEAGUE INC.
AREC, Belle Glade--$23,500
FLORIDA TOMATO COMMITTEE
AREC, Bradeaton--$12,000
FMC CORPORATION
Entomology and Nematology--$500
AREC, Bradenton--$500
AREC, Sanford--$500
FORD FOUNDATION
AREC, Lake Alfred--$2,000
FRANCES A. GBNTER STABLE
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$5,000









HAROLD C. CENTER
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$8,000
GEORGIA PACIFIC CORPORATION
Soil Science--$3,000
GILMAN PAPER COMPANY
Forest Resources and Conservation-$2,500
MR. GENE F. GLESSNER
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$1,00
GLOECKNER FOUNDATION
AREC, Bradentoa--$5,000
MRS. SARAH GQTLLEB
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale"-$50
MR. & MRS. HERMAN E. GRAY
Horse Research 94it, Ocala--$1,500
GREAT LAKES CHEMICAL CORPORATION
Entomplogy and Neaatology--$750
GULF OIL COMPANY
Agronoay--4500
F. WILLIAM HARTER (ELCEE-H STABLE)
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$4,700
A.0. SMITH HAREZSTORE PRODUCTS, INC.
AREC, Qu.iqcy-$2,000
HERCULES INCOtRPQRATED
Food Science--S750
Ornamental Horticulture--$1,000
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY MARKETING COMMISSION
AREC, Bradeatoa (DQuerl--$2,000
AREC, Bradepton (Dqver)--$2,050
HOECHST PHARMACEDTIaALS4 INC.
Poultry Science--$4 000
Poultry Sc.ence--$960
Poultry Sctenoe--$7 000
Poultry Sc3ence--$12,00O
MR. R.M. HOOKER
AREC, Belle Glade--$350
MR. FRED HOOPER
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$50,000
HORTICULTURE STUDY SOCIETY OF FLORIDA, INC.
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$200
HUDSON PULP AND PAPER CORPORATION
Forest Resources and Conservation--$2,500
Soil Science--$3,00
MRS. ROBERT L. HOTCRBES
Horse Research qUit, Ocala--$3,000
ICI AMERICA, ING.
Plant Patholog~--$300
Plant Pathology -$500
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale -$500
ARC, nonticellp--$500
MR. STEWART B. INGLEHART
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$25,000
INTERNATIONAL MINERALS & CHEMICAL CORPORATION
Soil Science--$1,000








INTERNATIONAL PAPER COMPANY
Soil Science--$3,000
INTERNATIONAL SOCIZSY FOR FLUORIDE RESEARCH
AHEC, Bradeqtoa--$300
ITT RAYONIER FOUNDATION
Forest Resources and Conservation--$600
ITT RAXONIER, INC.
Forest Resouroes and Conservation--$2,5(
Soil Science-$3,000
JOEL INDUSTRIES, INC.
Forest Resources and CoAservation--S500
JOHNNY CAKE, ISO.
ARC, Ona--$2,50
S.C. JOHNSON & SONS INC.
ARC, Ft. Laaderaale--$2,145
MR. RICHARD KELLY
Veterinary Science-"$300
KENNECOTT COPPER CORPORATION
AREC, Belle Glade--5450
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$1,500
HRS. MILDRED T. KIBA1L
Horse Research Bnit, Ocala--$1,500
MRS. RICHARD L.. KIMBALL
Horse Research Wqit, Ocala--$1,500
Veterinary Science-'$500
MR. DALE KNISELY
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$800
MR. NEWTON F. KONHOMEL
Horse Research Wait, Ocala--$6,000
Horse Research Wnit, Ocala--$7,500
DR. ALBERT H. LAISSLE
Botany--$2,200
HR. & MRS. WARREN C. LEONARD
Horse Research gnit, Ocala--$1,00
DR. JACK LIGGETT, MR. JACK NICHLAUS MR. PUT
Horse Research gnit, Ocala--$9,G00
LIN-DRAKE FARM
Horse Research Vnit, Ocala--$7,950
LIVE OAK STUD
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$12,500
BAt L. LYERLY AfD ASSOCIATES
Agricultural Engineering--$1,200
LYKES BROS., INC.
ARC, Ona--$11,600
38 EXPERIMENT STATION
Vegetable Crops-$750
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale-$500
MALLINCKRODT CHEMICAL CORPORATION
Plant Pathology--$500
AREC, Bradeeton--$500
ARC, Apopka"-$500
T.B. MARTIN
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$250


NAM PIERMAN


)0









MR. JACK MARTINEZ
AREC, Belle Glade--$300
BHALE INDUSTRIES INC.
AREC, Bradeqton--$1,500
MR. & MRS. DOUGLAS S. MdDERMOTT
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$1,200
MR. JULIAN P. McDOWELL
Veterinary Science- $3,000
MERCK, SHARP & DOHME RESEARCH LABORATORIES
Veterinary Science--$2,400
MIDWEST AGRICULTURAL WAREHOUSE COMPANY
AREC, Bradenton (Immokalee)--$500
DR. RALPH L. MILLER
AREC, Lake Alfred--$3,000
MILLER CHEMICAL & FERTILIZER COMPANY
AHEC, Laie Alfred--S1,000
MISSQURI BEEE PACKERS, INC. & PRO-VITA, INC.
Veterinary Science- $3,000
MOBIL CHEMICAL COMPANY
Entomology and Nematoloqy--$1,000
AREC, Sanfprd--$750
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$500
ARC, Hastings--S500
ARC, Jay--$500
ARC, Jay--$500
MONSANTO COMPANY
Agronomy--$l 000
ABEC, Belle Glade--$1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--51 000
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale"- 1,000
MOORMAN MANUFACTraING COMPANY
Animal Science-$3,000
NATIONAL ACADEMIC OF SCIENCES
Entomology and Nematology--$1,975
SFood Scienoe--$589
NATIONAL FEED INGREDIENTS ASSOCIATION
Animal Science--$3,000
NATIONAL FISHERIES INSTITUTE
Food Science--$4,000
NObA, INC.
AREC, Belle Glade--$2,604
O.J. NOER RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC.
Soil Science--$1,500
NOR-AM AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS, INC.
Agronomy--$500
AREC, Bradenton--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
OWENS-ILLINOIS CORPORATION
Forest Resources and Conservatio---$2,500
Soil Science--$3,000
IMS. MARY B. PATRICK
Horse Research Unit, Ocala--$1,00
PENNWALT CQBBORATIOL
Plant Pathology--$500
ARC, Monticello--$1,000








PRIZER INC., AGRICULTURAL DIVISION
ARC, Live Oak--$1,500
POTASH IMPORT & CHEMICAL CORPORATION
Soil Science--$1,000
POTASH INSTITUTE OF NORTH AMERICA
Soil Science--$1,500
PPG INDUSTRIES, INC.
AREC, Bradenton--$1,000
AREC, Bradenton--$1,000
AREC, Bradenton (Immokalee)--$3,000
PROCTER & GAMBLE
Agronomy and ARC, Live Oak--$1 000
Ornamental Horticulture--$1,000
AREC, Bradexton--$750
AREC, Lake Alfred (St. Pierce)--$750
R.J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY
Agricultural Engineering--$2,000
Agronomy--$2,000
MR. LOUIS L. BITTER
Horse Research Unit--$7,500
ROBERT BROTHERS, INC.
AREC, Bradenton--$135
ROHM AND HAAS COMPANY
Veterinary Science-'$10,141
AREC, Sanrord--$500
ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY
forest Resources and Conservation--$2,500
Soil Science--$3,000
ST. REGIS PAPER COMPANY
Soil Science--$3,000
SAND AND SEA KENNEL CLUB
Veterinary Science--$750
SCHERING CORPORATION
Veterinary Science-'$6,500
SCOTT PAPER COMPANY
Forest Resources and Conservation--32,500
Soil Science--83,000
SEA-BORN CORPORATION
AREC, Lake Alfred--$600
SHELL CHEMICAL COMPANY
Entomology and Nematology--$1,000
SHELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
SIERRA CHEMICAL COMPANY
AREC, Bradeniton--$1,000
MR. MURRAY SIPPRELL
Veterinary Science--$2,000
DR. EDWARD F. SLOSEK
ARC, Monticello--$781
SMITH KLINE & FRENCH LABORATORIES
Plant Pathology-$500
THE SOAP AND DETERGENT ASSOCIATION
Soil Science--$14,275
SOUTHERN FOREST DISEASE & INSECT RESEARCH COUNCIL








Entomology and Mematology--$3, 00
SOUTHERN MATERIALS CORPORATION
Poultry Science--$1,000
SPACE-AGE INDUSTRIES, INC.
ARC, Apopkac-$10,659
MR. & MRS. N.E. STANFIELD
Horse Research Uqit, Ocala--$2,000
STAFFER CHEMICAL COMPAST
Agronomy--$500
Entomology and Nematology--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--500
AREC, Lake Alfred--S500
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale -$500
ARC, Ft. Laalderdale -$250
MR. H.J. STAVOLA
Horse Research gBit, Ocala--$5,000
MR. ANDREW L. SE.OEL
Horse Research gnit, Ocala--$1,100
TALL TIMBERS RESEARCH STATION
Entomology and Nematology--$1,750
Entomology and Nematology-- 2,400
Entomology and lematology-- 1,750
Bntomology and Nematology--2,400
TENHBCO OIL COM ANY
Agronomy and Vegetable Crops--$1,500
DR. NEAL P. THOMPSON
Veterinary Science--$40
THSMPSON-HAiWARD CHEMICAL COMPANY
AREC, Lake Alfred--41 800
ARC, Ft. Laudardale,-$1,000
UNION CAMP COBPORAT[ON
Soil Science--33,000
UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION
Entomology and lematology--$500
Entomology and Nematology--2500
AREC, Belle 1iade--$500
AREC, Bradenton--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
ARC, HastiJgs--$500
UNIROYAL CHEMICAL
ABEC, Hoaestead--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
UNITED BRANDS, INC.
Entomology and Nematology--$9,900
UNITED STATES SUGAR CORPORATION
Dairy Scieae---$6,500
THE UPJOHN COMPANY
Dairy Scieaoe--$325
AREC, Lake Alfred--$900
ARC, Monticello--$200
VELSICOL CHEMICAL CORPORATION
Entomology and Mematology--$1,000
Food Science--$575
MRS. DAWN WILSON
Horse.Research Unit, Ocala--$5,000
WILSON & GEORGE MEYER S COMPANY








AREC, Lake Alfred--$1,000
FLOYD L. WALY FOUNDATION
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale"-$3,000
ZOECON CORPORATION
Entomology and lematology--S500


Grants were accepted from other agencies as follows:
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY
aicrobiology--$63,000
ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION
Agronomy--S7,540
Entomology and Nematology--$22 950
Entomology and Sematology--$2,500
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Soil Science--$60,000
FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
Animal Sciepte--2,.100
NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
Fruit Crops--$25,420
NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF HEALTH
Microbiology--S21,741
Veterinary Science--$10,060
Veterinary Scieace--$14,157
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
Entomology and Nemahology--$55,832
Entomology and Nematology--$74,100
ROCKEFELLER FOUS ATION
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$25,000
UNITED STATES ARHY
Entomology and Nematology--$33,662
UNITED STATES DBPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Agricultural Research Service
Agronomy--$30 000
Agronomy--$500
Entomology and Nematology--$66,000
Entomology and Nemanology--$10,256
Entomology and Nematology--$40,000
Forest Resources and Conservation--$12,000
Fruit Crops and Agrpnomy--$211,300
Statistics-"$8,000
AREC, Bradenton--$9.000
AREC, Quincy--$8,774
Cooperative State Research Service
AREC, Lake Alfred--$95,000
ARC, Apopka~-$67,683
Economic Research Service
Food and Resource Economics--$4,500
Food and Resource Economics--$3,000
Food and Resource Eaonomics--$3 000
Food and Resource Economics--$1 ,000
State Sqil Conservation Service
Soil Science--$7,200
Duval County
Soil Science--$4,720
Hernando County
Soil Science--$3,340





54


Osceola County
Soil Science--$1,000
Palm Beach Connty
Soil Science--$2,000
St. .ucie County
Soil Science--$938
Volusia County
Soil Science--$3,000
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
National Oceanic S Atmospheric Administration
Food and Resource Ecoqoaics--$10,00
Fruit Crops-$7,000






REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER


Summary of Expenditures of Federal Funds 1972-1973


Salaries & Wages

Travel

Transportation & Communication

Utilities

Printing

Lr Repairs & Maintenance

Contractual Services

Rentals

Other Current Charges & Obligations

Materials & Supplies

Equipment

Land & Buildings

TOTAL FEDERAL EXPENDITURES


Hatch
Funds

742,988.25

3,130.23

234.68

-0-

97.85

2,197.83

438.03

263.04

90.10

13,510.13

70,976.30

1,938.05


Regional
Research
Funds

101,104.80

12,330.91

2,192.48

9,722.67

541.22

1,946.56

1,036.77

1,022.40

235.40

37,031.19

1,977.92

158.00


--


835,864.49 169,300.32


140,251.16 1,145,415.97


McIntire
Stennis

103,552.89

7,228.45

1,955.78

6,237.80

489.60

1,141.04

1,886.67

211.65

-0-

11,868.78

5,678.50

-0-


Total
Federal
Funds

947,645.94

22,689.59

4,382.94

15,960.47

1,128.67

5,285.43

3,361.47

1,497.09

325.50

62,410.10

78,632.72

2,096.05


--






















Salaries, Wages & Fringe Benefits

Travel

Transportation & Communications

Utilities

Printing

Repairs & Maintenance

Contractual Services

Rentals

Other Current Charges & Obligations

Supplies and Materials

Equipment

Land and Buildings

Transfers

Special Appropriation-Building Fund

TOTAL STATE FUNDS


REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER

ary of Expenditures of State Funds 1972-1973

Fla. Agricultural
Experiment Station Incidental G:
General Revenue Funds Funds

10,897,249.56 210,677.76

213,284.11 37,099.86

158,103.78 24,099.72

220,928.25 35,311.46

79,030.06 2,657.58

69,382.50 16,055.71

91,386.08 19,974.60

90,211.25 25,366.34

5,152.95 3,043.41

823,747.33 636,584.54

-365,781.48 81,333.15

136,210.02 74,864.67

-0- -0-


-0-

13,150,467.37


-0-

1,167,068.80


rants and
Donations Funds

1,083,915.57

101,691.93

6,422.68

5,838.93

5,175.50

12,176.21

60,589.81

2,998.90

11,615.05

142,527.34

119,623.79

62,414.31

-0-

-0-

1,614,990.02


Total
State Funds

12,191,842.89

352,075.90

188,626.18

262,078.64

86,863.14

97,614.42

171,950.49

118,576.49

19,811.41

1,602,859.21

566,738.42

273,489.00

-0-

-0-

15,932,526.19


~








AGBCLULTBRAL EMGINEERINGDEPARTMENT

Research was conducted under fifteen projects with
preliminary research in eight areas. Research has been expanded
considerably on the use of trickle irrigation in Florida
agriculture and on filtration of treated municipal effluent
through cropland. Research is just getting underway concerning
pollution trom non-point sources. A major effort during the year
has concerned forced-air precooling of Florida vegetables and in
the processing of aquatic weeds for possible use as animal feed
or as a potting media for ornamental plants. Research on physical
properties of Florida fruits and vegetables and on development of
a pepper harvester were important aspects of the research program
during the year. Several projects are likely to develop out pf
the preliminary research which is reported herein.
A steel building tp house the aquatic needs research program
was constructed during the year. Related facilities in the
building will be completed soon so that a portion of the research
activity can ne moved to this building. Dr. Kenneth Campbell
spent his first year on the faculty after having joined us an
December 1972. His area of work includes drainage and pollution
frpm non-point sources.


