<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Map
 Table of Contents
 Faculty list
 Staff changes
 Report of the dean for researc...
 Theses and dissertations
 International programs
 Report of the administrative...
 Capital improvements
 Grants and gifts
 Agricultural engineering depar...
 Agronomy department
 Animal science department
 Botany department
 Dairy science department
 Editorial department
 Entomology and nematology...
 Food and resource economics...
 Food science department
 Forest resources and conservation...
 Fruit crops department
 Microbiology department
 Ornamental horticulture depart...
 Plant pathology department
 Poultry science department
 Soil science department
 Statistics department
 Vegetable crops department
 Veterinary science department
 Belle Glade agricultural research...
 Bradenton agricultural research...
 Homestead agricultural research...
 Lake Alfred agricultural research...
 Quincy agricultural research and...
 Sanford agricultural research and...
 Apopka agricultural research...
 Brooksville beef cattle research...
 Dover agricultural research...
 Ft. Lauderdale agricultural research...
 Ft. Pierce agricultural research...
 Hastings agricultural research...
 Immokalee agricultural research...
 Jay agricultural research...
 National weather service
 Lakeland agricultural research...
 Leesburg agricultural research...
 Live Oak agricultural research...
 Marianna agricultural research...
 Monticello agricultural research...
 Ona agricultural research...
 Index


UF FLAG



Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005147/00005
 Material Information
Title: Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Abbreviated Title: Annu. res. rep. Inst. Food Agric. Sci., Univ. Fla., Gainesville, Fla.
Physical Description: v. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida>
Place of Publication: <Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: 1972
Publication Date: 1968-
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Agriculture -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Food -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Biological abstracts
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1968-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000429247
oclc - 01408984
notis - ACH8451
lccn - 73646057 //r862
issn - 0071-609X
System ID: UF00005147:00005
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual report.
Succeeded by: Annual research report of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Title Page
        Title page
    Map
        Map
    Table of Contents
        Table of contents
    Faculty list
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Staff changes
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Report of the dean for research
        Page 24
    Theses and dissertations
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    International programs
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Report of the administrative manager
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Capital improvements
        Page 38
    Grants and gifts
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Agricultural engineering department
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Agronomy department
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Animal science department
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Botany department
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Dairy science department
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
    Editorial department
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Entomology and nematology department
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
    Food and resource economics department
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    Food science department
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
    Forest resources and conservation department
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
    Fruit crops department
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
    Microbiology department
        Page 133
        Page 134
    Ornamental horticulture department
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
    Plant pathology department
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
    Poultry science department
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
    Soil science department
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
    Statistics department
        Page 155
        Page 156
    Vegetable crops department
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
    Veterinary science department
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
    Belle Glade agricultural research and education center
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
    Bradenton agricultural research and education center
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
    Homestead agricultural research and education center
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
    Lake Alfred agricultural research and education center
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
    Quincy agricultural research and education center
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
    Sanford agricultural research and education center
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
    Apopka agricultural research center
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
    Brooksville beef cattle research station
        Page 221
        Page 222
    Dover agricultural research center
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
    Ft. Lauderdale agricultural research center
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
    Ft. Pierce agricultural research center
        Citrus section
            Page 231
            Page 232
            Page 233
            Page 234
        Vegetable-agronomy center
            Page 235
            Page 236
            Page 234
            Page 237
            Page 238
    Hastings agricultural research center
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
    Immokalee agricultural research center
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
    Jay agricultural research center
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
    National weather service
        Page 253
        Page 254
    Lakeland agricultural research center
        Page 253
        Page 254
    Leesburg agricultural research center
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
    Live Oak agricultural research center
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
    Marianna agricultural research center
        Page 265
        Page 266
    Monticello agricultural research center
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
    Ona agricultural research center
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
    Index
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
Full Text
00










ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT

of the

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida


1


I.r ,.. L









1972















ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT


of the


Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida



1972


This public document was promulgated at an annual cost of $6652.63 or
$1.90 per copy to provide a summary of research conducted during 1972 by
the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
This record is intended for use by libraries, Florida Cooperative Extension
Service county directors, scientists, growers and ranchers, and other
persons interested in agricultural research in Florida.















L UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


N


[] AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND
EDUCATION CENTERS
1. Belle Glade (cattle, forage crops, sugarcane,
vegetables)
2. Bradenton (cut flowers, vegetables)
3. Homestead (ornamentals, subtropical fruits,
vegetables)
4. Lake Alfred (citrus)
5. Quincy (cattle, field crops, fruit crops, tobacco,
vegetables)
6. Sanford (field crops, ornamentals, vegetables)

O AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTERS
1. Apopka (foliage plants, ornamentals)
2. Brooksville (Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station,
USDA)
3. Dover (strawberries, vegetables)
4. Ft. Lauderdale (animal diseases, aquatic weed control,
ornamentals, turfgrass)
5. Ft. Pierce (citrus, vegetables, forage and pasture crops)
6. Hastings (cabbage, potatoes)
7. Immokalee (forage and pasture crops, vegetables)
8. Jay (cattle, field crops, fruits, nuts)
9. Lakeland (National Weather Service)
10. Leesburg (grapes, watermelons)
11. Live Oak (field crops, fruits, swine, tobacco)


h Leesb


Brooksville


Hastings


urg


6J Sanford

() Apopka
i















CONTENTS

Page

ADMINISTRATION
Faculty List . . . . . . 1
Staff Changes . . . . . 22
Report of the Dean for Research . . ...... 24
Theses and Dissertations . . . . .. .25
International Programs . . . . ... 30
Report of the Administrative Manager ........... 36
Capital Improvements . . . . ... 37
Grants and Gifts . . . . ... . 37

MAIN STATION
Agricultural Engineering Department . . .. .47
Agronomy Department . . . . ... .53
Animal Science Department . . . ... 61
Botany Department . . . . ... ... .69
Dairy Science Department . . . . .. .71
Editorial Department . . . . ... .77
Entomology and Nematology Department . . .. .103
Food and Resource Economics Department . . .. 107
Food Science Department . . . . .. .117
Forest Resources and Conservation Department . .. .123
Fruit Crops Department .................. 129
Microbiology Department . . . ... 133
Ornamental Horticulture Department . . .. .135
Plant Pathology Department . . . .. .139
Poultry Science Department . . . .. .143
Soil Science Department . . . . .. .147
Statistics Department . . . . .. .155
Vegetable Crops Department . . . ... 157
Veterinary Science Department . . . .. .161


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTERS
VBelle Glade . . . . . . 165
Bradenton . . . ... . .177
-Homestead . . . ... . .185
Lake Alfred . . . . ... . .191
Quincy . . . . . . 203
Sanford . . . . ... . .211

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTERS
Apopka . . . . . 217
Brooksville (Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station, USDA) 221
Dover . . . . . . 223
Ft. Pierce
Citrus Section . . . . . 231
Vegetable Agronomy Section . . . 234
Hastings . . . . ... . .239
K'Immokalee . . . . . .. 243
Jay . . . . . . . 247
Lakeland (National Weather Service) . . . 253
Leesburg . . . . ... . .255
Live Oak . . . . ... . .261
Marianna . . . . ... . .265
Monticello . . . ... . .267
Ona . . . . ... . . 271

INDEX . . . . . . . 277




The use of trade names in this publication is solely for the purpose
of providing specific information. It is not a guarantee or warranty
of the products named and does not signify that they are approved to
the exclusion of others of suitable composition.






FACULTY LIST

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
College of Agriculture
Agricultural Experiment Stations
Cooperative Extension Service
University of Florida, Gainesville 32601

ADMINISTRATION
1 S. C. O'Connell, Pres. of Univ. (392-1311)
123 E. T. York, Jr., Ph.D., Vice Pres. Agr. Affairs (392-1971)
123 A. F. Cribbett, M.S., Dir. Spec. Prog.
123 J. F. McGuire, M.S., Asst. Dir. Spec. Prog.
23 V.C. McKee, Ph.D., Dir. Plan. and Bus. Affairs
123 D. R. Bryant, Jr., A.B., Admin. Asst.

Resident Instruction
1 C. B. Browning, Ph.D., Dean for Resident Instr.
(392-1961)
1 D. 0. Spinks, Ph.D., Assoc. Dean for Res. Instr.
1 J. E. Reynolds, Ph.D., Asst. Dean for Res. Instr.

Research

28 J. W. Sites, Ph.D., Dean for Res. (392-1784)
2 J. F. Gerber, Ph.D., Asst. Dean for Res.
2 S. H. West, Ph.D., Asst. Dean for Res.
2 H. H. Wilkowske, Ph.D., Asst. Dean for Res.
2 G. R. Freeman, M.S.A., Asst. Dir. of Agr. Expt. Sta.

Extension

3 J. N. Busby, Ph.D., Dean for Ext. (392-1761)
3 J. T. McCown, Ed.D., Assoc. Dean for Ext.
3 B. B. Archer, Ph.D., Asst. Dean FAMU Programs
P. O. Box 320, Fla. A & M Univ. Tallahassee,
Florida 32304, 904-222-8030, Ext. 438
3 Olive L. Morrill, Ed.D., Asst. Dean for Ext.
(Human Resources Dev.)
3 F. E. Myers, M.Agr., Asst. to Dean for Ext.

Supervision
3 F. S. Perry, M.Agr., Dist. Agt. (392-1781)
3 E. M. Kelly, M.Agr., Dist. Agt.
3 W. H. Smith, D.Ed., Dist. Agt.
3 E. R. Wheaton, D.Ed., Dist. Agt.

Program Evaluation and Organizational
Development
3 A. A. Straughn, Ph.D., Dir. Prog. Eval. and Org. Dev.
(392-0386)
3 Pauline Calloway, Ph.D., Prog. Spec.
3 S. E. Grigsby, Ph.D., Prog. Spec.
3 Emily E. King, Ph.D., Prog. Spec.

I Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others





School of Forestry and Conservation
305 Rolfs Hall

12 J. L. Gray, D.F., Prof. and Dir. (392-1792)
12 K. R. Swinford, Ph.D., Asst. Dir. Res. Inst.
12 W. H. Smith, Ph.D., Asst. Dir. for Research
3 T. G. Herndon, M.S.F., Asst. Dir. for Extension

International Programs
2001 McCarty Hall

123 H. L. Popenoe, Ph.D., Prof. and Dir. (392-1695)
123 J. E. Ross, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. and Assoc. Dir.




DEPARTMENTS

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
9 Frazier Rogers Hall 32601

123 E. T. Smerdon, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(392-1864)
2 L. 0. Bagnall, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Agr.
Mach.)
2 C. D. Baird, M.S.A.E., Res. Instr. (Water Mgt. and
Agr. Proc.)
3 L. B. Baldwin, M.S.A., Asst. Prof. (Pol. Control)
25 E. K. Bowman, B.S., Assoc. Prof. Indus. Engin.
(Citrus and Veg. Handling)
2 D. E. Buffington, Ph.D. Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Env. Housing Engin)
12 R. E. Choate, M.S.A., Prof. Agr. Engin. (Water Mgt.)
3 R. P. Cromwell, M.E., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Agr.
Mach.)
12 R. C. Fluck, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Agr. Mach. and Syst.)
25 J. J. Gaffney, M.A.S.E., Asst. in Agr. Engin.
(Citrus and Veg. Handling)

3 D. S. Harrison, M.S.A., Prof. Agr. Engin. (Water Mgt.)
25 F. E. Henry, B.I.E., Asst. Prof. Indus. Engin.
(Citrus and Veg. Handling)
2 D. T. Kinard, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Engin. (Elec. Power
and Proc.)
12 J. M. Myers, M.S.A., Prof. Agr. Engin. (Water Mgt.)
12 R. A. Nordstedt, Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Waste Mgt.)
2 A. R. Overman, Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin. (Water Mgt.
and Pol. control)
3 A.M. Pettis, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Farm Elec. Safety)
1 C. J. Rogers, M.Agr., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Agr. Mech.)
25 J. S. Rogers, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Soil and Water Mgt.)
12 L. N. Shaw, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Agr. Mech.)

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others





3 T. C. Skinner, M.Agr., Prof. Agr. Engin. (Agr. Struct)
25 W. K. Turner, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
25 J. C. Webb, M.S., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.


AGRICULTURAL & EXTENSION EDUCATION
186 Norman Hall 32601
904-392-0719

1 W. T. Loften, M.A.E., Prof. Agr. Educ. and Chmn.
of Dept.
1 C. E. Beeman, Ed.D., Asst. Prof. Educ.
1 S. D. Patterson, Ed.D., Asst. Prof. Educ.
1 S. G. Shinn, Ed.D., Asst. Prof. Educ.

AGRONOMY
304 Newell Hall 32601


123 D. E. McCloud, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(392-1811)
2 F. T. Boyd, Ph.D., Prof. (Forage Crop Brdg. and Mgt.)
2 Fred Clark, M.S.A., Prof. (Flue Cured Tob. Mgt.)
3 W. L. Currey, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Weed Sci)
2 C. E. Dean, Ph.D., Prof. (Clover, tobacco genet and
Brdg.)
1 J. M. Dempsey, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Fiber Crops)
2 W. G. Duncan, Ph.D., Prof. (Theoretical Crop Husb.)
12 J. R. Edwardson, Ph.D., Prof. (Cytogenet)
3 C. E. Freeman, M.S., Instr. (Sugarcane)
2 G. J. Fritz, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Physiol.)

2 L. A. Garrard, Ph.D., Res. Assoc. (Plant Physiol.)
12 V. E. Green, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. (Sorghum and Rice)
25 Kuell, Hinson, Ph.D., Prof. (Soybean Genet and Brdg.)
12 E. S. Horner, Ph.D., Prof. (Corn, Genet and Brdg.)
3 J. T. Johnson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Crop Mgt.)
3 D. W. Jones, M.S. Prof. (Forage Crop Mgt.)
2 G. B. Killinger, Ph.D., Prof. (Forage and New Crops
Mgt.)
25 E. B. Knipling, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Plant Physiol.)
12 Ferdinand leGrand, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Sugarcane and
Theoretical Crop Husb.)
12 G. 0. Mott, Ph.D., Prof. (Tropical Forage Crop Mgt.)

12 A. J. Norden, Prof., Ph.D., (Peanut Genet Brdg.)
8 A. J. Oswald, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Mgr. Fla. Found Seed
Assn.)
2 P. L. Pfahler, Ph.D., Prof. (Genet)
2 G. M. Prine, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Field Crop Ecol.)
12 E. G. Rodgers, Ph.D., Prof. (Weed Sci.)
12 0. C. Ruelke, Ph.D., Prof. (Forage Crop Ecol.)
12 S. C. Schank, Ph.D., Prof. (Forage Genet. and Brdg.)
12 V. N. Schroder, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Crop Nutr.)
2 R. L. Smith, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Forage Genet. and
Brdg.)
2 V. Vasil, Ph.D., Res. Assoc. (Plant Physiol.)

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extenson 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others

3





25 H. E. Warmke, Ph.D., Prof. (Cytogenet.)
3 E. B. Whitty, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Field Crop Mgt.)
2 Merrill Wilcox, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Herbicide Biochem.)


ANIMAL SCIENCE
2103 McCarty Hall 32601

123 T. J. Cunha, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. and Chmn. of
Dept., 392-1911
12 C. B. Ammerman, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr.
12 L. R. Arrington, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Laboratory
Animals)
12 F. W. Bazer, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Physiol.
12 J. W. Carpenter, Ph.D., Prof. Meat Sci.
12 G. E. Combs, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Swine)
12 J. H. Conrad, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Tropical
Animal Science)
2 G. K. Davis, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Dir. Sponsored
Res. Div.)
12 J. R. Dickey, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Assoc. Physiol. and
Genet. (Tropical Animal Science)
3 K. L. Durrance, M.Agr., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Husb.
(Swine)

2 J. F. Easley, M.S., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr.
12 J. P. Feaster, Ph.D., Prof. Biochem.
12 D. E. Franke, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Genet.
12 J. F. Hentges, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Beef)
3 B. G. Jackson, Ph.D:, Asst. Prof. Anim. Husb. (Horses)
12 Marvin Koger, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Genet.
12 P. E. Loggins, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Husb. (Sheep)
12 L. R. McDowell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr.
(Tropical Animal Science)
12 J. E. Moore, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Nutr.
12 E. A. Ott, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Horses)

3 J. E. Pace, M.S.A., Prof. Anim. Husb. (Beef)
12 A. Z. Plamer, Ph.D., Prof. Meat Sci.
3 R. L. Reddish, Ph.D., Prof. Meat Sci.
3 R. S. Sand, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Husb. (Beef and
Horses)
12 R. L. Shirley, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr.
12 Jenny E. Thomas, M. S., Asst. in Ani. Sci. (Tropical
Animal Science)
12 D. L. Wakeman, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Husb.
12 H. D. Wallace, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Swine)
12 A. C. Warnick, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Physiol.


BOTANY
2175 McCarty Hall 32601

12 Leland Shanor, Ph.D., Prof. Bot. and Chmn. of Dept.
392-1894
1 H. C. Aldrich, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.
12 D. S. Anthony, Ph.D.,Assoc. Prof. Biochem.
1 J. S. Davis, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.
1 J. J. Ewel, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Bot,

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others





1 D. G. Griffin, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Bot.
1 M. M. Griffith, Ph.D., Prof. Bot.
12 T. E. Humphreys, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot. and Mycol.
1 T. W. Lucansky, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Bot.
1 A. E. Lugo, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Bot.
1 J. T. Mullins, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.
1 R. C. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.
1 I. K. Vasil, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.
12 D. B. Ward, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Bot.

DAIRY SCIENCE
106 Dairy Science Bldg. 32601

123 H. H. Van Horn, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(Animal Nutr.) (392-1981)
12 K. C. Bachman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Biochem. (Foods)
3 Barney Harris, Jr., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Nutr.
12 H. H. Head, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Physiol.
(Lactation)
12 W. A. Krienke, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Dairy Technol.
12 S. P. Marshall, Ph.D., Prof. Dairy Nutr.
12 L. E. Mull, Ph.D., Prof. Microbiol. (Foods)
3 R. L. Richter, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Dairy Technol.
12 K. L. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Microbiol. (Foods)
12 W. W. Thatcher, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Physiol.
(Reproduction)

3 D. W. Webb, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Dairy Mgt.)
2 J. B. White, B.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Dairy Husb.
12 C. J. Wilcox, Ph.D., Prof. Genetics
12 J. M. Wing, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr.

EDITORIAL
G022 McCarty Hall 32601

23 M. H. Sharpe, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(392-1772)
3 D. L. Buck, M.Ag.,Asst. Prof. (TV)
23 K. B. Meurlott, M.A.J.C., Asst. Prof. (Publications)
3 D. W. Poucher, M.A.J.C., Asst. Prof. (Radio-TV)
3 R. C. Smith, Jr., B.A., Asst. Prof. (Radio)
3 Alma Warren, M.A., Asst. Prof. (Press)
2 Mary C. Williams, M.A., Asst. Prof. (Publications)
2 C. T. Woods, Jr., M.A.J.C., Asst. Prof. (Press)

ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY
3103 McCarty Hall 32601

123 W. G. Eden, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(392-1903)
27 G. E. Allen Ph.D., Prof. (Aquatic Ent.)
8 R. Arnett, Ph.D., Prof. (Systematics) Tall Timbers
Foundation, Tallahassee
15 D. L. Bailey, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
12 F. S. Blanton, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
3 J. E. Brogdon, M.S., Prof. (Extension)
12 J. F. Butler, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Vet. Ent.)

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others






15 P. S. Callahan, Ph.D., Prof. (Behavioral)
15 D. L. Chambers, Ph.D., Prof. (Behavioral Pest Man-
agement)
15 J. L. Coffelt, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Stored Products)
15 M. M. Cole, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
12 H. L. Cromroy, Ph.D., Prof. (Radiation Biology)
15 D. A. Dame, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
17 G. W. Dekle, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Taxonomy) Fla.
Div. Plant Industry
17 H. A. Denmark, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Acarology) Fla.
Div. Plant Industry
3 D. W. Dickson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Extension Nematology)
16 R. P. Esser, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Nematology) -
Fla. Div. Plant Industry

12 A. G. Fairchild, Ph.D., Prof. (Taxonomy)
15 I. H. Gilbert, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 H. S. Gouck, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
12 D. H. Habeck, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Immatures)
12 S. H. Kerr, Ph.D., Prof. (Economic Ent.)
1 W. J. Kloft, Ph.D., Prof. (Radiation Ent.)
1 Sol Kramer, Ph.D., Prof. (Behavioral)
12 L. C. Kuitert, Ph.D., Prof. (Economic Ent.)
15 G. C. LaBrecque, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
17 K. R. Langdon, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Nematology) -
Fla. Div. Plant Industry

15 W. J. Lewis, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Ent. Ins. Biocontrol) -
Tifton, Ga.
15 P. D. Lingren, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Pest Management) -
Quincy, Fla.
12 J. E. Lloyd, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Systematics)
15 C. S. Lofgren, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 R. E. Lowe, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 F. 0. Marzke, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Stored Products)
3 D. R. Minnick, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Extension Apiculture)
15 E. Mitchell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Behavioral)
15 P. B. Morgan, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 G. A. Mount, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Med. Ent.)

12 Milledge Murphey, Ph.D., Prof. (Apiculture)
12 J. L. Nation, Ph.D., Prof. (Physiology)
15 J. H. O'Bannon, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Nematology) -
Orlando
15 Herbert Oberlander, Ph.D., Assoc. (Endocrinology)
15 R. S. Patterson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
12 V. G. Perry, Ph.D., Prof. (Nematology)
127 W. L. Peters, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Aquatic Ent.) -
Fla. A & M Univ., Tallahassee, Florida
12 F. A. Robinson, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Apiculture)
15 A. J. Rogers, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.) Panama City,
Florida
8 Harry Samol, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Fla. Sugarcane League) -
Belle Glade, Florida

15 J. A. Seawright, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Genetics)
3 D. E. Short, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Extension)
15 D. L. Silhacek, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Stored Products)
12 G. C. Smart, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Nematology)

I Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others





12 W. W. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Med. Ent.)
15 B. J. Smittle, Ph.D., Prof. (Radiation Biology)
5 N. R. Spencer, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Biocontrol)
6 Alan Stone, Ph.D., (U. S. Museum) Washington, D.C.
3 J. R. Strayer, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Extension)
15 T. E. Summers, Ph.D., Assoc. (Biocontrol)
15 J. H. Tumlinson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Behavior)
15 K. W. Vick, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Physiology)
12 R. E. Waites, Ph.D., Assec-Tr'of. (EconomicEnt.)
12 T. J. Walker, Ph.D., Prof. (Ecology)

17 H. V. Weems, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Taxonomy) -
Fla. Div. Plant Industry
15 D. E. Weidhaas, Ph.D., Prof. (Med. Ent.)
1 M. J. Westfall, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Taxonomy)
12 W. H. Whitcomb, Ph.D., Prof. (Taxonomy)
12 R. C. Wilkinson, Ph.D., Prof. (Forest Ent.)
15 W. W. Wirth, Ph.D., Prof. (Taxonomy)
15 B. R. Wiseman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Plant Resistance) -
Tifton, Ga.
17 R. E. Woodruff, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Economic Ent.) -
Fla. Div. Plant Industry

4-H AND OTHER YOUTH PROGRAMS
2039 McCarty Hall

3 B. J. Allen, M.A., Assoc. State 4-H Club Agt.
(392-1744)
3 Gwendoline L. Angalet, M.S., Asst. State 4-H Club Agt.
3 Linda L. Dearmin, M.S., Asst. State 4-H Club Agt.
3 G. M. Godwin, M.Agr., Assoc. State 4-H Club Agt.
3 T. C. Greenawalt, M.Agr., Asst. State 4-H Club Agt.
3 Ruth L. Milton, M.S., Assoc. State 4-H Club Agt.

FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS
1157 McCarty Hall 32601

123 K. R. Tefertiller, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. and Chmn.
of Dept. (392-1826)
12 D. E. Alleger, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Human Res.)
23 L. Anderson, M.S.A., Asst. Prof. (Area Agr. Econ.) -
Lake Alfred
2 C. 0. Andrew, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Trade and Devlpmt)
25 H. D. Brodnax, M.S., Asst. in Agr. Econ. (Prod. Econ.)
2 D. L. Brooke, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Farm Mgt.
Mktg.)
25 J. R. Brooker, M.S.A., Asst. in Agr. Econ. (Mktg.)
27 T. L. Brooks, Jr., B.S., Statis. (Fla. Dept. of Citrus)
3 J. A. Brown, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Area Devlpmt. Spec.)
Live Oak
25 J. C. Cato, M.S., Asst. in Agr. Econ. (Prod. Econ.)

12 H. B. Clark, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Mktg.)
12 J. R. Conner, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Nat. Res.)
3 C. D. Covey, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Mktg.-Ext. Coord.)
12 C. G. Davis, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Res. Econ.)
2 J. K. Dow, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. Columbia

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8Coop Others





3 R. A. Eastwood, Ph.D., Prof. (Mktg. Spec.)
12 B. R. Eddleman, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Res. Econ.)
3 V. L. Elkins, M.S., Prof. (Area Prof. Spec.) -
Tallahassee
12 R. D. Emerson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Res. Econ.)
27 G. R. Fairchild, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Fla.
Dept. of Citrus)
12 K. C. Gibbs, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Nat. Res.)
3 K. M. Gilbraith, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. (Mktg. Spec.)
12 R. E. L. Greene, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Farm Mgt.)
1 J. R. Greenman, J.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Policy, Prod.
and Legal)
25 G. T. Harris, M.S., Asst. in Agr. Econ.

13 John Holt, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Farm Mgt. Spec.)
3 M: E. Konyha, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Rural Devlpmt.
Econ.)
12 M. R. Langham, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Econometrics)
27 W. B. Lester, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Fla. Dept. of Citrus)
12 Edna T. Loehman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Nat. Res. and Policy)
3 D. E. Long, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Area Devlpmt. Spec.)
3 J. C. McCall, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Area Devlpmt. Spec.) -
Marianna
12 W. K. McPherson, M.S., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Land Econ.
Mktg.)
12 W. W. McPherson, Ph.D., Grad. Res. Prof. (Econ.
Devlpmt. and Policy)
13 W. K. Mathis, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Mktg. Spec.)

3 C. C. Moxley, Ph.D., Prof. Rural (Devlpmt. and
Policy)
25 J. E. Mullin, B.S., Prof. (State Statis.) Orlando
12 C. E. Murphee, D.P.A., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Prod. Econ. and Policy)
2 L. A. Murray, Instr. Asst. Agr. Econ.
27 L. H. Myers, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Fla. Dept.
of Citrus)
25 J. L. Pearson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Mktg.)
3 G. R. Perkins, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Farm Mgt. Spec.)
12 Leonidas Polopolus, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Also
Asst. Dean Grad. School)
12 A. A. Prato, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Cons.
Econ.)
12 F. J. Prochaska, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Marine Econ.)


12 J. E. Reynolds, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ.
(Also Asst. Dean Res. Inst.)
2 G. N. Rose, B.S., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Farm Mgt.)
3 S. E. Rosenberger, Ph.D., Prof. (Mktg. Spec.)
12 C. N. Smith, Ph.D., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Mktg. and
Policy)
2 A. H. Spurlock, M.S.A., Prof. Agr. Econ. (Mktg.)
23 Charles Walker, M.E., Asst. Prof. (Area Agr. Econ.) -
Belle Glade

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others





27 R. W. Ward, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Fla. Dept.
of Citrus)
25 G. A. Zepp, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Econ. (Labor and
Policy)


FOOD SCIENCE
367 Food Science Building 32601

123 R. A. Dennison, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(392-1991)
12 E. M. Ahmed, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Food Psychophys.
12 Howard Appledorf, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Human Nutr.
123 R. P. Bates, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Food Proc.
12 F. W. Knapp, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Food Chem.
12 J. A. Koburger, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Food Microbiol.
23 R. F. Matthews, Ph.D., Prof. Food Sci.
12 H. A. Moye, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anal. Chem.
12 R. C. Robbins, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Human Nutr.
12 N. P. Thompson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Physiol.
2 C. H. Van Middelem, Ph.D., Prof. Pestic. Residue Anal.
12 W. B. Wheeler, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Toxicol.



FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION
(SCHOOL OF)
305 Rolfs Hall 32601
12 J. L. Gray, D.F., Prof. and Dir. (392-1792)
6 G. W. Bengtson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. TVA, Muscle
Shoals, Alabama
5 R. H. Brendemuehl, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. SE for
Exp. Sta., Olustee, Florida
12 G. W. Cornwell, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Wildlife Ecol.)
3 D. R. Crowe, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Ext. For.)
12 P. W. Frazer, M.F., Assoc. Prof. (Dendrol)
12 R. E. Goddard, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (For. Genet.)
1 V. L. Harper, Ph.D., Prof. For.
12 L. D. Harris, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Wildlife Ecol.)
3 T. G. Herndon, M.S.F., Assoc. Prof. (Ext. For.)

2 C. A. Hollis, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (For. Physiol.)
12 J. B. Huffman, D.F., Assoc. Prof. (Wood Technol.)
3 A. S. Jensen, M.S.F., Asst. Prof. (Ext. For.)
12 C. M. Kaufman, Ph.D., Prof. (Silvic.)
12 J. W. Miller, Jr., M.A.S., Prof.
12 D. M. Post, M.S.F., Asst. Prof.
12 R. A. Schmidt, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (For. Path.)
12 W. H. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (For. Nutr.)
5 A. E. Squillace, Ph.D., Prof. SE For. Exp. Sta.,
Olustee, Florida
12 R. G. Stanley, Ph.D., Prof. (For. Physiol.)


12 R. K. Strickland, M.S.F., Int. Inst. in For. Genet.
12 E. T. Sullivan, D.F., Assoc. Prof. (For. Econ.)
12 K. R. Swinford, Ph.D., Prof. (For. Recr.)
12 L. D. White, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Range Ecol.)

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others





FRUIT CROPS
1172 McCarty Hall 32601

123 A. H. Krezdorn, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Fruit Crops) and
Chmn. of Dept. (392-1996)
3 C. E. Arnold, Ph.D., Asst. Pof. Hort.
12 J. F. Bartholic, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Climatol.
12 R. H. Biggs, Ph.D., Prof. Biochem.
2 D. W. Buchanan, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Decid. Fruit)
3 C. E. Crocker, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Citric. Spec.)
3 L. K. Jackson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Citric. Spec.)
3 F. P. Lawrence, M.Agr.,Prof. (Citric. Spec.)
2 R. H. Sharpe, M.S., Prof. (Decid. Fruit)
12 W. B. Sherman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Decid. Fruit Brdg.)

12 James Soule, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
23 D.P.H. Tucker, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Citric Spec.) -
Lake Alfred
23 W. F. Wardowski, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Citric. Spec.) -
Lake Alfred
12 W. J. Wiltbank, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.
1 L. W. Ziegler, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.

HOME ECONOMICS
3041 McCarty Hall

3 Izola F. Williams, M.S., Assoc. Prof. and Chmn. of
Dept. (392-2201)
3 Sandra A. Claybrook, M.S., Ext. Home Econ.
3 Charla J. Durham, M.S., Home Mgt. and Fam. Econ.
Spec.
3 Ruth N. Hackler, M.S., Consum. Educ. Spec.
3 Roberta H. Hall, M.S. Home Impr. Spec.
3 Marie S. Hammer, M.H.E., Ext. Home Econ.
3 Mary N. Harrison, M.S., Consum. Educ. Spec.
3 Lora A. Kiser, B.S.H.E., Ext. Home Econ. Prof. Dev.
3 Vervil L. Mitchell, M.S., Home Mgt. and Fam. Econ.
Spec.
3 Elizabeth E. Mumm, M.P.H., Health Educ. Spec.

3 Lizette L. Murphy, M.S., Consum. Educ. Spec.
3 Evelyn A. Rooks, M.H.E., Human Devlpmt. Spec.
3 Beth H. Walsh, M.S., Foods Spec.
3 Yancey B. Walters, M.H.E., Home Econ. Prog.
3 Glenda L. Warren, M.S., Food and Nutr. Spec.

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS
2001 McCarty Hall 32601

123 H. L. Popenoe, Ph.D., Prof. And Dir. (Soils)
(392-1965)
123 J. E. Ross, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. and Assoc. Dir.
(Ag. Economics)
6 E. G. Beinhart, Ph.D., Vis. Prof. Coop. USAID/
El Salvador
6 J. P. Bishop, Ph.D., Vis. Asst. Prof. Coop. INIAP/
Ecuador
6 M. A. Boone, Ph.D., Vis. Prof. Coop. USAID/ Vietnam

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others





6 J. K. Dow, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Coop. INIAP/Ecuador
6 P. E. Hildebrand, Ph.D., Vis. Prof. Coop. USAID/
El Salvador
6 J. P. Hooker, Ph.D., Int. Asst. Prof. Coop. Gov. of
Guyana
6 R. E. Hudgens, B.S., Asst. in Agronomy Coop.
INIAP/Ecuador
6 W. R. Llewellyn, M.S.A., Assoc. in Intl. Prog. Coop.
USAID/Vietnam

6 G. A. Marlowe, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Coop. USAID/Vietnam
6 M. E. Marvel, Ph.D., Prof. Coop. USAID/Vietnam
123 L. R. McDowell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Animal Nutr.
6 G. C. Moses, M.S.A., Assoc. in Intl. Ag. Coop.
USAID/Washington
2 A. S. Muller, B.S.A., Assoc. in Intl. Prog.
6 H. E. Peirce, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Coop. USAID/El
Salvador
6 C. W. Reaves, M.S.A., Prof. Coop. USAID/El Salvador
6 G. K. Saxena, Ph.D., Vis. Asst. Prof. Coop. Gov. of
Guyana
6 Michael Schwartz, Ph.D., Int. Asst. Prof. Coop.
INIAP/Ecuador
6 F. J. Southcombe, Ph.D., Vis. Prof. Coop.
INIAP/Ecuador

6 L. E. Tergas, Ph.D., Vis. Assoc. Prof. Coop.
INIAP/Ecuador
2 J. E. Thomas, M.S., Asst. in Animal Science
3 T. E. Webb, M.S., Vis. Assoc. Prof.