FLA-AG-00001 SHERDON E T
PRELImINARY AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH
PROGRESS REPQRTi 73/01 73/12
Computer simulation models of transient heat flow in/out pf
buildings have been developed for buildings with/without
heating/cooling systems Research on increasing the relative
humidity inside greenhouses using misting devices show that the
devices used do not disperse enough water to appreciably increase
the humidity or lower the dry-bulb temperature. Tests show
respirable dust particle levels in open poultry houses is
consideraly lower than the legal limits specified by OSHA. Tile
drainage was installed at Hastings to study North Florida
drainage problems and subsurface water movement simulation
computer program was developed. Tobacco harvesting efficiendy
studies show harvester speeds more than 3 mph are unacceptable.
The harvester was adapted to apply sprays. rip and sprinkler
irrigation were compared with different plastic mulch and
fertilization treatments in tomato and tree crop production. Dr|p
requires about a third the water sprinkling requires. Rhizoctouna
Solani, Pythium Myr otyum, Aspergillus Niger, and Phytophtord
Palmivord were e fectively eliminated in annoculated field soil
and sand-peat mix by a continuous soil pasteurizer which also
works well as a soil mixer. Cold chamber tests show that
artificial snow for frost protection can be formed on plant
surfaces at an air temperature of 320F by using a fogging nozzle
which operates on 50 psi compressed air and water introduced by a
venturi.


FLA-AG-01250 CHOATE R E
WATER CONTROL FOB FORESTRY PRODUCTION
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Data on tree development on each of the drainage treatments has
been collected from time of seedling planting through five
growing seasons. Statistical analysis of these data for
significance of drainage treatments, fertilization, budding and
other cultural treatments is in process. A concluding statement,
evaluating each treatment will be based on these analysis.


BAGNALL L 0


FLA-AG-01406
SHAW L N


LUCK R C








VARIETY DEVELOPHEBMT CULTURAL PRACTICES AND MECHANICAL HARVESTING
SYSTEMS FOR FRESH MARKET TOMATOES
PROGRESS REPORTS 73/01 73/12
Impact tests were performed on tomatoes to determine the
relationships between velocity (as controlled by height of free
drop) and impact forces and impact damage. Individual tomatoes
were dropped ontp a target instrumented with a piezoelectirc
force gage. Five drop heights from 4 to 20 inches were used.
Force versus time curves of impact were displayed on an
oscilloscope and photographed. Resultant damage was compared
among Homestead 24, Halter and HB-1 cultivars at the breakes-
turning stage of maturity and among three maturities of MH-1;
mature green breaker, and firm red. Peak impact force and the
incidence of amzage were approximated by power functions fitted
by regression techniques. Damage increased with increasing
maturity and from NH-1 to Homestead 24 to Walter. Red MH-1
tomatoes had abont the same amount of impact damage as breaker
stage Homestead 24 or Walter tomatoes. Peak force and the
incidence of damage were approximately proportional to the square
root of drop height an therefore proportional to impact
velocity.


FLA-AG-01458 OVERRAN A R
DISPOSAL OF DAIRY FARM WASTE
PROGRESS REPQRTt 73/01 73/12
Forage crops were grown on Scanton fine sand under sprinkler
irrigation with dairy waste. Application rates were 1/2, 1 and 2
inches per week. Corn responded poorly and was inadequate for
silage production. Sorghum-sudangrass responded well at 2 inches
per week, but poorly at 1 inch per week. Pearl millet respqqded
avorably at all three application rates.


FLA-AG-01468 OVERRAN A R
NUTRIENT & WATER INPUTS & OUTGO FROM THE ORGANIC & MINERAL SOILS
IN THE LAKE APORKA AREA
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
An area of approximately 450 acres was selected for study of
groundwater recharge for possible disposition of drainage water
from the Zellwood Muck Farms. Rainfall was followed with a
recording rain gauge. Fluctuations in levels of ponded water were
monitored with a water stage recorder. Neekly measurement of
piezometric head were obtained at a well on the same property.
Correlations of these data should allow estimates of groundwater
recharge and permeability of the upper strata. The load of
suspended solids causes surface sealing and decreases the
feasibility of recharges Holding basins for recycling of drainage
water appear more practical. Chemical and turbidity measurements
showed that the farm canals carried higher levels of nutrients
and suspended solids, particularly during high rainfall, than was
present in the lake. Chages in farm management practices may be
necessary to reduce the rate of oxidation and the discharge of
nutrients from the farms.


FLA-AG-01478 MYERS J M OVERMAN A R
BOGERS J S
SYSTEMS FOH TILE DBAIN SLUDGE CONTROL POR CITRUS WITH HIGH WATER
TABLE IN FLORIDA
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Drain outflow from the surface tilled treatments continues to be
approximately twice that from deep tilled and deep tilled plus
heavy lime treatments. Water table draw down is generally faster
but not significantly so. Preliminary analysis of data from H-
tlumes installed in late 1972 indicate considerably less surface








runoff from surface tilled than from deep tilled treatments.
Reduced infiltration rates and higher water tables in the deep
tilled treatments are probably the cause of increased surface
runoff. Small tensiometers installed near the drain indicate a
very high gradient for Eater movement in the area of the boundary
between the gravel envelope and the soil. Comparison with
resis nce analog data show that the hydraulic conductivity 9f
this region may be oq the order of 1/30th of the hydraulic
co activity in the soil profile.


FLA-AG-01481 BAGNALL L 0
PROCESSED AQUATIC PLANTS FOR ANIMAL NUTRITION
PROGRESS REPORTz 73/01 73/12
Tested experimental presses to determine effects of design
parameters. Designed new lightweight press based on prqjeqt
experience. Recovered ap to 25 percent of juice solids 4n
continuous filters and centrifuge. Found properties and
composition of recovered material. Determined mechanical
properties of hyacinth stem. Analyzed drying data to determine
drying characteristics of aquatic veeds.


FLA-AG-01493 NORDSTEDT B A
DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF A MULTI-STAGE LAGOON SYSTEM FOR
TREATMENT OF DAIRY
FARM WASTE
PROGRESS REPORTz 73/01 73/12
Sampling of lagoon influents and effluents has continued, but
only on a random basis. No unusual changes were observed. An
algal bloom occurred in the third lagoon in March as in previous
years. Sludge depth and characteristics were determined twide
during the year. Sludge removal appears imminent in the near
future and plans are being formulated for this operation.
Temperature profiles were measured in the anaerobic lagoon in the
spring and in the summer. No significant thermal stratification
was observed, and diurnal variations were negligible except near
the water surface. Plans call for collection of more temperature
data through the winter months. Laboratory digestion studies are
underway to campare mixed versus unmixed anaerobic systems.
Preliminary results indicate that mixed systems may not be
justified. However, plans are being made to evaluate mixing of
anaerobic lagoons on a field scale system.


FLA-AG-01495 FLUCK B C
CHARACTERIZATION O8 THEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF FRUITS AND
VEGETABLES
PROGRESS REPORT 73/01 73/12
Further impact tests were performed on citrus to relate damage
resulting from impact to the number and severity of impacts.
Oranges and grapefruit Mere subjected to single and repeated
impact drops frrom three heights to a rigid surface. Subsequent
measurements of the force-deformation ratio and hysteresis loss
were made with gaasistatic compression tests on the impacted
whole fruit. Internal damage resulting from the impact was
indicated by a reduction in the force-deEormation ratio and an
increase in the hysteresis loss. Impact damage increased with the
number and severity of the impacts and was detectable for two pr
more drops from 25 or 50 cm or from a single drop from a 100 cm
height.


FLA-AG-01550
GAFFNEY J J


BAIRD C D


KINARD D T








FORCED AIR PRECOOLING OQ FLORIDA VEGETABLES
PROGRESS REPORTa 73/01 73/12
Copling of fresh vegetables promptly after harvest is a method pf
maintaining podaut quality by limiting the deteriorating
processes aided by warm temperatures. The operation is essential
or most Florida vegetables and has been practiced for many years
using various means of removing heat. Altnoagh hydrocooling and
vacuum cooling have been used predominantly in the vegetable
industry, forced air coupling promises to be superior for many
products and has the potential of being more universally
applicable. Cooling tests are being conducted on various products
in a research facility designed specifically for determining and
evaluating design parameters for forced-air precooling systems. A
nem interest in air cooling over hydrocooling has been brought
about by the increased use of paper cartons instead of wooden
crates for products which are packed in the field. Presently,
very little information is available which can be used to design
forced-air coupling systems. Using basic heat transfer theory a
mathematical model describing the temperature distribution within
a bulk load of fru.uis os vegetables has been developed and tested
for oranges, rapefruit, and sweet peppers Preliminary cooling
tests have Seen made on snap beans ana avocados. A procedure
utilizing the measurement of dew point changes resulting from
transpiration of vegetables in a closed system has been used to
determine mass transfer coefficients for green peppers and snap
beans. The results of this work will provide a basis f9r
determining optimum design and operating conditions for specific
coupling applications.


FLA-AG-01572 OVERMAN A R
FERTILIZERS AND ORGANIC WASTES APPLIED TO SQILS IN RELATION TO
ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Work is related to objectives covered in AG-1458 (dairy waste on
land) and AG-1478 (leaching of nutrients from soil through tile
drains). Emphasis is to relate findings from the Florida projects
to problems in the Southeast Begion. In particular, the
efficiency of the soil-plant system in utilizing nutrients frpm
organic wastes and fertilizer with supplemental irrigation as
being determined. Factors considered are crops, application
rates, soil type, depth to water table, and rainfall. Forage
crops have responded we 1 to dairy waste at rates up to two
inches per week. Some loss of nitrogen and phosphorus has been
found from the tile drainage system.


FLA-AG-01618 QVERMAN A R
RENOVATION OR MUNICIPAL WASTE WATER AT TALLAHASSEE
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Forage crops were grown under sprinkler irrigation with municipal
effluent on Lakeland fine sand. Winter crops included rye
rye rass, and oats.. Under irrigation rates of 1/4 1/2, 1 and Y
inches per week, all responded well except oats. Summer crops
included corn (grain), corn (silae), millet, sorghum-sudangrass,
and kenaf under irrigation rates of 2, 4, 6, and 8 inches per
week and all these responded well. Plant samples were analyzed
for N, P, K, Ca, Mg, a, Cu Fe, Al, Zn. Composite effluent
samples were analysed weekly for the same elements. From these
data efficiency of crop recovery was calculated for various
elements. Test wells are now being installed to monitor
groundwater quality.


FLA-AG-01639 SHAW L N FLUCK R C
SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT FOR VEGETABLE HARVESTING







PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
A mechanical shaker for pepper fruit removal from foliage was
desi ned and evaluated. This mechanism gave a jerking motion to
the fruit and foliage resulting in 100% separation of the fruit.
Up to 20% of the fruit was unmarketable because of mechanical
damage. This fruit removal concept appears promising for a once-
over bell pepper harvester. Studies of pepper fruit position and
orientation on the growing plants have been conducted and the
information utilized an designing mechanisms for the selective
removal of bell peppers, Further evaluations have been made of
combing devices mpunted on a double crank picking reel for the
selective removal of bell pepper fruit according to size.
Direction of comb travel and comb finger orientation were varied
to determine effects on plant damage. Plant damage can be reduced
to an acceptable level by a sideways and upward direction pf
travel for the combing fingers. Picking efficiency has been
evaluated and 71% of marketable sized fruit have been removed
from standing plants. About 80% of the fruit was retrieved after
removal from the plants and this can be improved with improved
catch conveyor and deflector design. Work is to be continued to
improve picking efficiency by use of different finger designs and
directions of fingers travel.


FLA-AG-01649 NORDSTEDT R A
ANIMAL WASTE TREATMENT AND RECYCLING SYSTEMS
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Grpundwater has been monitored near an anaerobic dairy waste
lagoon in a sandy soil in a high water table for four years. Long
term results confirm the conclusions reached earlier in the
study. Localized effects on the groundwater are apparent.
However samples collected farther away from the lagoon were not
affected. Laboratory tests with soil-digester columns indicate
that zero seepage does not occur, but it can be minimized through
good design practices. However, further studies are needed on
quality of seepage water and on transformations which occur in
the soil-water system Anaerobic digestion as a unit process in
animal waste handling systems is being evaluated in laboratory
tests. Preliminary results indicate that nitrogen removal can be
improved through control of mixing and control of other design
parameters. Further studies are planned to take full advantage of
nitrogen removal capabilities.


FLA-AG-1123 MYERS J M
STRAWBEhRY CULTURE
PROGRESS REPQBT; 73/01 73/12
Drip irrigation has the potential for utilizing water more
efficiently and regulating the soil moisture regime more
precisely than other ircigatio4 methods used in Florida. This
study considered management problems of drip irrigation for
strawberries. Water requirements for drip irrigation were 3.75
inches for a 92 day period in which applications were made on 64
days. Sprinkler irrggattio requirements were 11.63 inches or
abput 3 times greater. The soil moisture level in the drip
irrigated beds were at or near field capacity at all times while
soil in the sprinkler irrigated beds fluctuated from field
capacity to about 0% of field capacity between applications.
Root distribution was influenced by the type of irrigation.
Practically all rooting activity was in the top 7 inches of soil
for drip irrigated strawberries while major root activity was in
the soil layer between 5 and 12 inches for the sprinkler method
of irrigation. Rpot activity was fairly uniform in the top 12
inches of soil where irrigation was not used. Drip irrigation
used in combination with weekly nitrogen and potash fertilizer
applications made through the irrigation system gave largest
production increases. The best drip irrigation management
treatment increased production 22% when compared to non-irrigated
strawberries.





62


FLA-AG-1612 NORDSTEDT R A
ECONOMIC BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONmENTAL ASPECTS OF DAIRY-BEEF
CBESSES oN PASTURH AND IN DRYLOT
PROGRESS iEPQRT: 73/01 73/1?
Construction of fences and physical facilities for the semi-
confinement phase of the project is nearly complete. Animals
should be able to occupy the facilities early next year. Detailed
plans have been made for monitoring environmental impact of this
type of cow-calf production. Equipment for this study is being
procured and readied for installation as soon as the facility 's
completed. The cpmplete confinement area has been surveyed and
detailed plans for monitoring of the waste handling system are
nearly complete. Cpastruction of the facility should take place
scaetime next year.








AGRONOMY DEPARTMENT

Agronomic research was conducted under 27 projects. Some
highlights of agronomia research at Gainesville in 1973 follows.
Combination of new herbicides have shown superior weed
control when compared to the previously used herbicides.
In the initial release, over 3000 bales of the new Transvala
digitgrass were sold to Florida growers for increase in 1973.
Gibberellic acid applied to Pangola and Transvala gave
increases in production during the cooler periods of spring and
fall. There was no response from Coast Cross bermudagrass.
A new discovery shows that growth of the digitgrass and
other tropical grasses are depressed by short daylengths. The
inheritance pattern is being studied to aid plant breeders in
selecting grasses which do not possess this handicap.
The new Florida developed NC-FLA 14, eanut was released
jointly with north Carolina. It out-yielaed Florigiant by 200
pounds per acre in 1973.i
Several new ryegrass varieties have rust resistance and give
high yields in Florida tests.
Two new high yielding soybean varieties, Hutton and Cobb
are to be distriLuted in 1974. Button has improved root kngt
nematode res.istance.. Cobb is well adapted to the sandy soils of
central Florida and has high yields, root knot nematode
resistance, and improved seed quality.
Maryland type tobacco has been successfully grown in
Florida, and has a potential for supplying a market of several
million pounds of this tobacco.
Up to four inches pf dairy manure affluent per week was
applied successfully to summer annual crops and ryegrass.
New hybrids of guineagrass have been selected for improved
forage yield and nutritive value.
Male sterility has been transferred into selected lines of
tobacco with the objective of producing hybrid tobacco.
Some new lines of dorn have shown to have high levels pf
resistance to the more damaging races of southern corn leaf
blight.
The small pod stage has been shown to be the most sensitive
stage for factors affecting soybean yields.
Patent No. 3,709,694 was assigned to the University of
Florida for a beverage from plants of the Hemarthria species.