LIBRARY HUME LIBRARY
McCarty Hall 32601
123 A. C. Strickland, M.S., Assoc. Libr. in Chg.
(392-1934)
123 Ann M. King, M.S., Asst. Libr.
123 Lawan V. Orser, M.S., Asst. Libr.
123 Siew P. Su, M.S., Asst. Libr.
123 W. B. Weaver, M.S., Asst. Libr.




MICROBIOLOGY
1053 McCarty Hall 32601

12 P. H. Smith, Ph.D., Prof. and Chmn. of Dept.
(392-1906)
12 A. S. Bleiweis, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Bact. Physiol.)
12 D. E. Duggan, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Bact. Microbiol.
Proc.)
12 E. M. Hoffman, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Bact. Immunol.)
12 L. 0. Ingram, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Bact. Microbiol. Proc.
12 J. F. Preston, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Bact. Microbiol. Proc.)
12 E. P. Previc, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Bact. Metabol.)
12 M. E. Tyler, Ph.D., Prof. (Bact. Microbiol. Proc.)

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others





ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
105 Rolfs Hall 32601
123 J. W. Strobel, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. and Chmn.
of Dept. (392-1831)
12 R. D. Dickey, M.S.A., Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Nursery)
12 G. C. Horn, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Turf)
12 J. N. Joiner, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Flor.)
3 D. B. McConnell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Flor Fol.) -
Apopka
3 E. W. McElwee, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Nursery)
2 S. E. McFadden, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Nursery)
3 H. G. Meyers, M.S.A., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Turf)
12 T. J. Sheehan, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Flor.)
3 G. S. Smith, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Nursery)
12 C. E. Whitcomb, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
(Nursery)
3 W. T. Witte, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.

PLANT PATHOLOGY
Building 833 32601

123 L. H. Purdy, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. and Chmn. of
Dept. (392-1861)
2 J. A. Bartz, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Post
Harvest Diseases)
2 Ragahaven Charudattan, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Pathogens of Water Weeds)
2 A. A. Cook, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Bac. Plant
Pathogens)
2 Phares Decker, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Diseases of
Fruits)
2 T. E. Freeman, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Turfgrass
Diseases and Pathogens of Water Weeds)
2 Ernest Hiebert, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path (Virology)
3 T. A. Kucharek, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
(Ext., Field Crop Diseases)
25 H. H. Luke, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Cereal Diseases)
2 H. N. Miller, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Diseases of
Ornamentals)

2 D. J. Mitchell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Diseases
of Field Crops; Bio. of Soil-borne Pathogens)
3 R. S. Mullin, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Ext., Orna-
mentals and Vegetables
5 D. R. Pring, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Physiology
of Corn Diseases)
2 D. E. Purcifull, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
(Virology)
12 D. A. Roberts, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Virology)
2 N. C. Schenck, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Soil-borne
Pathogens)
12 R. E. Stall, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Bac. Plant
Pathogens)
2 D. L. Thomas, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Diseases
of Ornamentals)
2 F. W. Zettler, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Virology
and Pathogens of Water Weeds)

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others




POULTRY SCIENCE
Mehrhof Bldg. IFAS 32601

123 R. H. Harms, Ph.D., Prof. Poultry Nutr. and Chmn. of
Dept. (392-1931)
23 R. B. Christmas, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Random Test
Supvr.) Chipley
12 B. L. Damron, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Poultry Nutr.)
3 C. R. Douglas, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Ext. Poultryman)
12 J. L. Fry, Ph.D., Prof. (Poultry Prod. Tech.)
3 L. W. Kalch, M.Agr., Assoc. Prof. (Ext. Poultryman)
2 S. T. McCready, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Poultry Prod.
Tech.)
2 D. A. Roland, Ph.D., Asst. Prof., (Poultry Mgt.)
2 R. A. Voitle, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Poultry Physiol.)
12 H. R. Wilson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Poultry Physiol.)

SOIL SCIENCE
106 Newell Hall 32601

123 C. F. Eno, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Microbiology and Chm.
of Dept. (392-1804)
12 W. G. Blue, Ph.D., Soil Chemistry (Soil Fertility
Pastures)
12 H. L. Breland, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Analytical Research Laboratory)
12 R. E. Caldwell, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Pedology (Genesis
and Classification)
12 F. G. Calhoun, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Taxonomy
(Genesis and Mineralogy)
12 V. W. Carlisle, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Pedology
(Genesis and Classification)
27 C. L. Coultas, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Genesis and Classification) Coop. Fla. A&M
University
12 J.G.A., Fiskell, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Biochemistry
(Soil Fertility Vegetables)
12 N. Gammon, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Micronutrients)
12 D. A. Graetz, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Environmental Quality
(Soil and Water Pollution)

12 L. C. Hammond, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Physics (Water
Relations)
3 J. H. Herbert, Jr., M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Extension
Soils (Soil Conservation)
2 C. C. Hortenstine, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Environmental Quality)
12 D. H. Hubbell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Microbiology
(Rhizosphere)
12 R. S. Mansell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Physics (Water
and Pesticide Movement)
3 J. NeSmith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Extension Soils
(Soil Testing)
12 H. L. Popenoe, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Tropical
Soils, Director Center for Tropical Agriculture)
6 D. H. Marx, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Microbiology
(Soil-borne Organisms Coop.) US Forest Service

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others




12 W. L. Pritchett, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Forest
Soils)
2 W. K. Robertson, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Soil
Fertility Agronomic Crops)
12 D. F. Rothwell, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Microbiology
(Graduate Coordinator)
2 L. G. Thompson, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Soil Fertility Agronomic Crops)
12 G. M. Volk, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Soil Fertility
Turf)
2 T. L. Yuan, Ph.D., Prof. Soil Chemistry (Acidity and
Amorphous Clays)
12 L. W. Zelazny, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chemistry
(Mineralogy)

STATISTICS
G175 McCarty Hall 32601

1 William Mendenhall, Ph.D., Prof. Statis, and Chmn. of
Dept. (392-1941)
2 J. A. Cornell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Statis.
2 F. G. Martin, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Statis.
2 J. F. Schreckengost, M.S., Res. Asst. Statis.
2 J. I. Thornby, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Statis.

VEGETABLE CROPS
3026 McCarty Hall 32601

12 V. F. Nettles, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Actg. Chmn.)
(392-1794)
2 M. J. Bassett, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.
23 D. D. Gull, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort.
2 C. B. Hall, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
2 L. H. Halsey, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Hort.
23 J. R. Hicks, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Veg. Crops Spec.)
3 S. R. Kostewicz, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Veg. Crops Spec.)
12 S. J. Locascio, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
34 G. A. Marlowe, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Veg. Crops
3 M. E. Marvel, Ph.D., Prof. Veg. Crops Spec.

3 James Montelaro, Ph.D., Prof. (Veg. Crops Spec.)
23 R. K. Showalter, M.S., Prof. Hort.
3 J. M. Stephens, M.S.A., Asst. Prof. (Veg. Crops Spec.)
12 B. D. Thompson, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.


VETERINARY SCIENCE
Veterinary Science Research Lab 32601

123 C. F. Simpson, D.V.M., Ph.D., Prof. Path. and Actg.
Chmn. of Dept. (392-1841)
12 R. E. Bradley, D.V.M., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Parasitol
12 P. T. Cardeilhae, D.V.M., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Pharma-
col
2 C. E. Cornelius, D.V.M., Ph.D., Prof. Physiol. and
Dean Col Vet. Med.
12 G. T. Edds, D.V.M., Ph.D., Prof. ToxicoL

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others





12 D. J. Forrester, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Parasitol.
12 J. A. Himes, V.M.D., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Physiol.
12 K. D. Ley, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Virol.
3 G. W. Meyerholz, D.V.M., Assoc. Prof. Ext. Vet.
12 F. C. Neal, D.V.M., M.S., Assoc. Prof. Vet.
12 J. T. M. Neilson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Parasitol.
2 W. M. Taylor, D.V.M., M.S., Asst. Prof. Bact.
(Ft. Lauderdale)
12 F. H. White, Ph.D., Prof. Bact.


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND

EDUCATION CENTERS

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH
AND EDUCATION CENTER
P.O. Drawer A. Belle Glade 33430

2 D. W. Beardsley, Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. and Ctr.
Dir. (302-996-3062)
2 R. J. Allen, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Pasture)
2 R. D. Berger, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Veg.
Crops)

2 H. W. Burdine, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Physiol. (Veg. Crops)
2 T. W. Casselman, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Feed Harv. and Proc.)
25 J. E. Clayton, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
(Sugarcane)
2 J. R. Crockett, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Genet.
25 J. L. Dean, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path. (Sugarcane)
2 W. W. Deen, Jr., M.S., Assoc. Prog. Agr. Engin.
(Veg. Harv.)
3 C. E. Freeman, M.S., Asst. in Agron. (Sugarcane)

2 G. J. Gascho, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Sugarcane
Nutr.)
2 W. G. Genung, M.S., Prof. Ent. (Veg. Crops)
25 C. 0. Grassl, M.A., Assoc. Prof. Bot. (Sugarcane)
2 V. L. Guzman, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Veg. Crops)
2 B. W. Hayes, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Beef Cattle)
25 L. P. Hebert, Ph.D., Prof. Agron. (Sugarcane)
25 N. I. James, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agron. (Sugarcane)
2 M. J. Janes, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ent. (Veg. Crops)
2 S. R. Johnson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Nematol.
25 J. D. Miller, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Genet. (Sugarcane)

6 W. L. Mincey, Asst. Prof. Met. USWB
2 J. R. Orsenigo, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Physiol. (Weed
Control)
2 F. M. Pate, Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr. (Beef Cattle)
28 F. J. Raleigh, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Fla. Lettuce, Inc.)
25 E. R. Rice, B.S.A., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Sugarcane)
28 H. H. Samol, M.S., Asst. Prof. Ent. (Fla. Sugarcane
League, Inc.)
2 G. H. Snyder, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chem.
25 T. E. Summers, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ent.
2 B. G. Volk, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chem.

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others





3 C. Walker, M.S., Asst. Prof. Econ.
2 E. A. Wolf, M.S., Prof. Hort. (Veg. Brdg.)
2 T. A. Zitter, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Veg. Crops)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND
EDUCATION CENTER,
5007 60th St. E., Bradenton 33505

2 W. E. Waters, Ph.D., Prof. and Center Director (Ornam.
Hort.) (813-755-1568)
2 D. S. Burgis, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. (Veg. Weed Control)
2 J. P. Crill, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Veg. Genet.)
2 A. W. Engelhard, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Ornam. Dis.)
2 C. M. Geraldson, Ph.D., Prof. (Veg. Nutr.)
2 J. P. Jones, Ph.D., Prof. (Veg. Dis.)
2 R. 0. Magie, Ph.D., Prof. (Ornam. Dis.)
25 F. J. Marousky, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Ornam. Post
Harv. Physiol.)
2 Amegda J. Overman, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Ornam. Veg.
Nematol.)
2 S. L. Poe, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Ornam. Veg. Ent.)
2 J. C. Raulston, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Ornam. Hort.)
2 G. J. Wilfret, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Ornam. Genet.)
2 S. S. Woltz, Ph.D., Prof. (Ornam. Veg. Physiol.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND
EDUCATION CENTER
P.O. Homestead 33030
2 R. A. Conover, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. and Ctr. Dir.
(Veg. and Subtropical Fruits) (305-247-4624)
2 R. M. Baranowski, Ph.D., Prof. Ent. (Fruit Fly Res.
Biol. Control; Taxon-Hemiptera)
2 H. H. Bryan, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort. (Veg.)
2 C. W. Campbell, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Subtropical Fruits)
2 S. E. Malo, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Subtropical
Fruits)
2 R. B. Marlatt, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Ornam. Dis.)
2 R. T. McMillan, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
(Veg. and Subtropical Fruits)
2 P. G. Orth, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chem. (Veg. and
Subtropical Fruits)
2 R. B. Volin, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Veg.)
2 D. 0. Wolfenbarger, Ph.D., Prof. Ent. (Veg. and
Subtropical Fruits)
2 T. W. Young, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Subtropical Fruits)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND
EDUCATION CENTER
P.O. Box 1088, Lake Alfred 33850

2 H. J. Reitz, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. and Ctr. Dir.
(813-956-1151)
2 L. G. Albrigo, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.
2 C. A. Anderson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chem.
23 C. L. Anderson, M.S.A., Asst. Prof. (Farm Mgt. Spec.)

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others





27 C. D. Atkins, B. S. Prof. Chem. Fla. Dept. of Citrus
27 J. A. Attaway, Ph.D., Prof. Chem. Fla. Dept. of Citrus
2 C. R. Barmore, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.
27 R. W. Barron, B.A., Asst. In Chem-Fla. Dept of Citrus
27 J. G. Blair, B.S.M.E., Assoc. Prof. (Mech. Engin.)-
Fla. Dept. of Citrus
2 R. J. Braddock, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Food Sci.
2 R. F. Brooks, Ph.D., Prof. Ent.
27 G. E. Brown, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path. Fla.
Dept. of Citrus
27 B. S. Buslig, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Biochem. Fla. Dept.
of Citrus
2 A. F. Camp, Ph.D., Dir. Emer. Hort.

27 G. E. Coppock, M.S., Prof. Agr. Engin. Fla. Dept.of
Citrus
2 D. L. Deason, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
27 M. H. Dougherty, B.S., Asst. Prof. Chem. Engin. -
Fla. Dept. of Citrus
2 E. P. DuCharme, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path.
2 G. J. Edwards, B.A., Asst. Prof. Biochem.
2 A. W. Feldman, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path.
27 P. J. Fellers, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Food Tech. -
Fla. Dept. of Citrus
2 Francine E. Fisher, M.S., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
27 J. F. Fisher, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Chem. Fla. Dept.of
Citrus
2 H. W. Ford, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.

2 Dennis Gonsalves, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
2 William Grierson, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
2 R. W. Hanks, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Physiol.
2 F. W. Hayward, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Biochem.
2 Pamela K. Hearon, B.S., Asst. Libr.
25 S. L. Hedden, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Agr. Engin.
27 E. C. Hill, B.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Bact. Fla. Dept.of
Citrus
27 R. L. Huggart, B.S., Assoc. Prof. Chem. Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
27 M. A. Ismail, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort. Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
2 R. B. Johnson, Ph.D., Prof. Ent.

2 J. W. Kesterson, M.S., Prof. Chem.
2 R. C. J. Koo, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
2 C. D. Leonard, Ph.D., Prof. Hort.
2 S. K. Long, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ind. Bact.
27 A. A. McCornack, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Hort. Fla.
Dept. of Citrus
2 C. W. McCoy, Jr., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ent.
27 M. D. Maraulja, B.S., Asst. in Chem. Fla. Dept.of
Citrus
27 E. L. Moore, Ph.D., Prof. Chem. Fla. Dept. of Citrus
2 W. F. Newhall, Ph.D., Prof. Biochem.
2 R. W. Olsen, B.S., Prof. Biochem.

27 D. R. Petrus, M.S., Asst. in Chem. Fla. Dept. of
Citrus
2 R. L. Phillips, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others





2 A. P. Pieringer, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.
2 R. L. Reese, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort.
2 A. H. Rouse, M.S., Prof. Chem.
2 W. A. Simanton, Ph.D., Prof. Ent.
2 Ivan Stewart, Ph.D., Prof. Biochem.
25 H. R. Sumner, M.S., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
2 A. C. Tarjan, Ph.D., Prof. Nematol.
27 S. V. Ting, Ph.D., Prof. Biochem. Fla. Dept. of Citrus
23 D.P.H. Tucker, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Area Citric. Spec.)
23 W. F. Wardowski, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort. (Area
Citrus Spec.)

2 F. W. Wenzel, Ph.D., Prof. Chem.
2 T. A. Wheaton, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort.
2 J. 0. Whiteside, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Path.
2 J. D. Whitney, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agr. Engin.
27 W. C. Wilson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Physiol. Fla.
Dept. of Citrus
27 R. W. Wolford, M.A., Prof. Chem. Fla. Dept. of Citrus



AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND
EDUCATION CENTER
Quincy 32351 (PO Box 470)

2 W H. Chapman, M.S., Prof. Agron. and Ctr. Dir.
(904-627-9236)
2 J. B. Aitken, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Hort. (Fruits Veg.)
2 F. S. Baker, Jr.; M.S.A., Prof. Anim. Husb. (Beef
Cattle)
2 J. L. Baker, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Shade Top Brdg.)
2 R. D. Barnett, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Small
Grains Brdg.)
2 G. L. Greene, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent. (Field Crops)
2 F. M. Rhoads, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chem. (Shade
Tob.)
26 J. W. Smith, Jr., M.S., Asst. Prof. Met., USDC
2 R. L. Stanley, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Forage
Crops)
2 W. B. Tappan, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. Ent. (Shade Tob.)




AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND
EDUCATION CENTER
P.O. Box 909, Sanford 32771

2 J. F. Darby, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. and Ctr. Dir. (Dis.
Veg.) (302-322-4134)
2 R. B. Forbes, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chem. (Veg.
Crops)
2 H. L. Rhoades, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Nematol. (Veg.
Crops)
2 W. T. Scudder, Ph.D., Prof. Hort. (Herbic.)
2 J. 0. Strandberg, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
(Veg. Crops)


I Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others




AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND
EDUCATION CENTER
Florida A & M University, Tallahassee 32307

237 R. G. Seals, Ph.D., Ctr. Dir. (904-222-8030)
(Also Dean for School of Ag. & Home Ec.)
27 C. L. Coutlas, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chem. (Genesis
and Classification)
27 C. B. Owens, Ph.D.,Prof. Agron.
27 W. L. Peters, Ph.D., Prof. Ent. (Res. Coord.-CSRS
Programs)


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTERS

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Rt. 1, Box 980, Apopka 32703

2 C. A. Conover, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ornam. Hort. and
Ctr. Dir. (302-889-4161)
2 J. F. Knauss, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path.
23 D. B. McConnell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
2 R. T. Poole, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Plant Physiol.

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station, USDA
Brooksville 33512

25 W. C. Burns, M.S., Prof. Anim. Husb. and Ctr. Dir.
(904-796-3385)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Route 2, Box 629, Dover 33527
2 E. E. Albregts, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Veg. Nutr.)
(813-752-7649)
2 C. M. Howard, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Veg. Dis.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
3205 SW 70th Ave., Ft. Lauderdale 33314

2 B. L. James, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. and Ctr. Dir.
(302-584-6992)
25 R. D. Blackburn, M.S., Assoc. Bot. (Submersed Weed
Control) (305-583-5541)
2 E. 0. Burt, Ph.D., Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Turf Tech.)
2 A. E. Dudeck, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort. (Turf
Brdr.)
2 R. E. McCoy, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Turf and
Ornam.)
2 P. L. Neel, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ornam. Hort.
25 B. D. Perkins, Ph.D., Asst. Ent. (Aquatic Weeds)
2 J. A. Reinert, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent. (Turf and Ornam.)
25 K. K. Steward, Ph.D., Asst. Plant Physiol. (Aquatic
Weeds)
2 D. L. Sutton, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Aquatic Weeds)
2 W. M. Taylor, D.V.M., Asst. Prof. Microbiol.
(305-525-0611, ext. 250 )

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others




AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Box 248, Ft. Pierce 33450

2 J. B. Brolman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Legume
Brdr.)
2 R. C. Bullock, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Ent. (Citrus)
2 D. V. Calvert, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Chem. (Citrus)
2 Mortimer Cohen, Ph.D., Prof. Plant Path. (Citrus)
(305-461-4371 & 464-6017)
2 N. C. Hayslip, B.S.A., Prof. Ent. (Veg. Crops)
(305-461-6193)
2 A. E. Kretschmer, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Agron. (Pasture)
2 H. Y. Ozaki, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Hort. (Veg. Crops)
RFD 1, Box 340, Delray Beach 33444
(305-391-4112)
2 R. M. Sonada, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Plant Path. (Veg. Crops)
25 E. H. Stewart, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Soil Physiol., USDA


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Hastings 32045

2 D. R. Hensel, Ph.D., Prof. and Center Dir. (Soils, Veg.)
(904-692-1792)
2 J. R. Shumaker, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Hort., Veg.)
2 D. P. Weingartner, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Plant Path., Veg.)
2 R. B. Workman, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Ent., Veg.)


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Immokalee, Rt. 1., Box 2G, 33934
2 P. H. Everett, Ph.D., Prof. (Veg. Nutr.)
(813-657-2835 & 813-657-2237)
2 C. H. Blazquez, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Veg. Dis.)


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Rt. 3, P. O. Box 575, Jay 32565

2 R. L. Smith, M.S., Assoc. Prof. and Act. Ctr. Dir.
(Field Crop Mgt.) (904-994-5215 & 904-994-7373)
2 J. E. Bertrand, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Nutr.
2 L. S. Dunavin, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Agron. (Forage
Crop Mgt.)
2 R. A. Kinloch, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Nematol. (Field
Crop)
2 M. C. Lutrick, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. Soil Sci. (Fert.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P.O. Box 1068, 6 USDC, NOAA, National Weather
Service, Lakeland 33802

6 J. G. Georg, M.S., Meteorol. and Ctr. Dir.
(813-682-4221)
6 L. L. Benson, B.S., Asst. Meteorol.
6 J. L. Burleson, B.S., Asst. Meteorol.
6 F. L. Crosby, B.S., Asst. Meteorol.

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others





6 G. W. Leber, Asst. Meteorol.
6 W. F. Mincey, Asst. MeteoroJ,

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P.O. Box 388, Leesburg 32748

2 J. M. Crall, Ph.D., Prof. and Ctr. Dir. (Watermelon
Brdg. and Dis.) (904-787-3423)
2 W. C. Adlejz, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Virus Transmission,
Watermelon and Grape Ins.)
2 G. W. Elmstrom, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Cucurbit Growth
and Devlpmt.)
2 D. L. Hopkins, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Watermelon and
Grape Dis.)
2 J. A. Mortensen, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Grape Brdg. and
Genet.)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P. O. Box 657, Live Oak 32060

2 H. W. Lundy, B.S.A., Assoc. Prof. and Center Director
(904-362-1725)
2 R. H. Houser, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Swine Nutrition)


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P.O. Box 878, Marianna 32446
2 D. W. Gorbet, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Peanuts)
23 J. C. McCall, M.A.E., Asst. Prof. (Area Rural Dev.
Spec.)
2 P. E. Vipperman, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Anim. Nutr.
(Swine)

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Rt. 3, Box 213B, Monticello 32344

2 H. W Young, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. and Ctr. Dir.
(Horticulture) 904-997-2597
2 S. S. Fluker, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Ent.
2 W. J. French, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Phytopath.



AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
P. 0. Ona 33865

2 H. L. Chapman, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. Anim. Nutr. and Ctr.
Dir. (813-735-3121)
2 C. L. Dantzman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Soil Chem. (Soil
Fert.)
2 E. M. Hodges, Ph.D., Prof. Agron. (Pasture and Forage
Crops)
2 Paul Mislevy, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. Agron. (Pasture and
Forage Crops)
2 F. M. Peacock, M.S., Assoc. Prof. Anim. Husb. (Beef
Cattle)

1 Resident Instruction 2 Research 3 Extension 4 Leave of Absence
5 Coop USDA 6 Other Govt. Agency 7 Coop Other State Agency 8 Coop Others







APPOINTMENTS


Claude T. ADAMS, Professor, Ent. Dept., Aug. 1, 1972

Thomas R. ASHLEY, Assistant Professor, Ent. Dept., Dec. 18, 1972

Barry J. BLIGHT, Visiting Assistant Professor, Statistics Dept., Sept. 16, 1972

James T. BRADLEY, Assistant Professor, ARC, Lakeland, July 1, 1972, Courtesy

Arthur K. BURDITT, Professor, Ent. Dept., Sept. 15, Courtesy

William F. BUREN, Professor, Ent. Dept., Oct. 2, 1972

Kenneth L. CAMPBELL, Assistant Professor, Ag. Eng. Dept., Dec. 18, 1972

Derrell L. CHAMBERS, Associate Professor, Ent. Dept., July 1, 1972, Courtesy

Edward D. CRIDER, Interim Instructor, Forestry Dept., Dec. 23, 1972

Wyland S. CRIPE, Associate Professor, Vet. Sci. Dept., Sept. 15, 1972

James M. DAVIDSON, Visiting Associate Professor, Soil Sci. Dept., Aug. 1, 1972

Stephen M. FERKOVICH, Assistant Professor, Ent. Dept., Oct. 1, 1972, Courtesy

Luis A. GIL, Interim Associate in Nutrition, Ani. Sci. Dept., June 1, 1972

Patrick D. GREANY, Assistant Professor, Ent. Dept., Sept. 30, 1972

James W. GOODING, III, Assistant in Forestry, Forestry Dept., Dec. 9, 1972

Thurman T. HATTON, JR., Professor, Fruit Crops Dept., Nov. 1, 1972, Courtesy

Richard C. HOLM, Assistant in Meteorology, ARC, Lakeland, Sept. 20, 1972, Courtesy

Milton D. HUETTEL, Assistant Professor, Ent. Dept., Nov. 11, 1972

John F. KELLY, Professor and Chairman, Veg. Crops Dept., Nov. 1, 1972

Frederick KNUBTSEN, Post-Doctoral Fellowship, Plant Path. Dept., July 1, 1972

Kenneth M. LABAS, Assistant Professor, ARC, Lakeland, Sept. 20, 1972, Courtesy

John R. McLAUGHLIN, Assistant Professor, Ent. Dept., Nov. 11, 1972

Louis A. MURRAY, Graduate Research Assistant, Food & Res. Econ. Dept., July 22,
1972

James L. OBLINGER, Assistant Professor, Food Sci. Dept., Aug. 1, 1972

Frank T. ORTHOEFER, Assistant Professor, Food Sci. Dept., Sept. 15, 1972

Benjamin D. PERKINS, Assistant Professor, ARC, Ft. Lauderdale, July 1, 1972,
Courtesy

Donald Lee ROCKWOOD, Post-Doctoral Associate, Forestry Dept., May 1, 1972

Gerald E. SANDEN, Interim Assistant Professor, AREC, Quincy, Dec. 1, 1972

John L. SHARP, Interim Assistant Professor, Ent. Dept., Aug. 1, 1972

Albert L. TAYLOR, Professor, Ent. Dept., Oct. 1, 1972, Courtesy

Raymond L. WALKER, Interim Associate, AREC, Belle Glade, Aug. 1, 1972

Roger H. YOUNG, Associate Professor, Fruit Crops Dept., Nov. 1, 1972, Courtesy

Glenn A. ZEPP, Associate Professor, Food and Res. Econ. Dept., July 1, 1972,
Courtesy


TITLE CHANGE


Tony J. Cunha, Distinguished Service Professor and Chairman, Ani. Sci. Dept.,
Sept. 8, 1972







PROMOTION


James L. Pearson, Associate Professor, Food And Resource Econ. Dept., July 1
1972, Courtesy



RETIREMENTS

Cedric D. ATKINS, Professor, AREC, Lake Alfred, Sept. 8, 1972, Courtesy

Carl O. GRASSL, Associate Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, June 30, 1972

Albert P. LORZ, Professor, Veg. Crop Dept., Aug. 1, 1972, Emeritus

William K. McPHERSON, Professor, Food and Res. Econ. Dept., Sept. 29, 1972,
Emeritus

Oscar N. NORMAN, Assistant Professor, ARC, Lakeland, June 1, 1972

Ray T. SHEROUSE, Assistant Professor, ARC, Lakeland, June 1, 1972, Courtesy

William W. SMITH, Associate Professor, Ent. Dept., Aug. 31, 1972, Emeritus

Herbert W. WINSOR, Assistant Professor, Soil Science Dept., June 30, 1972

Harry E. YATES, Assistant Professor, ARC, Lakeland, June 1, 1972, Courtesy


TERMINATIONS


Francis M. BORDEAUX, Associate in Microbiology, Microbiology Dept., June 1, 1971

Donald B. CHURCHILL, Associate Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, July 7, 1972,
Courtesy

Denzil R. DAVIS, Assistant Professor, AREC, Quincy, June 1, 1972

Werner J. KLOFT, Visiting Professor, Ent. Dept., Sept. 29, 1972

Marvin E. MILLER, Assistant Professor, AREC, Homestead, June 30, 1972

Galen C. MOSES, Interim Assistant, Food and Res. Econ. Dept., June 30, 1972

Chittur V. RADHAKRISHNAN, Assistant in Parasitology, Vet. Sci. Dept., June 23,
1972

Warren R. WALLIS, Assistant Professor, ARC, Lakeland, Apr. 14, 1972



RESIGNATIONS

Henry D. BROADNAX, JR., Assistant in Food & Resource Economics, Food & Res.
Econ. Dept., Nov. 30, 1972

Gerald T. DAVIS, Assistant Professor, ARC, Lakeland, June 1, 1972

Stuart T. McCREADY, Assistant Professor, Poultry Sci. Dept., Dec. 13, 1972

Kannan P. C. NAIR, Visiting Professor, Vet. Sci. Dept., Sept. 1, 1972

Buford M. SHEPARD, Assistant Professor, AREC, Sanford, July 13, 1972

William M. TAYLOR, JR., Assistant Professor, Vet. Sci. Dept., Nov. 30, 1972

Fred H. TYNER, JR., Associate Professor, Food & Res. Econ. Dept., July 20, 1972

Carl E. WHITCOMB, Assistant Professor, Orn. Hort. Dept., Aug. 29, 1972



DEATHS


Curtis E. Hutton, Professor and Center Director, AREC, Quincy, June 11, 1972








REPORT OF THE DEAN FOR RESEARCH

Agricultural Research is one of the three major divisions of the
University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS).
All research is closely coordinated with the extension and resident
instruction divisions, the other two main divisions of IFAS. The agri-
cultural research program is a statewide responsibility that no other
university has in Florida. IFAS research faculty members have responsi-
bilities in the graduate research programs both on and off the Gainesville
campus. Research faculty also cooperate with the extension division to
extend the new research knowledge and information to all segments of industry
and society.

Within the IFAS research program there are 20 departments at the
University of Florida in Gainesville and 21 research centers located
throughout the state. The many locations make possible research on different
soils, under varying climatic conditions, and on many commodities such as
citrus, vegetables, field crops, pastures, livestock, ornamentals, tropical
fruits, forests and other. While production research receives the most
attention, much time also is devoted to research in processing, handling,
marketing, utilization, engineering, and economics, including basic
research in all disciplines. Environmental and human resource research is
being given increasing attention.

A statewide program, planning and budgeting system (PPBS) was
extensively revised in 1972 for the entire research program. A Research
Program Planning Memorandum has been developed around major crops,
commodities and services rather than disciplines, which provides a guide for
program evaluation which was not previously possible.

The entire research program of the Florida Agricultural Experiment
Stations is managed by use of formal written and approved projects which
document all research. The research program is primarily a mission-
oriented effort aimed at solving the problems of agriculture. As
problems arise, new projects are initiated. When problems are solved,
projects are terminated. At the present time there is a continuing trend
toward greater team effort than in the past. Problems are more difficult
and require the interdisciplinary approach for best results. As new
problems arise and new projects are planned they are carefully screened
and reviewed before activation. Maximum coordination now is achieved by
close working relations within the entire system of campus departments and
numerous research centers located throughout the state.

The current research is reported to the public in many ways, primarily
through published articles, bulletins and books. In addition, much research
is reported at conferences and meetings. Within the organization many
field days, short courses and conferences are held to which the public is
invited. These are held throughout the year by certain departments, and at
research centers throughout the state.

A brief report is included here of all projects on which research
was performed in 1972. Projects reported here are arranged by departments
and centers. The reader is referred to the index in order to obtain complete
and detailed information on a given question, topic, commodity or process.

We hope you will find this report informative and useful.






John W. Sites
Dean for Research







THESES AND DISSERTATIONS


Agronomy Department

Ronald Eloyd Jarrett. "Effect of Endogone Mycorrhiza on Four Species of
Gramineae: Sorghum, Pensacola Bahiagrass, Common Bermudagrass and
Pangolagrass." M.S.A. Thesis. V. N. Schroder, Chairman.

Douglas J. Pool. "Insect Leaf Damage as Related to the Intensity of
Management in Tropical Wet Forest Successions. M.S.A. Thesis. G. O.
Mott, Chairman.

Herbert Carson Schoonover. "Establishment of Legumes and Guinea Grass
on the Intermediate Savannahs of Guyana." M.S.A. Thesis. G. O. Mott,
Chairman.

Nguyen Van Tan. "The Inheritance of Pod Pubescence in the Peanut
(Arachis hypogaea L.) and its Relation to Yield." Ph.D. Dissertation.
A. J. Norden, Chairman.

David Harold Timm. "Optimum Enterprise Organizations for Dairy Farms West
of Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela." Ph.D. Dissertation. G. O. Mott,
Chairman.


Animal Science Department

Lee Ernest Anderson, Sr. "The Effects of Estrogen and Progesterone on
Fetal Development in Mice." M.S.A. Thesis. F. W. Bazer, Chairman.

Thomas Lewis Andrews. "Modification of Assay Procedures for Determining
Biological Availability of Phosphorus for Poultry." Ph.D. Disserta-
tion. R. H. Harms, Chairman.

Ricardo Botero. "Two-Breed Rotational Crossbreeding Systems Involving
Angus, Brahman and Hereford Cattle." M.S.A. Thesis. D. E. Franke,
Chairman.

Robert Bruce Christmas. "The Influence of Diet Composition on the Availa-
bility of Various Phosphorus Sources." Ph.D. Dissertation. R. H.
Harms, Chairman.

Luis Arturo Gil P. "Effect of MHA (methionine hydroxy analog) on Protein
Synthesis of Mixed Rumen Bacteria." Ph.D. Dissertation. R. L.
Shirley, Chairman.

Margaret Ann Godwin. "Genetic and Maternal Effects on Lactation and Growth
in Mice." M.S.A. Thesis. L. R. Arrington, Chairman; D. E. Franke,
Co-Chairman.

Charles F. Hinton, III. "Reflectance Colorimetric Evaluation of Carotenoid
Pigment Deposition in Broilers and Egg Yolks." Ph.D. Dissertation.
J. L. Fry, Chairman.

Noel L. Holder. "Supplemental Feeding of Beef Cattle Grazing Pangolagrass
Pastures on the Intermediate Savannahs of Guyana." M.S.A. Thesis.
C. B. Ammerman, Chairman.

James William Knight. "Effect of Superovulation, Unilateral Ovariectomy-
Hysterectomy and Progesterone-Estrogen Therapy on Qualitative and
Quantitative Aspects of Porcine Uterine Protein Secretions." M.S.A.
Thesis. F. W. Bazer, Chairman.

Harimurti Martojo. "Genetic and Environmental Factors Affecting Weaning
Weight and Weaning Type Score in Beef Cattle." Ph.D. Dissertation.
D. E. Franke, Chairman.

Eddy Muljono. "Influence of Location and Genetics on Thyroid Hormone
Levels in Beef Cattle." M.S.A. Thesis. A. C. Warnick, Chairman.

Vladimir de los Angeles Cruz Ortiz. "Genetic and Environmental Parameters
of Production in Brahman Cattle." Ph.D. Dissertation. M. Koger,
Chairman; D. E. Franke, Co-chairman.

Lenton O. Rowland, Jr. "Factors Influencing Bone Fragility in Chickens."
Ph.D. Dissertation. R. H. Harms, Chairman.

Tirath Singh Sandhu. "Antigenic Analysis of Moraxella bovis." Ph.D.
Dissertation. F. H. White, Chairman.

25








Ernest Lee Stephens. "Digestibility Trials on Ten Elements and Three
Toxicants in Aquatic Plant Diets Fed Steers." M.S.A. Thesis. R. L.
Shirley, Chairman.

David J. Weiner. "The Humoral Antibody Responses of Beagle Dogs Experi-
mentally Infected with Dirofilaria immitis." Ph.D. Dissertation.
R. E. Bradley, Chairman.


Botany Department

Helen Davis Brown. "A Floristic Study of the Attached Algae of Lake Mize,
Florida." Ph.D. Dissertation. D. G. Griffin, III, Chairman.

Patricio Gabriel Jerez. "Energy Flow Estimates in Cotton Production in
the Tropics (Nicaragua)." M.S. Thesis. A. Lugo, Chairman.

Jacquelyn C. Pendland. "A Freeze-Etch Study of the Green Alga Oocystis
Marsonil." M.S. Thesis. H. C. Aldrich, Chairman.

Mina Jeanine Robinson. "The Ultrastructure of Stalk Formation of Physarum
flavicomum." M.S. Thesis. Henry C. Aldrich, Chairman.




Dairy Science Department

Robert Wayne Adkinson. "Estimation of Genetic Parameters for an Ecuadorian
Holstein Population." M.S.A. Thesis. C. J. Wilcox, Chairman.

Edward George Benya. "Genetic and Environmental Parameters for Milk
Yield, Milk Composition and Body Weight of Guernsey, Jersey and
Holstein Cattle in a Subtropical Environment." M.S.A. Thesis.
C. J. Wilcox, Chairman.

Leonidas Antonio Chow. "Studies on Reproductive and Endocrine Functions
Following Synchronization of Estrus With Melengestrol Acetate (MGA)
in Dairy Heifers." M.S.A. Thesis. W. W. Thatcher, Chairman.

Francis C. Gwazdauskas. "Characterization of Bovine Adrenal Responsiveness
to Adrenocorticotrophin and Various Hormonal, Physiological and
Environmental Interrelationships at Insemination Affecting Conception."
M.S.A. Thesis. W. W. Thatcher, Chairman.


Entomology and Nematology Department

Jack Stangl Bacheler. "Biology and Hybridization of Apantesis phalerata
(Harris) and A. radians Walker in Florida (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae)."
Ph.D. Dissertation. D. H. Habeck, Chairman.

Dwight Roy Bennett. "Biology and Control of the Tropical Millipede,
Orthomorpha coarctata (Saussure), and Other Millipedes Associated
With Turfgrass in Florida." M.S. Thesis. S. H. Kerr, Chairman.

Hon-Ching Franklin Chow. "Colonization of Neoplectana dutkyi Jackson
and its Effects on Fall Armyworms Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith)."
M.S. Thesis. V. G. Perry, Chairman.

David W. Jones, Jr. "Field an, Laboratory Studies on Oviposition Preferences
of Culex nigripalpus Theobald." M.S. Thesis. W. W. Smith, Chairman.

Marshall Francis Kirby. "Florida Root-Knot Nematodes Characterized by
Morthology, Host Ranges, and Enzymes and Proteins Separated with Disc
Electophoresis." M.S. Thesis. D. W. Dickson, Chairman.

Pauline Olive Lawrence. "Susceptibility of Chrysopa rufilabris Burmeister
to Selected Insecticides and Miticides." M.S. Thesis. S. H. Kerr,
Chairman.

Kenneth Arlen Noegel. "The Pathogenicity and Interrelationship of Pratylenchus
coffee and Pythium splendens on Chinese Evergreen." Ph.D. Dissertation.
V. G. Perry, chairman; H. N. Miller, Co-chairman.

Marjorie Ching-Fong Li. "An Investigation of Total Lipid Content and
Long-Chain Fatty Acids in Adult Caribbean Fruit Flies, Anastrepha
suspense (Loew)." M.S. Thesis. J. L. Nation, Chairman.







Garland McIlveen, Jr. "Rearing and Insecticide Tests on Three Populations of
Horn Fly, Haematobia irritans (L.), (Diptera: Muscidae)." M.S. Thesis.
S. H. Kerr, Chairman; J. F. Butler, Co-chairman.

Ray Edward Parsons. "The Host-Flea Relationships in a Sylvatic Plague
Endemic Region of the Southwestern United States, with Special Studies
on Some New Approaches to Plague Control." Ph.D. Dissertation.
F. S. Blanton, Chairman; D. W. Weidhaas, Co-chairman.

Donald Eugene Stokes. "Parasitism of Pratylenchus spp. to 'Lovel,'
'Nemaguard' and 'Okinawa' Peach." Ph.D. Dissertation. V. G. Perry,
Chairman.

Panduka Mahendra Wijeyaratne. "Sterilization of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus
Say and Anopheles albimanus Wiedemann with Related Studies on Their
Biology and Insecticidal Susceptibility." M.S. Thesis. H. L. Cromroy,
Chairman; D. E. Weidhaas, Co-;chairman.

Jin-Ling Yeh. "A Cytogenetic and Biological Investigation of Four Reciprocal
Chromosomal Translocations in Aedes aegypti (L.)." M.S. Thesis. H. L.
Cromroy, Chairman.


Food and Resource Economics Department

Reinaldo do Barros Alcantara. "Returns to Scale and Resource Allocation
in the Production of Sugarcane in Sao Paulo, Brazil." M.S.A. Thesis.
A. A. Prato, Chairman.

Mario Miguel Amin. "Regional Market Allocation for Selected Florida
Citrus Products." M.S.A. Thesis. L. H. Myers, Chairman.

Morris Behar. "Recreational Usage in the Kissimmee River Basin, Florida."
M.S.A. Thesis. K. C. Gibbs, Chairman.

Henry Doss Brodnax, Jr. "The Effects of Various Tenure and Tax Management
Strategies on Organization of Beef Cattle Ranches in the Gulf Coast
Area of Central Florida." Ph.D. Dissertation. B. R. Eddleman, Chairman.

Jose Dearing. "Cost-Benefit Analysis of Vocational Agricultural Education
in El Salvador." M.S.A. Thesis. B. R. Eddleman, Chairman.

Juan Antonio Figueras. "Agrarian Reform and Agricultural Development in
Mexico." Ph.D. Dissertation. W. W. McPherson, Chairman.

Paul Jerome Hooker. "Systems Analysis of U.S. Management Strategies in the
Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Industry." Ph.D. Dissertation. Leo Polopolus,
Chairman.

Jonq-Ying Lee. "A Simultaneous Equation Model of the Economic-Ecologic
System in Citrus Groves." M.S.A. Thesis. M. R. Langham, Chairman.

John Francis McGuire, III. "An Application of Two Methods to Estimate
the Economic Value of Outdoor Recreation in the Kissimmee River
Basin." M.S.A. Thesis. K. C. Gibbs, Chairman.

Juan Montes. "Effect of a Supply Control Program in the United States
Market for Winter Tomatoes Produced in Florida and West Mexico."
M.S.A. Thesis. D. L. Brooke, Chairman.

Louis Andrew Murray. "Areawide Planning for Optimum Locations of Hospital
Facilities in Northeast Florida." M.S.A. Thesis. B. R. Eddleman,
Chairman.

Daniel Barry Wilder, III. "Marginal Values of Water Used in the Irrigation
of Citrus in the Central Ridge Section of Florida." M.S.A. Thesis.
J. E. Reynolds, Chairman.




Food Science Department

William Preston Donovan. "Nutritional Evaluation of Franchise Chicken
Dinners." M.S.A. Thesis. H. Appledorf, Chairman.

Ting-Ye Tinny Hung. "Color Measurements of Processed Mangoes." M.S.A.
Thesis. E. M. Ahmed, Chairman.







Kenneth E. Wrightson, Jr. "Flavor and Odor Thresholds and Interactions
of Selected Orange Juice Components." M.S.A. Thesis. R. H. Dougherty,
Chairman.

Younghee Oh Yoo. "Flow Behavior of Soybean-Rice Aqueous Mixture." M.S.A.
Thesis. E. M. Ahmed, Chairman.


Forest Resources and Conservation Department

Roy Louis Barker. "Prevention of Deer Damage to Truck Crops in North
Central Florida." M.S.F. Thesis. S. L. Beckwith, Chairman.

James Bruce Harrell. "Forest Understory Vegetation and Soil Moisture."
M.S.F. Thesis. C. M. Kaufman, Chairman.

Richard Hoeft, III. "Cryogenic Freezing of Tomato Slices." M.S.A. Thesis.
R. P. Bates, Chairman.

Daniel John Schinneller. "Flavor and Aroma Thresholds of Selected Aldehydes
and Interactions with 5' -Nucleotides Associated with Orange Juice."
M.S.A. TheSis. R. H. Dougherty, Chairman.

William Frederick Theobald. "Evidence for Existence of Nitrate Reductase
in Roots of Pine." M.S.F. Thesis. W. H. Smith, Chairman.

Henry Grady Underwood. "Response of Slash Pine Seedlings to Nitrogen
Sources." M.S.F. Thesis. W. H. Smith, Chairman.

Shih-chi Wang. "A Tensile Strength Test for Comparative Evaluation of a
Chlorinated Pyridine Preservative to Protect Wood Against Soft-Rot
Fungi." M.S.F. Thesis. J. B. Huffman, Chairman.

Robert E. Weiss. "Boron and.Copper Fertilization of a Nine Year Old
Slash Pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm var. elliottii) Plantation."
M.S.A. Thesis. W. L. Pritchett, Chairman.


Fruit Crops Department

Olasunikanmi O. Adigun. "The Influence of Seed, Gibberellic Acid and
Girdling on the Development of 'Orlando' Tangelo Fruit." Ph.D.
Dissertation. A. H. Krezdorn, Chairman.

Charles Rice Barmore. "Changes in Ribonucleic Acids in Citrus Fruit With
Growth and Development." Ph.D. Dissertation. R. H. Biggs, Chairman.

Larry Keith Jackson. "Female Sterility in Citrus." Ph.D. Dissertation.
A. H. Krezdorn, Chairman.

Robert E. Rouse. "The Effect of Locational Temperatures on Citrus Cold
Hardiness." M.S.A. Thesis. W. H. Wiltbank, Chairman.

Julian Winnfield Sauls. "Studies of Seed Dormancy of Prunus persica."
Ph.D. Dissertation. R. H. Biggs, Chairman.


Microbiology Department

George Erwin Brown. "The Effect of Light on the Repression of Mitochondrial
Functions in Euglena gracilis." M.S. Thesis. J. F. Preston, Chairman.

Andrew Mark Chludzinski. "Feedback Regulation and Characterization of
3-Deoxy-D-Arabino-Heptulosonate 7-Phosphate Synthetase in the Marine
Organism Vibrio MB22." Ph.D. Dissertation. D. S. Nasser, Chairman.

Sylvia Ethel Coleman. "Ultrastructural, Physiological, and Cytochemical
Characterization of Core-Like Structures in Group D Streptococci."
Ph.D. Dissertation. A. S. Bleiweis, Chairman.

Frank Bryan Dazzo. "The Microbial Ecology of Cultivated Soil Receiving Cow
Manure Waste." M.S. Thesis. P. H. Smith, Chairman.

Jyoti Deepak. "The Chemical Composition of Streptococcal Cell Walls at
Various Growth Stages." M.S. Thesis. A. S. Bleiweis, Chairman.

Jose Antonio Ferrer. "A Comparison Between Immune-Adherence and Immune-
Fluorescence Techniques to Detect Ehrlich Ascitic Tumor Cells (EATC)
Antigen." M.S. Thesis. E. M. Hoffman, Chairman.







Richard Michael Mahan. "The Stratification of an Anaerobic Dairy Manure
Lagoon." M.S. Thesis. P. H. Smith, Chairman.

Anthony Pfister, Jr. "Studies on Chromosome Replication in Escherichia
coli." Ph.D. Dissertation. D. E. Duggan, Chairman.

Ivo Jaap Van de Rijn. "Biochemical and Immunochemical Characterization
of a Group-Specific Antigen from Streptococcus mutans AHT. Ph.D.
Dissertation. A. S. Bleiweis, Chairman.


Plant Pathology Department

Harriet A. Bifham. "Physiological and Serological Variation of Pseudomonas
cichorii." M.S. Thesis. R. E. Stall, Chairman.

Helen Frances Hayslip. "Evaluation of Plant Pathogens as Biocontrols of
Eurasian Watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum L.)." M.S. Thesis.
F. W. Zettler, Chairman.

Howard Raymond Hill. "Survey and Evaluation of Plant Pathogens of
Alligatorweed (Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb.)." M.S.
Thesis. F. W. Zettler, Chairman.

Robert Samuel Johnson. "The Influence of Extracted Soil Water on the
Sporulation of Phytophthora parasitica." M.S. Thesis. D. A. Roberts,
Chairman; R. E. Stall, Co-Chairman.

Bobby Gerald Joyner. "Characterization of a Rhizoctonia sp. Pathogenic to
Aquatic Plants." M.S. Thesis. T. E. Freeman, Chairman.

Chion-yuan Lin. "Pathogenicity of Nutritionally Deficient Mutants of a
Prototrophic Strain of Xanthomonas vesicatoria." M.S. Thesis. R. E.
Stall, Chairman.

Wayne Clark Mixson. "The Etiology of False Broomrape of Tobacco." Ph.D.
Dissertation. R. E. Stall, Chairman.
Soils Department

Alfred Victor Downer. "Factors Affecting Fertility of Selected Brown Sand
Soils in Guyana." Ph.D. Dissertation. W. G. Blue, Chairman.

Tamirie Hawando. "Selected Properties of Soils Occurring in the Zapotitan
Valley, El Salvador." M.S.A. Thesis. V. W. Carlisle, Chairman.

Richard H. Loeppert, Jr. "Analysis of Sulfate in Soil Extracts by Atomic
Absorption Spectroscopy." M.S.A. Thesis. H. L. Breland, Chairman.

Hang-Tan Phung. "Reduction Processes in Modified Spodosol Systems and
Their Effects on Some Plant Responses." Ph.D. Dissertation. J. G. A.
Fiskell, Chairman.

Victor M. Urrutia. "Effects of Lime, Phosphorus, and Other Nutrients
Applied to Tropical Soils and a Florida Spodosol on Growth and
Mineral Composition of Forage Legumes." Ph.D. Dissertation. H. L.
Popenoe, Chairman; W. G. Blue, Co-chairman.

Manuel Ibarbia Zantua. "Investigation of Plant Growth Depression by Lime
Applied to an Alluvial Entisol from Eastern Costa Rica." M.S.A.
Thesis. W. G. Blue, Chairman.


Vegetable Crops Department

Leslie Newton Poe. "A Study of Factors Influencing Celery Seed Germination."
M.S.A. Thesis. V. F. Nettles, Chairman.

Veterinary Science Department

Henry G. Grant. "Isolation and Characterization of a Herpesvirus from
Wild Turkeys in Florida." M.S. Thesis. K. D. Ley, Chairman.

Ernest Clayton Harland. "Excretion and Metabolism of Aflatoxin BI by the
Chicken." M.S. Thesis. P. T. Cardeilhac, Chairman; F. C. Neal, Co-
Chairman.

Genia Lee Lin. "Studies on Bilirubin and Biliverdin Excretion in the
Chicken." M.S. Thesis. J. A. Himes, Chairman.







INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS

All activities which build or strengthen the international dimension
of IFAS are administered by the office of International Programs. Major
activities include administration of contract and grant technical assist-
ance, training of foreign nationals, and supporting research in tropical
agriculture.

The Center for Tropical Agriculture, as a major component of the office
of International Programs, assists with policy determination and is respon-
sible for coordination within IFAS of tropically oriented research and service
projects. It provides research and travel grants to faculty and graduate
students, assists academic departments in curricula development, supports
development of library and laboratory facilities, and publishes and dissem-
inates results of tropical research.

International Programs serves as a liaison office for IFAS with the
State Department of Agriculture and Florida agribusiness in carrying out
international activities that complement State programs. Projects admini-
stered by International Programs develop technology applicable to Florida,
attract agriculturally oriented industry to the State, open agribusiness
investment opportunities for Florida private enterprise, and expand markets
for Florida's goods and services.

IFAS is increasingly being called on to advise in the production,
marketing and processing of agricultural products in the tropics. Parti-
cipation in international research programs strengthens expertise in these
areas. In solving many of the problems it is beneficial to use an inter-
departmental approach. For example, in carrying out research on tropical and
subtropical livestock production and pasture improvement, scientists from
the Animal Science, Agronomy, Agricultural Economics, Soils and Veterinary
Science Departments are cooperating. It is anticipated that much of the
tropical research in the future will require a multidisciplinary systems
approach. IFAS, through its office of International Programs, is well
prepared to accept this challenge.

Research training and technical assistance were provided through ten
contracts and two grants during 1972. Staff from almost all units of the
Institute participated in some phase of these activities.

Three contracts with the Agency for International Development involved
technical assistance for educational institution building in Costa Rica,
El Salvador and Vietnam. The A.I.D. project for the meats laboratory in
Niger was completed during the year. The research project funded by the
Office of the War on Hunger to develop feed composition tables for South
and Central America was continued and the first were published in Spanish
and Portuguese this year. A new institutional grant was received from
the Institutional Grants Program of the Agency for International Development
to help the University of Florida strengthen its capabilities in ruminant
livestock development. This grant involves collaboration between the
Universities of Texas A & M, Purdue, Florida and Tuskegee Institute and
is for five years.

Other continuing projects included a small contract with the Central
Bank of Nicaragua for technical assistance on tropical crops and beef
cattle production, assistance to the Jamaica School of Agriculture for
curricula development and faculty training, and technical assistance to
the Government of Guyana to upgrade their agricultural production and assist
in the establishment of a research facility at the Ebini Livestock Station
in Guyana. Additional work on livestock production was initiated in Ecuador
under a loan from the World Bank to Ecuador, while the agricultural economics
research program initiated last year under a contract funded by the Inter-
American Development Bank was continued.

One new variety of soybean and one of peanuts have been developed as
a direct result of our testing and field trials in Guyana. These varieties
are now available and are in widespread demand.

As part of our continuing effort to establish control measures for
known diseases and pests of agricultural products before they become a
serious threat in the State, much research effort has been devoted in the
past year to obtaining a Digitaria grass resistant to stunt-virus. Due
to research efforts in Guyana, Surinam, Guadaloupe, Venezuela and Puerto
Rico, a digitgrass resistant to stunt-virus and sting nematode will be
available early in 1973.

We have also helped support research in Mexico and the Caribbean on a
wilt-resistent variety of tomato that should be of value to Florida growers.







Varietal selections are still being made, and it is hoped that in the future
one will be developed that will be totally resistent to this disease. Many
times varieties cannot be properly tested in Florida because the disease
is not yet widespread, but research needs to be done before the disease
does become a significant factor here.

We feel that our continued research on indigenous grasses and other
products grown in the tropical and subtropical areas of the world is of
tremendous importance to the growth and development of agriculture and
agriculturally-related products in the State. Diseases of various grasses,
oil crops, citrus, etc. can be investigated in the country where they are
prevalent before they become a serious hazard to industry in Florida.


IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A50: NIGER (AID/afr-815)

Source of Funds: Agency for International Development

Objectives: To study and recommend requirements for the construction of
a refrigerated slaughterhouse in Maradi, Niger. The study will include
economic justification and technical designs for plant and equipment.

Personnel:

Kinard, D. T. Agricultural Engineer
Morris, W. H. Agricultural Economist
Kiefer, E. Meats Specialist

Publication:

Final Report, "Feasibility Study for an Abattoir for the City of Maradi,"
May 1972.


IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A18: VIETNAM (AID/vn-24)

Source of Funds: Agency for International Development

Objectives: To provide technical advice and assistance to the National
Agricultural Center to strengthen the Center and to insure basic economic
and rural development in Vietnam.

Personnel:

Marvel, M. E. Chief of Party and Vegetable Crops Specialist
Boone, M. A. Animal Scientist
Llewellyn, W. R. Soils and Horticulture Specialist
Marlowe, G. A. Chief of Party and Vegetable Crops Specialist
Ross, J. E. Administrative Review

Publications:

Boone, M. A., Marvel, M. E., "Attendance at the South East Asian Center for
Agriculture Live-In Seminar," February 1972.
Marvel, M. E., "End-of-Tour Report as Chief of Party," July 1972.
"7th Semi-Annual Report," January 1-June 30, 1972.
"8th Semi-Annual Report," July 1-December 31, 1972.
Project Status and Accomplishments Report, University of Florida Contract,
July 1972.
Status of Employment of Graduates of the National Agricultural Center (NAC),
National Agricultural Center and USAID Education and University of Florida
Contract Team, October 1972.
Background information on The National Agricultural Center.
Ross, J. E., "Vietnam Inspection Trip," March 1972.


IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A23: GUYANA (GOG)

Source of Funds: AID Grant to Government of Guyana







Objectives: To provide technical assistance to the Government of Guyana
in its efforts to diversify and develop its agricultural economy.

Personnel:

Mott, G. O. Ebini Livestock Project Leader
Locascio, S. J. Vegetable Crops Specialist
Halsey, L. H. Vegetable Crops Specialist
Gull, D. D. Vegetable Crops Specialist
Saxena, G. K. Vegetable Crops Specialist
Hinson, K. Agronomist
Prine, G. M. Agronomist
Schoonover, H. C. Agronomist
Ammerman, C. V. Animal Scientist
Conrad, J. H. Animal Scientist
Dickey, J. R. Animal Scientist
Koger, Marvin Animal Scientist
Hooker, P. H. Chief of Party and Agricultural Economist
Eddleman, B. R. Agricultural Economist
Marvel, M. E. Administrative Review
Ross, J. E. Administrative Review
Fiskell, J. G. A. Soils Specialist
Bates, R. P. Food Scientist
King, Emily Extension Home Economist
Gillen, Margaret J. Editorialist
Grigsby, S. E. Agricultural Educationlist
Straughn, A. A. Agricultural Extension Specialist

Publications:

Saxena, G. K., Report of Progress in the Vegetable Crops Research Project,
June 1972.
Bates, R. P., "Trip Report," October 1972.
Dickey, J. R., "Trip Report," July. 1972.
Hooker, Paul, The Role of Livestock in a Country's Agricultural Development,
October 1972.
Norden, A. J., Chesney, H.A.D. and Stephenson, A.P., "Altika--a peanut
variety for the tropics (Guyana)," Fla. Agric. Exp. Sta. Cir. S-215, 1972.
Locascio, S. J. and Rama Roa, M.V., "Tomato and cabbage response to N, P,
and K fertilization grown in a clay soil in Guyana," Tropical Region
American Society for Horticultural Science.
Ross, J. E., Extension of Guyana Contract, March 1972.
Marvel, M. E., "Trip Report," November 1972.
Annual Report of the University of Florida, Contract between the Government
of Guyana and the University of Florida, March 1972.
Bates, R. P., Assistance in the Implementation of Food Preservation Programs,
Facilities and Support Systems in Guyana, 1972.
Eddleman, B. R. and Hooker, P. J., "Evaluation of the Economic Potential
of Crop-livestock Farming Systems in the Intermediate Savannahs," 1972.
Hooker, P. J., "Assessment of the Economic Potential for Beef Cattle and
Feed Grain Production of the Intermediate Savannahs as Typified by the
Ebiniltuni-Kwakwani Area," 1972.
Smerdon, E. T., Skinner, T. C., Myers J. M. and Shaw, L. N., "Agricultural
Engineering/Guyana," 1972.
Norden, A. J., "Peanut Research," 1972.
Hinson, K and Whitty, E. B., "Soybean Research (Breeding and Variety Testing),"
1972.
Hinson, K. and Whitty, E. B., "Pre-inoculating Soybeans," 1972.
Prine, G. M., "Sorghum and Corn Research at Ebini," 1972.
Schank, S. C. and Mott, G. 0., "Introduction and Selection of Desirable
Forage Grasses," 1972.
Ammerman, C. B., Conrad, J. H., Glenn, J., Dickey, J.R., and Koger, M.,
"Cattle Breeding and Management Systems for Beef Production in the Inter-
mediate Savannahs of Guyana," 1972.
Ammerman, C. B., Mott, G.O., Koger, M., "Supplemental Feeding of Grazing
Cattle in the Intermediate Savannahs of Guyana," 1972.
Straughn, A. A. and Grigsby, S. E., "Recommendations for Extension Staff
Training in Guyana," 1972.
Straughn, A. A. and Grugsby, S. E., "Agricultural Extension--Staff Training,"
1972.
Fiskell, J. G. A., "Vegetable Soils," 1972.
Halsey, L. H., "Vegetable Production: Tomato and Legume Variety Studies,"
1972.
Hinson, K., "Jupiter, A New Soybean Variety for Tropical Latitudes," Fla.
Agric. Exp. Sta. Cir. S-217, June 1972.
Dickey, J. R. and Koger, M., "Summary of 1972 Data from the Beef Cattle
Management and Breeding Project at the Ebini Research Station Work Plan
70-1," December 1972.







Downer, A. V., Factors Affecting Fertility of Selected Brown Sand Soils
of Guyana, Dissertation, 1972.
Holder, N. L., Supplemental Feeding of Beef Cattle Grazing Pangolagrass
Pastures on the Intermediate Savannahs of Guyana, Thesis, 1972.


IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A24: NICARAGUA (CB)

Source of Funds: Central Bank of Nicaragua

Objectives: To provide technical advice and assistance to the Central
Band of Nicaragua in the improvement and/or development of tropical fruits,
investigations on tropical beef cattle and such additional areas as may
be agreed upon.

Personnel:

Chapman, H. L. Animal Scientist
Krezdorn, A. H. Horticulturist
Malo, S. E. Horticulturist

Publications:

Krezdorn, A. H., "Trip Report," February 1972.
Chapman, H. L., "Trip Report," November 1972.


IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A31: FEED COMPOSITION STUDY

Source of Funds: Agency for International Development

Objectives: To find low cost feeds--(1) survey of existing data and analysis
of feeds, fodder and agricultural by-products; (2) analysis of other available
feeds; and (3) development of cattle feeding trials and systems utilizing
indigenous feeds to fill in the gaps of existing research.

Personnel:

Christiansen, W. C. Project Leader; Animal Scientist
McDowell, L. R. Animal Scientist
Conrad, J. H. Animal Scientist
Ammerman, C. B. Animal Scientist
Eggleston, J. Assistant in Animal Science
Harris, L. E. Consultant on Feed Compilation Tables

Travel Included: Dominican Republic, Surinam, Jamaica, Trinidad, Brazil,
El Salvador, Mexico, Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, Peru,
Puerto Rico, Panama, Ecuador, Argentina

Publications:

Annual Report, April 1971 through September 30, 1972, Latin American Feed
Composition Project.
Ammerman, C. B., Chicco, C. F., Loggins, P. E., and Arrington, L. R.,
Availability of Different Inorganic Salts of Magnesium to Sheep,
January 1972.
Latin American Tables of Feed Composition (Spanish, Portuguese & English),
Department of Animal Science and Center for Tropical Agriculture,
University of Florida, June 1972.
Adams, C. B., F. Cevallos, R. de la Torre, E. Golding, J. E. Moore and
0. C. Ruelke. Nutritive Evaluation of Bermudagrass Hays. J. Animal
Sci. 35:226 (Abstract) 1972.
Moore, J. E., G. O. Mott, D. G. Dunham and R. W. Omer. Large Capacity
In Vitro OM Digestion Procedure. J. Animal Sci. 35:232. (Abstract) 1972.
Ventura, M., J. E. Moore, D. E. Franke and 0. C. Ruelke. Nutritive
Evaluation of Pangola Digitgrass Hays. J. Animal Sci. 35:234 (Abstract)
1972.


IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A33: EL SALVADOR
*







Source of Funds: Agency for International Development

Objectives: To render technical advice and assistance to the Government of
El Salvador for the purpose of improving the quality of graduates of the
National School of Agriculture and to assist the school in its eventual
integration into CENTA--envisioned as a coordinated National Center for
Teaching, Research and Extension in Agriculture.

Personnel:

Peirce, H. E. Chief of Party and Education Specialist
Beinhart, E. G. Agronmist
Hildebrand, P. E. Agricultural Economist
Reaves, C. W. Dairy Scientist
McCloud, D. C. Agronomy Research
Mott, G. O. Agronomy Research
Andrew, C. O. Agricultural Economist
Cook, A. A. Plant Pathologist
Thatcher, W. W. Dairy Scientist
Lorz, A. P. Vegetable Crop Specialist
Malo, S. E. Horticulturist

Publications:

Andrew, C. O. and Hildebrand, P. E., Planificacion y Ejecucion de Investi-
gacion Aplicada, September 1972.
Thatcher, W. W., "AID Project Consultants Report (Dairy Science)," November
1972.

Agricultural Institution Building in El Salvador, Progress Report, June 1972.
Progress Report, University of Florida/AID, Project in El Salvador, December
1972.
Analisis Costo-Beneficio de la Educacion Vocacional Agricola en El Salvador,
Dearing, Jose, 1972.
Cook, A. A., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Cow Peas)," December 1972.
Malo, S., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Fruit Horticulture)," February
1972.
Lorz, A. P., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Fruit Horticulture)," February
1972.


IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A38: COSTA RICA

Source of Funds: Agency for International Development

Objectives: To provide technical advice and assistance to the Goverment of
Costa Rica in implementation of an Agricultural Technical School.

Personnel:

Muller, A. S. Education Specialist

Publications: NONE


IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A48: ECUADOR

Source of Funds: World Bank

Objectives: To provide International Technical Services to INIAP in its
efforts to strengthen its research and training facilities in support of
the development of the livestock industries of Ecuador and improving its
domestic staff.

Personnel:

Bishop, J. P. Animal Scientist
Tergas, L. Agronomist
Southcombe, F. L. Agronomist
Webb, T. E. Seed Technology Specialist
McCloud, D. C. Agronomist
Hudgens, B. Agronomist








Publications:

Proquesta Para un Programa de Mejoramiento y Produccion de Pastos y Forrajes
Para la Region Tropical del Ecuador, Tergas, L. E., 1972.

"End of Tour Report," Webb, T. E., 1972.

IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A42: ECUADOR

Source of Funds: Inter-American Development Bank

Objectives: To provide technical assistance to Instituto Nacional de
Investicagiones Agropecuarias (INIAP) in its efforts to diversify, improve
its staff and develop more rapidly its various research programs.

Personnel:

Dow, J. K. Chief of Party and Agricultural Economist
Schwartz, Michael Agricultural Economist
Mathis', Kary Agricultural Economist
Reynolds, J. E. Agricultural Economist

Publications:

Dow, J. K., "Reporte Anual de Actividades," 1972.
Schwartz, M., "El Vso de Presupuestos en la Planificacion de Fincas," 1972.
Dow, J. K., Estudio de la Situacion de los Derivados de Aceites de Oleaginosas
y el Incremento Necesario en el Cultivo con Miras al Autobastecimiento,
February 1972.
Dow, J. K., "Semiannual Report of Activities for Florida/INIAP Contract,"
July 1972.


IFAS Research Report


PROJECT A52: RURAL ELECTRIFICATION

Source of Funds: Agency for International Development

Objectives:, To assist AID in its efforts to determine the social, cultural
and economic efforts of rural electrification in areas of Latin America.