FLA-AY-00001 MCCBOUD DE
NON-PHOJECTED AGBONDMIC RESEARCH
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Management practices for fertilization and moisture application
to improve the yield of field corn were initiated. Irrigation at
one inch of water per week considerably increased the dry weight
of plants pripr to tasseling. Liquid fertilizer applied to the
foliage did not icrease ear weight as compared to splitt
applications to the soil. Percent brix and sugars in corn stems
remained high prior to harvesting, suggesting as inadequate sink
volume for ears. Percent brix and sugars in stems was n9t
influenced by moisture or amount of fertilizers applied. A
sampling technique for determination of dry weight of plants and
brix in stems should be investigated; the sample size consisting
of 5 corn plants each proved unreliable. A growth analysis study








was conducted in 1973 to characterize growth and to measure dry
matter accumulation in high yielding peanuts. Dry matter
accumulation of roots, stems, leaves and peanuts was followed
from seedling to maturity. The total dry matter produced was
9,609 kg/ha and at harvest the percent of plant components was
roots 1.6, stems 34.9, leaves 11.6 and peanuts 51.9. The yield
of peanuts was 4,681 kg/ha but unfilled peanuts were available
for a maximum yield of 6,940 kg/ha. Carbohydrate sink therefore
appeared not to limit yields.


FLA-AY-00374 HORNER E S
CORN BREEDING
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Thirty S(2) lines which had shown promise of superiority in
combining ability to F6 and F44 were retested in 1973 at four
locations. Two of these lines, 51282 and 51551-1, were
consistently superjpr to F44xF6 in combining ability with Fla. 5B
Sy However these lines produced taller hybrids than most of
the other lines, which is a disadvantage. An evaluation of the
5th and 7th cycle population of recurrent selection for combining
ability with F44xF6 indicated no progress was made for yield in
the last two cycles, but there was significant improvement fpr
percent erect plants at harvest. Two synthetic varieties. Fla.
C62 and Fla. S.T. were crossed with early commercial hybrids and
corn belt lines to reduce height and obtain earlier maturity. The
resulting populations were compared with C62 and S.T. in 1973.
Ear height was reduced 20 to 25% but grain yield was reduced
17%. These results bear out other data which have shown a close
correlation between plant height and yield.


FLA-AY-01087 WILCOX N CURiEY W L
CHEMICAL CONTROL OF WEEDS IN FIELD CROPS
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Evaluations of herbicides for weed control in Peanuts, Soybeans
and Tobacco were conducted at Marianna, Qaincy and Gainesville.
In peanuts, the superior herbicide program was benefit preplant
followed by a tank mix pf alachlor + Dyanap at cracking plus 2,4-
DB late postemergence. Two cultivations were also necessary.
Promising new preemergence herbicides were S-6044, 2 lb/A: MBR-
8251, 2 lb/A and preplant tank-mix of benefin + metribuzin 1.1 +
0.25 lb/A. Superior control of Florida beggarweed was achieved
with cracking stage applications of alachlor + Dyanap at 3 + 3 r
3 + 4.5 lb/A. Two July applications, 2 weeks apart, of DPX-2801
at .125 or .25 lb/A, gave excellent control of all late season
weeds. In soybeans, alachlor + metribuzia 2 + .38 lb/A gave
superior control of cocklebur and sicklepod and the highest
soybean yield. Adding glyphosate to tkis combination gave
excellent yields in stale-seedbed planting. Alachlor + metribuzin
+ glyphosate 2 + .38 + 2 gave excellent results in no-till
planting. Directed sprays of linuron or linurou + 2,4-DB improved
ate season weed control in all soybeans. In tobacco, all weeds
were controlled except nutsedge with R-7465 at 3 lb/A preplant. A
combination of isopropalin and pebulate preplant plus diphenamid
postplant at 1.25 + 2 + 4 lb/A gave commercial control of all
weeds including nutsedge.


FLA-AY-01154 DEAN C E HORNER E S
WHITE CLOVER AND ALFALFA BREEDING
PROGRESS REPORTt 73/01 73/12
White Clover Plants representing clones selected for
persistence, plant type, and general vigor were planted in a
polycross nursery to evaluate general combining ability and to
obtain bulk seed for testing. Clones representing interspecific
hybrids between T. repens, and T. uniflorum and T. occiaentale








were grown in a space-planted test, and were allowed to cross
with T. repense Considerable variability occurred in growth
pattern; however, the best lines in this group were inferior to
i. repens in ground coverage, leaf size, and forage production at
this stage of genetic development. A study of clones of T. repens
characterized as viney and non-viney was continued. Viney plant
types had longer internodes, flowered earlier, and produced less
forage than did non-viney types. A variety test was conducted,
which included 11 varieties and 3 experimental synthetic
varieties. The 3 experimental varieties performed as well as the
others in forage production, and in addition, showed more
persistence and early regrowth. Alfalfa The current cycle pf
selection for persistance will be compiled in 1974. Other work
included"cooperation with the Virginia Experiment Station on cold
tolerance in the Fla. 66 variety, and with the Arizona Experiment
Station on spotted aphid resistance in Fla. 66 and on disease
resistance in varieties developed in Arizona. These projects are
new and no data are available.


FLA-AY-01167 BOYD F T PINE G N
EVALUATION OF INTRODUCED AND NATIVE PLANT SPECIES FOR PASTURE,
FOBAGE AND OTHER USES
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Transvala digitgrass Mas released for planting for pasture
purposes this past season. Over 3000 bales of vegetative planting
stock were distributed to interested Florida growers. In
addition, foundation material was sent for planting purposes to
Nicaragua, Columbia, Venezuela, and Brazil. Its stunt-virus
resistance makes Transvala particularly desirable in tropical
American countries. Resistance of this pasture grass to gray lead
spot (Piricularia grisea) was also observed during the past
summer season. Twenty-four grazing and forage sorghums were
tested for cyanide content. Sorghums found potentially dangerous
for grazing purposes included Funk's 78 F and 83 F Pioneer's 927
and 988, Rudy-Patrick's More Su 11 Niagara's Sweet Chew and
ACCO's Sweet Sioux 11. Sorghums lowest in cyanide were Rudy-
Patrick's Trudy G, DeKalb's Sudax S-15, and Northrup-King s
Tradan 5. Four annual ryegrasses which produced large amounts of
seed in the spring were observed for reseeding abilities in the
following fall pasture season. Kinderlou, reseeded best. Florida
Rust-Resistant and Gulf varieties were intermediate, and Magnolia.
showed poorest reseeding habits. All four of these ryegrasses
gave satisfactory ground cover by mid-January. Perennial peanut
selection OGSI gave earlier rate of establishment and higher
yields than other perennial Arachis accessions.


FLA-AY-01286 PRINE G M SCHRODER V N
RUELKE O C
MICROCLIMATIC INFLUENCES ON FIELD CROPS
PROGRESS aEPORTs 73/01 73/12
The effect of gibberellc acid (G.A.) on reducing the detrimental
effects of cool temperatures in spring and fall on perennial
summer grasses was studied. Spring hay yield of Pangola
digitgrass harvested April 6 was increased from 310 pounds/acre
at 0 G.A. rate to 590 pounds/acre where 20 g/acre of G.A. was
applied 14 days prior to harvest. In the fall the hay yield .n
October 31 of Pangola receiving 20 g/acre of G.A. 28 days earlier
was 830 pounds/acre compared to 460 pounds/acre at 0 rate.
Similar responses were obtained for Transvala digitgrass but not
for Coastcross I bermudagrass. Joint vetch seed were scarified
and germination increased by burning the overwintering plant
residue of bahia grass and joint vetch. The legume in the vetch-
bahiagrass mixture was increased from 16. on unburned check to
50% where burned and dry matter yield of first harvest increased
from 2650 to 3000 pounds/acre, respectively. Effect of soil
temperature and G.A* on Pensacola bahiagrass and Pangola
digitgrass growth and sucrose content was investigated. Sucrose
levels increased in both species with increasing levels of G.A.








This was most apparent after 48 hours, but the increase persisted
for at least 21 days. At air temperatures of 26-32oc shoot growth
of bahiagrass was increased. Root growth was iot affected by G.A.
except in bahiagrass at the cold end of its growth range.


FLA-AY-01302 GASKINS B H
A BIOCHEMICAL STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENT ON THE GROWTH
OF HIGHER PLANS
PROGRESS REPORT. 73/01 73/12
Growth rates of Digitaria and other tropical grasses were
depressed by short photoperiods. The effect was independent of
light intensity and growth depression caused by low night
temperatures. Gibberellic acid (GA) treatments failed to reverse
this effect. In the field, GA dd not consistently diminish
accumulation of starch leaves of Digitaria at 10C. 0(2) evolution
by isolated chloroplasts was used to evaluate plant responses to
various treatments. Rapid extraction procedures were adapted for
grass leaf tissue and buffers were selected for assay
procedures. When figitaria was exposed to a gradually lowered
temperature regime, the adverse effect of 10C night temperatures
on photosynthesis rate was reduced. This effect and daylength
induced-growth rate changes are being studied in Chloris so that
inheritance patterns can be determined. Gel electrophoresis 9f
the amylolytic enzymes of Dactylis glomerate showed that, as An
the case of Digitaria, GA did not alter the number of isozymes.
In Digitaria, GA enhanced anylolytic activity at both 30 and 10C.
No significant differences in Dactylis amylolytic activities were
found due to either 10C ro GA application. Starch levels were
uniformly low, while GA treatment at 30C reduced sucrose levels.


FLA-AY-01303 NORDEN A J
VARIETAL IMPROVEMENT OF PEANUTS (ARACHIS HYPOGAEA L.)
PROGRESS REPQRT: 73/01 73/12
Since the introduction of Florunner in 1969 the use of runner
peanuts for confections has risen steadily in the U.S. This past
year runner use rose almost 13 million pounds and now surpasses
all other types used by candy industry (Peanut Journal Nat
World V.53 No. 1:36. 1973). Results of cooperative research
supported by USDA AHS Grant No. 12-14-100-9923 (34) showed that
an intact seed coat is necessary for resistance of peanut seed to
infection by Ascergillus flavis, and that wax-like accumulations
on the surface of the seed coat help prevent the fungus from
penetrating. Florunner was found to be more resistant to this
fungus than other commonly grown varieties. Additional crosses
were made to develop lines. with more resistance to toxin-
producing molds and to rust disease. NC-FLA 14 released jointly
with North Carolina in 1973 out-yielded Florigiant at Gainsville
by 200 pounds per acre in 1973. A Florida release committee is
currently studying the desirability of releasing UF 70115. This
early-maturiguq Virgnila-bunch line has been exceeding the yields
of Florgiant and Florunner in National Variety Trials at
Gainesville.


FLA-AY-01358 KILLINGER G B RUELKE O C
PASTURE AND LEGUBE VARIETY EVALUATION
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Ryegrass (17), varieties yielded from a low of 3542 to a high pf
6756#/A-DM with no rust on any variety. Tetraploid varieties were
only average in yield. Miss. blends, Magnolia Gulf and Fla. rust
resistant were the highest yielding. White clover (13) varieties
seeded in the fall of 1972 yielded from 2944 to 4682#/A-DM
forage. Highest yielding were Regal, Nolins Improved, K0176,
Tillman and Ladino. Nine red clover varieties yielded from 2960
to 4497#/A-DM forage. Highest yielding mere Redman, Penscott,








Nolins, and Kenland. Varieties yielded most when treated with
30#/Z of Fritted Trace Elements 503. 'Florida 66' alfalfa
produced 8,180#/A of Db outyielding 'African' which produced
6,220#/A during the second year, when fertilized with 2,000#/A of
0-10-20 plus manor elements and harvested at 6 week intervals.
Second yr DM yields of 'Florida 66' harvested at first flower
ranged from 2 300#/A with no added fertilizer, to 7,520#/A with
2000 /A of 6-10-20 added. Second year yields of 'Florida 66'
ranged from 2,180 to 8,780#/A in response to six different
management treatments. When 17 bermudagrass selections were
evaluated for persistence and yield the second year on vet
flatwood soils,, six selections outyielded Coastal. The best one
(Hybrid #41) produced 8,000#/A-DM when Coastal produced 5,700#/A.


FLA-AY-01359 HINSON K
SOYBEAN BREEDING
PROGRESS REPORTz 73/01 73/12
The overall objective is to develop more productive, higher
protein cultivars for all areas of Florida. Present emphasis is
on reducing production hazards in west Florida by incorporating
resistance to nematodes Meloidogyne incognita (root-knot) and
Heterodera glycines (cyst) into new cultivars. We are using
hybridization, selection field evaluation to obtain and
identify recombinants that possess resistance to these nematodes
in combination with high yield and other important adaptation
traits now in existing oultivars. In 1973 many high yielding,
advanced generation selections were resistant to H. incognita,
and some also had higher protein percentages. Slightly less
advanced selections combine apparent high yield with resistance
to H. glycines. Segregating populations have the potential for
combining resistance to both H. incognita and H. glycines with
high yielding types of Group VII maturity. The cultivar Cobb,
released in 1973 is superior to the older Hardee cultivar in
yield, resistance to M. incognita seed quality, and seedling
vigor. It is wll adapted to northeast and central Florida, thus
increases production potentials for these regions. We more
clearly identified a less prevalent nematode species Beloidogyne
maxanica as a potential threat to soybean production in Florida.
All commercial cultivars evaluated were susceptible. However,
some breeding lines were moderately resistant.


FLA-AY-01375 CLARK F
EFFECT OF CULTURAL MANAGEMENT ON BLACK SHANK AND ON QUALITY AND
QUANTITY OF FLUE-CURED TOBACCO
PROGRESS REPQRTt 73/01 73/12
Spun nylon, plastic and cheesecloth plantbed covers were compared
during the 1973 planted season. Spun nylon and plastic covers
continued to be superior to cheesecloth ln the production of
tobacco and seedlings. Tape strips, containing tobacco seed were
used with excellent results. This technique could contribute to
direct field seedling of tobacco, by-passing the necessity of the
plantbed. A suitable herbicide will be needed for direct seeding
o be successful. Direct seeding was successful when a treated
plantbed was used to simulate field conditions, tests will
continue with this technique during 1974. The regional sucker
control tests were conducted and complete results of these tests
will not be completed until April 1974 when chemical and smoke
tests are completed on the treated tobacco. Mechanical harvesting
tests of tobacco were continued and twenty commercial varieties
were used to see if there was an interaction of machine vs
variety. The 1973 results were consistent with those obtained in
1972; consequently, the data does not support the thesis that
special varieties are an urgent need if mechanical harvesting is
to be successful. Maryland Type 32 tobacco was grown with
success, and has a potential of supplying a market demand of
several million pounds of this type tobacco.








FLA-AY-01377 PFAHLER P L
QUANTITATIVE GENETIC STUDIES IN HIGHER PLANTS
PROGRESS REPQOTl 73/01 73/12
The level of hybrid vigor was reported to be positively
correlated to early postgermination growth. Coleoptile length in
rye was studied to determine if coleoptile length could be used
to identify and select plants containing various levels of
heterozygosity. Coleptile length was found to be associated with
early season forage production but not related to late season
forage production ps grain yield. Therefore, coleptile length
could not be used to select heterozygosity levels. Ultraviolet
irradiation is an unique and effective mutagenic agent and
irradiation of pollen grains offers an ideal method to induce
mutations without the undesirable and usually gon-transmissible
somatic mosaics associated with embryo irradiation. An apparatus
designed to .irradiate ppllen grains with ultraviolet from all
directions was developed. A negative linear relationship was
found between ultraviolet irradiation exposure and in vitro
germination percentage with a LD(50) value of 15.0 x 105 erg/cm2.
A negative relationship between ultraviolet exposure and in vitro
pollen tube length was found with the depression in length much
more pronounced at the lower exposure. Ultraviolet irradiation
depresses in vitro germination and pollen tube growth much less
than gamma irradiation suggesting that ultraviolet-induced
mutations would have a greater probability of being transmitted,
recognized and applied.


FLA-AY-01444 WILCOX M
BIOCHEMISTRY OF HERBICIDES
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
The family of herbicides and plant growth regulators represented
by compound 926 a last year's report is still being evaluated.
Amp4g this group, 926 and 1055 gave 100% sucker control at 750
ppm, while ccmpplnds 925, 1012, 1019, 1038, 1040, and 1041 though
less effective allowed fewer suckers to grow than did the
commercial sLandard MH30. A member of a new, previously
unreported family pf herbicides and plant growth regulators
1054, included in the above experiment also gave 100% control .f
tobacco suckers The citrus abscission agent 881 continues
loosen mature valencia oranges without damage to immature fruit
or bloom. Toxicolpgical evaluations are now under way. The
biodegradable auxia, 471, described in previous reports has been
found to be at least as active against some aquatic weeds as 2
4-D. Some of the above evaluations were performed by CIBA-GEIGI
Corp. These compounds are also designated as follows: 881=CGA
22911; 926=CGA 28938. These discoveries under this project are
protected by a total of 33 pending patents.