Personnel:

Ross, J. E. Agricultural Economist
Moses, G. C. Agricultural Economist
Davis, J. M. Sociologist
Saunders, J. V. Sociologist

Publications: NONE













REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER

Summary of Expenditures of Federal Funds 1971-72



Regional Total
Hatch Research McIntire Federal
Funds Funds Stennis Funds

Salaries & Wages 696,874.45 99,402.66 93,202.86 889,479.97

Travel 1,051.04 7,744.82 3,364.55 12,160.41

Transportation & Communication 1,183.15 3,333.24 5,460.80 9,977.19

Utilities 268.78 11,449.09 5,275.83 16,993.70

Printing 120.00 517.17 556.89 1,194.06

Repairs & Maintenance 2,113.09 2,263.17 2,841.56 7,217.82

Contractual Services 360.93 1,223.93 3,596.29 5,181.15

Rentals 619.86 3,072.44 2,690.74 6,383.04

Other Current Charges & Obligations 0 189.00 0 189.00

Materials & Supplies 19,974.01 26,401.77 13,228.69 59,604.47

Equipment 81,516.42 2,298.33 16,451.44 100,266.19

Land & Buildings 8,850.62 u 10,407.00 19,257.62

TOTAL FEDERAL EXPENDITURES 812,932.35 157,895.62 157,076.65 1,127,904.62










REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER

Summary of Expenditures of State Funds 1971-72


Fla. Agricultural
Experiment Station
General Revenue Funds

Salaries, Wages & Fringe Benefits 10,367,319.61

Travel 203,462.51

Transportation & Communications 138,706.95

Utilities 214,432.69

Printing 75,624.73

Repairs & Maintenance 76,947.38

Contractual Services 50,870.26

Rentals 89,602.76

Other Current Charges & Obligations 6,152.25

Supplies and Materials 702,978.80

Equipment 275,418.36

Land and Buildings 139,754.12

Transfers 0 -

Special Appropriation-Building Fund 0 -

TOTAL STATE FUNDS 12,341,270.42


Incidental
Funds

209,580.97

22,660.22

19,061.03

33,957.04

708.10

28,924.08

17,568.18

41,817.66

7,123.74

510,312.22

78,075-27

43,304.20

-0 -

-0 -

1,013,092.71


Grants and
Donations Funds

867,395.30

79,518.59

14,128.87

5,169.92

6,643.89

18,794.06

34,575.55

15,237.49

3,351.56

170,789.15

146,145.59

75,443.63

-0 -

-0 -

1,437,193.60


Total
State Funds

11,444,295.88

305,641.32

171,896.85

253,559.65

82,976.72

124,665.52

103,013.99

146,657.91

16,627.55

1,384,080.17

499,639.22

258,501.95

-

0 -

14,791,556.73


~








CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS


As of December 1972, the following major buildings were either complete or
under contract:


Agricultural Research Center
Marianna, Florida Swine Buildings

Horse Research Center
Lowell, Florida Barns




GRANTS AND GIFTS
1972

Commercial grants and gifts accepted as support for existing programs
during the year ending December 31, 1972. Financial assistance is hereby
gratefully acknowledged.

ABBOTT LABORATORIES
AREC, Belle Glade--$200
AREC, Bradenton--$750
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$200
ARC, Hastings--$100
ARC, Leesburg--$100
AREC, Quincy--$500
AREC, Quincy--$100
ARC, Sanford--$100

THE ALUMINUM ASSOCIATION
AREC, Lake Alfred--$5,000

AMERICAN CYANAMID COMPANY
Animal Science Department--$2,500
Poultry Science Department--$3,000
Veterinary Science Department--$2,500
AREC, Belle Glade--$1,000
ARC, Jay--$750
ARC, Sanford--$500

AMERICAN DEHYDRATORS
Poultry Science Department--$2,000

AMERICAN HOECHST CORPORATION
Poultry Science Department--$3,000
Poultry Science Department--$4,000

AMERICAN POTASH INSTITUTE
Soils Department--$1,500

AMCHEM PRODUCTS, INC.
Vegetable Crops Department--$500
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$250

APTEL, H.
ARC, Ocala--$6,500

ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN RAILROADS
Forest Resources and Conservation Department--$100

H. J. BAKER & BROTHERS
Poultry Science Department--$3,000

GEORGE G. BALL, INC.
AREC, Bradenton--$200

PAUL BELLINGER
ARC, Apopka--$100

BAR D BREEDING FARM
ARC, Ocala--$2,000

BESSEMER PROPERTIES, INC.
AREC, Lake Alfred--$100








CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS


As of December 1972, the following major buildings were either complete or
under contract:


Agricultural Research Center
Marianna, Florida Swine Buildings

Horse Research Center
Lowell, Florida Barns




GRANTS AND GIFTS
1972

Commercial grants and gifts accepted as support for existing programs
during the year ending December 31, 1972. Financial assistance is hereby
gratefully acknowledged.

ABBOTT LABORATORIES
AREC, Belle Glade--$200
AREC, Bradenton--$750
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$200
ARC, Hastings--$100
ARC, Leesburg--$100
AREC, Quincy--$500
AREC, Quincy--$100
ARC, Sanford--$100

THE ALUMINUM ASSOCIATION
AREC, Lake Alfred--$5,000

AMERICAN CYANAMID COMPANY
Animal Science Department--$2,500
Poultry Science Department--$3,000
Veterinary Science Department--$2,500
AREC, Belle Glade--$1,000
ARC, Jay--$750
ARC, Sanford--$500

AMERICAN DEHYDRATORS
Poultry Science Department--$2,000

AMERICAN HOECHST CORPORATION
Poultry Science Department--$3,000
Poultry Science Department--$4,000

AMERICAN POTASH INSTITUTE
Soils Department--$1,500

AMCHEM PRODUCTS, INC.
Vegetable Crops Department--$500
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$250

APTEL, H.
ARC, Ocala--$6,500

ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN RAILROADS
Forest Resources and Conservation Department--$100

H. J. BAKER & BROTHERS
Poultry Science Department--$3,000

GEORGE G. BALL, INC.
AREC, Bradenton--$200

PAUL BELLINGER
ARC, Apopka--$100

BAR D BREEDING FARM
ARC, Ocala--$2,000

BESSEMER PROPERTIES, INC.
AREC, Lake Alfred--$100









OFFICE OF SENATOR W. E. BISHOP
Department of Food & Resource Economics--$500

BLUE GOOSE GROWERS
AREC, Lake Alfred--$100

BORDEN CHEMICAL COMPANY
Poultry Science Department--$4,000

BRUNSWICK PULP AND PAPER COMPANY
Forest Resources and conservation Department--$2,500
Soils Department--$3,000

BUCKEYE CELLULOSE CORPORATION
Forest Resources and Conservation Department--$2,500
Soils Department--$3,000

BURGER KING
Food Science Department--$6,000

GALLERY JUDGE GROVE
AREC, Lake Alfred--$100

CAMPBELL SOUP COMPANY
Food Science Department--$5,000

NORMAN E. CASSE
ARC, Ocala--$100

CAULKIN GROVES
AREC, Lake Alfred--$100

CENTRAL FOLIAGE CHAPTER OF FNGA
ARC, Apopka--$8,000

CHEMAGRO
AREC, Belle Glade--$300
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$150

CHEVRON CHEMICAL COMPANY
Agronomy Department--$500
ARC, Apopka--$500
AREC, Belle Glade--$950
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$1,000
AREC, Quincy--$1,000

CHICIPEE MANUFACTURING COMPANY
ARC, Apopka--$500


BEN W. CHRISTLEY
Veterinary Science--$175

CIGAR LEAF TOBACCO FOUNDATION
AREC, Quincy--$5,500

CITIES SERVICE COMPANY
Soils Department--$2,000

W. A. CLEARY CORPORATION
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$300

COCA COLA COMPANY
AREC, Lake Alfred--$100

CONTAINER CORPORATION OF AMERICA
Forest Resources and Conservation Department--$2,500
Soils Department--$3,000

CONTINENTAL CAN COMPANY
Forest Resources and Conservation Department--$2,500
Soils Department--$3,000

D'ALBORA GROVES
AREC, Lake Alfred--$100

DEERFIELD GROVES
AREC, Lake Alfred--$100








DIAMOND SHAMROCK CHEMICAL COMPANY
ARC, Hastings--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$250
ARC, Monticello--$250

DISTILLERS FEED RESEARCH COUNCIL
Poultry Science Department--$3,000


DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY
Animal Science Department--$1,000
Entomology Department--$300
Poultry Science Department--$1,500
Veterinary Science Department--$3,700
ARC, Apopka--$500
AREC, Bradenton--$1,000
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$1,000
ARC, Lake Alfred--$1,000
ARC, Sanford--$600
ARC, Jay--$500

FRED DROEGE
ARC, Ocala--$3,000

E. I. DUPONT DE NEMOURS
Agronomy Department--$300
Food Science Department--$100
Food Science Department--$200
Vegetable Crops--$500
AREC, Bradenton--$500
AREC, Bradenton--$500
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$750
ARC, Homestead--$750
Vegetable Crops Department--$1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$750
AREC, Lake Alfred--$750
AREC, Lake Alfred--$1,800
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
ARC, Monticello--$500
ARC, Sanford--$750

DUVAL SALES CORPORATION
Soils Department--$1,000

K. D. EATMON
ARC, Ocala--$2,750

ELI LILLY 6 COMPANY
Agronomy Department--$500

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, INC.
Food Science Department--$312

FISONS CORPORATION
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500

FLORIDA CITRUS COMMISSION
Dairy Science Department--$4,720

FLORIDA FOUNDATION SEED PRODUCERS
Agronomy Department--$1,330
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$1,600
ARC, Marianna--$27,304.48
Research Administration--$14,343.75

FLORIDA FRUIT & VEGETABLE ASSOCIATION
Vegetable Crops Department --$2,000

FLORIDA STATE DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
Agricultural Engineering--$6,210
Entomology Department--$75,821
Forest Resources & Conservation Department--$9,000
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$7,584
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$17,771.00
Entomology Department--$19,529.00
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$20,796.00
Soils Department--$5,240








FLORIDA DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL & CONSUMER SERVICES
Agronomy Department--$7,000
Agronomy Department--$9,000
Forest Resources & Conservation Department--$3,300
Forest Resources & Conservation Department--$500
Forest Resources & Conservation Department--$2,500

FLORIDA GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION
Food Science Department--$10,000
Veterinary Science Department--$12,000

FLORIDA LEATHERLEAF & PLUMOSA GROWERS
ARC, Apopka--$500

FMC CORPORATION
Entomology Department--$500

FLORIDA HEART ASSOCIATION
Veterinary Science Department--$10,000

FLORIDA TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY
Botany Department--$500
Botany Department--$500

FLORIDA THOROUGHBRED FARM MANAGER CLUB
Veterinary Science--$500

FLORIDA TOMATO COMMITTEE
Food & Resource Economics--$1,500
AREC, Bradenton--$12,000

FOREMOST FOODS COMPANY
Poultry Science Department--$3,000

GEIGY CHEMICAL CORPORATION
Agronomy Department--$10,000
Soils Department--$1,500
AREC, Belle Glade--$2,000
AREC, Belle Glade--$200
AREC, Homestead--$1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$3,500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$1,500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$1,000

HAROLD C. CENTER
ARC, Ocals--$8,500

GEORGES ENTERPRISES, INC.
Fruit Crops Department--$1,875

GEORGIA PACIFIC CORPORATION
Soils Department--$3,000

GILMAN PAPER COMPANY
Forest Resources & Conservation Department--$2,500

FRED C. GLOCKNER FOUNDATION
ARC, Apopka--$3,000

GRACEWOOD GROVES
AREC, Lake Alfred--$100

GREAT LAKES CHEMICAL CORPORATION
AREC, Bradenton--$1,000

GULF TO BAY LAWN SPRINKLERS, INC.
Fruit Crops Department--$4,000

GULF STATE PAPER CORPORATION
AREC, Bradenton--$14,500

A. O. SMITH HARVESTORE PRODUCTS
ARC, Jay--$2,000
AREC, Quincy--$2,000

HERCULES, INC.
Soils Department--$3,000
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$7,500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$1,000








HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY MARKETING COMMISSION
ARC, Dover--$1,600

HOBE GROVE ASSOCIATION, LTD.
AREC, Lake Alfred--$100

HOFFMAN, LAROCHE, INC.
Poultry Science Department--$2,500

HUDSON PULP & PAPER CORPORATION
Forest Resources & Conservation Department--$2,500
Soils Department--$3,000

HUMAC COMPANY
AREC, Lake Alfred--$2,300

HUPFEL, DICK
AREC, Bradenton--$250

ICI AMERICA
Plant Pathology--$700
AREC, Bradenton--$500
AREC, Bradenton--$500
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$500

INDRIO GROWERS
AREC, Lake Alfred--$100

INTERNATIONAL MINERALS & CHEMICAL CORPORATION
Soils Department--$1,000

INTERNATIONAL PAPER COMPANY
Soils Department--$3,000

RICHARD E. IRWIN
Veterinary Science Department--$2,100

ITT RAYONIER, INC.
Forest Resources & Conservation Department--$2,500
Forest Resources & Conservation Department--$600
Soils Department--$3,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500

S. C. JOHNSON & SON, INC.
AREC, Bradenton--$500
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$1,500
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$1,500

KAY-ONE KAY-TWO GROVES
AREC, Lake Alfred--$100

KENILWORTH HOUSE
AREC, Ocala--$3,500

KENNECOTT COPPER CORPORATION
Plant Pathology Department--$1,000
ARC, Apopka--$1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500

NEWTON F. KONHUMEL
ARC, Ocala--$11,000

LIBBY, MCNEIL & LIBBY
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$100

LOFTS PEDIGREED SEED, INC.
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$1,000

3M COMPANY
Entomology Department--$1,000
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$500

MALLINCKRODT CHEMICAL COMPANY
Plant Pathology Department--$500
ARC, Apopka--$500

FRED MCDAVID
ARC, Ocala--$1,000








MERCK & COMPANY, INC.
Veterinary Science--$2,000
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$250

MILLER CHEMICAL & FERTILIZER CORPORATION
AREC, Bradenton--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500

MOBIL CHEMICAL COMPANY
AREC, Bell Glade--$1,000
AREC, Belle Glade--$300
AREC, Bradenton--$500
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$300
ARC, Hastings--$500
ARC, Jay--$500
ARC, Jay--$500
ARC, Leesburg--$500
AREC, Quincy--$500
AREC, Quincy--$500
ARC, Sanford--$500
ARC, Sanford--$500
ARC, Sanford--$750
Entomology Department--$1,000

MONSANTO
Vegetable Crops--$500
Vegetable Crops--$500
AREC, Belle Glade--$2,500
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$1,500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$8,000
AREC, Quincy--$500

MCLAUGHLIN GORMLEY KING COMPANY
ARC, Homestead & Entomology Department--$9,000

NATIONAL POULTRY RESEARCH FOUNDATION, INC.
Poultry Department--$3,000

NOBA, INC.
AREC, Belle Glade--$4,252.50

NOR-AM AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS, INC.
ARC, Sanford--$300

OWENS-ILLINOIS, INC.
Forest Resources & Conservation Department--$2,500
Soils Department--$3,000

PAVLO-MAGUIRE ENGINEERS
Soils Department--$9,500

PEEBLE HILL FARM
ARC, Ocala--$450

PENWALT CORPORATION
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$200
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$2000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$2,500
ARC, Live Oak--$525
ARC, Monticello--$500

PPG INDUSTRIES
ARC, Immokalee--$1,000
ARC, Live Oak--$1,000
AREC, Bradenton, $1,000

MICHAEL G. PHIPPS
ARC, Ocala--$30,000

PLANTATION GARDEN COMPANY
AREC, Belle Glade--$250

POTASH IMPORT & CHEMICAL CORPORATION
Soils Department--$1,000

PRINCETON CHEMICAL RESEARCH INC.
AREC, Bradenton--$500







PROCTOR & GAMBLE COMPANY
Agronomy Department--$1,250
AREC, Bradenton--$750
AREC, Lake Alfred--$600

PRO-VITA COMPANY
Veterinary Science--$1,000

REAMS FEED COMPANY
AREC, Live Oak--$100

R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY
Agronomy Department--$4,000

ROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$25,000

ROHM & HAAS
AREC, Quincy--$1,500
AREC, Quincy--$800
AREC, Sanford--$500

ROUSE COMPANY
ARC, Apopka--$200

SALSBURY LABS
Poultry Science Department--$3,000

SANDOZ-WANDER, INC.
AREC, Bradenton--$500
AREC, Bradenton--$200

SCOTT PAPER COMPANY
Forest Resources & Conservation Department--$2,500
Soils Department--$3,000

MRS. SARAH JANE SEDDON
Veterinary Science Department--$2,000

MRS. ARNOLD SCRUTON
ARC, Ocala--$2,000

BRYAN D. SHEEDY
ARC, Ocala--$3,000

SHELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY
Agronomy--$500
Entomology--$500
Entomology--$1,000
Entomology--$4,000
AREC, Bradenton--$500
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$500
ARC, Ft. Lauderdale--$500
ARC, Ft. Pierce--$500
ARC, Jay--$1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$1,800

SIERRA CHEMICAL COMPANY
AREC, Bradenton--$1,000

STAUFFER CHEMICAL COMPANY
Agronomy Department--$500
Entomology Department--$500
Vegetable Crops--$250
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
ARC, Quincy--$500

SOUTHERN FOREST DISEASE & INSECT CONTROL
Forest Resources & Conservation Department--$1,500

SOUTHERN MATERIAL CORPORATION
Poultry Science Department--$1,000

SPEEDLING, INC.
Ornamental Horticulture--$1,500
AREC, Bradenton--$3,500








STRAZULLA BROTHERS COMPANY
AREC, Lake Alfred--$100

DR. J. W. STROBEL
ARC, Ocala--$300

ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY
Forest Resources & Conservation Department--$2,500
Soils Department--$3,000

ST. REGIS PAPER COMPANY
Soils Department--$3,000

TALL TIMBERS RESEARCH STATION
Entomology Department--$1,620
Entomology Department--$1,620

THOMPSON HAYWARD CHEMICAL COMPANY
AREC, Lake Alfred--$950

RAYMON TUCKER
ARC, Ocala--$3,250

UNION CAMP CORPORATION
Soils Department--$3,000

U. S. BREWERS ASSOCIATION, INC.
Poultry Science Department--$3,000

UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
ARC, Hastings--$500
ARC, Hastings--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500

UNIROYAL CHEMICAL
ARC, Homestead--$500

U. OF F. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
Forest Resources Conservation Department--$400

VELSICOL CHEMICAL COMPANY
Entomology Department--$1,000
AREC, Bradenton--$1,000
ARC, Quincy--$500

MRS. CHRISTINE VIERA
ARC, Ocala--$4,000

WATER & AIR RESEARCH INC.
Soils Department--$750

WEKIVA GARDENS
ARC, Apopka--$250

WESTBURY FARMS
AREC, Lake Alfred--$100


Grants were accepted from other agencies as follows:

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION
Agronomy Department --$6,786
Botany Department--$55,965

U. S. ARMY
Entomology Department--$20,857
Entomology Department--$37,256
Entomology Department--$32,230

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Agricultural Engineering--$35,000
Agronomy--$500
Animal Science--$26,507
Entomology--$150,000
Entomology--$10,000
Entomology--$9,000







Entomology--$20,000
Entomology--$20,000
Entomology--$32,400
Entomology--$55,000
Entomology--$60,000
Entomology--$40,000
Entomology--$35,000
Food & Resource Economics--$5,000
Food & Resource Economics--$2,000
Food & Resource Economics--$3,900
Food & Resource Economics--$10,000
Food & Resource Economics--$3,000
Food & Resource Economics--$12,000
Food Science Department--$80,000
Forest Resources & Conservation--$20,000
Forest Resources & Conservation--$11,400
Soils Department--$4,720
AREC, Bradenton--$6,500
ARC, Brooksville--$8,020
AREC, Lake Alfred Agricultural Engineering--$1,000
Agronomy Department--$35,000
AREC, Brooksville--$3,600
Entomology Dept--$11,000
Entomology Dept--$1,000

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Food & Resource Economics Department--$6,470

HERNANDO COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Soils Department--$3,340
AREC, Ft. Lauderdale--$30,000

PALM BEACH COUNTY
Soils Department--$500

OSCEOLA COUNTY
Soils Department--$1,000

VOLUSIA COUNTY
Soils Department--$3,000

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
Entomology Department--$39,367
Entomology Department--$15,000
Plant Pathology Department--$38,000
Poultry Science Department--$1,900

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Agricultural Engineering Department--$93,948

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF HEALTH
Microbiology Department--$22,441
Microbiology Department--$16,915
Veterinary Science Department--$13,550
Veterinary Science Department--$17,075








AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT


Research was conducted under 17 projects and nonprojected preliminary
research was conducted in five areas. Five existing projects are being
terminated because the work is completed. Thus research resources can be
directed to important problems such as better irrigation methods and pressing
mechanization problems.

The research related to environmental problems has made very good progress.
New project 1618 relates to the expanded work on municipal wastewater reno-
vation with irrigation systems. That work has received considerable attention
and now has additional support through an EPA grant. An annual workshop
concerned with this wastewater renovation problem has held in 1972 and a
second is planned early in 1973.

Much has been learned on handling dairy waste through projects 1458 and
1493. Many dairies in Florida already are using lagoons where the results
of our animal waste lagoon research is being put in use.

Excellent progress has been made on processing aquatic weeds for various
uses. Different kinds of mechanical presses have been tested as well as
research on ensiling aquatic weeds for animal feed.

Research continues on the important problems of irrigation, drainage
and water control as well as problems related to mechanization. Machines
built and tested include a continuous flow soil pasteurizer for potting media
and a bell pepper harvester. Work also continues on physical properties and
precooling of Florida fruits and vegetables.

In December Dr. Kenneth Campbell joined the faculty from Iowa State
University where he completed his Ph.D. Dr. Campbell will do research related
to drainage and soil and water relationships.


yLA-AG-C0001 SMEPDON E T

PRELIMINARY AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
A commercial mechanical tobacco harvester was tested under Florida conditions.
Factors investigated were the forward speed of the machine (1, 2 and 3 mph), the
rotational speed of the defoliating rollers (150, 200 and 250 rpm) and the time
of day. Results indicate the harvester can be successful. Achievable harvest
-fficiencies are: 95% at 1 mph and 88% at 3 mph. A transducer to measure
enthalpy of an air water-vapor mixture is b3ing developed. A humidity test
chamber has been secured and is being readied to allow testing of the enthalpy
transducer over the range of psychrometric conditions expected in animal
envircnments. Preliminary investigations were conducted to determine the
feasibility of utilizing misting nozzles, in lieu of aspen mats, to humidify
greenhouses. The water output and air pressure and volume required are being
determined before any installation will be made. Exploratory computer work has
been started to simulate an optimal economic temperature model for hog
production. This model will predict the temperature at which swine buildings
should be maintained in order to optimize net profit. Measurements of
temperature and relative humidity were made in the Swine Research Center nursery
building over a period of 4 wks last August to obtain data to design an
anvtrormental modification system to relieve the heat stress in hogs in the
building.




FLA-AG-00627 MYERS J M

PASTURE PROGRAMS AND CATTLE BREEDING SYSTEMS FOR BEEF PRODUCTION

PFOGRISS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
This report covers the final year of a seven year study on cow-calf production
responses to several different pasture production programs. One of the pasture
programs includes seepage irrigation as a cultural practice. Approximately one
half of the acreage in the program is subjected to irrigation. The program
using irrigation is compared to other pasture production programs of different
levels of intensification but without irrigation. water is applied in
sufficient quantities to prevent the water table from receding below the soil
surface more than 24 inches during winter and spring and 30 inches during summer
and fall. Rainfall during the annual period (October 71-September 72) was
approximately 6 inches above normal. Only 2 irrigation applications were







required, ona in September and the other in March. Total depth of the water
tolled was 5.12 inches. Program response for 1972 in terms of beef production
is not available yet; however, results based on visual observations would
indicate a response similar to previous years. Production increases due to
irrigation have averaged about 40 pounds of beef per acre, and have not been
adequate to offset irrigation costs. These results do not reflect typical
responses to seepage irrigation, but should be attributed to the physical
conditions of the experimental area which is marginally suited to seepage
irrigation.




FLA-AG-1123 MYERS J N

STRAWBERRY CULTURE

PROGRESS REPuiT: 72/01 72/12
Trickle, overhead sprinkler and furrow irrigation methods were compared in a
strawberry production experiment. Rainfall during the season was above normal.
Yield and size of fruit were not affected by irrigation method. The results of
a soil fertility analysis taken near the end of the production season gave
evidence of a very low fertility level which probably precluded positive
response to irrigation treatment. Irrigation method was a significant factor
with regards to movement of soluble salts in the bed. Movement of salts was
towards the upper center part of the bed for the sprinkler and furrow methods,
while significant movement was not detected for the trickle method. Soil
moisture content in the rooting zone was maintained near field capacity on a
continuous basis by the trickle method, while the sprinkler and furrow methods
were effective in returning the soil moisture content to field capacity when
applications were made, but this was followed by a gradual depletion to almost
the soil moisture level of the unirriqated treatment before the next
application. Approximately one half of the quanitity of water was used for the
trickle method as compared to the sprinkler and furrow methods.




FLt-AG-01250 CHOATE R E

WATER CONTROL FOR FORESTRY PRODUCTION

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
The effect of drainage upon tree development is being evaluated. Three drainage
treatments are under study: 2 ft., 5 ft., and4no artificial drainage,
respectively. Water table levels have been recorded on a weekly basis since
February 1969. Seedling trees were planted during the winter of 1968. Average
tree eight at the end of three years growth was as follows: no drainage 3.0
ft., 2 ft. drainage 3.4 ft., 5 ft. drainage 3.5 ft. Tree development will be
evaluated at the end of 5 years (January 1973). The average water table depth
below ground surface during 1972 was as follows: No drainage: Range 0.94 ft.
to 2.84 ft; ave: 1.75 ft. 2 ft. drainage: Range 1.24 ft. to 2.23 ft; ave: 1.66
ft. 5 ft. drainage: Range 0.90 to 3.87 ft; ave: 2.47 ft. Depth to water table
is influenced by distance from drainage ditch and surface topography. Tree
development will be correlated with drainage and other cultural practices at the
and of 5 years growth and reported in 1973.




PIA-AG-01251 BAIRD C D

GENETICS AND ENVIRONMENT OF BEAT TOLERANCE IN LAYING HENS

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Heat tolerance of laying hens is of great concern to egg producers since periods
of high heat stress affect egg production, egg quality and mortality rate.
Survival time of five-week-old birds subjected to a controlled environment of
high heat stress is used as an index to heat tolerance. Experiments were
conducted to determine the effects of antipyrogens on heat stressed chicks.
Acetysalicylic acid (ASA) acetaminophen (AAP) were given to five-week-old birds
15-30 minutes prior to subjecting them to a heat stress of 1050F and 75% RH at
dose rates of 3, 30 and 300 mg. ASA was also fed at levels of 0.025 or 0.05%
for either 6 hours or 6 days prior to heat stress at 4 weeks of age. ASA and
AAP had no significant effects on survival time although ASA showed a tendency
to be beneficial. Both drugs caused an exaggerated increase in body temperature
during beat stress. Feeding ASA for 6 hours or 6 days prior to stress had no
beneficial effect on survival time.








MYERS J M CHOATES R E


IRRIGATION EFFICIENCY

?BOGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Formal research was not conducted on this project during the year. Two
manuscripts were prepared and submitted to Transactions of ASAE. Publication of
these manuscripts is pending.



FLA-IG-01406 LUCK R C BAGNALL L 0 SHAW L N

VARIETY DEVELOPMENT, CULTURAL PRACTICES AND MECHANICAL HARVESTING SYSTEMS FOR
FRESB MARKET TOMATOES

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Tests of mechanical properties of tomatoes were performed tc find ways to reduce
damage. Impact tests performed with an instrumented falling weight showed that
with increasing maturity impact force decreased, duration of impulse increased,
and impulse remained essentially unchanged. Impact, flat plate slow loading,
and sand penetration simulation tests were performed on three varieties at five
maturities. Maximum force produced byimpact and firmness measured in slow
loading decreased with maturity: penetration energy increased with maturity.
Variety MH-1 retained firmness at the red ripe stage more so than Walter or
Hcmestead but had an intermediate firmness at mature green and breaker stages.
MH-1 produced higher maximum impact forces than Walter or Homestead at all
maturities. Homestead was least resistant to penetration at red ripe but most
resistant at mature green. Comparisons between cold and warm fruit showed cold
mature green and breaker fruit were firmer than warm fruit and require more
energy for penetration, but there were no differences in maximum impact force.
Abrasion tests have not shown any differences in subsequent damage due to fruit
temperature at time of abrasion.



FIA-AG-01411 MYERS J M KINARD D T

MECHANICAL HARVESTING OF TEA

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
High labor requirements for harvesting apparently caused abandonment of the
commercial production of tea in the Southeastern part of the U.S. in the early
part of this century. As soils and climate are favorable for the growth of tea
and tea is a popular item, perhaps if the crop could be harvested mechanically,
tea production might be again profitable. Experience with an experimental
tarvester here suggests that mechanical harvesting of tea might be entirely
feasible. Currently a manufacturer of a field prototype is being sought so that
conclusive field harvesting tests can be completed on a full-scale machine.



FLA-AG-01458 OVERMAN A R

DISPOSAL OF DAIRY FARM WASTE

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Forage crops were grown on Scanton fine sand under sprinkler irrigation with
dairy waste. Application rates were 1/2, 1, and 2 inches per week. Corn
responded poorly and was inadequate for silage production. Sorghum-sudangrass
responded well at 2 inches per week, but poorly at 1 inch per week.



FLI-AG-01468 OVERRAN A R

NUTRIENT E WATER INPUTS & OUTGC FPCM THE ORGANIC & MINERAL SOILS IN THE LAKE
APCIKA IFEA

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
%n area of approximately 450 acres was selected for study of groundwater
recharge for possible disposition of drainage water from the Zellwood Muck
Farms. Rainfall was followed with a recording rain gage. Fluctuations in
levels cf ponded water were monitored with a water stage recorder. Weekly
measurements of piezometric head were obtained at a well on the same property.
Correlations of these data should allow estimates of groundwater recharge and
Dermeability of the upper strata.


PLA-AG-01296










SYSTEMS FOR TILE DRAIN SLUDGE CONTROL FOR CITRUS WITH HIGH WATER TABLE IN
FPORTCA

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
CcmFosite drawdown curves for the three soil modification treatments (surface
tillaqe, deep tillage, and deep tillage plus heavy lime application) and two
drain treatments (open and submerged) indicate no significant difference in rate
of water table drawdown following heavy rainfall. The drain outflow from the
surface tilled treatment is about twice that from deep tilled and deep tilled
plus lime treatments. Analysis of the water holding capacity of the soil
profile reveals very little difference in amount of water held between
saturation and 15 bar suction. There is a shift,however,such that there are
differences in water holding capacity at low suctions that when combined with
small difference in water table drawdown agree with the drain outflow data.
Sand tank studies reveal the potential for as much as 40% reduction in drain
outflow as the result of air compression beneath restricting layers in a soil
profile. Compressed air in a layered system may make the system behave like a
vertical column with the dimensions of the drain trench. Unsaturated hydraulic
conductivity was measured by use of this continuity and Darcy equations and was
calculated by the Millington-Quirk method for Lakeland fine sand. For water
contents between 17 and 34% agreement was reasonable. Below 17% calculated
values overestimated the measured values considerably.





FIA-AG-014F1 BAGNALL L 0

PROCESSED AQUATIC PLANTS FOR ANIMAL NUTRITION

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Hyacinth silaqe for animal acceptability and digestion trials has been made in
barrel, 4X8 culvert, and 12140 tower silos. A light weight simplified screw
press design is being developed and several models have been tested. A
prototype harvester is being tested. Juice recovery filters and centrifuges
have been scaled up and are not yet as satisfactory as a laboratory test
indicated. Chopping energy requirements have been found to be similar to those
for corn, but chopper, feeding requirements are more difficult. Interest in the
lightweight press has been generated in industry and developing countries.
Hyacinth has been composted and tested in potting mixtures. Data and designs
developed in this project are forming the basis for the design of plants to be
used in conjunction with large harvesters being developed by the Florida
Department of Natural Resources.








FLA-AG-01493 NORDSTEDT R A

DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF A MULTI-STAGE LAGOON SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF DAIRY
FARE ASTE

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Results from the first 24 months of operation did not differ significantly from
results of 12 months, indicating a rather stable operating condition in the
first twc lagoons. There was some indication that the third (aerobic) lagoon
has not stabilized. Suspended solids have increased and treatment efficiency
has decreased in the third lagoon. Algal blooms occurred each year in March.
Sludge depth was measured in all three lagoons. However, no conclusions can be
reached on rate accumulation until the depth of sludge is known for several more
years. Laboratory studies are underway to delineate factors affecting the
sealing of anaerobic lagoons. Fourteen soil-digestor columns were operated for
approximately five months to compare the effects of loading rate, hydraulic
head, and inhibited microbial activity. Four of the columns have been
maintained for approximately nine months. There was no significant difference
in infiltration rate for hydraulic heads of 15, 30 and 60 cm. Infiltration rate
increased as the loading rate decreased. Gas production in the soil was evident
and its escape through the soil-water interface appears to affect the sealing
mechanism. Tests in three 10 liter digesters are underway comparing stirred
and unstirred anaerobic digestion with aerobic digestion of dairy cow manure.


FIA-AG-01478


MYERS J M OVERMAN A R


ROGERS J S









CHARACTERIZATION OF RBEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Impact testing of fruits and vegetables was continued to better understand the
impact process and enable design of harvesting and handling systems to minimize
damage resulting from impacts. Relationships of energy and impulse-momentum to
impact curves have been established mathematically. Analysis of impact curves
has shown the following: as the relative velocity of impact increases, peak
force and impulse increase and duration of impact decreases. As the masses
involved in impact increase, peak force and duration of impact increase and peak
deceleration decreases. Of the parameters investigated only peak force
consistently increased with increases of velocity or mass which would cause
increased damage. Peak decelerations (and peak force) and duration of impact
are, for given loading conditions, highly dependent upon fruit (species,
maturity, etc.) and inversely related to each other. Impulse is mainly
dependent on loading conditions rather than fruit characteristics. Severe
failure, such as crushing of cylindrical potato flesh specimens, is easily
detectable on the impact curve and results in less impulse and a shorter
luraticn impact. Less severe failure, such as bruising, is less easily
detectable. It may be evidenced by an extended or flattened peak of the impact
curve. Most of the energy applied to the fruit during impact is absorbed, and
little is returned from the fruit to cause subsequent motion.






FLA-AG-C1550 KINARD D T BAIRD C D GAFFNEY J J

FORCED AIR PRECOOLING OF FLORIDA VEGETABLES

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Cccling of fresh vegetables promptly after harvest is necessary in order to
maintain product quality throughout the marketing channels. Some Florida
vegetables are now hydrocooled or vacuum cooled, whereas others receive no
cooling. The use of air as a cooling medium would be desirable for several
products, but at the present time, very little information is available which
can be used to design forced-air precooling systems. Cooling tests are being
conducted on various products in a research facility which was specifically
designed for determining pertinent information concerning the design of
forced-air precooling systems. Basic heat transfer and fluid flow theory has
been used to derive a mathematical model which predicts the cooling rate and
temperature distribution of citrus in bulk containers. Based on the results of
future tests, this model will be extended to include various vegetables. After
obtaining basic heat transfer data for each product, these models can be used to
determine optimum design-and operating conditions for a specific cooling
application. Adigital data acquisition system is being added to the research
facility which will greatly improve the speed and accuracy of data collection
and analysis. Initial determinations of the mass transfer coefficients for
sweet peppers transpiring in a closed system had a mean of 2.36 X 10-* ga. of
water per (min) (Sq.mm) (mm.Hq.) with a standard deviation of 0.26 I 10-e, with
apparently no effect of temperature in the range of 506F to 800F.








FLA-AG-01572 OVERMAN A R

FERTILIZERS AND ORGANIC WASTES APPLIED TO SOILS IN RELATION TO ENVIRONMENTAL
QUAII1Y

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Work in this project is related to objectives covered in AG-1458 (dairy waste on
land) and AG-1478 (leaching of nutrients from soil through tile drains).
Emphasis in this project is to relate findings from the Florida projects to
problems in the Southeast Region. In particular, the efficiency of the
scil-plant system in utilizing nutrients from organic wastes and fertilizer with
supplemental irrigation is being determined. Factors considered are crops,
application rates, soil type, depth to water table, and rainfall. Forage crops
have responded well to dairy waste at rates up to two inches per week. Some
less of nitrogen and phosphorus has been found from the tile drainage system.


PIA-AG-C1495


FLUCK R C










ECONOMIC, BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS OF DAIRY-BBEI CROSSES ON PASTURE
AND IN CRYLOT

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
The pasture and semi-confinement phases of the project have begun. Pasture
areas have been determined and fences are being constructed. As soon as fences
are in place, instrumentation for monitoring surface and ground water will be
installed. Plans and drawings for the confinement phase of the project have
been drawn up and construction of the physical facility will begin when funds
are available.



FLA-AG-01618 OVERMAN A R

WASTEWATER RENOVATION BY SPRINKLER IRRIGATION AT TALLAHASSE

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Forage crops were grown under sprinkler irrigation with municipal effluent
on Lakeland fine sand. Winter crops included rye, ryegrass, and oats under
rates of 1/4, 1/2, and 2 inches per week. All responded well except oats.
Summer crops included corn (grain), corn (silage), millet, sorghum-sudangrass,
and kenaf under rates of 2, 4, 6 and 8 inches per week. All these responded
well. Samples will be analyzed for N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Cu, Fe, Al, Zn.



FLA-AG-01639 FLUCK R C SHAW L N BAGNALL L 0

SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT FOR VEGETABLE HARVESTING

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
A finger assembly mounted on the connector link of an off-set four-bar
mechanism was tested for removing green bell peppers from standing plants.
Results were encouraging, especially on Avelar variety. A harvester with a
similar but larger mechanism is planned for 1973 tests. Fruit position
studies on pepper plants are also being conducted.


FLA-AG-1612


NORDSTEDT R A







AGRONOMY DEPARTMENT


Agronomic research was conducted under 26 projects. Some highlights
in 1972 are as follows.

A new soybean variety name Hutton has been released. It is root-knot
nematode resistant and is expected to increase the soybean acreage in north
central Florida.

Mechanical harvesting of tobacco leaf was successfully conducted during
the 1972 season with high quality leaf being produced for the market.

New interspecific crosses in rye have produced hybrid vigor for forage
production; however, satisfactory levels of seed production have not, thus
far, been obtained.

A new peanut variety, NC-Fla. 14, which is an early maturing Virginia
type was approved for joint release between Florida and North Carolina.

The Florunner variety is now being planted on over 40% of the entire
U.S. peanut acreage and 97% of the Florida acreage. Seldom has a single
variety so dominated the U.S. peanut industry.

Gibberelic acid applied to Pangola has been shown to partially alleviate
the deleterious effects of cool night temperatures.

A new digitgrass variety, Transvala, has been approved for release as
as palatable new forage, resistant to sting nematode and Pangola stunt virus.

New combination herbicide treatments show promise for improved weed
control in peanuts, soybeans, and tobacco.

Male sterile cytoplasm from El Salvador has been introduced into several
Florida in-bred corn lines for potential use in developing new hybrids for
the southeast.

Two new families of herbicides have been found to be superior to other
known tobacco sucker agents.

The first guineagrass hybrids were produced using the newly discovered
sexual plants. This is the first step toward developing an important new
forage grass from this genus.

Resistance to the tobacco black-schank disease has been confirmed in
advanced breeding lines. Making it possible to develop new black-schank
resistant varieties.

New studies on soybean yield factors indicate that the critical period
for seed development is the first two weeks of flowering and yield reductions
during this period result from fewer seed per plant.


PIA-AY-00001 BCCLOUD D E

NCN-PFOJECTED AGRONOMIC RESIAFCH

PFOCGESS DEPORT: 72/01 72/12
Two new projects are ready for submission: Balance of Sugars During Grain
Production of Corn, and Yield Potential for Agronomic Crops. Investigations to
initiate the first project is made possible by the purchase of a polariscope.
Four suqarbeet varieties: U.S. H7, H8, H9, and H11 are being tested in two
replicated experiments to assess production possibilities for this crop on sandy
scils of north Florida during winter. In Florida the only high-yielding source
of concentrated carbohydrates is sugar cane. Thus carbohydrate concentrates
must be imported as feedstuffs. Under this project we are concerned with
quantitatively estimating the basic climatic limitations to yield of grain
crops, with and without irrigation. This may provide data for economic
feasibility estimates as well as direct attention to grain crops with the
greatest potential for improvement.


FIA-AY-CO374 RBONER E S

CCEN EREEDING

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
An evaluation of a long-term recurrent selection experiment which utilizes
F44XF6 as the tester was continued. A comparison of selected 5th cycle and 7th

53







cycle lines indicates a gair in yield of 7 percent for the last two cycles of
selection. This result is encouraging in view of earlier data that indicated no
gain in yield for the 6th cycle of selection. A backcrossing program to
eliminate the Texas male sterile cytoplasm frc the 7th cycle selected
population of the above experiment has been completed. This will allow us to
proceed with the 8th cycle of selection in 1973. Backcrossing to convert
several Flcrida lines to "C" and "El Salvador" male sterile cytoplasma is also
under way. In a continuing attempt to develop lines to replace inbred lines F6
and P44, 140 new lines were crossed with the male parent of Florida 200A (F44 x
F6 x F5B Syn.) and the crosses were tested in 1972. A number of these crosses
were superior to Fla. 200A in standability and yield and had lower ear height.
About 20 of these will be retested in 1973.



FLA-AY-CC627 KILLINGEG G B

PASTURE PROGRAMS AND CATTLE BREEDING SYSTEMS FOR BEEF PRODUCTION

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
This completes the third phase of the Beef Research Unit pasture-cattle program
systems. Clovergrass harvested throughout the season is being chemically
evaluated as well as in-vitro evaluation. Limited rainfall in April and May and
August and September reduced clover production and somewhat limited growth but
not quality of grass in the mixture. Data for the past six years is being
tabulated for publication in a technical bulletin to be completed next year.
Experimental pastures in 1966, 1967, 1968, and 1969 have failed to produce more
forage than undisturbed pastures, however, the smutgrass population and growth
has been retarded approximately 50 percent.



FLA-AY-C1C87 WILCCX M CURREY W L

CHEMICAL CCNTBOL OF WEEDS IN FIELD CROPS

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
!valuations of new herbicides and programmed applications of registered
herbicides, were conducted in corn, peanuts and soybeans. In corn, directed
sprays at lay-by of paraquat at 0.25 lb/A provided excellent control of Texas
panicum. In peanuts, benefin (1.12 lb/A) preplant plus alachlor + dinoseb
(2+1.5 lb/A) at cracking stage provide excellent weed control and yielded 4,748
Ibs/A of peanuts. Acceptable control of Florida beggarweed was provided with
9PX-288, 2 Ib/A; A-820, 4 Ib/A, while equal control of sicklepod was noted from
CGA-17482. Control of sicklepod was noted from CGA-17482. Control of both weed
species was provided by DPX-2888, 2 lb/A, and alachlor + DPX-288, 2 + 1 lbs/A.
In soybeans, stale-seedbed applications sicklepodd 4 inches tall) of Bay-94337,
3.5. Ib/A, EL-119 + or Bay-94337, 1.5 + 0.5 Ib/A, alachlor + Bay-94337, 2 +
1.5 Ib/A, Bay-94337 + dinoseb, 0.5 + 1.5 and alachlor chloroxuron, 2 + 1, gave
improved sicklepod control and reduced crop injury over the same treatments
applied preemergence to soybeans planted in a freshly prepared seedbed. The
three preplant incorporated treatments giving highest yields and acceptable weed
ccntrcl in flue-cured tobacco were R-7465 + EL-179 + pebulate, 1 + 1.5 + 4 lb/A.
R-7465, 3 Ib/A, and EL-179 + pebulate, 1.5 + 4 Ib/A. Combinations of EL-179,
dipleramide, and pebulate gave better weed control and slightly lower yields.



FLA-AY-C1134 EDWARDSON J R WARMKE H E

IFE RCLE OF THE CYTOPLASM IN HEREDITY OF HIGHER PLANTS

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Fertility restoration studies in Petunia species crosses is continuing.
Inheritance of dominant sterility genes and their suppressors in corn is being
.tudied. Attempts to induce resistance to Helminthosporium maydis infection in
ccre containing T-type cytoplasm with chemical mutagens and gamma irradiation
ire continuing. Fertile progenies from gamma irradiated T-type sterile corn
continue to exhibit resistance to H. maydis infection. Host influence on the
form of O-virus aggregates in tobacco has been observed. Investigations of
viruses and their induced inclusions are continuing with light and electron
ricroscopy. Tissues from cytoplasmic male sterile and maintainer lines of
several species are being compared cytologically. A method was developed by
which corn mitochondria can be prepared free of cytoplasmic ribosomes.
iclecular weights of mitochondrial ribosomal RNA species were determined.
Details have been worked out for isolation of protoplasts from some species
containing cytoplasmic male sterility (corn, petunia, tobacco).







DEAN C I HOBNEB E S


4EITI CLOVER AND LALALA BREEDING

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
White clover Progeny of the 1971 polycross test was evaluated in broadcast
plots on the basis of plant type, general vigor, and flowering characteristics.
Results indicated good general combining ability of parental clones. The 1972
pclyctoss test included clones both tolerant and susceptible to rootknot, and
ranging in plant type from virey to bunch types. Intensive data on growth rate,
plant type, and flowering were collected. In general, clones having tolerance
tc zoctknot were superior in overall characteristics to those which were
susceptible. Seed were collected from each clone. Space-planted clones were
evaluated for plant type, vigor, and early fall regrowth. Progress is being
made through a strain-building technique in developing populations which are
mcre persistent and resume growth earlier in the fall. Germ plasm originating
frov interspecific crosses between 1. repens, and I. uniflorua and Z.
occidentale has been obtained through cooperation with the USDA-ARS for the
purpose of introducing into the T. reopens genome characteristics which might
improve commercial utilization. This would include larger stolons, a better
root system, shorter internodes, and larger seed. Alfalfa Selection for
persistence was continued, and subprojects on spotted aphid resistance and cold
tolerance were initiated.



FLA-AY-C1166 KILLINGEB G B

EVALUATION OF INTRODUCED PLANT SPECIES AND VARIETIES FOR ECCNCHIC USES

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Sunflower (Helianthus annus) varieties were planted in a four replicate test on
February 7, 1972, yielded 1942, 3134, 2152, 3422, and 3877 pounds of seed per
acre for Krasnodaret, Record, Peredovik, NK 101, and HS52 respectively. Three
irrigaticns of. 3/4 inch each were applied in April and May. Kenaf (Hibiscus
cannabinus L.) varieties Everglades 41, Everglades 71, Cuba 108, Cuba 2032, and
Guatemala 4 yielded 13000 to 18000 pounds of oven-dry stem per acre. Thirteen
breeding lines and introductions of kenaf and Roselle (H. sabdariffa L.) were
evaluated for yield and disease resistance. None of these lines produced as
muct dry stem per acre as commercial varieties of kenaf. Selection of
riqeonpeas (CaJanus cajan) from the 'Norman' Variety for seed coat color and
yield of seed continues to show promise. On October 25, 1972 application for a
patent, serial no. 109712, 'Beverage from plants of the genus Hemarthria was to
be finalized in the U.S. Department of Commerce patent office. Pampasgrass
(Cortaderia selloana) from commercial fields in Florida and from Mayaguez,
Puerto Rico have been examined for seed production potential. Lemongrass
(Cymbopogon citratus) and (C. flexuosus) are under cold tolerance evaluation.




FIA-AY-01167 BOYD F T

EVALUATION OF INTRODUCED AND NATIVE PLANT SPECIES FOR PASTURE, FORAGE AND OTHER
USES

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Transvala digitgrass was recommended and approved for release as a palatable
forage crass resistant to stinq=nematode and pangola stunt virus. It is
adaptable to tropics south of 300 North latitude. Cyanide evaluations were made
and reported for 19 grazing-type sorghums. Three of these were found
potentially dangerous for grazing livestock. These were Corman's Suregraze,
Dekalt's X-1905, and Pioneer's X-8188. Perennial peanut 5 year average yields
were as follows: GS-1:8580 pounds, ARI: 7,410 pounds, Pl 262794: 6,660, P.1.
2(2840: 6,200, P.I. 2629188: 5830, P.I. 262819: 5690, P.I. 262828: 5,64C, P.I.
262832: !"30, and for P.I. 262839 (Arbhick): 4,400 pounds per acre. The first
of these (GS-1) was developed and selected at the University of Florida.


FIA-AY-01302 WEST S B

A EIOCBEMICAL STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENT ON THE GROWTH OF HIGHER
RIANIS

PFOGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Previous studies with 'Pangola' digitgrass (Digitaria documbens) indicated that
10C immobilizes starch in chlcroplasts and reduces growth and photosynthesis,


PLI-AY-01154






resulting in a shortened growing season and economic loss. This starch
immcbilization has been associated with reduced activities of amylolytic
enzymes. Starch in leaves at 10C was not mobilized in the presence of proximate
metabolic sinks maintained at 3CC. These findings indicate that control of
starch mobilization is within the chloroplast. Further, it became apparent that
greatest amylolytic activity was contained in leaf parts with high mesophyll
cell to bundle sheath cell rations. Gibberellic acid (GA) application to
'Pangola* increased total amylolytic activity at 10C to the level found in 30C.
In terms of carbohydrate accumulation, continuous 10C was less harmful to
'Parqcla' than alternating temperature regimes of either 10C days/30C nights or
30C days/10C nights. Studies with 'Pangola' continuously illuminated for 48
hours showed that starch accumulation was near maximum levels after 12-16 hours.
initial starch levels were reached after about the same period of continual
darkness at 3.C. Gel electrophoresis of amylolytic enzymes from temperature and
tricical species presented distinctive protein patterns for each species tested.


FLA-AT-01333 NORDEN A J

VARIETAL IMPROVEMENT OF PEANUTS (ARACHIS HYPOGAEA L.)

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
The Florunner variety released by the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station in
1569 accounted for over 40% of the United States peanut acreage in 1972 and 97%
of the Florida acreage. The gain to peanut growers in the Southeast from using
Florunner over that which would have been received with Early Runner was
reportedly $32 million in 1971 and $41 million in 1972. Less vine growth and
stronger peg attachment would lessen harvest losses of peanuts. Applications of
tte qgroth regulators, Kylar and TIBA in field and greenhouse trials reduced the
cotyledonary lateral branch length, main stem height and internode length of the
qenctypes tested. The reduction was more pronounced in certain genotypes.
Neither chemical, however, had a significant effect on peg strength or yield,
and their effects on seed quality and seed vigor were inconsistent. NC-FLA 14,
a new early maturing Virginia-type variety with a bunch plant growth habit was
recommended as a loint release by the Agricultural Experiment Stations in North
Carclina and Florida. NC-FIA has comparatively high flavor ratings and a lower
iodine value than the currently grown commercial varieties. The potential for
genetic improvement of the protein and oil quality of future peanut varieties
was revealed in laboratory tests conducted in 1971 and 1972 by D.H. Block and
J.L. Heinis. Wide variations were found to exist among advanced Florida
breeding lines in fatty acid composition of the oil and in the methionine
content of the protein.


FLA-AY-C1358 EILLINGEF G E RUELKE O C

PASTURE ANr LEGUME VARIETY EVALUATION

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Twenty ryegrass, eleven white clover, and ten red clover varieties and breeder
lines were evaluated for oven-dry forage yields. Ryegrass yields were 1713 to
5572 pounds per acre, with rust ratings from slight to intense. Florida rust
resistant, Wintergreen, Magnolia, Jolanda, and Aubade yielded most. White
clover varieties KO-176, Tillman, Ladino, Nolin's Improved, and Regal produced
from 4148 to 3612 pounds per acre. Red clovers, pennscott, Va. Med. common,
Clesapeake, Tensas, and Nclin's averaged 6298 to 5492 pounds.per acre.
Seventeen bermudaqrass selections were evaluated for persistence and production
cn wet flatwoods soils. Highest total yield of 11,080 lbs. DM/A was from Tifton
hybrid #6 at 300 lbs/A of N. Coastcross-1 yielded 95801 DM/A. Alicia
beraudagrass produced 8630# DM/A in 1972 with 2140#/A by May 3, 1972. Fla. 66'
alfalfa produced 11,770tDM/A, with African yielding 10,280#DM/A the first season
fertilized with 2000#A of 0-10-20 + minor elements and harvested every six
weeks. Alfalfa cut at three week intervals had yields drastically reduced.



FIA-AY-C1359 HINSON K

SCYEEAN ERTEDING

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Soybean breeding line F63-400C was released and named "Hattcn." About 650
potentially superior breeding lines are being evaluated for yield, disease and
agrcnosic traits in about 3000 4-row plots at Gainesville, Jay and Live Oak.
rarest is not complete as of 11-29-72. These lines were also evaluated for
reaction to rootknot nematode species Meloidogyna incognita and M. Javanica.
Any new variety released for production in Florida must be resistant to M.






incognita. Most lines evaluated had acceptable resistance. Data on rye
following nodulated and non-ncdulated soybeans showed that residual nitrogen
frce nodulated soybeans increased nitrogen uptake of rye 5 Ibs/A which was equal
tc about 17 Ibs/A applied N. Further analysis of 1971 data illustrated that
correlations between seed yield and percent protein and between seed yield and
percent oil are influenced by environment. From 72 lines grown at both
Gainesville and Jay, correlations between yield and protein were -.581 at
Gairesville and -.232 at Jay. Correlations between yield and oil were +.437 and
+.116 at Gainesville and Jay, respectively.



FLA-AY-01375 CLARK F

SFFECT OF CULTURAL MANAGEMENT ON BLACK SHANK AND ON QUALITY AND QUANTITY OF
FIUI-CUPEE TOBACCO

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Three types of tobacco planted covers were tested in 1972. Cheesecloth,
plastic and a new spun nylon material. Seed germination was good under all
covers, plant growth was faster under the plastic, and nylon than under
cheesecloth, plastic covered plants were 3 to 5 days ahead of those grown under
the spun nylon. For those growers who use cheesecloth the new nylon material
appears to be an excellent substitute. The Regional Sucker Control Committee
continues to test chemicals for use in controlling suckers and several of the
new chemicals appear to be effective for control of axiliary growth of tobacco;
however, additional chemical and smoke test evaluations will have to be made
before they are approved for commercial use. Several chemicals were evaluated
for their effectiveness in the control of weeds and grass EL-179 (1.25 Ibs) +
nebulate (2 Ibs.) + diphenaride (4 lbs.) per acre gave good control for grass,
clover, (100A), and nutgrass was effectively reduced (80%). R.7465, and R7465
plus or minus pebulate was also effective against all weed pests found in the
test area. EL 179 has been approved for use on tobacco in Florida for 1973.


FLA-AY-C1377 PFAHLER P L

QUANTITATIVE GENETIC STUDIES IN HIGHER PLANTS

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Substantial deviations from random mating resulting from pollen genotype
differences were found. Pollen grains containing the various alleles at the
waxy, sugary and shrunken loci differed in fertilization ability,
biochemistry(amino acids and carbohydrates) and in vitro germination
characteristics. Preliminary studies with alleles at the opague-2 and floury-2
loci have indicated a similar relationship. This suggests that selection on the
basis of pcllen genotype may increase the effectiveness and efficiency of plant
imircvement programs. However, gamma and ultraviolet irradiation studies with
mature pollen have indicated that irradiation-induced damage to the pollen grain
sufficient to produce zygotic or embryonic abortion, does not materially
decrease the ability of the pollen grain to fertilize. This suggests that
selection techniques and procedures based on pollen genotype differences must be
closely-related to the specific action and effect of the allelle at a given
locts and would probably have to be extremely sensitive and selective. Later
generations of interspecific hybrids between Secale aontanum and 5. cereal have
indicated that hybrid vigor for forage production exhibited in early generations
is being maintained. However, levels of seed production comparable to
acceptable S. cereal varieties has not been attained probably because of the
persistence of translocation heterozygotes which reduce seed set.



FLI-AY-01444 WILCOX P

BIOCPEMISTFY OF HERBICIDES

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Two members of the family of herbicides described last year in paragraph 1
(Ccupcunds 604 and 709) were found superior to other known tobacco sucker
agents, including trifluralin and A-820. One member of the family of herbicides
described last year in paragraph 2 (Compound 926) was later found superior to
trifleralin, A-820, and compounds 604 and 709. Trifluralin and A-820 were
superior to the commercial standard, MH. Compound 881 enhanced abscission of
oranges without damage to fruit or leaves and without abscission of immature
fruit. Some of the above evaluations were performed by CIBA-GEIGY Corp. These
ccmycunds are also designated as follows: 604 = CGA 12534; 709 = CGA 22480; 881
= CGA 22911.










LAND DISPOSAL OF DAIRY FARM WASTE

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
A rye and ryagrass mixture was grown on .41 ha areas of flatwoods soil that was
irrigated with 1/2, 1 and 2 inches per week with effluent from milking barn at
Dairy Research near Hague, Florida during winter of 1971-72. Best growth was at
the high rate of irrigation but both crops suffered from severe rust infestation
during the warm winter. The irrigation plots were split in late spring of 1972
and 1/2 planted to hybrid corn and 1/2 to Grazer S sorghum-sudangrass. Crops
were harvested as green chop and for silaqe and fed to Dairy cattle. The
growing cf summer and winter crops where the soil is plowed and worked into seed
bed before each crop is planted has minimized heavily build-up of a surface
organic layer even at highest rate of irrigation. During heavy rainfall
difficulty was experienced with harvesting, planting and seeding operations from
equipment logging even where not irrigated.







?IA-AY-C1475 MOTT G C

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROPERTIES OF SOUTHERN FORAGES AND ANIMAL RESPONSE

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
(1.) Bahiagrass hay, harvested after 6, 10 and 13 wk regrowth, was fed to dairy
heifers; ave. daily gain was 126, 48 and 15 g and ave. daily dry matter intake
was 73.7, 66.4 and 55.1 g/W 0.75, respectively. Gains were not significantly
different, but the intake of 6 wk hay was higher than that of 13 wk hay (P .05).
(2) Laboratory analyses on 53 samples of Florida forages were compared to in
vivc intake and digestibility data. Included were 10 bahia, 21 pangola and 22
bermuda samples. Regression analysis showed that the digestibility of organic
matter (CM) was best predicted by in vitro organic matter digestion (IvOMD)
(sy.x = + or 3.98, all species; + or 1.69, bahia: + or 2.69, pangola; + or
- 3.39, beruda). There were discrepancies among species in that the IVOMD of
bahiacrass was always lower than that of the other species at a given CM
digestibility. Among chemical analyses, Lignin was superior to Crude Protein,
Cell Walls and Acid Detergent Fiber as a predictor of OH digestibility.
Vcl ntary intake was best predicted for all species by Acid Detergent Fiber
(sy.x = + or 5.25). Within species the best predictors of intake were:
bahia, IVOND; pangola, Cell Walls; bermuda, IVOnD.







FLA-AY-C1478 KNIPLING I B

SYSTEMS FOR TILE DRAIN SLUDGE CONTROL FOR CITRUS WITH HIGH WATER TABLE IN


FFOGFESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
The objectives of this experiment on a 20 hectare site of poorly drained
flatwcod scil at Fort Pierce, Florida are to evaluate the effects of three soil
modification systems and two drain line designs on the prevention of iron
compound sludginq of drains and on growth responses of 12 citrus rootstock/scion
ccmbinaticns. In comparison to conventional shallow-tilled soils, deep-tilled
soils (1C7 cm) had lower hydraulic conductivities, water table recession rates,
redox potentials, and dissolved oxygen content, but greater drain line clogging.
Water tables in deep-tilled soils with drains receded faster than in
shallow-tilled soils without drains. Root and shoot development of young citrus
trees were best on the deep-tilled soils because of their longer water holding
capacity during periods of drought and nutrient retention properties. In
related laboratory studies with citrus seedlings one day of flooding reduced
water uptake by roots and resulted in high leaf deficits. Transpiration and
photosynthesis rates dropped precipitously. The greatest adverse effect was on
clecpatra mandarin seedlings and on shallow-tilled soils. The least adverse
effect %as cn rough lemon seedlings and deep-tilled soils with high lime. Sour
orange aid trifoliata seedlings and spodic and deep-tilled soils with low lime
were intermediate.


FLt-AY-01458


PRINE G H










FORAGE GRASS GENETICS AND BREEDING PRIMARILY PANICUMS

PROGRESS BEPIRT: 72/01 72/12
The first Panicum maximum hybrids were produced using newly-found sexual plants
is feniles. Hybrids between early-flowering fine-leafed females and
late-flowering broad-leafed males were intermediate in both characteristics.
Because of severe spikelet shattering, no emasculation technique proved
practical, so methods of mutual pollination were studied. Isoenzyme systems
were developed to monitor hybridization; preliminary studies showed that plants
placed side-by-side in the greenhouse and allowed to interpcllinate naturally
can set as low as 101 hybrids. Hybrid production by controlled mutual
pcllination in dialysis tubing with 5 male panicles per female panicle produced
frcm 51% to 70% hybrids. In developing a technique for producing hybrid P.
maximum seed from culms cut from the plant at anthesis, we found high humidity
was essential; nutrient solution was helpful but the flower life extender,
9-hydroxyquinoline, had little effect. Six plants of better seed-holding
ability were selected from a large population cf segregating E. maximum plants.
% hand-held power grass seed cutter was designed that is 5 times more efficient
than hand-cutting small plots.


fIA-AY-C1520 BOYD F T

TIt BICICGY AND CONTROL OF NEMATODES AFFECTING AGRONOMIC CROPS

PROGFESS BIPORT: 72/01 72/12
Ccmparative studies have been made on various parasitic nematodes on forage
grasses. Panqola and Transvala diqitqrasses were compared with infestations of
sting and lance nematodes at 20C to 400C. Neither of these grasses proved to
be good hosts for lance nematodes. Highest sting populations were found on
Panqcla at temperatures between 220 and 270c. Stubby-root nematodes
(Trlchodceus sp.) introduced cn roots of planting material were favored by both
pangcla and transvala diqitgrasses and were found in greatest numbers at
temperatures below 320C. Hemarthria altissima was greatly parasitized by sting
nematodes at temperatures below 270C, and suffered root damage by temperatures
tbove 35C.



FIA-AY-C1556 WILCOX C

FEREICIDE MOVEMENT FROM APPLICATION SITES AND EFFECTS ON NON-TARGET SPECTES

PEOGBESS BFrORT: 72/01 72/12
We lavi observed unexpected growth enhancement of St. Augustinegrass wh""
treated by the herbicide neburon. Formulated neburon showed antibacterial
activity, but purified neburon did not. We speculate that an impurity, possibly
ncrneburcn or 3,3,1,-4,41- tetrachlorocarbanilide, is responsible for the
antitacterial activity and the growth enhancement. Comparative VPC analysis is
under way.




FIA-AY-01569 'DEAN C F CLAHK F

GENETIC IMPROVEMENT CF TOBACCO

PROCESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Flue-cured Tobacco The program to develop improved disease resistance combined
with acceptable quality was continued. Resistance to black shank in advanced
breeding lines was high. Yields of several lines exceeded those of standard
check varieties, while average price per pound varied very little among advanced
lines and varieties. An accumulation of germ plasm with resistance to PVY and
TEC was begua, with 17 lines collected. These viruses are becoming increasingly
damaging cn Florida tobacco. Greenhouse screening tests with two isolates of
PVY and one of TEV indicated that some of the lines showed few or none of the
symptoms normally associated with these viruses. Limited field evaluations
showed that resistance to PVY may also impart some re-iistance to TEV, in some
instances. Field resistance to PVY may take the form of slower symptom
development, by the host, or presence of the virus in host cells without symptom
expression. Crosses of adopted lines with resistant material were made.
Transfer cf aphid resistance from N. qossei to N. tabacum has progressed to the
BC(1) generation. Evaluation of resistance to aphids and other tobacco insects
in this material is continuing.


SMIITH L


PIA-AY-C1511







HORNER F S EEWARDSON J R


BRIEEINC FOR RESISTANCE.TC SOUTHERN CORN LEAF BLIGHT

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Over 400 varieties, synthetics, and introductions have been screened for
scutbarn corn leaf blight resistance, and selected plants from about 50 of the
more resistant sources have been intercrossed to form a broad base, normal
cytoplasm composite. Two cycles of phenotypic recurrent selection for
resistance were completed in 1972 by intercrossing the most resistant plants in
this composite. This material is also being converted to a I-cytoplasm
population, and selection for resistance to Race T of H. mavdis is being done.
Gccd resistance exists in the normal cytoplasm composite, but attainment of
adequate resistance with T-cytoplasm seems very remote. Electron microscopy of
this sections of apical qrowinq tips and younq leaves has shown differences in
size and shape of Mitochondria in comparisons of normal lines and some
cytcplasmic male sterile lines. Such comparisons with light microscopy have
failed to reveal consistent differences. Attempts to produce new male sterile
cytoplasma by radiation and chemical mutagens are being continued.


FLA-AY-01573 PRINE G n SCHEODER V N

MINIMIZING HAZARDS AND INCREASING POTENTIALS FOR SOUTHERN SOYBEAN PRODUCTION

PtOGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Soybeans were grown at controlled soil temperatures over a range of 16 to 39 C
to study the effect of mycorrhizae or. growth and mineral uptake. Sterilized
scil was used and 2 species of mycorrhizae were used to inoculate the plants.
Dry weights of treated and check plants were essentially the same, but
phosphorus uptake was increased by approximately 15% and nitrogen by 10% on a
dry weight basis when compared to the check plants. Plant growth was reduced at
both the cold and hot extremes of the temperature range used. A field study to
deterlite nitrogen residual left in the field following nodulating as compared
tc non-nodulating soybeans showed that rye plants following the nodulating
soybeans made more growth although the percent N in the forage was the same.
Additional nitrogen increased growth but the differential in forage yield
remained. Thirty late flowering plants were selected from a 2-acre field of
Bragq planted in April. Bragq soybeans seeded on May 28 were shaded for 7-day
periods with black plastic mesh shades with 25% light transmittance beginning
July 1 to September 1. Two 2-week periods occurred when the 7-day shade periods
reduced seed yields up to 7.3 bushels per acre below the unshaded check yield of
42.7 tushels per acre. Tle first 2-week period was during early flowering and
the second during pod development. Principal reason for yield reductions was
fewer seed developing per plant.


FLA-AY-C1590 GREEN V E JR WITTY E E HORNER E S

FIRLD CROP VARIETY TESTING

PFOCBESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Results of field crop variety tests were reported for the first time in one
Publication. Over 20 persons contributed data from 1971 tests for the report.
A report of the 1972 variety trials will be issued in early 1973.



FIA-AY-C1600 SCHANK S C SLEEPER D A

FORAGE GRASS CYTOGENETICS ANR BREEDING, PRIMAfTLY DIGITARIAS, BRACHIARIAS AND
HIMARIHRIAS

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Ratings were made of new introductions of Digitari and Hemarthria received from
the 1971 USCA-African plant collection trip. Many of the "new" introductions
appear very similar to previous African accessions of 1965. One of the 1971
iccessions, P1 364619, proved to be identical tc cv. 'Transvala' digitgarss.
Interspecific and intraspecific hybridizations using the new Digitari germplasm
were initiated, with 162 crosses set up. Approximately half (75) of these
hybridizations yielded seed, which will be germinated in the spring of 1973.
The number of seed produced per cross varied from 1 to 131, with an average of
17 caryopses produced by each digitgrass cross. Seed set among the Hemarthrias
was considerably lower, with cnly 31 of 100 hybridizations yielding seed. The
number of seeds per crossed inflorescence ranged from 1 to 9 with a mean of 2.5
caryopses per limpograss cross. Chromosome counting in nearly all of the new
Hemarthria introductions has also been completed with both diploid and
tetraploid forms present.


PLA-AY-C1571







ANIMAL.SCIENCE DEPARTMENT


During the past year research was conducted on 29 projects. The
Department has increased its cooperation with other Departments and 8
Research Centers with additional projects on nutrition, breeding, physio-
logy, genetics, feeding, meats and management studies. The Meats Laboratory
slaughtered over a thousand animals for carcass and meat quality studies.
The Nutrition Laboratory made thousands of determinations for 30 different
substances in feeds, blood and other animal tissues and excretions. The
320 acre horse research center near Ocala is developing. Thoroughbred and
Quarter horses have been donated by Florida horsemen and are now being used
at the Center. A second horse project was written this year.

Other physical improvements include relocation of the swine research
unit. The Purebred Beef Experimental Unit is being moved to an area near
the Dairy Unit at Hague to make room for the new Veterinary-College. The
Beef Research Unit Project was revised and the cattle for the next phase
are being obtained. Facilities are being changed at this unit so that pas-
ture, semi-confinement and complete confinement studies will be undertaken
with cow-calf programs.

During the past year the faculty in Animal Science published 158
scientific and professional articles. The research program has continued
to receive national and international recognition via awards and invitations
to present papers throughout the world.