FLA-AY-01458 PRIME G M
LAND DISPOSAL OF DAIRY EARM WASTE
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Long season annual summer crops and ryegrass and/or small grains
in cool season with seedbed preparation before seeding each crop
prevented builduE of an objectionable amount of surface duff at
weekly rates of 1 2, and 4 inches per acre of dairy manure
effluent. The biggest problem with this system was getting each
new crop seeded rapidly and effectively. So damage was noticed on
plants as an effect of the manure effluent treatments. The manure
disposal areas are now being established in perennial Transvala
digitgrass which will be topseeded with annual ryegrass during
cool season.


FLA-AY-01475


MOTS G 0O








RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROPERTIES OF SOUTHERN FORAGES AND ANIMAL
RESPONSE
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
The dry matter diqestibility by sheep, of bahia rass hays
harvested after 6, 0 and 13 wv regrowth was 54.5, 50.0 and 51. 6
respectively. Supplemental protein increased the intake of low-
quality Pangola digitgrass hays by sheep but did not increase
digestibility or acetate tolerance. Nitrogen balance, rumen fluid
volume and fecal dry matter excretion were increased by
supplement. Corn aeal decreased the intake of high-quality
bermudagrass hay by sheep 26% but had no effect on the intake of
low-quality hay. Total digestible energy intake (hay + grain) was
increased by feeding corn meal with all hays. Low-quality forages
may be supplemented with grain to meet malxtenaAce requirements
but grain supplementation of high-quality forages decreases the
ampunt of forage utilized by producing animals. Systems of forage
utilization must consider forage quality (intake of-digestible
energy when fed alpine the effect of supplemental nitrogen
sources on intake and the replacement of forage energy by
supplemental concentrate energy.


FLA-AY-01478 ALLEN L H JR
SYSTEMS FOR TILE DRAIN SLUDGE CONTROL FOR CITRUS WITH HIGH WATER
TABLE IN FLORIDA
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
The purpose of this research work unit is to evaluate the effects
of three soil profile modifications and two drain line designs on
water table management, the prevention of iron compounds
sladging of dsraLs, and growth responses of twelve citrus root-
stock/scion combinations. This research is conducted on poorly
drained flatwcods soils at Fort Pierce, Florida. This research is
important because high water tables during periods of persistent
rainfall lead to anaerobic soil conditions unfavorable for root
growth and survival, and because urbanization of better-drained
upland sites is causing a shift of citrus to flatwoods sites.


FLA-AY-01511 SMITH H L
FORAGE GRASS GENETICS AND BREEDING PRIMARILY PANICUMS
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Sexuality was transferred to a broad range of Panicum maximum
plant types through hybridization with newly found sexual plants.
hybrids were selected for forage yield and di stability plant
vigor disease resistance, cool season growth and resistance to
poor drainage. Seed was increased on the best lines for further
evaluation. Although most sexual plants were tetraploid one
sexual diploid was recovered and has been crossed with an
apomictic diploid and stocks produced to study the inheritance of
apomixis and for mutation studies to attempt produce much needed
genetic variability for seed holding ability not now in
existence. Seed dormancy in P. maximum was reduced by seed
treatments with GA, KNO(3). conc. H(2)SO(41 and storage. Lowering
storage temperature from 20oC to 10 C nearly halted the loss of
dormancy in some lines. Removal of the lemma and plea did not
reduce germination, as has been reported, if physical and
microbial damage was prevented. Dormant seeds were characterized
by higher peroxidase activity than nondormant. No difference was
detected in amylases, esterases, MDH or total protein. Both
peroxidase and asylases isoenzymes change rapidly with
germination. Buffelgrass hybrids were made to incorporate the
Dirdwoodgrass inflorescence, rhizomatous habit, and good seed
producing ability into well adapted high yielding types.


FLA-AY-01520 BOYD F T
THE BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF NEMATODES AFFECTING AGHONOMIC CROPS








PROGRESS BEPORT: 73/01 73/12
Damage to forage grasses by nematode infestation is the result of
interactions among the plant host, specificity of nematode
organism the type pf spil, and temperature of the soil medium.
Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne Sp.) were found in greatest
members in Digitaria pentzii P.. 2999602 during the midsummer
season. In July, 5i 1-root-know nematodes were found in 100 cc. of
Arredondo sandy soil. Spiral nematodes were found in greatest
numbers in heavier soils in which Pensacola bahiagrass and
Hemarthria altissiua were being grow. Sting nematodes
(Belonolaimus longicaudatus) have been found in surface sandy
soils in pangolagrass and Hemarthria during April and day with
fewer numbers in the heat of midsummer. A count of 630 sting
nematodes in 100 cc. soil was found nay 23, 1973 in pangolagrass
on Arredondo fine sand. Such counts of sting nematodes are highly
destructive to grass roots. The mere presence of parasitic
nematodes has not necessarily meant that significant crop
destruction was taking place. Certain resistant grasses were
tolerant of certaAn parasitic nematodes when not present in too
dense population anubers.


FLA-AY-01556 WILCOX M
HERBICIDE MOVEMENT FROM APPLICATION SITES AND EFFECTS ON NON-
TARGET SPECIES
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
We have observed unexpected growth enhancement of St. Augustine
grass when treated by the herbicide neburon. Formulated neburpn
showed antibacterial activity, but purified neburon did not. We
speculate that an impurity, possibly norneburon or 3,31,-4,4-t
tetrachlorocar-banilide, is responsible for the antibacterial
activity and the growth enhancement. Comparative VPC analysis is
being evaluated


FLA-AY-01569 DEAN C E CLARK F
GENETIC IMPROVEMENT OF TOBACCO
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Flue-cured Tobacco-Sixteen varieties and breeding lines with
reported resistance to PVY, and one breeding line with resistance
to TBV were collected to provide the basis for a breeding
program. Artificial inoculations under controlled greenhouse
conditions showed that two lines, 1224 (Virgin A Mutante) and
1227, were resistant to regional strains of PVY. These lines
supported the virus, however and could transmit it to healthy
plants. Line i224 was slightly higher in resistance than 1227.
All other entries exhibited slight to severe symptoms. Lines 1224
and 1227 also had resistance to regional strains of TEV, with
1227 being more resistant than 1224. Line 1227 did not support
the virus and could not be used as a source of inoculation to
other plants. As far as can be determined, 1227 is the only
source of resistance to strains of TEV attacking tobacco. Field
tests with PVI and TEV Substantiated these results. Crosses were
made between these resistant lines and selected flue-cured
tobacco varieties to develop an acceptable commercial type.
Advanced breeding lines being developed for black shank and root
knot resistance continued to perform well, with black shank
resistance at a high level. Price per pound varied very little
among all lines evaluated. Transfer of male sterility into
selected lines and varieties was advanced as part of a study of
F(1) hybrid varieties.


FLA-.AY-01571 HORNER E S EDWARDSON J R
BREEDING FOR RESISTANCE TO SOUTHERN CORN LEAF BLIGHT
PROGRESS REPORT 73/01 73/12
Selection for resistance to Race 0 of Helminthosporium maydis in







a normal-cytoplasm population was continued. Over 525 full-sib
progenies were grown and the most resistant plants were selfed.
Further selection for leaf blight and common rust (P. sorghii)
was done prior to harvest and 557 selfed ears were saved. These
were grown under severe leaf blight conditions and plant-to-plant
crosses were made among the most resistant lines. Many of these
lines showed a high level of resistance to both leaf blight and
rust. A similar selection program in a T-cytoplasm population has
failed to produce adequate resistance to Race T of H. maydis.
Difference in size and shape of mitochondria in apical growing
points and young leaves have been observed in cytoplasmic male
sterile lines and in comparisons of sterile and normal lines.
Fertility restoring genes do not appear to influence the
morphology of the abnormal mitochondria.


FLA-AY-01573 PRIME G M SCHRODER V N
MINIMIZING HAZARDS AND INCREASING POTENTIALS FOR SOUTHERN SOYBEAN
PRODUCTION
PROGRESS REPORT 73/01 73/12
Bragg soybeans were shaded at 50 and 75A shading for weekly
intervals from one month after seeding until near maturity.
Several periods were indicated where soybean plants were
particularly affected by the low light intensities. The
potentially most damaging period was the small pod stage
following the end of flowering when shading resulted in reduced
numbers of seed per plant. Bragg and Jupiter soybeans were seeded
after early, medium and late maturing corn on July 12, July 23,
and August 3, respectively. A soybean cultivar slightly earlier
than Jupiter would have good plant size and yield and mature by
end of Irost-free season at the first two planting dates.
Soybeans seeded in reseeding ryegrass residue with no tillage
planter made gopd yields and the ryegrass reseeded in fall. The
effects of 2 species of Endogone mycorrhiza on growth of soybeans
was studied in autoclaved soil maintained at temperatures ranging
from 17-41 C. Soil temperatures from 23-34 C were most favorable
for soybean growth. In this range soybeans inoculated with E.
calospora had a nitrogen content 18% above the check and a
phosphorus content 40% aoove the check. Plants inoculated with E.
heterogama also had an increase of nitrogen of 18%, but
phosphorus content was not increased.


FLA-AY-01590 GREEN V E JR WHITTY E B
HOfNER E S
FIELD CROP VARIETY TESTING
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Uniform tests of corn, sorghum pearlmillet, eanuts and soybean
varieties were grown at several locations in the state. Of t e 49
corn hybrids tested 28 could be recommended to farmers on the
basis of satisfactory yield lodging resistance, grain quality,
and diseases and insect resistance. Average grain yields over six
locations ranged from 82 to 129 bushels per acre, and lodging
from 6% to 374, for the 49 hybrids. At Gainesville, 50 grain
sorghums had a range of 2190 to 5580 lbs. per acre of grain and
an IVOND range of 70 to 88% Twenty-four silage sorghums averaged
5 tons per acre dry matter. Thirty four pearlmillet and sorghum x
sudangrass hybrids averaged 7.5 tons per acre dry matter with a
range of IVOMD values from 59 to 69A. Low tannin (non bird
resistant) grain sorghums produced higher yields and were more
digestible than high tannin hybrids. Yields of peanut varieties
in pounds per acre ranged from 3870 to 5210 at Gainesville 2800
to 4190 at Marianna, and 1740 to 1140 at Jay. Florunner had the
highest average yield among the four runner-type varieties and
NC-FLA 14 was the highest yielding of seven Virginia-type
varieties. Eleven soybean varieties grown at five locations
ranged from 31 bushels per acre for Forrest to 38 for Hansom,
Hutton, and Cobb. Fpur group VIII and four group VI varieties
averaged 37 and 34 bu/A respectively in 1973. but the same
varieties averaged 28 and 34 bu/A respectively iq 1972. Thus in








years with normal rainfall late maturing varieties yield best,
but in years with severe late-season drought stress, as in 1972,
early maturing varieties yield best.


FLA-AY-01600 _SCHANK S C SLEPER D A
FORAGE GRASS CIZEGEBETICS AND BREEDING, PRIMARILY DIGITARIAS,
BRACHIARIAS AND HEMARTHRIAS
PROGRESS REPORT 73/01 73/12
Approximately 1 000 Digitaria plots were evaluated for winter
hardiness. A mild winter resulted in little information on winter
survival of the Digiteria genera in Florida. Analysis of
digitgrass hybrids fcr winter survival is continuing. Data from
two sibling genptypes of a Digiteria hybrid indicated that the
IVOND of the apical portion remained relatively constant over a
6-week period (67A) while the whole forage decreased in in IVOMD
from 69.7% at the first sampling date to 61.6% at the last
sampling date. Five weeks regrowth of several Hemarthrja
asseccions ranged from 54.3% in an Argentine diploid to 68.4% an
an African tetracloid. The tetraploid has fewer leaves and stems
thicker in diameter than the diploids. Studies of stem morphology
revealed that the combined percentage area of vascular bundles
for each cross section area was inversely related to IVOMD,
indicating that structural differences can greatly reduce
digestibility.


FLA-AY-01608 EDWARDSON J R WARMKE H E
SPRING D R
CYTOPLASM GENE INTERACTIONS IN HIGHER PLANTS
PROGRESS REPORT; 73/01 73/12
Studies of fertility restoration in Petunia, suppression of non-
Meadelian plastid abnormalities by nuclear genes in tobacco and
induction of dominant male sterility and its suppression in corn
are continuing. Chemical mutagens and gamma irradiation are being
applied to T-cyt'oplasm corn in attempts to alter cytoplasm#c
factors controlling susceptibility to Helmithosporium maydas
infection, and to normal corn in attempts to induce cytoplasmic
male sterility factorsA Various viruses and their inclusions are
being investigated with light and electron aicroscopy. Consistent
differences in sterile and maintained cytoplasmic inclusions have
been observed in Vicia faba. Graft-transmissions of cytoplasmic
male sterility in sunflower is in progress. The c tology of
anther development was studied in corn lines F(6) and F44), oth
in N and T cytoplasas. Angled-layer aggregates of the ancuba
strain of TMV were found to form constant left-handed helises.
Studies on production, manipulation, and culture of corn
protoplasts are in progress. Absorption maxima of mitochondrial
cytochromes were identical, although T lines contained 6-10% more
of one species. Isoenzyaes of T and N corn or fertile and sterile
sorghum underwent band shifts during meiosis.


FLA-AY-01612 MOTT G 0
ECONOMIC BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS OF DAIRY-BEEF
CROSSES ON PASTURE AND IN DRYLOT
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
First matings were made in the Sprin4 of 1973 to produce
straightbred Angus and Brown Swiss, F 1) and Backcross calves
from both breeds of sire. Procedures are being set up to monitor
soil and ground water nutrient levels as well as runoff from
pasture and semi-confinement programs to determine if
contamination levels are evident from these management programs.
Semi-confinement programs are under construction and complete
confinement facilities are in the planning stages. Plans are
being formulated to sample the pasture forages offered to animals
in this trial and to estimate the nutritive value by various








laboratory procedures including in vitro digestibility of the
organic matter fractions


FLA-AY-01622 KILLINGER G B
"NEW PLANTS" THEIR INTRODUCTION, MULTIPLICATION, EVALUATION,
AND PRESERVATION
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Keaaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) is the most promising paper-pulp
crop for Florida flat-woods soils with Everglades 41, Guatemela
108 Everglades 71 Cuba 2032 and Guatemela 4 yieldings 21488,
17368, 16664, 10984 and 8415 pounds er acre of oven-dry stem
per acre respectively, Sunflower (He ianthus annua) can be
successfully grown in North Central Florida as a late winter or
early spring crop if irrigation is available. Varieties NK-HO1,
Peredovik Romansun HS52, Krasnodaret, and Record yielded 3340,
3318, 2846, 2635, and 2258 pounds per acre o seed. Tmo
irrigations of one inch water each were required in April and lay
for the early February seeded crop. Pampasgrass (Cortaderia
selloana) plants with brown plumes were found to be male plants
whereas the more attractive light colored plume plants were
female. Because dark colored plumes are less showy these plants
are usually destroyed and being the polled plants, the more showy
liqht colored plume plants cannot produce seed. Patent No.
3.709,694 was issued January 9, 1973 for a beverage from plants
of the genus Hemarthnia. Hemarthria spp (limpograss) received
from South Africa in 1964 were discovered to have a tea like
flavor and odor in 1967 with subsequent research indicating it
may have commercial possibilities as a beverage crop. A field
planting of a pigeongea (Caljanus cajaan selection from the
Norman variety in the spring of 1973 has indications of seed
yields over 2000 ppunds per acre.


FLA-AY-01646 PRINE G M RUELKE O C
ECOLOGY OF FIELD AND FORAGE CROPS
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
A critical period when low light intensities are particularly
detrimental to grain sorghum was established by saying grain
sorghum to remove 75% of sunlight for 5-day periods under field
conditions. The critical period is during the period of rapid
panicle enlargement from early boot stage to emergence of panicle
frpm the boot4 Low light intensity during this period reduces
drastically the number of seed developing per panicle. Similar
shading research pn a single-eared corn hybrid indicates the
presence fo a critical period 5 to 10 days before silking.