'IA-AL-C0627 KOGER M

PASTUPR PROGRAMS AND CATTLE BLEEDING SYSTEMS FOP BEEF PRODUCTION

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Pasture programs investigated included: (1) clcver-grass fertilized at the rate
of 300 lbs. of 0-20-20 per acre annually, (2) comparable pastures with one
fourth of the area being renovated annually by fall plowing and planting to
winter cereal pasture (oats and ryeqrass), and (3) clover-grass pastures one
half of which is identical to program (1) and the remaining half irrigated by
stepaGe and fertilized at the rate of 500 Ibs. of 0-10-20 annually. All
pastures are grazed by cows and calves. Annual calf production per cow has
averaged 509, 491 and 511 pounds, respectively, for the three programs.
Production per acre averaged 365, 336, and 387 pounds, respectively. Lowered
productivity to program 2 is explained by requirement of more than a year for
renovated areas to return to full production. Cattle breeding systems initiated
in 1957 included: (1) grading to British bulls (Angus and Hereford) and three
2-breed-of-sire rotations, including (2) Angus-Hereford, (3) Angus-Brahman and
(4) Hereford-Santa Gertrudis. Foundation females were Brahman-British-Native
crosses. Production per 1000 Ibs. of cow bred 1965-1969 has averaged 397, 420,
391 and 391 pounds, respectively, for the four systems.




FLA-AL-C3155 AMMERMAN C B LOGGINS P F MOORE J E

TFE NUTRITIONAL AVAILABILITY OF COMPONENTS OF LIVESTOCK FEETSTUFFS

PiOCFISS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Studies with sheep were conducted to investigate the influence of supplemental
nitrogen in the form of natural proteins (soybean and cottonseed meal) or as
urea and biuret combined with an energy source. Effects on voluntary intake,
diqestibility of nutrients and nitrogen balance were evaluated when sheep were
fed low quality pangolagrass hay. In all experiments supplemental nitrogen has
increased hay intake and improved the digestibility of total nitrogen. The
digestibility of cellulose frcm the hay has been greater in all experiments when
supplemental nitrogen was fed. All sheep receiving supplemental nitrogen were
in positive nitrogen balance while those receiving hay alone have been in
negative balance. Biuret plus an energy source has given a response similar to
that obtained with either soybean or cottonseed meal,and when compared, biuret
and urea have responded similarly.






-ARNICK A C BAZEY F W


EIFCT CF HORMONES ON PHYSIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION IN CATTLE

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Sixty-seven female cattle of beef and dairy breeding were slaughtered at all
days of the estrous cycle to determine uterine protein levels (Lowry's method)
and estradiol and progesterone hormone values. A uterine specific protein band
(pclyaciylamide gels) was found in 62% of the animals at 13-23 day of the cycle.
This protein band was present in all samples on days 15 and 16 of the cycle.
The molecular weight of this uterine specific protein is approximately 100,000.
A highly significant correlation of r = .47 was found between plasma
progresterone level and presence of this protein. Plasma progesterone levels
were significantly correlated with total uterine protein (r = .32) from days 3
to 19 of the cycle. Plasma estradiol levels were significantly correlated with
tctal uterine protein (r = .67) on days 20, C, 1 and 2. These data will aid our
understanding of the estrous cycle so progress can be made in estrous control
and multiple calving.




PLA-AL-COS38 WARNICK A C BAZEE F W KOGER M

:CNTIOLLED TEMPERATURE AND REPRODUCTION IN BEEF CATTLE

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
eighteen Angus and 16 Brahman bulls 10 to 12 months of age were used to study
monthly changes in semen traits beginning in January through August. Semen was
collected with an electroejaculator. Angus bulls had attained puberty at first
semen collection at 50 weeks of age based on sperm numbers while Brahman
attained puberty at 66 weeks of age. Semen volume and % sperm motility showed a
significant effect of month in Argus bulls with a decrease during May, June and
July. This decline probably results from the high summer temperatures and
humidity. Brahman bulls did not show marked monthly variations in semen traits
possibly due to physiological changes which masked effects of high summer
temperature. Angus bulls had higher levels of protein in seminal fluid compared
to Brahman bulls. Angus bulls showed a marked decline in seminal fluid protein
luring May, June and July.




FLA-AL-f0999 COMBS G E

FLORICA FFEDS AND BY-PRODUCIS FOR SWINE FEEDING

PPOGFESS FEFORT: 72/01 72/12
the utilization of NPN (diammonium phosphate) in a 11.5% protein diet was
studied with finishing pigs. Additions of 2 or 3% protein as NPN depressed gain
5% and feed efficiency 2%. Blood urea nitrogen but not plasma protein tended to
reflect dietary NPN levels. These data indicate a limited utilization of NPN
occurred. The feeding value of dehydrated water hyacinth and Florida elodea was
studied by substituting these feeds for corn. Isonitrogenous diets were
maintained by adjusting the quantity of soybean meal. With pigs weighing 30
rcunds the rate and efficiency of gain was similar when the diets contained 0,
2.5 or 3% hyacinth. Pigs in experiment 2 had an initial weight of 180 pounds
and were fed diets containing 0, 5, 10, 20 or 30% hyacinth. Performance as
measured by rate and efficiency of gain were adversely influenced by the
addition of hyacinth at any level. The decrease in gain ranged from 31% with
the 51 hyacinth diet to 94% with the diet containing 30% hyacinth. In
experiment 3 pigs weighing 140 pounds were given access to diets containing 0,
3, 10 or 20% elodea. When compared to pigs that received 0% elodea a weight
gain depression of 10% was found with pigs fed either 5 or 10% elodea diets.
With the 20% elodea diet weight gains were depressed 25 percent. These
preliNinary studies indicate that small quantities of dehydrated aquatic plants
may be included in swine diets.




FLA-AL-01(02 WALLACE H D

TFE EVALUATION OF FEED ADDITIVES FOR SWINE

PeOGFESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Jrowing-finishing swine diets were supplemented with 0.25% potassium. No
beneficial effects were observed on daily gain, feed conversion or quality and


FIA-AL-00809








leanness of carcasses. Results indicate that commonly used diets based on corn
and soybean meal are likely to be adequate in available potassium for heavy
muscled lean modern type pigs. In free-choice feeding experiments involving a
suppmental mixture and corn, gilts by.choice consumed an average of over 1
percent more protein than barrows. This difference was observed early in the
feeding period and persisted to slaughter weight of 220 lb. These results
confirmed previous data which suggested that gilts require more protein than
barrows for optimum feedlot performance and carcass development. Ground corn
fed free-choice promoted better performance than did shelled corn. Pigs fed
complete feed mixtures generally outperformed pigs on free-choice regimes. A
series cf three experiments involving zinc-bacitracin at levels of 0, 10, 20, 40
and 80 gm. per ton of feed indicated that this antibiotic was generally
ineffective and that the higher levels in particular were not justified for
growing-finishing swine under the test conditions.



FLA-AL-01003 KOGER B

INtEFENT BODY SIZE IN CATTLE AS RELATED TO ADAPTATION

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
This project is cooperative with the Florida State Prison, Raiford. Most of the
activity tc date has been devoted to generating populations with desired
characteristics. Beginning in 1971 representative calves from the two
populations were placed under identical environments to evaluate feed lot
performance. The objective is to evaluate the performance traits of the two
traits as soon as possible and close the project. Equalization of environment
for the two selection groups has been difficult with the facilities at hand.



FIA-AL-C1166 KOGER M

A STUDY OF RESPONSE TO SELECTION AND GENETIC-ENVIROMENTAL INTERACTION IN
BREFECBR CATTLE

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Reciprocal exchanges of cattle from unrelated lines developed at Brooksville,
Florida and Miles City, Montana were made during the period 1962-1964. Thus,
two genotypes (lines) are being compared in each of two environments
(locations). Highly significant genotypes x environment interactions (GEI) have
been observed for birth weight, weaning weight and post-weaning gain on pasture.
These interactions occurred for both foundation cattle, half of which had been
transferred, and in subsequent generations where all cattle were born and reared
at the location where comparison was made. Interestingly, there was no GEI for
feed-lot gain where the cattle were not on pasture. In addition to the above
trial with u-related lines, the comparison is being repeated with closely
related lines selected in each of the two environments. The foundations of
these related lines selected in each of the two environments. The foundations
of these related lines were random samples from an inbred group, Montana Line 1.
Confirmation of the above preliminary indications of GEI in traits of economic
importance would have significant implications for genetic improvement of
cattle, especially in the use of bulls in AI studs. The level of circulating
blood thyroid hormone was determined on 260 head of cattle at the two locations
during 1968-69. Both locations and origin of cattle (line) had significant
effects with the Brooksville classifications being high in both cases.



FIA-AL-01205 PALMER A Z

PHYSIOLOGICAL AGING OF CATTLE ANC CARCASS MATURITY

PIOGFESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Seventeen grade angus cattle of similar breeding were slaughtered at ages
ranging from 11 to 66 months. Maturity of the carcasses varied widely relative
tc chronological age, particularly after 20 months of age. Blood hemoglobin
ranged from 7.5 to 13.7 qm/100 ml. Blood serum calcium ranged from 6.4 to 11.4
mq./1C0 ml. Blood serum phosphorus ranged from 2.5 to 10.3 mg./100 ml. and
appeared to decline with advancing age. Blood serum magnesium ranged from 1.4
tc 2.5 ng./100 ml. and apparently was not influenced by age at time of
slaughter. Steaks of individual animals were variable and most of them
acceptable in tenderness by taste panel and Warner-Bratzler Shear up to 34
acnths cf age; thereafter, the broiled short loin steaks from 7 carcasses were
unacceptable in tenderness. The small number of heifers, steers and cows used
in this study allow these data to be only suggestive and not conclusive-









SELECTICN FOR PESISTANCB IN SEEEP TO ABO1ASAI PARASITIC NEMATODES

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Six lamb crops have been produced from the selection study on resistance to
internal nematodes in the Florida Native and Rambouillet ewe flock (R=
Rambouillet, N = Native, H = High, L = Low resistance groups). Ewes were
assigned tc low or high groups based on their average hemoglobin levels. The RH
and RL groups were continued on a routine anthelementic treatment program
necessary to maintain the combined group early in the study. The percent lamb
crop in 1972 was 105, 114, and 109 for RHL. NH and NL respectively. Data were
analyzed from the five previous lamb crops, ard significant sources of variation
influencing birth weight were sex, birth type and age of ewe. Year, sex,
hemoglobin group, type of rearing, ewe age, age of lamb and Breed x hemoglobin
group ware sources of variation significantly different. More Florida Native
lambs survived to a 60 day weaning period (P less than .01). Year, hemoglobin
group and hemoglobin group x Breed also significantly (P less than 01)
influenced fertility rate in the Florida Native. A relationship of hemoglobin
type (AA, AB and BB) to Haemonchus contortus infection in necropsied Florida
Native was observed.



PLA-AL-01442 PALMER A Z

FEEDING AND MANAGEMENT OF SWINE RAISED IN CONFINEMENT

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Sixty-four crossbred pigs were used to compare the effect of diets based on
ccrn-soybean meal (SBOM), wheat plus equal SEOM, wheat plus equal crude protein
(provided by SBOM) and harley-SBOM on carcass characteristics. The pigs were
slaughtered at approximately 215 1i. Pigs from the barley-SEOM diet had a
significantly (P<.01) lower dressing percent than the other lots,and their
carcasses cut out significantly (P<.01) higher percentages of ham, picnic and
four lean cuts.



FIA-AL-C1460 SHIRLEY R L EASLFY J F HENTGES J F

IOXTC SUBSTANCES AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF HYACINTHS AND CTHER WATER PLANTS

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
A study was made to compare the nutrient and toxicant characteristics of
hyacinth (Eichornia crassipes), hydrilla (Hdrilla verticillate) and alfalfa
(Medicago sativa) when incorporated at the level of 50% dry weight in the diet
of rats. The other constituents of the diet included 13% casein, 25% sucrose,
5% corn oil, 5% H.M.W. salts and 2% vitamin fortification mixture. Forty female
weanling Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into three dietary groups.
rhe averaqe weight gains when fed the diets through 12 weeks after weaning were
156, 142, and 170 grams, respectively. At this time they were mated and
continued on the diets. The number of young littered by the groups fed the
hyacinth, hydrilla and alfalfa diets were 44, 48 and 48, respectively. Another
study involved the determination of the concentration of 10 nutrient elements in
hydrilla taken from a lake and a ditch at monthly intervals throughout the year.
The 10 elements were also analyzed in water taken from the lake and ditch at the
same times that the hydrilla samples were obtained. This was done to determine
Lf the concentration of the individual elements in the water affected the
concentration in the tissue of the plant. The average concentrations of Ca, Fe
ind Na expressed as mq per litter of water were as follows: Ca (ditch, 75; lake,
16), Fe (ditch, 314; lake, 34), and Na (ditch, 39; lake 13).



PIA-AL-01462 BAZER F W WARNICK A C WALLACE H D

UTERINE FACTORS AFFECTING EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT AND CORPUS LUTIUM FUNCTION

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Progress Report: Total uterine protein recovered from ovariectomized gilts
treated with 0, 25, 50, 100, 200 or 300 mg Progesterone (P)/45.45 kg bodyweight
from day 4 (day of ovariectcmy to day 15 after enset of estrus was 9.5, 51.4,
59.7, 83.9, 149.7 and 106.2 ag, respectively. These data indicated that the
quantity of uterine protein secreted is dependent upon the dosage of
progesterone. Mated gilts were ovariectomized on day 4 and treated with either
50 mg (LP) or 150 mg P (HP)/45.45 kg bodyweight to day 40 after onset of estrus.
Similar gilts which were not mated were ovariectomized on day 4 and treated with


FLA-AL-C1313


LCGGINS P E








the same dosage of P to day 15 after onset of estrus when 86.1 and 133.5 mg
protein was recovered from the LP and HP groups respectively. This difference
was highly significant (P <.01). Treatment effects on conception rate, embryo
survival, number of embryos, embryo weight and length were not significantly
affected by treatment. However, empty uterine weight, allantoic fluid volume
and placentae length, and allantoic fluid total protein were significantly (P
<.05) increased in the HP gilts.



FIA-AL-C1463 3SZER F W WARNICK A C WALLACE H D

FETAL SURVIVAL TO 105 DAYS GESTATION IN SWINE ON VARIOUS HORMONAL AND
NOTRITICNAL REGIMES

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Twenty sows received 1250 I.U. pregnant mares serum (PMS) on the day pigs were
weaned 5O0 I.U. human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) 72 hr later and were mated
30 hours after HCG injection. Conception rate was 90%. Live pigs born and pigs
weaned averaged 11.1 and 8.55 which was within the normal range for the herd.
In a second experiment 30 sous were divided into three groups: (1) Controls;
(2) EMS only on day of weaning; and (3) PMS + HCG as previously described.
Conception rates were 67, 50 and 60 percent and live pigs bcrn averaged 11.4,
10.9 and 9.7 for the three respective groups. Although PMS is known to increase
ovulaticn rate, the superovulated females did not farrow more live pigs.
Furthermore, total pigs farrowed for groups, 1, 2 and 3 was 14.4, 13.6, and 12.0
respectively was not significantly affected by PMS treatment.



FIA-AL-01467 FEASTER J P

EfECIS OF LOW LEVEL DIETARY PESTICIDES ON RATS

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Lov levels of DDT, Parathion and Carharyl fed in earlier studies of effects of
pesticides on growth and reproduction in rats had no apparent effects; hence
high levels (100 and 5CO times concentration in the average human diet) have
bean studied. With the three pesticides fed in combination, no effects could be
observed from the 100-times level, but the 50C-times diet decreased weight gains
and caused death of young born to females reared on the diets. Findings were
the same when only DDT was added to the diet at 100 and 500 times the average
human dietary level. Second and third generation offspring from the 1CO-times
females have been maintained on the 100-times level, both of DDT alone and DDT,
Parathion and Carbaryl in combination. No adverse effects were observed on
growth or reproduction in these descendants. Since all offspring of 50C-times
females died shortly after birth, no study of descendants could be made at this
level. In another study, 2, 4, 5-T, a herbicide said to have adverse effects on
reproduction, has been fed in the diets of rats at 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg body
weight. Weight gains were decreased just slightly in females fed the 40 and 80
2q levels, and hemoglobin was depressed slightly at the 80 mg level. It
appears that at the latter level, 2, 4, 5-T may have some effect on
reproduction; a need for further study is indicated. Effects of the insecticide
lirex on growth and reproduction in rats are also being studied.



FIA-AL-01471 FRANKE D E

BEEI AND EAIRY X BEEF CROSS CATTLE FOR BEEF PRODUCTION IN NORTHERN FLORIDA

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
The third calt crop of an extensive cooperative dairy x beef crossbreeding study
between Flcrida Agriculture Experiment Station's and Apalachee Correctional
Institution has been weaned. This study was designed to evaluate usage of dairy
sires and F(1) dairy-beef females in a beef program. Preliminary data analysis
show F(1) dairy-beef calves to wean approximately 15% heavier than straightbred
Anqus and Hereford calves. F(1) dairy-beef females appear to be less tolerant
to environmental changes than Angus or Hereford females in regard to
raepoducction ability. Two more calf crops are to be weaned from this study.



FLA-AL-01475 MOORE J E

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROPERTIES OF SOUTHERN FORAGES AND ANIMAL RESPONSE

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
11). Bahiagrass hay, harvested after 6, 10 and 13 wk regrowth, was fed to








dairy heifers; ave. daily gain was 126, 48 and 15g and ave. daily dry matter
intake was 73.7, 66.8 and 55.1 g/WO.75, respectively. Gains were not sig-
nificantly different, but the intake of 6 wk hay was higher than that of 13
wk hay (P<.05). (2) Laboratory analyses on 53 samples of Florida forages
were compared to in vivo intake and digestibility data. Included were 10
bahia, 21 pangola and 22 bermuda samples. Regression analysis showed that
the digestibility of organic matter (OM) was best predicted by in vitro
organic matter digestion (IVOMD) (Sy.x= 3.98, all species; T.6-, Eahia;
2.69, pangola; 3.99 bermuda). TKere were discrepancies among species in
that the IVOMD of bahiagrass was always lower than that of the other species
at a given OM digestibility. Among chemical analyses, Lignin was superior
to Crude Protein, Cell Walls and Acid Detergent Fiber as a predictor of OM
digestibility. Voluntary intake was best predicted for all species by Acid
Detergent Fiber (s x = 5.25). Within species the best predictors of intake
were: bahia, IVOMD0 pangola, Cell Walls; bermuda, IVOMD.



FLA-AL-C1480 HENTGES J F JR

'UTRITICN AND GROWTH BESPCNSE OF BEFF AND DAIRY X BEEF CALVES

IFOGEESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Ccmparative postweaning calf performance data were summarized for straiqhtbred
knqus or Hereford, crossbred Anqus X Hereford and crosses of beef (Angus or
Hereford) x dairy (Holstein and Brown Swiss) breeds. Data were summarized for
liveweioht gain, feed conversion, feedlot behavior, slaughter yield, carcass
quality and predisposing causes of liver abscesses on diets with different
nutrient densities. Heterosis was apparent in all crossbreds but its expression
was hiqhest when the cattle were offered diets which were high in nutrient
density and low in bulky ingredients. Such diets predisposed all lots to liver
abscesses. Carcass characteristics and slaughter data were not widely different
when steers were slaughtered at equal stages of maturity and degrees of finish.



LRA-AL-01481 HENTGES J F JR SHIRLEY R L COMBS G E JR

EROCESSEC AQJATIC PLANTS FOR ANIMAL NUTRITION

PROGRFSS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
The ensilability of mechanically harvested, chopped and pressed waterhyacinths
and tte nutritive value of waterhyacinth silage was measured with sheep and
cattle. Dried citrus pulp to absorb moisture and sugarcane molasses to provide
fermentable sugars were effective additives. Acceptability by cattle of 48
treatments of waterhyacinth silage from pilot silos was excellent and indicated
a vast potential for the ensilinq of waterhyacinths. The first commercial
larce-scale effort to harvest, press and ensile waterhyacinths in a tower silo
was successful from the standpoint of mechanical handling, minimal runoff,
satisfactory pH of ensilage and nutrient contest.



FIA-Al-01511 KOGER M FRANKE D E

3SREDING METHODS FOR BEEF CATTLE IN THE SOUTHERN REGION

PFOSGESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Tte breeding value of highly fertile grade cattle with good calf survival is
being compared with that of purebreds in inter-se, backcross and first cross
matinqs. The first matinqs were made in 1971. For the first calf crop weaned
(1972) weaning rate and weaning weight of calves was higher for grade cows than
fcr purebred cows.



FIA-AL-C1E27 PALMER A Z CARPENTER J W

FACTORS RESPONSIBLE FOP TENDERNESS VARIATIONS IN MEAT

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
In the first study, relatively large within muscle variations in hydroxyproline
(OHP) were obtained when triplicate samples were taken from ground-mixed fresh
muscle. A second study was made wherein duplicate fresh muscle samples were
lycphilized, fat extracted and ground by wiley mill through a 60 mesh screen and
then sub-sampled in duplicate. Variations in OHP values were consistently
smaller amcng duplicate sub-samples than between the duplicate samples. In a






third study, three methods of OHP assay were compared in percent recovery of
standard hydroxyproline from muscle hydrolysates. Mean recovery percentages and
standard error of the mean for each procedure were: Bergman and Loxley (Anal.
Chem. 35:1961, 1963), 97.34 plus or minus 1.12: Ramamurthy et al. (Biochem. Med.
5: 555, 1971), 97.09 plus or minus 1.13: Woessner (Arch. Eicchem. Biophys.
33:44C, 1961), 101.32 plus or minus 0.85. The Armour Tenderometer was used in
avaluatinq the tenderness of U.S. Good and Choice beef carcasses. Tenderometer
data are being compared with broiled steak tenderness by taste panel and by
4arner-Bratzler Shear. 290 carcasses were used in this study.



1IA-AI-C1528 ARRINGTON L R SHIPLEY R L AMMERMAN C B

ICTRIENT REQUIREMENTS CF LABORATORY ANIMALS

PFOGrFSS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Growing guinea pigs were fed practical diets containing 5.4, 8.2 and 11.5
percent fat and effects upon growth and efficiency of feed utilization measured.
Weight gain of females was increased with highest level of fat and feed
efficiency of both sexes was improved with the higher dietary fat. effects of
protein intake upon growth and feed efficiency of hamsters was studied using
diets containing 10.6, 13.7 percent protein. Weight gain increased with the
higher levels of protein, but there was little improvement above 13.7 percent.
Fced efficiency was not improved above 13.7 dietary protein,and the protein was
ocre efficiently utilized at the lowest intake.



FIA-AL-C1545 OTT E A FEASTER J P

PHYSIOLOGY OF DIGESTION IN IHE HORSE

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Three digestion studies with horses and a terminal experiment with ponies were
conducted to evaluate the efficacy of polyethylene powder as an indigestible
marker in equine diets. Laboratory results have not been completed.
Preliminary results indicate that polyethylene moves through the tract with the
indigestible portion of the inqesta. Two horses have been fitted with 4 inch
cecal fistulas which permit access to the ileo-cecal orifice. These horses will
be used to study factors influencing movement through the digestive tract. A
study is murder way to determine the influence of calcium level and source on the
diqestibility of calcium and other minerals.



FIA-AL-C16C5 COMBS G E WALLACE H U CUNHA T J

NUTSIENT PQUIREMENTS OF EIPLY-WEANED GROWING AND FINISHING SWINE

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Studies were continued in the area of formulating and evaluating diets for use
in determining the biotin requirement of young pigs. When pigs were housed in
coacrete-floored pens and fed a purified diet containing 3' percent dried egg
white symptoms of a biotin deficiency were not evident within a seven week
feeding period. Pigs housed in similar pens and fed a seri-purified diet
containing 2 percent of succynlsulfathiazole failed to show symptoms of a biotin
deficiency after a six week period. A diet containing two percent of
phthalysulfathiazole was also ineffective in producing a biotin deficiency
within a four week feeding period. Maintaining the pigs on concrete floors
permits coprophaqy and thus a possible source of biotin. Subsequent experiments
will be conducted in metal cages in an attempt to alleviate these conditions.



PLA-AL-C1612 FRANKE E E

ECCVCMIC, BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIFOHMENTAL ASPECTS OF DAIRY-BF-' CROSSES ON PASTURE
AKR IN ERYLOT

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Brown Swiss, Angus and F(1) Brown Swiss Angus females will be evaluated in
three management programs (1) pasture (2) Semi-confinement and (3) dry lot.
Population increase in the Southeast and the need for weaning calves ready to go
tc the feedlot are primary reasons why this project is important. Brown Swiss
and Anqus cows are being gathered to initiate the 1973 breeding season.
Confinement facilities should be in operation by the 1974 breeding season.











BOTANY DEPARTMENT


Major efforts in project research have been in plant physiology,
vascular plant taxonomy, mycology, and ecology. Non-projected investigations
pursued have been in phycology, plant tissue culture, the morphology of
both vascular and non-vascular plants, taxonomy of non-vascular plants,
and entomogenous fungi. Substantial acquisitions of equipment have been
made during the year to further both the research and the teaching
responsibilities of the department.

There were no major staff changes during the year. Mr. D. W. Hall
has continued to serve as the Interim Research Associate in the Vascular
Plant Herbarium. Dr. George Bowes, coming from the Carnegie Institution
of Washington at Stanford, has been employed as an Assistant Professor to
assume duties January 1, 1973. He is a plant physiologist whose research
is in the area of photorespiration and photosynthesis.




FLI-ET-01042 FRITZ G J

'ITAECLISM OF MOLFCULAP OXYGEN BY PLANTS

EfOGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Demonstrated that when sunflower seedlings were incubated for several days in
atmcspheres enriched with oxygen-18 (10 atom percent), then caffeic acid
isolated from the seedlings was labeled in the hydroxyl groups (8.7 atom
percent). This demonstration required the isolation of caffeic acid from the
tissues and its purification by repeated runs or thin layer chromatoqrams,
followed by analysis in a mass spectrometer. However, to prove conclusively
that caffeic acid biosynthesis involves the direct addition of molecular oxygen
to prectrsors also requries a demonstration that the aforementioned labeling in
caffeic acid does not arise indirectly, i.e., by reaction of a precursor with
labeled water produced in respiration. To provide this demonstration, seedlings
were qrcwn in unlabeled atmospheres with their roots immersed in labeled water;
it was expected that the hydroxyl groups in caffeic acid would not be labeled.
Urfortunately, it has not been possible to obtain caffeic acid in sufficient
purity for mass spectrometric analysis, even in spite of repeated and persistent
efforts. These failures emphasize the considerable technical difficulties in
the purification of caffeic acid. To resolve this problem, a different approach
was adopted a few weeks ago. Seedlings are incubated in atmospheres enriched
with cxygen-18, as in the original experiments (see above), but now the tissue
water is isolated and analyzed for oxygen-18. These experiments are currently
in progress (Nov. 1972). If the results show, as expected, that the tissue
water is labeled only to a very small extent, then the results will be assembled
for publication.



FLA-ET-01118 WARD D B

A FLORA OF FLORIDA

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
This project was terminated during the year and is to be continued as part of a
acre comprehensive project now awaiting approval. Two papers were completed and
have been presented for publication: Contributions to the Flora of Florida --
5, Corydalis, Fumaria (Fumariaceae). Contributions to the Flora of Floriaa --
6, Rlephantopus, Pseudo- elephantopus (Compositae).


FLA-BI-C1226 KIMBEOUGH J W

TAXCNCPY OF SPECIES OF THE TRIBE THEIEBOLEAE

PROGRESS FEFORT: 72/01 72/12
N acnograph of the genus Coprotus was completed and published in the Canadian
Journal cf Botany. Manuscript on "Apothecial ontogeny, ascal structure, and a
natural classification of the Thelebolaceae" was prepared and has been accepted
for publication in Persoonia 6. Type specimens of Lasiobolus have been obtained
and studies toward a monograph of that genus continues. Cultural studies are in
progress for Thelebolus subfuscus, the first 9-spored species of this gpenus
attainedd in culture by us thus far. Developmental studies of Coprots lacteus
have been submitted for publication in Mycologia. Dr. Ann Bell, of Wellington,
l'ew Zealand, and I are jointly publishing a new species of Coprotu on opposum
ine frcm N.Z.











TFE IFGUME FLORA OF FLOPIEA

PsOGsESS FEFOFT: 72/01 72/12
rhis project is to be co:t.nued as part of a more comprehensive project now
awaiting approval. A preliminary checklist of the Lequminosae native and
naturalized in Florida was completed and has been distributed.



FIA-EI-C1387 MULLINS J T

-UL1IVATICN JF COELOMCMYCES, P FUNGAL PARASITE CF MOSQUITOES

FNCGFESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Icsauitces continue to be a major problem to man, especially in the transmission
of diseases. New methods cf mosquito control are needed to overcome the
zrcblems of insecticide resistance and insecticidal residues. The genus
Cc-lomomyces, a group of aquatic fungi, offers great potential as a biological
ccntrcl agent. This research is directed toward cultivating or mass-producing
these fungi and infecting latcratory colonies of mosquitoes. Species of
ccelcacivces are obligate parasites of mosquitoes, which infect and consume the
larval stages. The vegetative or mycelial phase is plasmodial-like and at
natcrity is transformed entirely into sporanqia. Under appropriate conditions
these sporangia germinate by producing swimming spores, which then infect new
larvae. Field collections of cmsquito larvae infected with the fungus
Ccelcmceyces were made for the sixth consecutive year in the Gainesville area.
Post of this infected material was Psorophora hcwardli, which is difficult to
cclcnize. We thus attempted to infect Anopheles quadrimaculatus, the most
available colony mosquito, with Coelomomyces from Psorophora. We have not yet
had success with this infection and this supports the general idea that species
cf Coelomomyces have a restricted hbst range among species of mosquitoes. Some
success has been obtained in infectirn colony A. quadrimaculatus with
ccalccnmyces from field-collected Anopheles. Work has continued in the testing
of wide variety of nutrient media for their ability to support growth of
Coelcmomyces. ho production of srcranqia has yet been obtained.




FLA-BI-C1401 HUMPHREYS T E

CARBOBYERATE SYNTHESIS AND TRANSPORT IN PLANTS

PROGRESS BEFORE: 72/01 72/12
The maize scutellum absorbs sugars, synthesizes sucrose and transports the
sacrose into its storage vacuoles or to the developing seedling axis. This
project is concerned with all these processes. Leakage of sucrose from the
whole maize scutellum occurred only after the root-shoot axis was removed. The
leakage rate had a low Q(1)(0), and it was not inhitibed by dinitrophenol or an
1(2) atmosphere. Leakage was inhibited by Ca2+, but only if the Ca2+ was
present after the seedling axis was removed. By placing the scutella of intact
seedlings in 1.0 n fructose for lcnq periods before removing the axis, large
quantities ( 140) moles/g) of leakable sucrose were obtained. It was concluded
that sucrose leakage takes place in a pressure-flow of solution which originates
in the parenchyma cells, flows from cell to cell through plasmodesmata, enters
te phlcem, and finally empties into the bathing solution through the cut ends
of the phlcem at the scutellar node. If this conclusion is correct then other
ccmpounds such as phosporylated intermediates should also be carried out of the
tissue. Tn the case of hexose phosphates this was shown to be true. The uptake
of sucrose, glucose and fructose was studied using slices of the scutellus.
lucrose was actively taken up without inversion. Hexoses were taken up by two
processes, diffusion and active transport operating simultaneously. We proposed
that active uptake of both sucrose and the hexoses is coupled to glycolysis.


FIA-BI-C1287


kARD C E







DAIRY SCIENCE DEPARTMENT


Dairy research was conducted on 17 projects relating to dairy production
and dairy foods. Two new projects (Dy-1462 and Dy-1606) were initiated during
the year. Faculty in the department published 9 journal articles, presented
16 abstracts of papers at scientific meetings and gave 31 reports and reviews
of research. The Interdepartmental Research Program in physiology between
the Departments of Dairy Science, Animal Science and Obstetrics and Gynecology
which received a grant for the 1971-73 period is showing good progress in the
development of research programs in reproductive physiology.



FLA-EY-C0001 VANHCFN H H

PRELIMINAEY RESEARCH IN CAITY rFODUCTTON AND CAIRY PRODUCTS

PFOCFFSS EFFORT: 72/01 72/12
Four areas of preliminary research are: (1) Study of Adrenal Function During
Lactatic --"esponse to intravenous inlecticns of exogenous ACTH at 3, 8, 16, 24,
32, and 40 wk of lactation were studied by measuring post-injection
ccncentratiois of peripheral ;laEma qlucocorticoids and the corticoid binding
qlotulin capacity for cortiscl. Data from 10 of the 21 cows on the study are
being analyzed statistically to see if analysis of the blood samples from the
remaining cows would aid in interpretation of results and ir meeting objectives.
(2) Effect of Age, Diet and Substrate Infusions on Hormonal and Metabolite
Levels in Calves--Weekly blccd samples or multiple blood samples during infusion
periods were taken from 9 calves assigned to a hay and grain ration and 9 calves
assigned tc a milk and milk solids diet. Animals were fasted 19 hours before
weekly sampling or the initiation of infusions of glucose, arqinine or a VFA
mixture. R-sponsos beinq measured are changes due to age and diet on fasting
levels of blood glucose, nocesterified fatty acids, insulin and growth hormone
and tte effect ot the infused metabolites on these constituents. (3) Fistula
vs. Stomach Tube for Samplinq Rumen Contents--Ccmparisons were made of rumen
samples taken via stomach tube and fistual following 3-week pre- periods on each
3f 12 rations. The mean aclar percentage of VFA's from the two methods of
safrlinq were not significantly different. (4) Blood Fat Levels in Calves
Supplemented with Methyl cDnors--Forty-eight calves were supplemented with
methicnine, methionine hydroxy aralcque or betalne from 4 to 84 days of age to
see if these products exert a lipotrophic effect. Analysis of the data is in
progress.


FIA-DY-00213 WING J M

ENSIIABILITY OF FLORICA FORAGE CrOPS

PFOGBESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Ccrpatitle crops qrown together help insure against failures due to unfavorable
weather or disease. Crops and their mixtures grown on land treated for
aematodes and fertilized according to soil tests yielded the following amounts
of forage per cutting, in tons per acre: kenaf, 24.6: kenaf and sorghum, 25.4;
kenaf and corn, 22.9; corn, 14.6; sorghum, 16.6: corn and sorghum, 18.5. All
ccabinaticrs ensiled effectively. ?esp'ct!ve ccsumption by dairy heifers per
1CCI0 l. body weight of silage, diqestible drv matter and diqgstible protein in
pounds, and digestible energy in megacalories varied as follows: kenaf, 5 ,
5.6, 1.C, 11.5; corn 81, 10.1, 0.5, 19; corn and kenaf, 83, 8.3, 92, 17.1; corn
and sorghum, 90.4 7.8, 1.0, 16; sorghum, 83, 7.1, .81, 14.7; sorghum and kenaf,
9C, 7.8, .92, 15.5. Silaqe in which half the dry matter was kenaf and half was
citrus full met requirements of dairy cows for milk production as well as did
corn silage with supplementary concentrates. All crops and their mixtures
studied appear feasible for silaqe where they grow well.



FLA-DY-00575 WILCOX C J THATCHER W W HEAD H H

PRODUCTION, REPRODUCTION AND CONFORMATION OF THE FLORIDA STATION DAIRY HERD

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
By the method of least squares, 500 lactation records of Jersey, Holstein and
Guernsey firstcalf heifers, completed during 1959-70, were analyzed to provide
estimates of effects of various factors on body weight and 15 measures of milk
production and composition. Most responses were significantly affected by days
open, age of animal, length of record to 305 days and year. Effects of months
of freshening were generally small and not significant. Pooled estimates of
heritability for yields of milk, total solids (TS), solids-not-fat (SNF), pro-
tein, fat and lactose-minerals (LM) were about 0.20; values for corresponding








percentages and for ratios of SNF/fat and protein/fat ranged from 0.40 to
0.85; heritability of body weight was about 0.50. Most phenotypic correlations
between yields were positive, 0.71 to 0.99; between percentages, 0.32 to 0.93;
between yields and percentages, -0.40 to 0.15. Corresponding ranges for most
genetic correlations were 0.65 to 0.95, 0.40 to 0.90, and -0.40 to 0.10 res-
pectively, the major exception being LM yields and percentages which closely
followed milk yield relationships. Phenotypic correlations between body weight
and yields were about 0.20, but genetic correlations were slightly higher than
those found in most previous research, 0.81 to 0.99. With the exception of
the -latter relationships, results agreed very well with earlier investigations
conducted in temperate regions.



PLA-tY-C11E5 MARSHALL S P SMITH K L

FEPNING SYSTEMS, NUTRIENT INTAKE AND GROWTH OF DAIRY CALVES

PROGRESS PEPORT: 72/01 72/12
k manuscript entitled "Effect of Milk Fat Levels on Growth and Efficiency of
3nerqy Utilization for Weight Gain in Dairy Calves fed Ad Lititum" was prepared
and has been submitted for publication to the Journal of Animal Science.



FLI-EY-01234 WILCOX C J THATCHER W W

GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS UPON REPRODUCTION OF FLORIDA DAIRY CATTLE

PIOGFESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Collection of reproduction data has been completed and data are being sorted and
punched into IBM cards. In an attempt to characterize environmental conditions
existing in Florida, inspection of 477 dairy farms (essentially a 100% sample)
was conducted by representatives of the State Department of Agriculture. Breed
composition of Florida's 191,C00 dairy cows was Holstein, 59%; Jersey, 22%:
Suernsey, 141; Brown Swiss, 31; Ayrshires, 1%; others, 1%. Estimated energy
intakes were in the form of concentrates, 78%; silaqe, 2%; hay, 4%; green chop,
21; grazing, 13%. Milking machine units in active service numbered 2756 (range
per farm, 0 to 64), of which 21% were brand A; 68%, brand 8; 4%, brand C; and 7%
otters. Average length of milk lines under vacuum was 52.4 m; average milk tank
capacity was 7040 1. Milk was processed on the farm in 28 cases, trucked
directly to the plant in 415 cases, and marketed through a cooperative in 375
cases. Milking parlors were used on 156 farms, pipeline milking on 283, other
systems on 38. Steel milk lines were used most widely, 58%, with glass, 31%,
ccmbinaticn, 3%, and none, 8%. Most popular line diameters were 3.8 and 5.1 cm
(761 and 14%, respectively).



FIP-LY-01255 WING J M

ENERGY SOURCE AFFECTING DIGESTIBILITY OF CELLULCSE, PROTEIN, & RUMEN
FIF(ErnrTICN IN DAIRY CATTLE

PFOGRESS 3aP3ET: 72/01 72/12
Previous results prompted an investigation of the effects of citrus pulp on urea
tolerance. Two 4 x 4 latin squares were completed with fistulated steers. Each
animal received .75 pounds of urea daily mixed thoroughly with a 15 pound ration
which was 1/3 sugar-cane baqasse. The basal concentrate was ground corn and
mineral supplement. Experirertally 1/3, 1/2 or all of the corn was replaced by
citrus pulp which was pelleted in cre square and conventional in the other. The
rations were tolerated by all subjects and no difference was observed between
citrus pulp forms. Blood urea increased during the first 7 hours, decrees.,"
scmewhat tc 12 hours post feeding and returned to a low at 23 hours. Rumen
ammcnia followed a similar pattern with no significant difference attributable
to feed. Digestion and rumen fermentation studies are in progress.



FIA-CY-01264 WILCOX C J

VITAL STATISTICS OF BEEF AND [AIRY SIRES USED IN ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION

PIOGCRSS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Data collection continued during the year but no additional statistical analyses
were completed. An estimated 48.6% of all U.S. dairy cows and breeding-age
heifers were bred artificially during 1971; Florida ranked third overall, but
first among major dairy states, in percentage of artificial services. Stud








consolidation continued during the year: about 30 separate organizations engaged
in artificial insemination in the U.S. and Canada now cooperate in this
investigation, along with the breed societies and others.



PLA-DY-01271 HEAD E V

GLUCOSE AND PREE PATTY ACID METABCLISM IN THE IMnATUPE DOMINANT

PEOGFESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Additional statistical analyses have been performed to identify
Interrelationships among factors (plasma glucose concentration, agq, and body
weight) determining rate of glucose utilization in milx-fel and grain-tel
(weaned) calves. Age and body weight remain more important than plasma glucose
concentration in accounting for within animal variability of glucose
utilization. An additional 15 calves were used to investigate age and diet
effects on glucose tolerance, glucose concentration and glucose provoked (.5g/kg
body weight, IV) insulin secretion. The diets (5 calves/diet) were: whole milk
fortified with milk solids (I), whole milk plus high starch concentrate (II) and
wbcle milk plus high-fiber concentrate (III). Previous analysis revealed that
qlucosa tolerance decreased with advancing age, but rates of decrease were not
significantly different amcng diets. Insulin analyses on plasma samples
obtained during glucose tolerance studies glucosee injections 0.5 g/kg body
weight) conducted at 10 day intervals (10 infusions/calf) throughout the 1(0 day
experimental period have been completed.




FLA-DY-01399 MARSHALL S P VANHORN H H

COMPLETE RATIONS FOR LACTATING COWS

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Thirty-six lactating cows were allotted to complete rations containing either
20, 25 or 30% pelleted sugarcane bagasse for 15 weeks immediately after a 14
day standardization period. Within each bagasse level, coastal bermuda hay
(1.36 kg offered/cow daily), sodium bentonite (3.7% of complete ration), or
the control ration for that bagasse level was fed for 5-week periods (a 3x3
Latin square design). Covariance adjusted treatment means for the 20, 25
and 30% bagasse treatments were, respectively: dry matter intake (kg/100
kg. body wt) 3.48, 3.59 and 3.47; actual milk (kg/day) 18.6, 18.5, 18.1;
milk fat % 4.31, 4.67, 4.56; SCM (kg/day) 18.8, 20.1, 19.2; SNF % 9.09,
9.15, 9.20; Protein % 3.56, 3.60 3.59; body weight change (kg/cow/day) -
.45, .29, .31. Dry matter intake was higher on 25% bagasse (P<.05) and
SNF was higher on the 30% than the 20% bagasse ration (P<.05). Cows on the
20% bagasse ration produced more SCM during the period when hay was fed
(P<.05).




FIA-DY-014C8 WILCCX C J

CUANTITAVIVE GENETICS OF MILK PRODUCTION

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Lactation records for 1948 to 1968 were provided by the official milk testing
program of Ecuador. Average performance (5,481 normal first-lactation records)
was 6,825 Ib milk, 3.46% fat and 235 Ib fat. Four least squares models were
applied; all contained effects of years, months, age (linear and quadratic) and
Length of record (linear and quadratic). Model I included sires, II included
farms and ignored sires, III included sires, farms and sire farm interactions
and IV ignored sires, farms and sire farm interactions. Weighted regression
analyses of year constants frcm appropriate models provided estimates of annual
trends. Genetic trends were positive and curvilinear and environmental and
total trends negative and curvilinear, all plateauing about 1960. Heritability
estimates (based upon intraclass correlations involving 878 half-sib families of
1.32 plus or minus .02, 0.48 plus or minus .03 and 0.68 plus or minus .03 for
silk yield, fat yield and fat per cent, respectively, were found. Genetic
correlations between milk yield and fat yield, milk yield and fat per cent and
fat yield and fat percent were 0.96 plus or minus .01, 0.09 plus or minus .18
and 0.30 plus or minus .16, respectively. Sire by farm interactions were small
(less than 1) for the three responses. Least squares sire constants for 86
sires represented in two or more herds by ten or more daughters were fitted to
provide estimated breeding values.









SELECTION FOR MILK YIELD IN JERSEYS

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
This project is still in its early stages. Objectives are to place major
s ptasis in selection upon a single trait, milk yield, and to estimate the
maximum amount of genetic progress which can be made. Genetic changes in other
traits of economic importance, but which are not subjected to direct selection
pressure, will also be estimated. Unproven sons of sires in use in the herd
prior to tle start of the project were used to produce males for subsequent
service in the control herd. Eight daughters of these original matings are
still alive: 3 are milking at present. Two others have completed records and
left the herd. The oldest control daughter sired by a home-raised control son
was bcrn in November, 1970; the first pregnant is due to freshen in June, 1973.
The herd numbers 102 females. The rolling herd average for 1972 was 8,450 Ib
milk and 410 lb milk fat. In the control portion of the herd, semen from 23
young sires is being used; four of the highest AI proven sires available in the
U.S. were used in the selection group.


FLA-DY-01458 WING 3 M

LAND DISPOSAL OF DAIRY FAFM WASTE

PROGRESS FRPORT: 72/01 72/12
Each of three one acre plots were treated with 500 lb. muriate of potash. Half
of each was seeded to Grazer S Sudan-Sorghum and the remainder to coker hybrid
corn. Weekly applications of dairy barn waste water at rates of 1/4, 1/2 or 1
inch were made by sprinkler irrigation. Germination and initial growth were
satisfactory but corn did not mature. Respective Sudan-Sorghum yields of dry
matter and protein in pounds and of energy in megacalories for lowest to highest
applications were: 3926, 264, 7594; 4108, 265, 8026; 4557., 294, 8320.


?LA-DY-01462 THATCHER V W

DTBEIN3 FACTORS AFFECTING EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT AND CORPUS LUTIUM FUNCTION

PEOGBESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Pre-slaughtered plasma and immediate post-slaughter .33 N saline uterine
flushings were collected from 67 cattle of mixed breeding (Angus, Hereford,
Hclstein and Brahman x British crosses). Three samples were collected for each
lay of the estrous cycle (4 samples on each of days 3, 5, 13 and 15). Plasma
samples were assayed for progesterone (competitive protein binding procedure)
and estradicl (radioiaaunoassay). Total uterine protein was determined by
lowry's method. Qualitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sephadex
G-2CO patterns were obtained for each sample. A uterine specific protein band
(not present in corresponding plasma samples) was found in 16 (62%) of the
pclyacrylamide gels from days 13-20. This band (R.f. = 0.35 was present in all
samples on days 15 and 16. Based on its sephadex G-200 elution volume elutedd
lust prior to albumin), the molecular weight of this uterine specific protein is
ap ocxirately 100,000. A highly significant (P <.01) correlation (r = .47) was
fund between the plasma level of progesterone and the presence of this protein.
Plasma progesterone levels were significantly (P <.05) correlated with total
uterine protein (r = .32) from days 3-19. Plasma estradiol levels were
significantly (P <.05) correlated with total uterine protein (r = .67) on days
20, 0, 1 and 2. A distinct plasma estradiol increase was detected prior to the
decline in plasma progesterone. However, this estradiol increase needs to be
documented on a within animal basis.



FLA-DY-01475 WING J M

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROPERTIES OF SOUTHERN FORAGES AND ANIMAL RESPONSE

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Fertilized Pensacola Bahiagrass was harvested at growth stages of 6, 9, and
12 weeks. It was dried with forced hot air and stored under plastic film in
an open barn. Eighteen Holstein, Guernsey, and Jersey heifers were blocked
by breed and randomized into three dietary groups of 6 which were fed only
hay, water and mineral matter during three 28-day periods. All subjects
gained during the first period and all lost weight during the second. Holsteins
gained during the third period. There were overall gains in each group: 6
week hay, 25.2; 9, 8.8; and 12 week hay 3.2 pounds. None of these differences
were significant. Daily dry matter intakes were 9.0, 6.7, and 6.7 pounds.
The difference was significant at the 5 percent level of probability.


PLI-EY-014C9


WILCOX C J HEAD H H


THATCHER W W










LACTATIONAL, PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL RESPONSE OF DAIRY COWS TO CORTICOID
HORMONES

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
Beqincirq day 28 of lactation, 13 cows received 0.010 mg of Flumethazone in a
40% propylene glycol solution (5 ml) and 12 controls received the vehicle only
once daily on feed for the duration of a 305-day lactation. In addition to
daily milk production and feed intake measurements, plasma and milk samples were
collected at 2 week intervals during lactation (19 samples/cow). In none of 14
dependent variables were treatment effects significant. Overall means were:
daily milk yield, 14.2 kg; daily feed intake (complete dry ration), 16.9 kg;
body weight, 458 kg; plasma corticoids, 6.9 nq/ml; insulin, 13.2 muU/ml;
glucose, 43.3 aq/100 l; nonesterlfied fatty acids, 304 mueg/liter; total
esterifled fatty acids, 162 mq/100 ml; milk fat, 4.8%; milk SNF, 9.2%; milk
protein, 4.0%; apparent acidity, 0.167%; chloride 0.163% and 875,000 somatic
cells/ml wilk. Flumethazone did not depress plasma corticoids during the first
28 days of treatment. Overall average levels of plasma corticoids prior to day
56(days 28, 42 and 56) were lower (P <.01) than the average levels for the
remainder of lactation (5.2 vs 7.0 ng/ml plasma).


FLA-DY-01525 THATCHER W W SMITH K L WILCOX C J

POST-MILKING TEAT DIP AND DRY COW MEDICATION PCR MASTITIS CONTROL

PROGRESS REPORT: 72/01 72/12
The mastitis control project Is now in its terminal stages. The last remaining
samples after the dry cow medication (DCM) are being collected. Data is
currently being transferred to an IBM card layout for future statistical
analyses to evaluate the main effects of teat dipping (TD), DCM and the TD-DCM
interaction on the incidence of intrarammary infections. It is anticipated that
tie mastitis project will be completed and terminated during the 1973 calendar
year.


PIJ-rY-C16C6 SMITH K L MULL L k

GtOTH INC ACID PRODUCTION IN LACTIC ACID BACTERIA

PROGRESS REPORT: 7.2/01 72/12
Incomplete studies,of the effect of yeast extract on growth rate and rate of
lactic acid production indicate that the growth rate of Streptococcus lactic
ATCC 12929 can be increased 25 fold over the growth rate in plain skimmilk by
the addition of yeast extract. Although growth rates increased greatly upon the
addition of yeast extract to skimmilk, the rate of acid production per cell
division remained the same. The continuous fermentation studies were carried
out at 30C at pH 6.0 and calculated growth and acid production rates agree
closely with earlier data obtained using batch*cultures.


FLA-Y-014e88


IHATCEER V W IEAD H H


WILCOX C J











EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT


Plans for the future of the department are aimed at a better
integrated approach to the overall departmental operation. The
department must conduct research into developing new communication
technology, as well as developing new and alternative uses for
old technology for expanded educational purposes.

Future goals include in-service training communications
methods and technology. The utilization of mass communication
techniques have been found to be important for educational purposes.
Editorial faces its greatest challenge in helping IFAS educate
the layman. The environmental crisis, human development, consumer
protection, and problems for both urban and rural citizens will
increase in educational importance.

Priorities will be given to improvement of the environment,
Rural Areas Development, mechanization of agriculture, aquatic
food production, and biological pest control.







PUBLICATIONS


The Station printed 28,000 copies of four bulletins totaling 188 pages
and 472,000 copies of seven circulars totaling 80 pages. One bulletin and
one circular were revised and reprinted, and another bulletin was reprinted.
Four 16-page issues of "Sunshine State Agricultural Research Report" were
printed and distributed to 8,000 subscribers.


Publications printed were:
Number
Pages Printed

Bul. 750 Virus Diseases of Papaya. A.A. Cook...... 20 4,000

Bul. 751 Citrus Feeds for Beef Cattle. H.L. Chapman,
Jr., C.B. Ammerman, F.S. Baker, Jr., J.F.
Hentges, B.W. Hayes, and T.J. Cunha....... 32 10,000

Bul. 752 Supplementing Steers on Pasture from Weaning
to Feedlot and Subsequent Effect on Finishing
Performance. F.M. Pate, C.E. Haines, R.E.L.
Greene, A.Z. Palmer, J.W. Carpenter, and D.W.
Beardsley.................................. 24 10,000

Bul. 753 Florida Farm Prices. D.L. Brooke, A.H. Spur-
lock, and G.N. Rose.......................... 112 4,000

Cir. S-215 Altika, A Peanut Variety for the Tropics.
A.J. Norden, H.A.D. Chesney, and A.T. Stephen-
son......................................... 16 5,000

Cir. S-216 Bagasse Pellets in Beef Cattle Fattening
Rations. H.L. Chapman, Jr. and A.Z. Palmer... 8 10,000

Cir. S-217 Jupiter---A New Soybean Variety for Tropical
Latitudes. Kuell Hinson.................... 12 7,500

Cir. S-218 Ozone Air Pollution and Weather Fleck of
Tobacco. C.E. Dean and D.R. Davis........... 12 8,000

Cir. S-219 C. P. 63-306 and L. 61-49, Two New Sugarcane
Varieties for Sugar Production in South Florida.
Charles E. Freeman and Edwin R. Rice.......... 12 6,000

Cir. S-220 Florida 556. J.W. Strobel, Pat Crill, D.S.
Burgis, and C.A. John........................ 4 4,000

Cir. S-221 Nutritional Deficiency Symptoms of Sugarcane.
G.J. Gascho and F.A. Taha..................... 16 6,700








Publications revised and/or reprinted were:

Number
Pages Printed

Bul. 536C Recommended Fertilizers and Nutritional Sprays
for Citrus. H.J. Reitz. C.D. Leonard, Ivan
Stewart, R.C.J. Koo, C.A. Anderson, R.L.
Reese, D.V. Calvert, and P.F. Smith......... 32 10,000

Bul. 683 Minerals for Beef Cattle in Florida. T.J.
Cunha, R.L. Shirley, H.L. Chapman, C.B.
Ammerman, G.K. Davis, W.G. Kirk, and J.F.
Hentges, Jr............................... 64 3,500

Cir. S-172A Azalea Culture. R.D. Dickey............... 16 15,000




Technical Journal Articles

Papers by research staff members continue to be printed in large
numbers. These appear in technical journals in the United States and a few
in foreign countries. Those included in the Journal Series are forwarded to
the journals by the Station editorial staff, and reprints are ordered for
distribution when they are printed. The series now contains more than 4,500
listings.

Following is a list of Journal Series articles printed during the
year and those not previously listed.

3089 Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Jaraguagrass under Soil Moisture Stress in
a Hot Savanna. Luis E. Tergas and William G. Blue. Agron. J. 63:6-9.
Jan.-Feb. 1971.

3095 Intensity and Balance Concept as an Approach to Optimal Production.
C. M. Geraldson. Recent Advances in Plant Nutrition 2:352-364. 1971.

3297 Tne Effect of 2-Chloroethylphosphonic Acid on Ripening of Mango
Fruits. C. W. Campbell. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci., Trop. Reg. 13:
221-226. 1969.

3338 Decay Control for Citrus Fruits Using 2-Aminobutane Vapor. W.
Grierson and F. W. Hayward. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci., Trop. Reg.
13:124-131. 1969.

3341 Localization and Detection of Coumarins in Exocortis Virus-Infected
Citron. A. W. Feldman, R. W. Hanks, and S. M. Garnsey. 5th
Internat. Conf. Citrus Virol. 239-244. 1969.

3346 Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium Fertilization of Anthruium Andraeanum
'Nitta' and 'Kaumana.' R. T. Poole and B. A. Greaves. Amer. Soc. Hort.
Sci., Trop. Reg. 13:367-372. 1969.

3351 The Ornamental Horticulture Industry of Florida and its Implication
to Production in Tropical Americas. W. E. Waters. Amer. Soc. Hort.
Sci., Trop. Reg. 13:382-392. 1969.

3474 A Leaf Insert Graft Used for Virus Transmission in Citrus. Mortimer
Cohen. Fifth Conf. Int. Org. Citrus Virol. 282-284. 1972.


3476 Changes in Amounts of Auxin-Like Growth Promoter, Gibberellin, an
Inhibitor in Citrus Infected with Exocortis Virus. R. W. Hanks and
A. W. Feldman. 5th Internat. Conf. of Citrus Virol. 244-250. 1969.

3506 Relationships Between Macro-and Micronutrient Nutrition of Slash Pine
on Three Coastal Plain Soils. D. H. Van Lear and W. H. Smith. Plant
and Soil 36:2:331-347. Apr. 1972.

3576 Control Methods for Post-Harvest Diseases of Flowers and Bulbs. R. 0.
Magie. Proc. 1st Internat. Symposium on Flowerbulbs 23:199-206. 1972.

3608 The Requirement for Inorganic Sulfate in the Diet of Chicks for Optimum
Growth and Feed Efficiency. Ernest Ross, Robert H. Harms, and B. L.
Damron. Poultry Sci. LI:5:1606-1612. Sept. 1972.







3657 Mineralogical Properties of Clays from Panama Soils. R. B. Reneau, Jr.,
and J. G. A. Fiskell. Proc. Soil Sci. Soc. Amer. 36:3:501-505. May-
June 1972.

3692 Advances in Watermelon Fertility. S. J. Locascio, J. G. A. Fiskell,
and P. E. Everett. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci., Trop. Reg. 14:223-231. 1970.

3695 Phytotoxicity of Four Formulations of the Alkylamine Salt of Endothall
on Hydrilla verticillata and Fish. R. D. Blackburn, K. A. Boyer, and
C. E. Timmer. Hyacinth Control Soc. 9:1:55-58. July 1971.

3696 Plant Population and Fertilizer Effects on Concentration of Tomato Yields
for Once-Over Harvest on Rockdale Soils. H. H. Bryan. Amer. Soc. Hort.
Sci., Trop. Reg. 14:133-144. 1970.

3740 Propagation of Ficus carica on Tropical Species of Ficus. A. H. Krezdorn
and S. K. Glasgow. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci., Trop. Reg.14:156-164. 1970.

3751 Quality of Black and Green Teas Manufactured from Florida-Grown Chinese
Leaf. James Soule. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci., Trop. Reg. 14:175-185. 1970.

3753 A Simple Method for Estimating Mango Leaf Areas. James Soule and John
L. Malcolm. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci., Trop. Reg. 14:84-88. 1970.


3760 Propagation of the Mamey Sapote. Simon E. Malo. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci.,
Trop. Reg. 14:165-174. 1970.

3771 Ascochyta Leaf Spot. A New Disease of Leatherleaf Fern, Polystichum
adiantiforme. J. F. Knauss. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci., Trop. Reg. 14:
272-279. 1970.

3772 Growth Retardants and Tropical Ornamentals. R. T. Poole. Amer. Soc.
Hort. Sci., Trop. Reg. 14:268-271. 1970.

3812 The Influence of Cultural Conditions on the Chemical Composition of Six
Tropical Foliage Plants. J. N. Joiner and W. E. Waters. Amer. Soc.
Hort. Sci., Trop. Reg. 14:254-267. 1970.

3820 The White Amur for Aquatic Weed Control. Jane E. Michewicz, D. L.
Sutton, and R. D. Blackburn. Weed Sci. 20:1:106-110. Jan. 1972.

3844 Comparisons of Bone Characteristics Between Floor and Battery Grown
Broilers. L. O. Rowland, Jr., B. L. Damron, E. Ross, and R. H. Harms.
Poultry Sci. L:4:1121-1124. July 1971.

3851 Seed Development in Certain Florida Tetraploid and Hexaplodi Blueberries.
T. W. Edwards, Jr., W. B. Sherman, and R. H. Sharpe. J. -Amar. boc. Ifort.
Sci. 7:2:127-128. Apr. 1972.

3870 Peripheral Reticulum in Chloroplasts of Plants Differing in CO2 Fixation
Pathways and Photorespiration. V. E. Gracen, Jr., Joe H. Hilliard, R. H.
Brown, and S. H. West. Planta 107:3:189-204. 1972.

3877 Laboratory Evaluation of Six Insecticides Against the Tobacco Flea
Beetle. Urs-Beter Roos, William B. Tappan. Entomol. Soc. of Amer.
65:1:217-219. Feb. 1972.

3881 Antimetabolite Effects on Larval Feeding of Spodoptera Eridania. S. L.
Poe and S. S. Woltz. J. Econ. Entomol. 65:1:201-202. Feb. 1972.

3888 Spray Interval for Cabbage Looper Control in Central Florida. Gerald L.
Greene. J. Econ. Entomol. 65:1:205-208. 1970.

3890 Treatment for Control of Root Mealybug on Nursery Plants. S.L. Poe.
J. Econo. Entomol. 65:1:241-242. Feb. 1972.

3891 Residues on Ryegrass Following Preplant or Post Emergence Applicatins
on Four Insecticides for Mole Cricket Control. C. H. Van Middelemn,
D. H. Habeck, J. R. Strayer. Entomol. Soc. Amer. 65:2:495-497. Apr. 1972.

3904 Influence of Fertilizer Placement and Micronutrient Rate on Watermelon
Composition and Yield. S.*J. Locascio, J. G. A. Fiskell, and F. G.
Martin. J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 97:1:119-123. Jan. 1972.

3913 Further Studies on a Hominy Feed Basal for Use in Phosphorus Assays.
R. B. Christmas, B. L. Damron, and R. H. Harms. Nutrition Reports
Internat. 3:6:395-401. June 1971.







3916 Regression of Tobacco Black-Shank Index on Soil Calcium. Randall
R. Kincaid, Frank G. Martin, and Fred M. Rhoads. Phytopathology
62:2:302. Feb. 1972.

3925 The Influence of Partially Delactosed Whey, Fish Meal and Supplemental
Biotin in Broiler Diets. B.L. Damron, D.P. Eberst and R.H. Harms.
Poultry Sci. L:6:1768-1771. Nov. 1971.

3928 Seasonal Occurrences of Click Beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae) in
the Everglades as Measured by Two Types of Traps. William G. Genung.
Fla. Entomol. 55:1:35042. 1972.

3930 Host Response of Worm-Free Florida Native and Rambouillet Lambs
Experimentally Infected with Haemonchus Contorus. C. V. Radhakrishnan,
R. E. Bradley, P. E. Loggins. Amer. J. Vet. Res. 33:4:817-823. April
1972.

3933 Corn Earworm Control on Sweet Corn Ears in Central and South Florida,
1969-70. M.J. Janes and G.L. Greene. Entomol. Soc. Amer. 65:2:
521-522. Apr. 1972.

3936 Effect of Pregnancy and Lactation on Liver Vitamin A of Beef Cows
Grazing Pangolagrass. W.G. Kirk, J.F. Easley and R.L. Shirley,
E.M. Hodges. J. Range Manag. 25:2:114-116. Mar 1972.

3940 Multistage Lagoon Systems for Treatment of Dairy Farm Waste. R.A.
Nordstedt, L.B. Baldwin, and C.C. Hortenstine. Internat. Sym.
Livestock Wastes, Amer. Soc. Agric. Eng. Proc.271:77-80. 1971.

3941 Attacks of an Ambrosia Beetle Xylosandrus Compactus (Eichhoff), on
Avocados with Result of Control Efforts. D. O. Wolfenbarger.
Sociedad Entomologica de Peru.

3944 The Use of Beta-Apo-8-Carotenoic Acid Ethyl Ester as a Standard
for Determination of Xanthophyll Utilization from Natural Sources
by Broilers. George M. Herrick, Jack L. Fry and R. H. Harms.
Poultry Sci. 51:2:428-435. March 1972.

3946 Availability of Different Inorganic Salts of Magnesium to Sheep.
C.B. Ammerman, C.F. Chicco, P.E. Loggins and L.R. Arrington. J.
Animal Sci. 34:1:122-126. Jan. 1972.


3950 In Vitro Germination and Pollen Tube Growth of Maize (Zea Mays L.)
Pollen. VI. Combined Effects of Storage and the Alleles at the
Waxy (wx), Sugary (sul) and Shrunken (sh2) .Loci. P. L. Pfahler and
H. F. Linskens. Theoretical and Appl. Genetics 42:3:136-140. 1972.

3951 The Effect of Ambient Temperature, Relative Humidity and Maturation
on WingBeat Frequency of Four Species of Cockroaches in the Genus
Periplaneta. Edward G. Farnworth. J. Insect Physiology 18:5:827-829.
1972.

3952 The Effect of Ambient Temperature and Humidity on Internal Temperature
and Wing-Beat Frequency During Flight in Male Periplaneta Americana
Cockroaches. Edward G. Farnworth. J. Insect Physiology 18:359-371.
1972.

3954 Ethylene Diffusion Through Citrus Leaf and Fruit Tissue. C. R.
Barmore and R. H. Biggs. J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 97:1:24-27. Jan.
1972.

3955 Sucrose Leakage from Excised Maize Scutella. T. E. Humphreys.
Phytochemistry 11:4:1311-1320. 1972.

3957 The Toxicity of an Amicarbalide Isethionate Formulation to Ponies.
W. M. Taylor, C. F. Simpson, and F. G. Martin. Amer. J. Vet. Res.
33:3:533-541. March 1972.

3961 Electorphoretic Patterns of Porcine Uterine Protein Secretions During
the Estrous Cycle. G. D. Squire, Fuller W. Bazer and F. A..Murray, Jr.
J. Biol. Reprod. 7:3:321-325. Dec. 1972.

3962 Quantitative and Qualitative Variation in the Secretion of Protein
by the Porcine Uterus During the Estrous Cycle. F.A. Murray, Jr.,
Fuller W. Bazer, H.D. Wallace and A.C. Warnick. J. Biol. Reprod.
7:3:314-320. Dec. 1972.







3965 Evaluation of the Macroscopic Plate Test and the Immunoflorescence
Test for Detection of Leptospiral Antibodies in Bovine Serum. T.S.
Sandhu and F.H. White. Canadian J. Comparative Med. 36 :1:34-37.
Jan. 1972.

3966 Apparent Elastic Properties of Unprocessed and Processed Irish
Potatoes. T.R. Schmidt and E.M. Ahmed. J. Texture Studies
3:18-30. 1972.

3969 Relationship of Soil pH to Sugarcane Responses on Everglades Peat.
G.J. Gascho and C.E. Freeman. Proc. Amer. Soc. Sugar Cane Technol.
8-20.

3970 Cultural features and Imperfect stage of Hymenoscyphus caudatus.
James W. Kimbrough and Merelee Atkinson. Amer. J. Bot. 59:2:165-
171. Feb. 1972.

2971 Amylolytic Activity in Leaves of Tropical and Temperate Grasses.
Parviz Karbassi, S.H. West, L.A. Garrard. Crop Sci. 12:58-60.
Jan-Feb. 1972.

3973 The Use of a Multi-celled Apparatus for Anaerobic Studies of Flooded
Root Systems. D.L. Culbert, H.W. Ford. HortScience 7:1:29-31.
Feb. 1972.

3974 Effect on Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium Fertilization of Roses
on Oldsmar Fine Sand. T.W. Young, G.H. Snyder, F.G. Martin, N.C.
Hayslip. J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 98:1:109-112. Jan. 73.

3978 Histopathology of Citrus Greasy Spot and Identification of the
Causal Fungus. J.O. Whiteside. Phytopathology 62:2:260-263.
Feb. 1972.

3980 Protein-Lipid Films as Textured Food Ingredients. I. Film Formation
Phenomenon Studies with Soymilk and Model Systems. L.C. Wu and
R.P. Bates. J. Ibod Sci. 37:36-39. 1972.

3981 Protein-Lipid Films as Textured Iood Ingredients. II. Optimization
of Protein-Lipid Film Formation in Soymilk and Model Systems.
L.C. Wu and R.P. Bates. J. Food Sci. 37:40-41. 1972.

3982 The Relation of Age and Weight at Puberty to Reproductive Perfor-
mance in Two Lines of Mice Selected for 42-day Weight. D.S.D.
Crane, A.C. Warnick, M. Koger, R.W. Rodriguez. J. Anim. Sci. 34:
4: 596-600. Apr. 1972.

3983 Carotenoids in Citrus: Their Accumulation Induced by Ethylene. Ivan
Stewart and T. A. Wheaton. J. Agr. and Food Chem. 20:2:448-449.
Mar.-Apr. 1972.

3984 Effect of Benomyl and Surfactants on Populations of the Two Spotted
Spider Mites on Dwarf Marigold. S. L. Poe, S. McFadden. J. Georgia
Entomcl. Soc. 7:3:167-170. July 1972.