FLA-AY-01658 FRITZ G J
THE HOLE OF OXYGEN FIXATION IN LIGNIN BIOSYNTHESIS IN FORAGE
PLANTS
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Inasmuch as one of the goals of this research program is to
demonstrate the ia v4vo incorporation of oxygen into phenolic
acids which function as lignin precursors caffeic acid was
selected as a suitable candidate. This selection was justified
becuase the formatio-n of caffeic acid by hydrozylation of the
aromatic ring of p-cpumaric acid in in vitro experiments is
recorded in the literature. In preliminary experiments,
procedures for isolating caffeic acid from plant tissues were
worked out. Also it was found that caffeic acid could be purified
sufficiently for mass spectrometric analysis by repetitive thin-
layer chromatography. In later experiments, sunflower seedlings
were grown in the light in an atmosphere enriched with oxygen-13.
It was found that the hydroxyl oxygen atoms in caffeic acid are
derived from molecular oxygen. These results are now in press.
The significance of this work is to focus attention on the







indispensability of oxygen gas in the biosynthesis of caffeic
acid. Future work With other precursors of lignin will focus
attention on the indispensability of oxygen in lignin
biosynthesis. By refining our knowledge of the mechanism of
lignin biosynthesis, suggestions may become available for
regulating the lignun content of forage plants.








ANIMAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

During the past year research was conducted on 37 projects.
In addition the department cooperated Jn projects with other
University departments and 8 branch stations on nutrition
feeding, breeding, physiology genetics, meats and management
studies. The Meats La oratory slaughtered ower a thousand animals
for carcass and meat quality studies in cooperative projects
throughout Florida. The Nutrition Laboratory likewise made
thousands of determinations for over 32 different substances #n
feeds, blood and other animal tissues and excretions In
cooperative studies. A new position in Physiology was obtained
for work in twinning and estrus control of beef cattle.
Development is continuing on the 320 acre horse research center
near Ocala. Additional Thoroughbred and Quarter horses have been
donated by Florida horsemen and they are now being used at the
Center. Two new horse projects were written on reproduction of
horses by a new Horse Physiologist.
Other physical improvements include completion of the swine
research unit's mpve to a new location. Continued development
occurred in the part of the Purebred Beef Experimental Unit which
is being moved to an area near the Dairy Unit at Hague to make
room for the new Veterinary College. Another part of the Purebred
Beef Experimental Unit will be moved to 200 acres of the Bedford
Farm which was donated to IPAS. The Beef Research Unit Project
was revised and the cattle for the next phase have been obtained
and work is being done on the new facilities needed. These
facilities are being changed so that pasture, semi-confinement
and complete confinement studies will be undertaken with cow-calf
programs.
During the past year the faculty in Animal Science published
165 scientific and professional articles and two books. The
faculty's research-progEam has continued to receive national and
international recognition via research awards and invitations to
present papers throughout the world.


FLA-AL-00755 AMMERMAN C B LOGGINS P E
dOORE J E
THE NUTRITIONAL AVAILABILITY OF COMPONENTS OF LIVESTOCK
PEEDSTUFFS
PROGRESS REPORTS 73/01 73/12
Experiments were conducted on the influence of supplemental
nitrogen (feed grade biaret) and supplemental energy on voluntary
intake nutrient digestibility and nitrogen balance when sheep
were fed low-guality (3.28 and 4.51% crude protein) pangolagrass
hay. In Experlment 1 the 2 x 4 factorial arrangement of
treatments involved 6 or 10 g added nitrogen and 0, 50, 100 or
200 g energy supplement per sheep daily, Experiment 2 was a 3 x 3
factorial with 0, 8 or 16 g added nitrogen and 0, 60 or 120 q
energy supplement per sheep daily. The energy supplement (4.58%
crude protein) contained 50% corn meal, 25% sucrose and 25%
starch. Supplemental nitrogen increased hay intake (P<.01) and
apparent digestibility of nitrogen and cellulose (P<.01).
Nitrogen supplementation increased (P<.05) organic matter
digestion. All sheep that received supplemental nitrogen were in
positive nitrogen balance. Those fed hay alone or with energy
supplement only, were in negative balance. Increasing
supplemental nitrogen from 8 to 16 g per head daily did not
influence the parameters tested. Supplemental energy did not
increase the voluntary intake of hay, and depressed cellulose
digestibility (P<.01).


FLA-AL-00809 WARNICK A C BAZER F W
EFFECT OF HORMONES ON PHYSIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION IN CATTLE
PhOGRESS REPORTS 73/01 73/12







Lactating Angus beef cows at the Brooksville Beef Cattle Research
Station were injected w4th Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and
Estradiol at the beginning of the breeding season to determine
effect on pregnancy rate and earliness of calving. One group of
cows served as a control and received no hormones; one group
received 6 ag FSH subcutaneous while the third group received 6
mg FSH + 1 mg Estradiol intramuscularly. Only 12% of these cows
had either a corpus lubeum or 10 mm follicle on the ovaries that
could be palpated indicating little ovarian activity at time pf
hormone i4jecti.ons. The pregnancy rate in August in the three
groups were: Control 87%; FSH alone 88% and FSH + Estradiol -
89%. These differences were not significant. This coming year 3
years data will be combined to determine if small differences in
pregnancy rate and earliness in calving were significant.


FLA-AL-00938 NARNICK A C BAZER F W
KOGER M
CONTROLLED TEMPERATURE AND REPRODUCTION IN BEEF CATTLE
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
The records from 317 Charolais beef cows from a private purebred
herd have been studied to determine factors influencing
reproductive performance. The average length of the calving
intervals for this herd was 472 days with cows calving during
November, December and January having the longest intervals. The
source of cows had a significant effect on calving interval
indicating that genetic differences or the earlier environment
influenced reproduction at the ranch. The interval from calving
to first heat was 157 days which is excessively long. Again this
interval was longer in calvings that occurred during the months
of October November, December and February. The gestation period
was 284 days and was not influenced by any of the variables
studied. It is possible that an inadequate nutritional level
occurred during the winter months which partially accounted for
the excessively long calving intervals and long intervals from
calving to first heat. Improvement in reproduction could occur if
a strict culling program were practiced to cull cows with
excessively long.intervals to first heat following calving or for
failure to conceive.


FLA-AL-00999 COMBS G E
ELORIDA FEEDS AND BY-PRODUCTS FOR SWINE FEEDING
PROGRESS REPORT 73/01 73/12
Two experiments involving 40 growing pigs (43 lb.) and 28
finishing pigs (149 l1.) were conducted to evaluate performance
when the protein in cane molasses was considered in diet
formulations. Daily gain, feed efficiency and dry matter
digestibility was comparable for both weight groups when the 0
and 20% molasses diets were compared. Protein digestibility was
higher with 20% molasses diet for both young and finishing pigs.
Increasing the molasses to 40 and 60A of the diet resulted in
significant decreases in rate and efficiency of gain. Also
digestibility of dry matter and protein was less than either the
0 or 20% molasses groups. In all instances the depression was
more severe for the 60% group than with the 40% group. This would
indicate that the major factor contributing to this decrease with
the 60% molasses group was a deficiency of lysine and methionine
brought about by substituting molasses protein for corn protein.
The utilization of NPN (ammonium citrate and diammoiuam
phosphate) was studied witn young pigs. Additions of 2 or 3% NPN
protein to 15 or 14% corn-soy protein diets depressed gains 11 or
3b% and teed efficiency 8 or 22% respectively.


FLA-AL-01002 WALLACE H D
THE EVALUATION OF FEED ADDITIVES FOR SWINE








PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
The effects of protein level and lysine supplementation were
evaluated using growing pigs. Two protein level sequences, (17-
15%) and (13-11%), were involved. When lysine was added to the
low protein ration gains and feed conversion were improved but
remained some lower than that observed on the high protein diet.
Barrows responded significantly to lysine supplementation while
gilts did not. This observation suggests that tne amino acid need
of the gilt may be more demanding and involve the need for
supplementation cr other critical limiting amino acid(s). Carcass
leanness, as measured by backfat thickness loin eye area, % 4
lean cuts and marbling score was improved by lysine a editions and
these measurements were equal to those of pigs fed the high
protein diet. In a second experiment differences in performance
and carcass characteristics between intact male pigs and barrows
when fed different levels of protein, lysine and tryptophan were
studied. Growth of boars and barrows was similar when fed a 17%
protein diet. However, boars converted feed more efficiently. The
addition of lysine to the 17% protein diet stimulated gaig
boars but not barrows. The low protein diet (13%) depressed the
growth of boars much more than that of barrows. When lysine was
added to this diet both barrows and ilts responded but the
response was more dramatic for boars. The addition of tryptophan
did not stimulate performance of either barrows or boars. Boars
dressed slightly lower but yielded leaner carcasses. There was a
detectable level of boar taint in the cooked meat from most pf
the boars. Castration 16 days prior to slaughter reduced this
taint to a low level.


FLA-AL-01003 KOGER M
INHERENT BODY SIZE IN CATTLE AS RELATED TO ADAPTATION
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Starting with a fouaadation of Florida commercial cows two groups
have been upgraded to Angus bulls with contrasting
characteristics* one set of sires being of large genetic size
the other of smaller size but with indications of good
adaptability to the area. The only obvious response to date has
been in that of skeletal size of the two groups. Detailed
observations on fertility rate in brood cows and on growth,
feedlot performance and carcass characteristics are in progress.
These studies should be completed in two years.


FLA-AL-01079 AMMERMAN C B
MINERAL REQUIREMENTS OF CATTLE
PROGRESS REPQRTs 73/01 73/12
Lambs were used in a 2x2 factorial arrangement of treatments to
study the metabolism of Mn. One hundred microcuries of s5*n as
MnC12) were administered either orally or intravenously to
lambs led a basal (30 ppm an) or basal diet plus 4,000 pom
supplemental Mn4 Absorption of *5Mn was low and excretion of hoth
stable Mn and s54n was almost exclusively by way of the feces
regardless of dietary Mn level or pathway of isotope
administration. Lambs receiving low dietary Mn retained more s*an
in tissues than did lambs fed supplemental Mn. Tissue and plasma
levels of stable Ra were higher and tissue Fe and Zn were lower
in lambs fed the an-supplemented diet. Experiments were conducted
with wethers to study dietary interrelationshi s of Ca, P1 and
Mg. Dietary levels varied as follows: Ca 0.13 to .78%, P 0.12 to
0.36% and Mg 500 to 7,750 ppm. As measured by mineral balance
and plasma levels, direct antagonism was observed in these
studies between Ca and P and between Ca and Mg. There appeared to
be little direct interaction between P and Mg. Tne relationship
in ruminants between plasma Mg and voluntary feed intake as
influenced by age of animal and by dietary ag was studied with
lambs (6 to 12 mo), yearlings (1 to 2 yr) and adult sheep (2 to 3
yr). Plasma Mg decreased more quickly, and voluntary feed intake
was reduced sooner in the' mature sheep than in the younger







animals when a diet low in M1 was fed. Voluntary feed intake and
plasma Mq were correlated: lambs, .60; yearlings, .72; and adult
sheep, .58.


FLA-AL-01186 KOGER M
A STUDY OF RESPONSE TO SELECTION AND genetic-environmental
INTERACTION IN HEREFORD CASTLE
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
During the first phase of this project two genotypes of Hereford
Cattle-Miles City Montanta Line 1 (HCL(1)) and the Brooksville,
Florida selection herd (BL(6) -were compared in each of tmo
environments (Miles City and Brooksville). Results (previously
published) showed highly significant genotypes by environment
interactions (GEI) for most of the production traits. During the
second phase which is nearing completion, the trial has been
expanded to include a cpmpar.son of two branches of Line 1 cattle
(Omac1I1) and B1,(1) The total cow herd efficiency at
Brooksville for BL 6), BL(1) and MCL(1) was 40%, 30 and 11%,
respectively, fpr 1973. These results continue to confirm the
previous indication that selection and breeding for specific
environments is of great importance in maximizing production
efficiency in beef cattle.


FLA-AL-01313 LOGGINS P E
SELECTION FOR RESISTANCE IN SHEEP TO ABOMASAL PARASITIC NEMATODES
PROGRESS REPORTS 73/01 73/12
Having previously established a relationship of hemoglobin type
(AA,AB,BB) to HaeaTmQghU contortus infection levels in necropsied
Florida Natives tfe experim-enta-flock was reallotted for the
1972 breeding season based on the hemoglobin type of the ewe. The
Rambouillet ewe groups were deleted from the study following the
collection of 1972 lambing data. The 1973 Florida Native lamb
crop data were collected from within single sire hemoglobin type
treatment groups. The percent lamb crops were 108 105 and 10
for hemoglobin type AA, AB, and BB respectively. Lamb birth and
120 day weights were respectively 2.4, 10.6; 2.1, 10.4 and 2.0,
10.6 kgm for the AA, AB and BB groups. The average hemoglobin
levels of lambs at .120 days of age were 10.7, AA; 9.4, A3 and
9.1 BB. Future selection of replacements will be based on data
collected from the within hemoglobin type groups.


FLA-AL-01442 PALMER A Z
FEEDING AND MANAGEMENT OF SWINE RAISED IN CONFINEMENT
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Twenty-eight barrows and twenty-eight gilts were used to compare
the influence of sex, dietary protein level and potassium
supplementation on the carcass characteristics. Two pens (7 pigs
each) of barrows and two pens (7 pigs each) of gilts were fd a
17-15% protein sequence and two pens of barrows and two pens pf
gilts were fed a 14-12% protein sequence. One pen of barrows and
one pen of gilts on each protein level were supplemented with
potassium. Protein sequence changed at approximately 125 lb.
average weight, figs were slaughtered at approximately 220 lbs.
Dressing percent was not influenced by the variables imposed.
Barrow carcasses had more backfat (L<.05) than gilt carcasses.
Level or protein and potassium supplementation had no effect on
backfat thickness. Carcass length was not effected by sex,
protein level or potassium supplementation. The high protein
regime carcasses had greater (<.01) area of loin eye than the low
protein regimes Gilt carcasses cut greater (<.01) percent of
four lean cuts than barrow carcasses. The 17-15% protein sequence
pigs also yielded greater (<.01) percent of four lean cuts.
Carcasses of pigs fed the lower protein sequence has more (<.05)








marbling. Potassium supplementation did not influence carcass
characteristics in either barrows or gilts.


/ FLS*R- 60 SHIRLEY a L EASLEY J F
-SITZNGES J F
TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF HYACINTHS AND OTHER
WAIER PLANTS
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Concentrations of 10 nutrient elements for livestock in six
species of aquatic plants from 2 lakes and a river in Florida
were studied over a period of one year. The plants were hydrilla
(Hj4rilla vertici' ata), waterhyacinth (Bichbornia cr ssies),
hornwVor5t 1 tTeao mTI demersug), pondweed ( a moelos
PctAnatus), eelgrass Valsn-eria americana) and naad 1Natad
jquaW lupensi3). On a dry weigT Basis P, K, Hg, Cu, Zn anaX !t
were in the range of concentrations of land forages in the United
States; Na was 10 to 100 times greater; and Fe exceeded the range
by 4 to 19 times. Ca concentration was higher and P generally
lower except for waterhyacinth which contained approximately 2
Ca. The Ca:P ratio in this plant was suitable for cattle
Hydrilla, naiad, hornwort pondweed and eelgrass had average Ca:
ratios of approximately 30 to 90 and 1 xg of the dry plant would
provide at average levels 3 to 6 times the daily Ca requirement
of a cow on a maintenance ration. Average as content of 14 ag/kg
dry weight in hydrilla in a lake compared with 1 mg/kg from a
river. Water hyacinth from a lake averaged 9 mg/kg. Hornwork,
pondweed, eelgrass and Naiad from the same lake ha averages
ranging rom 0.7 to 1.2 mg/kg dry weight.



FLA-AL-01462 BAZER F W WARNICK A C
WALLACE H D
UTEdINE FACTORS AFFECTING EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT AND CORPUS LUTEUM
FUNCTION
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
The purple protein .(Fraction IV) i ig 0 te e flushings was
puririe using carboxymethyl cellulose and antiserum to it was
prepared in sheep (Anti-IV). The anti-IV did not cross-react with
extracts of heart, lung, stomach, intestine, liver, spleen,
kidney or oviduct tissue, pig serum or other uterine proteins.
This indicates that the purple protein is uterine specific. Using
anti-IV, for immunodirfusion studies and electrophoretic
procedures the purple protein was not detectable in allantoic
flid recovered on days 20 22,24 or 26 of pregnancy but was
present in alla4toic fluids collected between days 30 and 100 of
gestation. These data suggest the protein is synthesized by the
uterus, secreted into the uterine lumen and transported into the
allantoic fluid. Anti-IM was used to passively immunize pregnant
gilts in order tp evaluate the effect on fetal and placental
development. Control gilts were administered sheep serum. Anti-IV
was gven on days 7 (20ml), 9 J20ml), 11 (40ml), 13 (40ml) and
15 (4 ml) of gestation and the gilts hysterectomized on day 30. A
significant (P<.01) reduction in uterine weight, placental length
and allantoic fluid protein concentration resulted.
Administration of anti-IV on days 34, 36, 38, 40 and 42 of
pregnancy significantly (P<.01) reduced placental length and
weight and fetal crown-rump length at day 50 of gestation. These
data suggest that the purple protein may be involved in some
aspect of placental development which may, in turn, affect
development of the fetus.


FLA-AL-01463 BAZER F W WARNICK A C
WALLACE H D
FETAL SURVIVAL TO 105 DAYS GESTATION IN SWINE ON VARIOUS HORMONAL
AND NUTRITIONAL REGIMES









PROGRESS REPORTS 73/01 73/12
Gilts which were pregnant bilaterally (Controls) and unilaterally
ovariectomized hysterectomized (UtOX) gilts which were
unilaterally pregnant are being studied on days, 20 25, 30, 35,
40 45, 50, 55, 60, 70, 8U 90, and 100 aays of gestation to
determine the time and dause of fetal deaths when intra-uterine
crowding is imposed (UHOX gilts). Complete data are not
available; however, the data indicate that Inadequate placental
development is the major problem resulting from increasing litter
size. These data will provide a basis for determining whether or
not placental development can be enhanced through the use of
hormones (progesterone and estrogen) to insure fatal survival.


FLA-AL-01467 FEASTER J P
EFFECTS OF LOW LEVEL DIETARY PESTICIDES ON RATS
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
In a study to learn whether the pesticide mirex adversely affects
growth or reproduction inr rats, and whether toxic effects are
greater with peanut oil as the source of dietary fat than with
corn oil, 48 weanling female rats were allotted to 6 groups which
were fed no mirex, 5 ppm, mirex, or 25 ppm airex with either corn
or peanut oil- They were bred at maturity after 12 weeks on the
diets. Growth ,(i.e. weight gains) among rats of all six lots was
approximately the same, although the 25 ppm mirex peanut oil
rats showed a slight depression. Blood hemoglobin levels were
unaltered. As to reproduction, all 5 ppm marex females performed
normally. Among the 25 ppm airex rats conception rate equaled
that o the other lots and number and size of off-spring did not
differ significantly; however, all but 2 pups died within 3 days.
Young female rats rom the control and 5 ppm mirex lots, as well
as the two 25 ppm mirex-corn oil females which survived, were
raised on the same diets which had been fed their dams, and were
bred upon reaching sexual maturity. Findings were the same as
with the first generation. Laboratory analysis showed mirex was
present in all tissues studied. Concentrations were 30 to 50
times as high in fat as in brain, liver, kidney or muscle, and 5
ties as high in rats fed 25 ppm mirex as in those fed 5 ppm. In
summary, R5 pm dietary mirex did not affect growth pr
reproduction; 25 pa mi ex aid not affect growth, but resulted in
death of virtually all newborn pups within 72 hr., with corn or
peanut oil as the dietary fat.


FLA-AL-01471 FRANKE D E
BEEF AND DAIRY X BEEF CROSS CATTLE FOR BEEF PRODUCTION IN
NORTHERN FLORIDA
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
The fourth calf crop of an extensive cooperative dairy x beef
crossbreeding study between Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station and ipalachee Correctional Institutton has been weaned.
In this calf crop F(1) dairy x beef (Brown Swiss X Angus, Brown
Swiss X Hereford, ~olstein X Angus and Holstein X Hereford)
calves weaned approximately 12% heavier than straightbred Aggus
and Hereford calves. Backcross dairy calves weaned about 10% less
than backcross British calves. F(1) dairy-beef females were 15
percent less fertile than contemporary British females under
similar conditions.


FLA-AL-01475 HOORE J E
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROPERTIES OF SOUTHERN FORAGES AND ANIMAL
RESPONSE
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
The dry matter digestibility, by sheep, of bahiagrass hays
harvested after 6, 10 and 13 wk regrowth was 54.5, 50.0 and
51.0%, respectively. Supplemental protein increased the intake of








low-quality Pangola digitgrass hays by sheep but did not increase
digestibility or acetate tolerance. Nitrogen balance, rumen fluid
volume and fecal dry matter excretion were increased by
supplement. Corn meal decreased the intake of high-quality
bermudagrass hay by sheep 26% but had no effect on the intake of
low-quality hay. Total digestible energy intake (hay + grain) was
increased by feeding corn meal with all hays. Low-quality forages
may be supplemented with grain to meet maintenance requirements
but grain supplementation of high-quality forages decreases the
amount of forage utilized by producing animals. Systems of forage
utilization must consider forage quality (intake of digestible
energy when fed alpne), the effect of supplemental nitrogen
sources on intake and the replacement of forage energy by
supplemental concentrate energy.


FLA-AL-01480 HENTGES J F JR
NUTRITION AND GiOWTH RESPONSE OF BEEF AND DAIRY X BEEF CALVES
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
A secondary objective to identify predisposing causes of cattle
liver abscesses was partially successful. Liver abscesses
previously were reported in all lots of cattle offered diets high
in nutrient density and low in bulky or coarse-textured
ingredients. Rumen epithelium changes were related to diet and
liver damage. Experimentally administered S. necrophorMg
organisms retarded cattle performance and caused -livZe-faagme.
Periodic blood tests for enzymes nutrients and metabolites were
inconclusive for identification of live cattle with developing
liver abscesses. A standardized procedure for preparing finishing
cattle for high-energy diets was developed.


FLA-AL-01481 HENTGES J F JR SHIRLEY R L
COMBS G E JR
PROCESSED AQUATIC PLANTS FOR ANIMAL NUTiITION
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) ensiled with graded levels
of dried citrus pulp and sugarcane molasses were evaluated.
Voluntary intake by sheep and cattle was highest with treatments
containing 4 kg dried citrus pulp and 1 kg sugarcaue molasses per
100 kg water hyacinth press residue. These treatments had the
highest acidity, lowest ash and least surface spoilage. Both in
vivo (sheep) and in vitro organic matter aigestibilities of a
Ia5i forage, pangolagrass (D iitaria decuabens), were higher than
for the best treatments of water acinth srTage. Preservation of
water hyacinth silage was satisfactory with formic, propionic,
acetic and mixtures of these organic acids as measured by
acidity, temperature and spoilage. Acceptability of these
treatments by cattle was highest with high lactic acid and low
pH. These results indicate a potential value as ensiled ruminant
animal feed for mechanically harvested and processed water
hyacinths.


FLA-AL-01501 KOGER M FRANKE D E
BREEDING METHODS FOR BEEF CATTLE IN THE SOUTHERN REGION
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
The objective of this project is to assess the value of highly
productive commercial stocks as a source of genetic improvement
of breeds through a backcrossing technique. Fertility and calf
survival in Brahman cattle were the traits chosen for the trial
because of breed characteristics and an open Registry maintained
by the breed association. Performance of progeny from purebred
and foundation females have been obtained since 1971. Performance
of the grade cows and that of their progeny have excelled the
purebreds for all production traits measured. Total cow
efficiency for the purebreds has averaged 25A vs. 37% for the









grades, an advantage of 48% for the latter. Postweaning weights
of grade animals have excelled purebreds by approximately 20
pounds for heifers and 100 pounds for bulls. These preliminary
data suggest that superior grades potentially are a valuable
source of genetic material for traits that are low for purebreds.


FLA-AL-01527 PALMER A Z CARPENTER J W
FACTORS RESPONSIBLE FOR TENDERNESS VARIATIONS IN MEAT
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
The level of intramuscular fat did not influence the accuracy of
the hydroxyproline determination in beef. In connective tissue
isolation studies, mean recoveries of 14.1 and 96.2 percent were
obtained using the selective fragmentation and mechanical
agitation techniques, respectively. Delayed chill (100C for 4
hours postmortem) of beef carcasses did not influence ultimate
pH, water-holding capacity, sarcomere length and fiber diameter
of the longissimus and palatability of shortloin steaks. Delayed
chill did not influence apparent degree of marbling, color
texture and firmness of lean. To determine the relationship of
carcass maturity (C, D, and E) and marbling with tenderness,
broiled loin steaks from 67 cow carcasses were evaluated by taste
panel and by Warner-Bratzler Shear. Thirty percent of the
carcasses were above average in tenderness by both panel and
shear measurement. Marbling was significantly (<.05) related to
tenderness.


FLA-AL-0152d ARRINGTON L R SHIRLEY B L
AMMERMAN C B
NUTRIENT REQUIREMENTS OF LABORATORY ANIMALS
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Protein requirements of hamsters were studied using graded levels
of dietary protein (10.6 to 19.7 percent) in practical type diets
for growing hamsters and 5.0 and 7.7 percent protein in similar
diets tor mature hamsters. Measures of the protein effects were
weight gain and efficiency of feed utilization in growing
hamsters; nitrogen balance and weight change in adult hamsters.
Gain and feed efficiency were not significantly improved with
protein intakes above 13.7 percent. Positive nitrogen balance and
maintenance of body weight were observed in mature hamsters
consuming diets with 5.0 and 7.7 percent protein. In studies of
fat utilization by rabbits, digestibility of the fat in diets
containing 11.4 percent fat was 90.7 percent and in diets with
3.6 percent fat, digestibility was d3.6 percent.


FLA-AL-01545 OTT E A FEASTER J P
PHYSIOLOGY OF DIGESTION IN THE HORSE
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Polyethylene powder, incorporated into a complete ration as an
indigestible marker, was found in small quantities in the cecum
of ponies within one hour after feeding. Sizable amounts of
polyethylene were found in the cecum after 2 hours indicating
tha a considerable amount of the feed consumed moved rapidly
through the foregat. Crude fiber to polyethylene ratios were
relatively constant from the stomach to the cecum indicating that
the polyethylene moved with the dry part of the ration. Mineral
absorption studies using mature geldings indicated that calcium
frcm ground limestone was more readily absorbed than calcium from
either Coastal Bermudagrass hay or Alfalfa hay. Phosphorus
intakes of 17.9-20.8g per day were inadequate to permit a
positive phosphorus balance in 454kg. horses consuming 29-72g pf
calcium per day.








FLA-AL-01605 COMBS G E WALLACE H D
CUNHA T J
NUIdIENT REQUIREMENTS OF EARLY-WEANED GRO4iNG AND FINISHING SWINE
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Utilizing the de letion-repletion technique the nutritional value
of supplemental biotin was studied with young pigs. Both
practical corn-soy and purified egg-white diets with and without
a high level or antibiotic-sulfonamide were fed. With the pigs
fed the corn-soy diet rate and efficiency of gain was comparable
for the biotin supplemented (50 mcg/lb) and non-supplemented
groups. Cracked feet, hair loss and dea t loss were not present
with either group. The groups fed egg-white diets exhibited
cracked feet, loss of hair and decreased rates and efficiency of
gain irrespective of biotin (50 mcg/lb) treatment. Further
treatment with biotin levels ranging up to 400 mcg/lb. was
ineffective in reversing the previously noted symptoms.
Supplemental biotin was of limited value for pigs fed a fortified
corn-soy diet.


FLA-AL-01609 WALLACE H D COMBS G E
FACTOiS AFFECTING SURVIVAL OF SUCKLING PIGS
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
The influence of level of feeding during gestation (4 vs. 6 lb.
complete feed per head per day) is under study as to specific
influence on reproductive efficiency, reproductive longevity and
production costs. Thus far 42 litters from sows on the lower feed
level have averaged 10.43 live pigs at birth; average birth
weight was 3.08 lb. each litter averaged 0.36 dead pigs and 0.45
resorbing fetuses at birth; 9.40 pigs were weaned per litter at 2
weeks or age and the average weight per pig was 8.54 lb.
Corresponding figures for 38 litters from sows fed 6 lb. feed
were 11.08, 3'<3, 0.29, 0.76, 9.89 and 8.93. The data suggest
that the higher level of feeding stimulated ovulation as
indicated by larger total initial litter size conception. All
sows were fed ad libitum during lactation. During this period the
larger overconditioned sows 16 lb.1 ate significantly less feed
per day (7.5 vs, 9.6 lb.) and ost significantly more weight (100
vs. 53 In.). Incidence of MMA mastitiss, metritis, agalactia) was
higher and culling rate due to poor conception and performance
has been 5 times as great in the high level feed group. In a
study to determine the importance of bulk in the sow diet just
prior to farrowing and during lactation it was observed that
inclusion of 15A wheat bran did not improve sow performance.
Similarly 15N alfalfa meal was ineffective for improvement of
sucKling pig survival but did cause a significant reduction in
the incidence of MMA. Vitamin K supplementation did not improve
pig survival.


FLA-AL-01612 FRANKE D E
ECONOMIC BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS OF DAIRY-BEEF
CROSSES ON PASTURE AND IN DRYLOT
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
First matings were made in the Spring of 1973 to produce
straightbred Angus and Brown Swiss, F(1) and Backcross calves
from both breeds of sire. Procedures are bexng set up to monitor
soil and ground water nutrient levels as well as runoff from
pasture and semi-confinement programs to determine if
contamination levels are evident from these management programs.
Semi-confinement programs are under construction and complete
confinement facilities are in the planning stages.


FLA-AL-01653 OTT E A FEASTER J P
NUTRIENT REQUIREMENTS FOR OPTIMUM GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE









YOUNG HORSE
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
A ten month feeding trial has been initiated with 24 Thoroughbred
and Quarter Horse weanlings to evaluate two protein levels. Half
of the foals will be fed on 18% protein concentrate for 168 days
followed by a 15% protein concentrate. The other 12 foals will e
fed the 15% protein concentrate for 168 days followed by a 129
protein concentrate. Criteria for evaluation of the programs will
include: weight .aia, body development feed consumption and
efficiency, bop chemistry, and skeletal maturity.


FLA-AL-01655 SHIRLEY R L EASLEY J F
PALMER A Z
METABOLIZA3LE ERBHGY AND NET ENERGY FOR GAIN OF FLORIDA GROWN
FEEDS
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Total digestible nutrients, metabolizable energy (ME), and net
energies for maintenance (NE(m)) and gain (NE(g)) were compared
in corn, non-bird-resistant (NBH) and bird-resistant (BR) sorghum
grain rations when fed to steers. The corn, NBR and BR sorghum
grains had 3.21, 2.63 and 2.49 Mcal of NE energy per kilogram on
the dry matter basis respectively. NE(m) values for the grains
were 2.40, 1.98 and 1.78 Mcal per kilogram and the NE(g) values
1.49 1.15 and 0.73 Maal/kilogram dry weight when the corn, NBR
and Bf sorghum ratipns were fed ad libituA, respectively. The
gross energy .(GE), ME, NE(m) and-TE(g) v~ aes determined for the
corn, NBR and BB sorghum grains were used for predicting gains by
the N.R.C. and the A.R.C. systems; rates of gain were predicted
and compared with those actually obtained in the feedlot. The
predicted gains for the steers fed ad libitu using the N.R.C.
system agreed with those actually obtaiea -"w1iin 0.08 kg per
day. Predicted gains by the A.R.C.& system were within 0.01, 0.23
and 0.12 kg of that observed for the corn, NBR and BR diets fed
ad libitum, respectively. When the N.R.C. (1970) NE(m) and NE(g)
-aluesT-E -sorghum grain were used for the BR sorghum grain, the
predicted gains were 0.45 kg per day greater than actually
observed. This difference indicates that the N.R.C.& values for
sorghum grain are too high when using a BR sorghum grain of the
type used in this study,


FLA-AL-01663 WABNICK A C BAZER F W
REPRODUCTIVE EFFICIENCY OF CATTLE
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Levels of uterine protein, plasma progesterone and estradiol were
determined at each day of the estrous cycle in a group of 67
cows. The average total uterine protein was 11.23 mg at day 20 of
the cycle and 14.53 mg on first day of heat. Values at other days
oi the cycle varied from 0.98 mg to 7.23 mg of uterine protein. A
uterine specific protein band was in 62% of the samples from days
13 to 20 of the cycle and in all samples on days 15 and 16. The
molecular weight of this uterine specific protein was
approximately 100,000. A highly significant correlation (0.47)
was found between the plasma level of progesterone and the
presence of this protein. During the coming year work will be
conducted in the areas of estrous synchronization and multiple
ovulation in beef cows.








BIOCHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT

The following two Rrojects are financed in part by the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations.


FLA-BY-01640 MANS B J
LIGHT INDUCED CHANlES II NUCLEIC ACID SYNTHESIS BI PLANTS
PROGRESS REPOETI 73/01 73/12
Seeking the biochemical aqchanism whereby light facilitates the
growth of corn seedlings by directly enhancing utilization of
their genetic ipformatipn, we have detected a high reproducible
increase in the RNA synthesizing capacity of illuminated
seedlings. A greater than 2-fold increase in DNA dependent, RNA
polymerase activity was detected in extracts of frozen shoots
prepared from 5-day-old etiolated seedlings within one minute
after illumination with 270 uuvatts/cza of 350 to 600 na light.
t. Since the response is rapid, and proceeds any change n
prptein synthetic capacity, we believe the effect is directly
upon the polymerase and is affinity for the DNA template.
Preliminary studies indicate that the action spectrum does not
include the near ultraviolet (280 to 310 na) and the red, far red
(660 to 730 em) partiops of the spectrum.


FLA-BY-01641 FRIED M
UPTAKE, OF FATTY ACIDS AND ORGANIC POLLUTANTS BI ECONOMICALLY
IMPORTANT MARINE
FILTER FEEDERS
PROGRESS REPORT; 73/01 73/12
The free fatty acid (FFA) and complex lipid content of plants,
oysters, scallp-s and water from Cedar Key estuary has been
determined. Uptake of t1C palaitate from sea water by oysters has
been demonstrated and an assay method developed for rapid
isolation and measurement of its incorporation into complex
lipids. Initial data indicates FFA uptake against a concentrating
gradient by oysters, with measureable amounts. of radiactivity
appearing rapidly Xn the neutral and phospholipid fractions. The
increase in '*C lipid in the oyster with tiae is paralleled by a
decrease in the 1AC FFA in the medium. The uptake can be
inhibited by KCN. The oyster hemolyaph has been shown to contain
lipgproteins. probably responsible for lipjd transport. The data
indicate that oysters utilize dissolved FFA for metabolic
purposes.








BOTANY DEPARTnENT

The Department of Botany is a teaching and basic research
unit serving iamortant botanical and service functions. Although
it is now fundamentally a department of the Division of
Biplogical Sciences. within the College of Arts and Sciences, it
also has close operational ties and important service roles
within the College ox Agriculture, and indeed, has several
professional and career service lines funded through IFAS.
Taxonomists within the department provide extremely valuable
extension service. Unquestionably, the largest number of
inquiries from aFAS field personnel, as well as from citizens in
all walks of life and any professions, have to do with "higher"
plants the flowering plants and ferns, and many hundreds of
requests for information are processed annually. Of comparable
importance is the identification service for fungi, many species
of which are important disease or poisonous organisms for man,
animals, and plants. As popular interest in hallucinogenic fungi
grows, and as medical and veterinary needs climb with increasing
sophistication of treatment and diagnosis, the number of crucial
identifications increases year by year. Finally, although the
number of requests is fewer, valuable assistance is also provided
for identification of mosses and their relatives and for algae.
The continuing emphasis on marine and fresh-water ecosystems
within Florida prpmises to make identification services for the
latter group ever nore critical and important in the years ahead.
The Departaent of Botany is proper and traditional for the
courses and special teaching activities at graduate and
undergraduate levels that contribute significantly to the
learning experiences pf students in many fields of Agricultural
Science. These include courses in plant structure, function,
physiology, and identification that are vital for agriculturls.ts
of the future.
Research activities span the gamut of botanical biology, and
several of the faculty have filed research projects with the
Experiment Station. This research may be summarized within
several generalized areas:
A. Growth and ehksioloa -- transport of sugars across membranes;
etabolisa ofr aquatic plants emphasizing mineral and carbon
movement through te tissues with particular emphasis on aquatic
weeds (e.g., water hyacinth and hydrilla); effects of mushroom
toxins on cells in tissue culture; photosynthesis and
photorespiratio especially with regard to the enzymes and
substances that, can regulate these processes; comparative
investigation of C3 (normal) and C4 (super-pro active)
photosynthesis with a view to increasing productivity of vital
crop species and cultivars.
B. ecology -- the biology, management, and growth of aquatic
ieeds; nutrient cycling in terrestrial systems; pollution effects
on ecosystem structure: effects of climatic change on Florida
ecosystems* studies of fallout of radioactive particles from the
terrestrial atmosphere, emphasizing radiocesium (137Cs);
biological mechanisms for concentrating toxins within the
bipsphere, especially of mycorrhizal fungi; succession and land
use planning in tropical ecosystems; the roles of microorganisms
in production of solar salt effects of heated effluents on
marine algae; periodicity and seasonality of marine algae.
C cytology, S -actre. aod Development -- mitosis and membrane
phenomena in del.lar and plasodlal slime molds; anatomy and
morphology of trop cal and subtropical ferns and fern allies, and
of aquatic plants, especially aquatic weeds of Florida;
developmental moiphplog; and biology of pollen; protoplast, cell,
and tissue aclture, especially as these involve cellular
differentiation and morphogenesis.
D. taxon omy a.n ytematic Studies -- the flora of Florida; the
terns apna ern-aI ies ofE--loida; the flora of Nicaragua;
systematic and avplutionary implications of plant epidermis
structure and pollen structure; the kinds and biology of








ragweeds; monographic studies of tropical mosses, including the
genera Priojdgn,- Leiomrla, and Rhe~aatodQn; bryological-
floristic studies in Brazil, Venezuela azda Costa Rica;
systematics and phylpgeny of operculate Discomycetes, with
special emphasis on the Thelebolaceae; biology and host parasite
relationships of entomogenous fungi, with emphasis on their
potential roles as biological control agents; taxopoay,
morphology, and ,ife cycles of aquatic Phycomycetes; sampling
techniques for analysis of natural populations.


FLA-BT-00001 PAYNE W W
EXPLORATORY RESEARCH IN BOTANY
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Progress is being made on a number of problems involving basic
research in bptany. These span a broad spectrum of botanical
disciplines, including bryology, cytology, developmental
morphology, ecoogy, evolution, phycology, and physiology. He are
pleased that a number of administrative and physical changes in
the department of botany in .he past few months hold.prqml.se for
accelerating development which will lead to significantly
improved output bearing upon problems of science and society.
This is an important category unit to continue.


FLA-BT-01226 KIMBROUGH J W
TAXONOMY OF SPECIES OF THE TRIBE THELEBOLEAB
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Research toward a mpoograph of the genus Lasiobolus is complete.
A manuscript is currently being prepared. Our.studies on the
culture and development of Lasiobolus monascus, a new species,
was completed and has been accepted for publication in Mycologia.
Field work in the upper peninsular of Michigan yielded close to
300 collections po dung. Two hundred and 86 collections of
discomycetes were made during the month of July, 1973. Graduate
research studies completed under this project during the year
included a Culture and Development of Thecotheus pelletieri, I.
cinereus, Thelebolus stercoreus, and Lasiobolus ciliatus.
Manuscripts are currently being prepared for publication (K. E.
Conway Ph.D.). A new geaus Cleistoiodophanus (Pezizaceae) with an
Oedocephalum imperfect stage was discovered by J. L. Bezzara
(M.S. student), He has also completed studies on the structure
and development of a species of Octospora.


FLA-BT-01387 MULLINS J T
CULTIVATION OF COBLOHOMZCES, A FUNGAL PARASITE OF MOSQUITOES
PROGRESS REPQRTz 73/01 73/12
Mosquitoes are a major public health problem, and alternate
methods for their control are needed to overcome the deleterious
effects of insecticides on the ecosystem and the diminishing
effectiveness of chemicals. Coelomomyces, a fungal parasite of
mosquito larvae, offers potential as a means of biological
control of many mosquito species. This research is directed
toward an understanding of the parasitic association between
Coelomomyces and mosquito larvae so that the fungus can be
cultivated in amounts suitable for field testing against
mosquitoes. Field collections of mosquito larvae infected with
the fungus Coelomomyces were made for the seventh consecutive
year in the Gainesville area. The mortality rate for infected
mosquitoes was 100%. It was extremely rare for an infected larvae
to pupate and none emerged as adults. Some success was obtained
in infecting colony mosquito larvae by placing them in contact
with resistant sporangia of the fungus. These sporangia germinate
to produce zoospores, which are probably the agents of infection.
We have not been able to maintain large colonies of infected








larvae. Additional testing of a variety of nutrient media fpr
their ability to support growth of zoospores of Coelomonyces was
done. No growth beyond incipient stages has been obtained.


ELA-BT-01401 HUoaaHEIS T E
CARBOHYDRATE SIATHESIS AND TRANSPORT IN PLANTS
PROGRESS REPQRTA 73/01 73/12
Previously we identified two sucrose pools in the corn scutellua
One was a leakabie poo and was assigned to the cytoplasm; the
other was a non"leakable pool and was assigned to the vacuole.
Sugar movement between the two pqols (and presumably, therefore
across the toneplast) has been studied. It was found that
cytqplasmic sacrose could not be transported into the vacuole
although sucrose ao.ed into the vacuole during sucrose synthesis
which occurred when exogenous hexose was supplied. It was
concluded that a sucsose derivative formed during sucrose
synthesis (e.gi sucrobe phosphate) is accepted by the tonoplast
transport system, aot fsee sucrose. Sucrose utilization vacuolarr
or cytoplasain). was completely inhibited when scutellua slices
were incubated in 1.0 sorbitol. when diiitrophenol was added to
the sorbitol solutipa, wacuolar (but not cytoplasnic) sucrose was
utilized. :Exogenous sucrose was transported across the
plassalenma and mas utilized in the presence of 1.0 K sorbitol.
It was concluded .that although the sucrose transpqrt systems of
toaoplast and plasmalemma are different neither system releases
free sucrose into the cytoplasm. Esseqntally, all scutellau
tissue hexose is leasable. Nevertheless, little hexose was found
in the solutions bathing in scutellun slices during utilization
of vacuolar sucrose or during uptake of exogenous sucrose. It was
concluded, therefore, that neither glucose and fructose npr
fructose and UDPG mere products of sucrose traaspqrt.


FLA-BT-01633 WARB D B
TAXONO.T OF THE VASCULAR FLORA OF FLQRIDA
PROGRESS REPQBT: 73/01 73/12
Contributions tp the Flpra of Florida -- 5. Corydalis, Fumaria
(Pumariaceae-. 8 ma. pg. + plates. Contricatiors to the Flora of
Florida -- 6 Elepha4togus, Pseudoelephaqtopus (Compositae),. 7
as. pp. + 5 pla es. Contributions to the Flora of Florida -- ,
Vacciniun (Ericaceae). JO ms. pp. + 14 plates. ,O the scientific
name of the Longleaf Pine. 7 as. pp. u(noameclature of Pinus
palustris). Taxonoam of the genus Polygala series Decurreltes
(Pplygalaceae). 45 ms/ pp + 9 plates. ,(coApleted but not yet
approved). Progress has continued toward a guide to the native
and naturalized legumes of the state, with a date of completion
estimated to be within pne year.








DAIRY SCIENCE D ARTMENT


Sixteen active research projects and three areas of
preliminary research are reported herein. Faculty in the
department published 30 journal articles and abstracts of papers
presented at scientific meetings which represent data generated
frpm these projects. Vex projects added dur ng the year were 1637
and 1663.
The only faculty change was the transfer of Mr. J.B. White
to the Agronomy Department.


FLA-DI-00001 VANHORN H H
PRELIMINARY HESBARCH IN DAIRY PRODUCTION AND DAIBY PRODUCTS
PROGRESS REPORT 73/01 73/12
Three areas of prelai.nary research which will probably lead into
projected research in future years. il Fat Globule Hembrane
Characterization. The mjlk fat globule ne rane is respqnsibAe
tor the TllE flavor defect, spontaneous hydrolytic rancidity.
Methods for recovery and characterization of the membrane are
being adapted and evaluated for their ability to yield membrane
preparations wh'ch reflect the membrane structure in situ.
Separation of the membrane material into high-density HDLdi and
low-density lipoprotein (L ) fractions has been accomplished and
the fractions analysed to show differences in chemical
composition. Aeaal unction Du Intraveqoas
injections of ex ognow 2is A.u. 16, 24, 32 and
40 wk of lactatio4 sere carried out in 1 cows. Blood samples
were taken before and up to 12 hrs after injection to evaluate
adrenal xesponsiveness. Post-injection glucocorticoId
concentration wab significantly iqf. uenced by average
temperature, milk yield and age but overall the data do nt
support the coneep that adrenal insufficiency is responsile for
declining milk productipn during advancing lactation. Feed n a
lHaagenent sysenem fo Young Calws. Forty-seven calves (of a
total o 10U8 assigne have completed an experiment involing
portable peqs vs cloSed bar vs open barn, Starters contained
cottonseed hulls with and without citrus pulp compared to no
cottonseed hull rations with and without citrus pulp. mil was
fed either once or twice daily.


FLA-DY-00213 WING J B
ENSILABILITY OF FLORIDA FORAGE CROPS
PROGRESS REPQRTs 73/01 73/12
Corn, sorghum and keqaf were studied alone and in mixtures as
follows: (1) carn, (2) corn + sorghum, (3) corn + enaf, (41
sorghum + kena .(5) sosghum and (6) kenaf. Percent recovery rf
dry matter frprm ilos were (1 99.0, (2) 93.2, (3) 94.3, (
89.4, (5) 95-8 and ,(6) 96.5. Digestibility ercent and standard
deviation of sila e dry matter by dairy neifers were (1) 55.5,
2.0 (2) 53.3, 1.5 13) 56.7, 1.8; (4J 55.2, 4.4; (5) 56. 6 2.4;
and (6) 54.5, 2.1. Deterainatiop of data for specific nutrients
is in progress. Sudan sprghua was ensiled after being ground in
the green stage smith additives of citrus pulp, propyl para
hydroxy benzoic acid, corn or sugar cane baqasse. Pooled ata for
the four were dry matter by direct heat ,ID) 29.10. vacuum oven
(V) 31.87 lyophlaization (L) 27.07, toluene distillation (T)
3333%. Energy of fresh samples calculated to dry basis with
above data were D, 3820/9; V, 35Q3.89; L, 4089.79; and T, 3655.18
Calories per gram.


FLA-DY-00575 WHISE J B
PRODUCTION, REPRODUCOION AND CONFOBRATION OF THE FLORIDA STATION
DAIRY HERD








PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Estimates of genetic environmental and phenotypic trends during
1959 to 1970 were obtained for Holstein (n=173J and Jersey (2598
first calf heifers. Pooled estimates suggested a positive annual
genetic trend in milk yield of 32 kg (0.833 of the overall mean)
and a negative environmental trend of 39 kg. During this time
genetic trends were negative for protein yield (2 kg? and protein
percentage (0.026%). Very slight negative genetic trends An
ratios of solids-aot-tat to fat and protein to fat ratios
occurred, 0.004 and 0.005 per year, respectively. Although
standard errors of these estimates were large, results were 4n
general agreement mith larger studies conducted with data from
temperate areas. Pooled estimates of heritability were obtained-
milk yield, 0.24; protein yield, 0.37; protein % 0.53- chloride
%, 0.89; protein to fat ratio, 0.84; body weight, 0.51. Genetic
correlations were: milk and protein yields, 0.906 milk and
chloride % 0.68- chloride 5 and lactose-minerals X -0.73. Direct
selection tor amik yield would be expected to result in increased
yields of milk fat, solids-not-fat and protein, and decreased
percentages of all constituents except protein aRd chloride.


FLA-DY-01137 WILCOX C J
VARIATIONS OF MILK AND BAT YIELDS OF FLORIDA DAIRY CATTLE
PROGRESS REPORTt 73/01 73/12
Studies of sire x and herd interactions were carried out on
Florida DHIA milk production records by means of standard
analyses of variance. lplstein, Jersey, aqd Guernsey records were
adjusted for year, season, age at calving, and lactation length,
using the constants obtained from least-squares analyses. Sources
of variation included were herd, sire, herd x sire, and
remainder. Estimates of variance components were obtained using
Henderson's Method IA. Equating analogous squares to their
expectations and solving the resulting system of equations
yielded negative sire y herd interaction components for milk and
fat yields in most of the analyses, suggesting that the
interaction cpameoents of variance was negligible or zero. Some
variation (0 to 14~ was detected in the interaction component
for fat percentage. Results implied that there is little need to
concentrate daughters of AI bulls on which evaluations for milk
and fat yields are based, in Ligher producing herds. Further
daughter records frpm all herds can be used, regari:f.'.;s of level
of production with equal confidence. These results do rnt mean
that genotype by environment interactions for milk yield are
necessarily unimportant iq other environments, e.., conditions
existing in developing dairy production countries. Nor do results
suggest that these interactions are unimportant in other traits
of dairy cattle* Further work on the magnitude and practical
importance of igteractipns for fat percent is also suggested.


FLA-DY-01213 HEAD H H WILCOX C J
GRBOTH HORMONE AND INSULIN EFFECTS ON THE METABOLISM OF GLUCOSE
AND ACETATE IN DAIRB CATTLE
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
A replicated 4 x 4 Latin square and a single reversal trial have
been used to evaluate Growth Hormone (GH, 0.2 ag/kg) and fasting
effects on blood metabolite and insulin levels. Fasting (24 h)
significantly reduced blood and plasma glucose and plasma insulin
concentrations, but plasma nonesteri ied fatty acid (NEFA)
concentrations were elevated. Plasma free amino acid-nitrogen
(FAA-N) concentrations were not altered. Effects of prolonged
fasts (up to 96 hr) were also evaluated. Fasting blood and plasma
glucose levels declined from 53.3 + 1.50 and 81.69 + 2.01 (4 hr)
to 35.65 + 1.29 and 51.41 + 1.08 mg/100 ml (96 hr) respectively.
Plasma insulin declined from 16.7 + 1.7 (4 hr) to 6.1 + 1.2
muO/ml (96 hr). Plasma NEFA increased from 144 + 11 (4 hr) to
1260 8 mueg/ (96 hr) and plasma FAA-N remained unchanged.
Hapid intravenous injections of GH (13-20 mg) did not produce








insulin-like effects nor significant alteration in these blopd
metanolites in either the fed or fasted (24 or 96 hr) dairy
animal.


FLA-DY-01234 WILCOX C J THATCHER W W
GENETIC'AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS UPQN REPRODUCTION OF FLORIDA
DAIRY CATTLE
PROGRESS REPORT 73/01 73/12
Reproductive performance of 577 cows of the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station dairy herd was evaluated from 1959 to 1968.
Following 1,398 parturitions, 1,209 pregnancies occurred and 189
cows were sold for various reasons without having been diagnosed
pregnant. Percentages of cows exhibiting standing heat before 60
days postpartum were: 0 heats, 25.9%, 1, 38.7%; 2, 28.0%; 3, 7.2%
and 4, .3%. No cow was bred until 60 or more days postpartum.
Average services required per conception for the five groups were
2.60, 2.58, 2.32 2.21, and 1.75, a significant decline. Overall
services required per conception were .48. Rates of nonreturn to
first service increased with number of heats. Cows exhibiting one
or more standing heats during 0 to 30 days pqstpartum required
fewer services (2.29) thag did cows with no heats during 0 to 30
days (2.63). However, incidence of standing heats (0, 1, or more)
during 31 to 60 days was not related to subsequent reproductive
performance. In addition cows sold qonpregnant experienced fewer
postpartum heats during 6 to 30 days and overall than did those
which became pregnant.


FLA-DY-01255 WING J M
ENERGY SOURCE AFFECTING DIGESTIBILITY OQ CELLULOSE, PROTEIN,
RUMEN FERMENTATION IN DAIRY CATTLE
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Effects of pelleted and non-pelleted citrus pulp in high-urea
isonitrogenous rations on rumen pH and aamoqia, blood urea and
rumen volatile fatty acids (VFA) were studied in two 4x4 Latin
Squares balanced 4or carryover effects using eight different
rumen fistulated steers. Diets (6.8 kg per animal dily)
contained 5A urea, 33% sugarcane bagasse with corn being replaced
b either 0, 19, 38 or 55% pelleted or non-pelleted citrus pulp
( Dets I, II III and IV. Rumen fluid and blood samples vese
taken 1 hr before and 2, 4, 7 and 12 hr after placing the feed
directly into the rume,. No differences among means were observed
between pelleted and non-pelleted diets or among time trends
except for rumen ammgnia curves (P<.05). Rumen pH decreased
(P<. 1) with added citrus pulp (Diet I vs. II, III and IV)
whereas blood urea and rumen ammonia showed slight increases
(P<.10) in Diet II when compared with III and IV. olar %
prppionic acid decreased (P<.01) ii Diets I III and IV makin
the acetic to propionic ratio higher *(P<.01). Total VBA
concentrations were higher in Diets II, II and IV than in I
(P<.01) and higher in I and IV than in II (P<.051. There were
no toxicity problems. These data show that diets containing
citrus pulp effect lower rumen pH and higher acetic propionBc
ratios which may increase a ruminant's aamonia tolerance.


FLA-DY-01264 WILOOX C J
VITAL STATISTICS OF BEEB AND DAIRY SIRES USED IN ARTIFICIAL
INSEMINATION
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Data collection continued according to plan.. A major analysis of
beef and dairy data is underway and is scheduled for completion
during 1974. Florida dairymen were contacted by mail survey to
establish their attitudes and practices in AI sire selection and
use. Returns were received from 153 herds representing 37% of the
herds in the state and 34% of the cows. Average herd size of









respondents was 445 cows; Al was used by 83%. Most (71~X dairymen
select sires perspnall, 55 indicated that Predicted Difference
gawe an accurate apoaikal of the value of a sire for their hesd
25% indicated tha the concept was overrated) and over 50% bred
heir heifers to beef sires. Results also suggested that more
information ob sire evaluation techniques should be made
available to dairymen. A majority of dairyen said the USDA and
the land-grant universities were not spending too many research
dollars on AI research; oqly 35 felt they were.


FLA-DY-01271 HEAD H H
GLUCOSE AND FREE FATTY ACID METABOLISM IN THE IMMATURE RUMINANT
PROGRESS REPQRTS 73/01 73/12
An additional 15 calves were used to investigate age and diet
effects on glucose tolerance, glucose concentration and glucose
provoked (.5g/kg body weight, IV) insulin secretion. The diets (5
calves/diet) qre: whple milk fortified with milk solids (I),
whple milk plus high starch concentrate (II) and whole milk plus
high-fiber concentrate (II). All analyses on plasma samples
obained during glucose tolerance studies (glucose injection
0.5g/kg body weight) conducted at 10 ay intervals (16
infections/calf), throughout the 100 day experimental period have
been completed~ Energ intakes have been calculated for each 10
day interval. These data and all calculated parameters of glucose
and insulin response have been punched into IBM cards and are
currently undergoing statistical evaluation. Response variables
being considered are changes in fasting glucose, insulin and
nonesterified fatty acid concentrations due to age, diet and
energy intake, and peripheral glucose and insulin concentrations
and insulin concentrations in response to glucose injection
including evaluating pf (a) initial rate of rise, (b) time
required for onset pr ruse, (c) maximal concentrations, and (d)
total secretary response. Differences in these response
parameters due to diet, age and energy intake will be evaluated.


FLA-DY-01399 MARSHALL S P VANHORN H H
COMPLETE RATIONS FOR LACTATING CONS
PROGRESS REPORT 73/01 73/12
Two experiments were conducted with complete rations containing
25 0% sugarcane. bagase pellets in which the primary objectives
related to protein requirements of lactating cows and how much o
these requirements could be satisfied with urea. Several other
objectives were also evaluated in the factorial designs (eadh
experiment involving 36 cows fed a different ration in each of
three, 4-week peripds)d Significant findings were: High-corn
(8.0% citrus pulp) depressed fat percent in these diets compared
to 43.1% citrus pulp diets. Urea depressed intake at 1.7_% and
3.0% of the d.et particularly in the high-corn diets.
Incremental suppleaentation of soybean meal increased milk
production as compared to a 10.0% basal ration but isonitrogenous
urea-supplemented diets did not increase milk reduction.
Supplementation with methiopine-hydroxy-agalog (NHA gave an
increase in fat yield in cows receiving soybean meal
supplementation but was detrimental to performance in high-urea
rations. In low-protein basal ratios (approx. 10.0% crude
protein on air dry basis) 0.95% urea diets ave equal performance
with soybean meal supplemented diets but 1.9 urea diets did not.
Higher milk production .was obtained from 12.5% protein diets than
10.0% protein diets. Urea proved equal to an extruded corn and
urea product in performance even though rumen ammonia levels were
slightly lower in the cows receiving the latter diets.


FLA-DY-0140d SILOOX C J
QUANTITATIVE GENETICS OB MILK PRODUCTION








PROGRESS REPORTS 73/01 73/12
Lactation records fpr 1948 to 1968 were provided by the official
milk testing program of Ecuador. Average performance (5,481
normal first-lactation records) was 6,825 15 milk 3.46% fat and
235 lb fat. Four least Squares models were applied; all contained
effects of years, months, age (linear and quadratic) and length
of record (linear and quadratic), Model I included sires farms
and sire farm interactions and IV ignored sJres, farms an& sire
farm interactions. Weighted regression analyses of year constants
from appropriate models provided estimates of annual trends.
Genetic trends were positive and curvilinear and environmental
and total trends negative and curvilinear, all plateauing about
1960. Heritability estimates (based upon iatraclass correlations
involving 878 half-sib families ) of 0.32 .02, 0.48 .03 and
0.68 .03 for milk yield fat yield and fat per cent
respectively were found. Genetic correlations between milk yield
and fat yield, milk yield and fat per cent and fat yield and fat
per cent were 0.96 .01, 0.09 .18 and 0.30 t .16,
respectively. Least squares sire constants for 86 sires
represented in two or apre herds by ten or more daughters were
fitted to provide estimated breeding values. Estimates of genetic
parameters were very similar to those estimated in other milk
producing areas of the world.


FLA-DY-01409 WILCOX C J HEAD H H
THATCHER W W
SELECTION FOR MILK YIELD IN JERSEYS
PROGRESS REPORT 73/01 73/12
This selection project was initiated in August 1968. Objectives
are to place mapr emphasis in selection upon a single trait,
milk yield, and to estimate the maximus amount of genetic
progress which can be made. Genetic changes in other traits of
economic importance, but which are not subjected to selection
pressure, also mill be estimated. All measurements are
progressing according to plan. These include milk yield, milk
composition (fat, SNF, protein and chloride),, body size (weight
and wither height at various ages), udder structure and milking
rates, mastitis status (as measured by manual palpation, strip
cup and leucocy.te count) and other standard productive aLa
reproductive measures. The herd numbers 85 animals, two-thirds of
which are assigned to the selection group and the remainder to
the control grpo Sires used in the selection herd during 1973
were: Coralad's Dream Boy, Milestones Generator, Observer
Chocolate Soldier, Secret Baronet, and S. S. Quicksilver pf
Fallneva. Latest mean Predicted Differences for these sires As
817 M and 34 F. Semen fsom 21 young sires has been frozen for use
in the control herd, 14 of which were used during the year.
Daughters of control sires born in the herd are due to freshen
for the first time in July 1974.


FLA-DY-01458 WING J M
LAND DISPOSAL OF. DA[RY FARM WASTE
PROGRESS REPORTS 73/01 73/12
In late Fall of 1972, the plots were seeded to 30 pounds per acre
of Florida Rust Resistant Ryegrass. Irrigation with waste water
was accomplished at rates of 1/4, 1/2, and 1 inch weekly. The
forage was harvested and samples were obtained for the soils
department. The growth was insufficient for evaluation with
animals. The entire field was sprigged in Transvala Digitgrass,
during the summer, and overseeded to ryegrass again in December
of 1973. Irrigation at the previous rates is in progress.


FLA-DY-01462 THATCHER W U
UTERINE FACTORS AFFECTING EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT AND CORPUS LUTEUM
FUNCTION








PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Progestins (P), estradiol (E(21) and LH were measured in bovine
plasma samples collected from indwelling ju ular catheters: Daily
on days-7 to -4; every 6 h on days -3 and -2; every 2 h from day
-1 to ovulation. Plasma P, E(2) and LH were measured by radio
immauoassays. An extensive series of least squares analyses were
used to characterize hprmonal interrelationships, animal effects
(n=6) and time changes. Time of peak LH was designated as T(O).
lasma P decreased from 5.7 ng/ml at day -6 to 0.068 n at T(0).
Estradiol increased from 2 pl/m at day -4 to 6 pg at -12 h and
then increased abruptly to 7.4 pg at T(0). Average E(2) (days -7
to T(O)) differed among cows (p<.01). A positive association was
detected between E(2) and LH (<.01), whereas a negative
association was found between P and (2) (p<.01). A 50% decrease
in E(2 occurred by +5 h with a return to basal levels (2 pg) at
+14 h. A linear increase of 0.1 sn LH/ml plasma/day was detected
from day -7 to -0.3 day (-8 h). The least squares mean of LH for
this period was 0 82 ng/ml. LH increased to a peak of 13.8 + 6.1
(X + S.D.) ng/mi over an interval of 4.67 + 1.03 h and returned
from the peak to basal levels during an interval of 5.03 + 1.03
h. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that a
proestrus increase in E(2), not P, triggers the preovalatory
surge of LH in the bovine. In a regional cooperative study it was
determined that fertility was normal when cattle are inseminated
at synchronized estrus following PGF(2ALPHA), and fertility was
normal when cattle were inseminated at predefined intervals
following PGF(2ALPHA) (72 and 90 h).


FLA-DY-01475 WING J H
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROPERTIES OF SOUTHERN FORAGES AND ANIMAL
RESPONSE
PROGRESS REPORTi 73/01
Eighteen heifers about one year old are on a preliminary period
of forage feeding. They will be confined two per pen and fed
paagolagrass hay representing three stages of maturity. Criteria
will be intake and changes in body weight. These data will be
compared with ~j'tro and chemical laboratory analyses and
digestion trials wvXh sheep.


FLA-DY-01488 THATCHER W H HEAD H H
WILCOX C J
LACTATIONAL PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL RESPONSE OF DAIRY COWS
TO CORTICOI6 HOHRONES
PROGRESS REPORT: 73/01 73/12
Rectal and uterine temperatures of lactating cows were recorded
at insemination and 14.5 4.6 h (mean + standard deviation)
later for the first three services. Blood samples were collected
from a subcutaneous abdominal vein at the later time. Plasma
corticoids and progesterone were quantified by competitive
prptein-binding analysis. Means and standard deviations of 226
rectal and uterine temperatures at insemination were 38.4 .04 C
and 38.6 .03 C and later, 38.1 .03 C and 38.3 .03 C. Mean
corticoid and progesterone (ng/ml) at the later time were 8.02
.32 and .28 .06. Uterine temperature at insemination; maximum
minimum, and average environmental temperature both the day of
and the day after insemination were associated with variation in
conception. Uterine temperatures and average ambient temperature
on day of insemination were inversely related to fertility.
Progesterone at the later time was related to environmental
temperatures on day of insemination. Plasma concentrations of
progesterone and corticoids, sampled at the later time
postinsemination, had no detectable association with conception.


THATCHER W W


FLA-DY-01525
WILCOX C J


SMITH K L