3985 Efficacy of Certain Chemical Agents in the Treatment of Lepto-
spiruria in Hamsters. E.W. Baldwin, F.H. White and G.T. Edds.
Amer. J. Vet. Res. 33:4:863-865. Apr. 1972.

3986 The Effect of Phenobarbital on Bixhydroxycoumarin Plasma Concen-
trations and Hypoprothrombinemic Responses in Sheep. S.N. Shetty,
J.A. Himes, and G.T. Edds. Amer. J. Vet. Res. 33:4:825-834.
Apr. 1972.

3989 The Freezing Point of Detached Leaves as a Measure of Cold Hardiness
of Young Budded Citrus Plants. C.E. Hutcheson, W.J. Wiltbank.
HortScience 7:1:27-28. Feb. 1972.

3991 An New Species of Dimeromyces (Laboulbeniales) on Subterranean
Termites. J.W. Kimbrough, Maria Isabel Morales, R.J. Gouger.
Mycologia LXIV:2:388-393. Mar-Apr. 1972.

3995 Compatability of Fungicides and Insecticides on Tomato. S.L. Poe
and J.P. Jones. J. Econ. Entomol. 65:3:792-794. June 1972.

4001 Properties of Young and Mature 'Valencia' Oranges Related to
Selective Harvest by Mechanical Means. G.E. Coppock. Amer. Soc.
Agr. Eng. 15:2:235-238. 1972.








4002 Development of a Citrus Removal Device Using Oscillating Forces
Air. J.D. Whitney and J.M. Patterson. Amer. Soc. of Agr. Eng.
15:5:849-860. 1972.

4093 Fungi in Foods: III. The Enumeration of Lipolytic and Proteolytic
Organisms. John A. Koburger. J. Milk and Food Technol. 35:2:
117-118. Feb. 1972.

4004 Effects of Temperatures on Mortality of Green Peach Aphids,
Myzus Persicae, on Potatoes Treated with Ethyl-Methyl Parathion.
D. O. Wolfenbarger. J. Econ. Entomol. 65:3:881-882. June 1972.

4006 Diaporthe Citri Wolf and Phonopsis Citri Fawcett--A Correction.
Fran E. Fisher. Mycologia LXIV:2:422. Mar.-Apr. 1972.

4010 The Horizontal Resistance of Red Rustproof Oats to Crown Rust.
H.H. Luke, W.H. Chapman, and R.D. Barnett. Amer. Phytopathol. Soc.
62:4:414-417. Apr. 1972.

4013 The Hemogram and Certain Serum Protein Fractions in Normal Beagle
Dogs. D.J. Weiner and R.E. Bradley. Vet. Med. 67:4:393-398.
Apr. 1972.

4014 Use of Herbicides in Ornamental Flower Production Under Sub-tropical
Conditions. J.C. Raulston and W.E. Waters. Trop. Reg. Amer. Soc.
Hort. Sci. 15:229-238.

4016 Sotalol for the Protection of Turkeys from the Development of
B-Aminopropionitrille-Induced Aortic Ruptures. C.F. Simpson.
J. Pharmacol. and Exp. Therapeutics 45:3:385-390. July 1972.

4031 High Levels of Dietary Iodine and Sexual Maturity in Males.
H.R. Wilson and R.H. Harms. Poultry Sci. LI:3:742-746. May 1972.

4032 Some Observations on the Microflora of Disposable Paper Hand-wipes.
John A. Koburger and Robert M. Lapin. J. Milk and Food Technol.
35:1:30-31. Jan. 1972.

4033 Effects of the Bluestain Fungus Ceratocystis ips on Development
of Ips Bark Beetles in Pine Bolts. W.C. Yearian, R.J. Gouger,
R.C. Wilkinson. Annal Entomol. Soc. Amer. 65:2:481-487. March,
1972.

4034 Effects of Dietary DDT and Zinc on Growth and Reproduction in
Rats. J.P. Feaster, C.H. Van Middelem and G.K. Davis. J. Nutrition
102:4:523-528. Apr. 1972.

4038 Rheological Properties of Tioga Strawberries. E.M. Ahmed, R.C.
Fluck, and R.A. Dennison. J. Texture Studies 3:30-88. 1972.

4039 Influence of Nonfat Milk Diets on Intake, Growth and Energy
Utilization by Young Calves. S.P. Marshall and K.L. Smith.
J. Dairy Sci. 55:3:345-347. March 1972.

4042 Puncture Testing of Tioga Strawberries. E.M. Ahmed and R.C. Fluck.
J. Texture Studies 3:165-172. 1972.

4043 Systematics and Acoustic Behavior of Borin-quenula, a New Genus
of Brachypterous Coneheaded Katydids Endemic to Puerto Rico
(Ortyoptera, Tettigoniidae, Copiphorinae). Thomas J. Walker and
Ashley B. Gurney. Annals Entomol. Soc. Amer. 65:2:460-
474. March 1972.

4044 A Comparison of Ammonium and Nitrate Nitrogen for Cigar Wrapper
Tobacco. F.M. Rhoads. Agron. J. 64:209-210. Mar.-Apr. 1972.

4046 Habits and Present Distribution in Florida of the Exotic Ant,
Pseudomyamex mexicanus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). W.H. Whitcomb,
H.A. Denmark, W.F. Buren, J.F. Carroll. Fla. Entomol. 55:1:31-34.
1972.

4047 Calcium Metabolism in the Laying Hen. 1. Calcium Retention in
the Digestive Tract of the Laying Hen. D.A. Roland, D.R.
Sloan and R.H. Harms. Poultry Sci. LI:2:598-601. March 1972.

4049 Screening Growth Regulators for Vegetative Growth of Citrus.
R.L. Phillips. HortScience 7:3:252-254. June 1972.








4051 Gas Sterilization of Beekeeping Equipment Contaminated by the
American Foulbrood Organism Bacillus Larvae (White). F.A.
Robinson, K.L. Smith, and P.M. Packard. Fla. Entomol.
55:1:43-52. 1972.

4052 Relationship of Ammonia to Necrosis of Petter Leaf Tissue during
Colonization by Xanthomonas vesicatoria. R.E. Stall, C.B. Hall,
and A.A. Cook. Amer. Phytopathol. Soc. 62:8:882-886. Aug. 1972.

4054 Fertilizer Responses in Young Pine Plantations. W.L. Pritchett
and W.H. Smith. Soil Sci. Soc. Amer. Proc. 36:4:660-663. July-
Aug. 1972.

4056 Respiratory Quotients of Irradiated Fruits. E.M. Ahmed, R.A.
Dennison, and G.F. Green. J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 97:3:373-
376. May 1972.

4057 Swelling of Irradiated Tomato Fruit Mitochondria. E.M. Ahmed,
R.A. Dennison, S.R. Padwal-Desai. J. Amer. Soc. :ort. Sci.
27:3:289-291. May 1972.

4058 Calcium Metabolism in the Laying Hen. 2. Patterns of Calcium
Intake, Serum Calcium, and Fecal Calcium. D.A. Roland, Sr.,
D.R. Sloan and R.H. Harms. Poultry Sci. LI:3:782-787. May 1972.

4060 The Effect of Restrictive Feeding Programs During the Growing
Period on Turkey Breeders. R.A. Voitle and R.H. Harms. Poultry
Sci. LI:1:338-340. Jan. 1972.

4061 Rheological Properties of Floradel Tomatoes. E.M. Ahmed, R.C.
Fluck and R.A. Dennison. J. Texture Stud. 3:1:115-121. 1972.

4062 Tool-Using Behavior of Pogonomyrmex badius. Wendell L. Morrill.
Fla. Entomol. 55:1:59-60. 1972.

4063 Feedback Regulation of 3 Deoxy-D-arabino-Heptulasonate 7-Phosphate
Synthetase from a Marine Bacterium, Vibrio MB22. Andrew M.
Chludzinski, Donald S. Salter, and DeLill Nasser. J. Bacteriol.
109:3:1162-1169. Mar. 1972.

4064 Evaluating Seedlings of Cantaloupe for Varietal Nonpreference-Type
Resistance to Diabrotica spp. Dr. J. L. Overman and L. E. MacCarter.
J. Econ. Entomol. 65:4:1140-1144. Aug. 1972.

4067 Effect of Long-Term Feeding of DDT to Turkey. Charles F. Simpson,
N.P. Thompson, and J.T. Neilson. Bull. Environmental Contamination
and Toxicol. 7:5:277-283. 1972.

4068 Meteorological Aspects of Atmospheric Ozone as a Potential Threat
to the Forest Industry of North Florida. D.R. Davis and C.E. Dean.
J. Environmental Quality. 1:4:438-441. Oct-Dec. 1972.

4069 Biuret, Ruea and Natural Proteins as Nitrogen Supplements for
Low-quality Roughage for Sheep. C.B. Ammerman, Gladys J. Verde,
J.E. Moore, W.C. Burns and C.F. Chicco. J. Anim. Sci. 35:1:121-
127. July 1972.

4070 Ordering of Mutant Sties in the Isoleucine Valine Genes of
Escherichia coli by use of Merogenotes Derived from F14: A New
Procedure for Fine Structure Mapping. Nancy Marsh and D.E. Duggan.
J. Bacteriol. 109:2:730-740. Feb. 1972.

4071 Susceptibility of Chickens Fed P-DDT to Histomoniasis. C. V. Radhakrish-
nan, H. P. Thompson, and D. J. Forrester. Bull. Environ. Contamination
and Toxicol. 8:3:147-152. 1972.

4072 Utilization of Dietary Magnesium by Sheep. C.F. Chicco, C.B.
Ammerman, W.G. Hillis and L.R. Arrington. Amer. J. Physiol.
222:6:1469-1472. June 1972.

4073 The Influence of Moenomycin in the Diets of Broilers and Leghorn
and Broiler Breeder Hens. B. L. Damron and R. H. Harms. Poultry
Sci. LI:3:934-937. May 1972.

4075 The Feeding Value of NBR (Non-Bird-Resistant) and BR (Bird-
Resistant) Sorghum Grain in the Ration of Beef Steers. J. E.
Bertrand and M. C. Lutrick. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc.
31:24-25. 1971.








4076 Distribution of Stomata and Epicuticular Wax on Oranges as Related
to Stem End Rind Breakdown and Water Loss. L. Gene Albrigo. J.
Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 97:2:220-223. March 1972.

4077 Field Testing of Weak Acids for Facilitating Citrus Fruit Harvest
Under Florida Conditions. W.C. Wilson. HortScience 7:1:31-33.
Feb. 1972.

4078 Comparative Morphology of Intimal and Adventitial Hyperplasia of
the Arteriosclerotic Turkey Aorta. Charles F. Simpson. Exp. &
Pathol. 17:1:65-76. Aug. 1972.

4079 Control of Aphids and Mites on Cut Chrysanthemums by Post Harvest
Absorption of Azodrin and Dometon. S.L. Poe and F.J. Marousky. Proc.
Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:432-435. Nov. 1971.

4080 Bacterial Leaf Spot of Watermelon Caused by Pseudomonas Lachrymans.
D. L. Hopkins and N. C. Schenck. The Amer. Phytopathol. Soc.
62:5:542-545. May 1972.

4082 Physical 6 Serological Comparisons of "R" and "T" Strains of
Mosquito Iridescent Virus from Aedes taeniorhynchu. Drs.
Donald W. Hall and Ronald E. Lowe. J. Invertebrate Pathol.
19:3:317-324. May 1972.

4083 Influence of Fluoride on Foliar Necrosis of Cordyline terminalis cv
Baby Doll During Propagation. Charles A. Conover and Richard T. Poole.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:380-383. Nov. 1971.

4084 Effects of rianual and Chemical Pruning Methods on Growth of Forcing
Azaleas. Charles A. Conover and Jasper N. Joiner. Proc. Fla. State
Hort. Soc. 84:394-399. Nov. 1971.

4085 Corpora Lutea Function and Pregnancy Maintenance in Gilts Following
Unilateral Ovariectomy, Unilateral Uterine Horn Transection and
Unilateral Ovariectomy-Uterine Horn Transection. Fuller W. Bazer,
F. A. Murray, Jr, and H. D. Wallace. J. Anim. Sci. 35:3:569-571.
Sept. 1972.

4087 The Occurrence in Florida of the Brown Recluse Spider, Loxosceles
Reclusa (Araneae: Scytodidae). W. H. Whitcomb and H. K. Wallace.
Entomol. News. 83:60:57-59. March 1972.

4088 Orange Essence Evaluation: A New Chemical Test. R. J. Braddock and
D. Z. Petrus. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:223-225. Nov. 1971.

4089 Influence of Tree Root Competition on Growth Response of Four
Cool Season Turfgrasses. Carl E. Whitcomb. Agron. J. 64:
355-359. May-June 1972.

4090 Relationship Between Grain Yield and Environmental Variability in
Oats (Avena sp.). P. L. Pfahler. Crop Sci. 12:254-255.
March-April 1972.

4091 Control of Cryptotermes brevis. D. R. Minnick, S. H. Kerr and
R. C. Wilkinson. J. Econ. Entomol. 65:6:1577-1579. Dec. 1972.

4092 Response of Tifway Bermudagrass to Sulfur on Sandy Soils. G. M.
Volk and G. C. Horn. Agron. J. 64:359:361. May-June 1972.

4093 Flowering of Christmas Cactus as Influenced by Nyctoperiod Regimes.
R. T. Poole. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:410-413. Nov. 1971.

4095 Effects of Photoperiod During Incubation on Embryonic and Post-
Embryonic Development of Broilers. J. H. Walter and R. A.
Voitle. Poultry Sci. 51:4:1122-1126. July 1972.

4096 Kallastroemia maxima: A New Host of Radopholus similis. E. P.
DuCharme. Plant Dis. Reporter. 56:1:85. Jan 1972.

4098 1. Factors Affecting Texture of Cocktail Shrimp. E. H. Ahmed,
J. A. Koburger, and V. T. Mendenhall. J. Texture Stud. 3:2:
186-193. 1972.

4100 Studies on the Causal Agent of Black Fungal Lesions on Stored
Tomato Fruit. J. A. Bartz. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:
114-119. Nov. 1971.







4102 Pathogenicity and Control of a Florida Population of the Sugar-
beet Nematode, Heterodera schachtii, on Cabbage. H. L. Rhoades.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:139-142. Nov. 1971.

4103 Phlebotomine Sand Flies from Texas and Florida. (Diptera,
Psychodidae). David G. Young. Fla. Entomol. 55:1:61-64.
1972.

4106 Helminths of the Florida Duck, Anas, platyrhynchos fulvigula.
J. M. Kinsella and D. J. Forrester. Proc. Helminthol. Soc.
of Washington. 39:2:173-176. July 1972.

4108 Virus Disease Affecting Lettuce and Endive in Florida. D. E.
Purcifull and T. A. Zitter. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:165-
168. Nov. 1971.

4109 A Trap for Alate Imported Fire Ants. Wendell L. Morrill and W. H.
Whitcomb. J. Econ. Entomol. 65:4:1194-1195. Aug. 1972.

4110 Reproductive Capacity of Broiler Males Following Protein
Restriction at Various Ages. H. R. Wilson, R. A. Voitle and R. H.
Harms. Nutrition Rep. Int. 5:1:9-15. Jan. 1972.

4112 -.e Citytotoxicity of Seventeen Miticides Applied as Repeated Weekly
Sprays Under Slat Shed Conditions to Five Foliage Plant Species. J. f.
Knauss. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:428-432.

4114 Influence of Dietary Fillers on the Performance of a Phosphorus Assay
Diet. T. L. Andrews, B. L. Damron and R. H. Harms. Poultry Sci. 51:
4:1171-1174; July 1972.

4115 Cabbage Looper Control on Watermelon at Leesburg, 1968-1970. W. C.
Adlerz. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:145-156. Nov. 1971.

4117 Vegetable Seedling Uniformity Studies. V. F. Nettles. Proc. Fla.
State Hort. Soc. 84:99-103. Nov. 1971.

4118 Cabbage Looper Injury to Different Cabbage Cultivars. R. B. Workman
and J. R. Shumaker. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:142--144. Nov.
1971.

4119 Strawberry Yield and Soil Nutrient Levels as Influenced by Plant
Population, Fertilizer Rate and Bed Shape. S. J. Locascio. Proc. Fla.
State iort. Soc. 84:160-162. Nov. 1971.

4120 Simulation of Sand Penetration of Tomatoes. Richard C. Fluck. Proc.
Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:112-116. Nov. 1971.

4121 Progress of the Nectarine. R. H. Sharpe and J. B. Aitken. Proc. Fla.
State rort. Soc. 84:338--345. Nov. 1971.

4122 ilicrowave Processing of Citrus Salad Gels in Plastic Containers. A. H.
Rouse and E. L. Moore. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:241-244.

4123 Relative Susceptibility of Selected Strawberry Clones and Cultivars
to Spider Mite Injury. S. L. Poe and C. 1. Howard. Proc. Fla. State
short. Soc. 84:152-156. Nov. 1971.

4124 Single Harvest Yields of Several Tomato Cultivars in Relation to Seed
Size. L. H. Halsey. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:110-112. Nov.
1971.

4125 Effectiveness of Spray Materials Against Citrus Greasy Spot in
Relation to Time of Application and Infection Periods. J. 0. Whiteside.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:56-63. Nov. 1971.

4126 Lffect of Varied Iron, Manganese and Zinc Nutrition on the in vitro
Growth of Race 2 Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Lycopersici and upon the
Wilting to Tomato Cuttings Held in Filtrates from Cultures of the
Fungus. S. S. Woltz and John Paul Jones. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
84:132-135. Nov. 1971.

4127 Physiological Disorders of Leaves of Chrysanthemum Cultivars Relative
to Accumulation of Excess Carbohydrate. S. S. Woltz and Arthur W.
Engelhard. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:370-374. Nov. 1971.

4128 Response of Maygold Peaches to Various Rates and Application Dates
of Alar. James B. Aitken. Proc. Fla. State. Hort. Soc. 84:335 336.
Nov. 1971.






4131 Evaluation of Paper and Polyethylene-Coated Paper Mulches and Fertilizer
Rates for Tomatoes. Paul H. Everett. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
84:124-128. Nov. 1971.

4132 Association of Pseudomonas marginalis with Pink Rib of Lettuce. C. B.
Hall, R. E. Stall, and H. W. Burdine. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
84:163-165. Nov. 1971.

4133 Virus Diseases of Pepper in South Florida. T. A. Zitter. Proc. Fla.
State Hort. Soc. 84:177-183. Nov. 1971.

4134 Combinations of Fungicides and Insecticides for Control of Disease,
Insects and Mites on Chrysanthemum. Arthur W. Engelhard and S. L.
Poe. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:435-441. Nov. 1971.

4135 Effect of Some Microelements on Growth and Quality of Container Grown
Viburnum suspensum Lindl. R. D. Dickey. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
84:408-410. Nov. 1971.

4136 Subtropical Apples. W. B. Sherman, R. H. Sharpe and J. B. Aitken.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:337-338. Nov. 1971.

4137 The Evaluation of Bactericides and Bactericide Combinations for the
Control of Bacterial Leaf Spot and Tip Burn of Philidendron oxycardium
Incited by Zanthomonal dieffenbachiae. J. F. Knauss, W. E. Waters and
R. T. Poole. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:423-428. Nov. 1971.

4138 Influence of Population Density, Row Arrangement and Fertilizer Rate
on the Single Harvest Yield. A. A. Navarro and S. J. Locascio. Proc. Fla.
State Hort. Soc. 84:129-131. rov. 1971.

4139 Shoot-tip Culture of Gladiolus: An Evaluation of Nutrient Media for
Callus Tissue Development. G. J. Welfret. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
84:389-393. Nov. 1971.

4140 Evaluation of Watermelon Cultivars for Comercial Production in Florida.
G. W. Elmstrom. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:96-99. Nov. 1971.

4143 Control of Leaf Blight in Florida Strawberry Nurseries. C. M. Howard
and E. E. Albregts. Plant Dis. Rep. 56:1:23- 25. Jan. 1972.

4144 A Strawberry Fruit Rot Caused by Colletotrichum fragariae. Charles M.
Howard. The Amer. Phytopathol. Soc. 2:6:600-602. June 1972.

4145 Influence of Plant Density of Strawberry Fruit Production. E. E.
Albregts. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:156-169. Nov. 1971.

4146 Influence of Plant Density of Strawberry Fruit Production. E. E.
Albregts. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. .84:156-159. Nov. 1971.

4147 Postharvest Rind Disorders of 'Persian' Limes. W. Grierson, W. F.
Wardowski, and G. J. Edwards. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:294-298.
Nov. 1971.

4148 The Effects of Age and Position on Mineral Composition of Mango Leaves.
R. C. J. Koo and T. W. Young. J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 97:6:792-794.
Nov. 1972.

4149 Effect of Ethylene Degreening on Decay of Florida Citrus Fruit. A. A.
McCornack. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:270-272. Nov. 1971.

4150 Field Tests with New Iron Chelates on Citrus Growing on Calcareous
Soils. C. D. Leonard and D. V. Calvert. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
84:24-30. Nov. 1971.

4151 Effects of Ethylene nnd Temperature on Carotenoid Pigmentation of
Citrus Peel. Ivan Stewart and T. A. Wheaton. Proc. Fla. State Hort.
Soc. 84:264-266. Nov. 1971.

4152 Tree Loss in Relation to Young Tree Decline of Citrus in Florida. C.
P. DuCharme. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:48-52. Nov. 1971.

4153 Fusarium Wilt of Chrysanthemum: Symptomatology and Cultivar Reactions.
Arthur W. Engelhard and S. S. Woltz. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:
351-354. Nov. 1971.

4154 Weed Control with Preemergence Herbicides in a Mature Vineyard. C. F.
Balerdi. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:333-334. Nov. 1971.








4155 Genetic Trends in Milk Production in an Experiment Station Jersey Herd.
J. E. Palmer, C. F. Wilcox, O. G. Verde, F. G. Martin, and R. E.
Barrantes. J. Dairy Sci. 55:5:631-632. May 1972.

4156 Microbial Survey of Imported Shrimp. Michael A. Surma and John A.
Koburger. Proc. Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Inst. 93-99. Nov. 1971.

4157 Prepared Grapefruit Halves with Thiabendazole: Decay Control and
Residue Analysis. W. F. Wardowski and F. W. Hayward. Proc. Fla. State
Hort. Soc. 84:244-247. Nov. 1971.

4158 Processing Evaluation of Fla. Blueberries. F. W. Knapp. Proc. Fla.
State Hort. Soc. 84:247-249. Nov. 1971.

4159 Week Control in Container-Grown Woody Ornamentals. E. W. McElwee,
B. A. Barmby, and A. L. Harrell. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:442-
447. Nov. 1971.

4160 Utilization of Plant Phosphorus by the Turkey Poult. T. L. Andrews,
B. L. Damron and R. H. Harms. Poultry Sci. 51:4:1248-1252. July
1972.

4161 Tolerance of Different Tomato Cultivars to Soft Rot. J. A. Bartz and
J. P. Crill. Amer. Phytopathol. Soc. 62:9:1085-1088. Sept. 1972.

4163 Starch Degrading Enzymes of Temperate and Tropical Species. J. L.
Carter, L. A. Garrard and S. H. West. Phytochemistry 11:8:2423-2428.
1972.

4165 A Colorimetric Method for the Determination of Residues of Thiabendazole
In Citrus Fruits. F. W. Hayward and A. A. McCornack. Proc. Fla. State
Hort. Soc. 84:272-274. Nov. 1971.

4166 Commercial Production of Minor Tropical Fruit Crops in Florida. Carl
W. Canmbell. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:320-323. Nov. 1972.

4167 Effects of Soil pH and Calcium on Yields and Fruit Quality of Young
'Valencia' Oranges. Carl A. Anderson. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
R. C. J. Koo. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:298-303. Nov. 1971.

4169 Fungicides for Disease Control en Avocados, Limes and Mangos in Florida.
R. T. McMillan, Jr. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:290-294. Nov.
1971.

4170 Evidence for Sulfate as an Unidentified Growth Factor in Fish Solubles.
C. F. Hinton and R. H. Harms. Poultry Sci. 51:2:701-703. March 1972.

4171 Taste Panel Responses to Flavor of Heated Mango Puree. R. H. Dougherty.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:250-53. Nov. 1971.

4172 Herbicide Tests on Pepper Transplants and Seeded Peppers. D. S.
Burgis. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:183-186. Nov. 1971.

4173 Effect of Growth Regulators on Morphological Characteristics and Yield
of Peanuts in Guyana. R. W. Baumann and A. J. Norden. Soil and
Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:48-51. 1971.

4175 Lactic Fermentation of Florida Vegetables. R. P. Bates and R. F.
Matthews. Proc. Fla. State'Hort. Soc. 84:253-257. Nov. 1971.

4176 Properties and Genesis of Selected Colombian Andosols. F. G. Calhoun,
V. W. Carlisle, and C. Z. Luna. Proc. Soil Sci. Soc. Amer. 36:3:480-
485. May-June 1972.

4177 Effect of Chloride Level in Irrigation Water on Nutrient Content, Burning
Quality, Yield, Leaf Quality and Tensile Strength of Cigar-Wrapper Tobacco.
F. 1'. Rhoads. Tobacco Sci. XVI:89-91.

4178 Compressibility of Turf as a Measure of Grass Growth and Thatch
Development on Bermudagrass Greens. Gaylord M. Volk. Agron. J. 64:
503-506. July-Aug. 1972.

4180 Interaction of Nematodes and Soil Temperature on Parasitic Injury
and Growth of Three Tropical Grasses. F. T. Boyd, V. N. Schroder
and V. G. Perry. Amer. Soc. Agron. 64:297-500. July-Aug. 1972.

4181 The Effects of Omitting Single Nutrient Element from Fertilizer on
Growth and Performance of 'Pineapple' Orange. R. C. J. Koo and R. L.
Reese. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:11-16. Nov. 1971.







4182 Short Term Screening for Acidity Reduction. Bela S. Buslig, Robert
D0 Carter, George E. Good. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:236-238
Nov. 1971.

4183 Yield of Peel Oil in Lemons as Related to Budwood and Rootstocks.
R. W. Drescher, R. A. Dennison and J. W. Kesterson. Proc. Fla. State
Short. Soc. 84:190-193. Nov. 1971.

4184 Top Regrowth Inhibition of Topped Film-Packaged Radishes by Growth
Retardants and Mechanical Means. V. L. Guzman. Proc. Fla. State
Hort. Soc. 84:147-152. Nov. 1971.

4185 Plant-Parasitic Nematodes, Occurrence in Florida, Sensitivity to
Temperatures and Effect on Tropical Forage Yields. F. T. Boyd and
D. W. Dickson. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:267-268. 1971.

4186 Measurement of Breakage Properties of Snap Bean Pods. R. K. Showalter.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:2570259. Nov. 1971.

4187 Prediction of Hourly Temperatures ot Cold Nights for Inland Dade
County, Florida. P. G. Orth, J. T. Bradley. Proc. Fla. State Hort.
Soc. 84:326-330. Nov. 1971.

4189 Sweet Lime, Its Performance and Potential as a Rootstock in Florida.
A. I;. Krezdorn, W. S. Castle. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:32-38.
Nov. 1971.

4190 Weed Control in Lime, Avocado and Mango Groves. R. W. Harkness, Conrad
Byrd. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:285-290. Nov. 1971.

4192 Field Testing Airblast Sprayers for Florida Citrus. R. F. Brooks and
J. D. Whitney. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:44-47. Nov. 1971.

4194 The Brabender Visco-Corder for Rheological Evaluation of FCOJ and
High Density Citrus Concentrates. R.. L. Huggart, A. H. Rouse and
E. L. Moore. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:226-229. Nov. 1971.

4195 Response of Chrysanthemum Cultivars to the Nematicide, .ocap. A. J.
Overman and J. C. Raulston. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:413-418.
Nov. 1971.

4196 Uptake and Distribution of Iron in Citrus. Fouad M. Basiouny, R. H.
Biggs. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:17-23. Nov. 1971.

4197 Some New Analytical Indicators of Processed Orange Juice Quality.
John A. Attaway and Robert D. Carter. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
85:192-203. Nov. 1972.

4198 Biological Availability of Minor Mineral Ions: A Review. C. B.
Ammerman and Sarah M. Miller. J. Anim. Sci. 35:3:681-694. Sept.
1972.

4199 Effects of Amino Acids on Development of Fusarium Wilt of Resistant
and Susceptible Tomato Cultivars. John Paul Jones and S. S. Woltz.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 85:148-151. Nov. 1972.

4200 Protein Requirement of Growing Turkeys. D. P. Eberst, B. L. Damron,
and R. I. Harms. Poultry Sci. 51:4:1309-1312. July 1972.

4201 A Comparison of Pre-plant and Post-plant Nematicides for Controlling
Sting Nematodes. H. L. Rhoades. Proc. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla.
31:260-262. 1971.

4202 Effect of Off-season Culture on Weeds, Nematodes, and Potato Yields
on Marl Soils. A. J. Overman, H. H. Bryan, and R. W. Darkness. Proc.
Fla. State Hort. Sci. Soc. 84:135-139. Nov. 1971.

4203 Vegetable Virus Problems in South Florida as Related to Weed Science.
J. R. Orsenigo and T. A. Zitter. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:
168-171. Nov. 1971.

4204 Gray Leafspot of Pepper. C. H. Blazquez. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
84:171-177. Nov. 1971.

4205 Confrontation Behavior Between Lasius neoniger (Hymenoptera-Formicidae)
and the Imported Fire Ant. A. Bhatkar, W. H. Whitcomb, W. F. Buren,
P. Callahan and T. Carlysle. Environmental Entomol. 1:3:274-279.
June 1972.








4207 Evaluations of Easter Lily and Hybrid Lily Cultivars for Commercial
Flower Production in Florida. G. J. Wilfret and J. C. Raulston.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:359-363. Nov. 1971.

4209 Production of Cut-flowers on Subirrigated Mulched Beds with a Single
Pre-plant Fertilizer Application. J. C. Raulston and C. M. Geraldson.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:403-407. Nov. 1971.

4210 Bud-cut Flowers A Concept for 'Once-over' Harvest of Chrysanthemums.
J. J. Karousky and J. Nanney. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:399-403.
Nov. 1971.

4211 Effect of Fluoride and a Floral Perservative on Quality of Cut Gladiolus.
F. J. larousky and S. S. Woltz. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:375-380.
Nov. 1971.

4212 Observations on Extracting Citrus Nematodes Tylencbulus semipenetrans
from Citrus Roots. A. C. Tafjan. Plant Dis. Rep. 56:2:186-188.
Feb. 1972.

4213 The Male of Warileya nigrosacculus (Diptera, Psychodidae). David
G. Young and Byron N. Chaniotis. Fla. Entomol. 55:2:97-99. 1972.

4214 Folic Acid An Essential Vitamin Present in Citrus Fruit. E. C.
Hill, J. A. Attaway and Richard R. Streiff. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
84:238-241. Nov. 1971.

4215 Comparative Harvest Trials of a Foliage and Limb Shaker in 'Valencia'
Oranges. S. L. Hedden and G. E. Coppock. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
84:88-92. Nov. 1971.

4216 Plastic Lined Mole Drains in Organic Soils. T. W. Casselman and
V. E. Green, Jr. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:12-15. 1971.

4217 Harvesting 'Valencia' Oranges with a Limb Shaker. G. W. Coppock.
Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:84-88. Nov. 1971.

4218 Effect of Potassium Nitrate and Ammonium Nitrate on Ozone Damage in
Shade Tobacco. F. H. Rhoads. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:
118-120. 1971.

4219 Effect of Phosphorus Fertilization on Calcium Uptake by Cigar
Wrapper Tobacco. F. M. Rhoads. Communications in Soil Sci. and
Plant Analysis 3:2:87-95.

4221 Observation on the Foraging Behavior of the Southern Harvester
Ant, Pogonomyrmex badius. David A. Nickle and Thomas M. Neal. Fla.
Entomol. 35:1:65-66. 1972.

4222 Measuring Chlorida in Effluent Flowing from a Soil Column. R. S.
Mansell and Atef Elzeftawy. Proc. Soil Sci. Soc. Amer. 36:2:
378-380. March-Apr. 1972.

4223 Time Required to Develop Bone Fragility in Laying Hens. L. O.
Rowland, Jr. and R. H. Harms. Poultry Sci. 51:4:1339-1341. July
1972.

4225 Alterations of Glomerular Capillaries in Canine Heartworm Infection
Charles F. Simpson, R. F. Jackson, R. W. Bradley. Symp. Canine
Heartworm Dis. 39-42. 1972.

4226 Heating of Citrus during Degreening and Associated Temperature
Gradients within the Typical Horizontal Airflow Degreening Room.
Douglas L. Deason and William Grierson. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
84:259-264. Oct. 1970.

4227 Comparative Production of Corn and Sorghum for Grain. M. C. Lutrick.
Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:45-48. 1971.

4228 The Reproduction of H dihystera on Soybeans. R. A. Kinlock, M. C.
Lutrick, and W. K. Robertson. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:
262-263. 1971.

4229 Dietary Calcium and Phosphorus for Bobwhite Chicks. H. R. Wilson,
M. W. Holland, Jr., and R. H. Harms. J. Wildlife Management 36:
3:956-958. July 1972.








4230 Safety Evaluation of an Amicarbalide Isenthionate Formulation in
Ponies. V. K. Weidle, and G. T. Edds. U.S. Anim. Health Ass.
Annual 281-295. 1971.

4231 Sugarcane Bagasse, a Waste Disposal Problem. H. L. Chapman, Jr.
Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:22-23. 1971.

4232 Hybrid Environment Interactions in Corn. E. S. Horner, W. H.
Chapman, H. W. Lundy, and M. C. Lutrick. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc.
Fla. Proc. 31:64-66. 1971.

4233 Yolk Mottling Associated with' Dietary Calcium Deficiency. D. A.
Roland, Sr., D. R. Sloan and R. H. Harms. Poultry Sci. 51:2:710-712.
March 1972.

4234 Design Criteria for Flow Retarding Materials on Newly Designed
Waterways and Embankments. II. Malcolm Johnson and J. Mostella
Myers. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:7-11. 1971.

4235 Bulk Curing Tobacco with Random Leaf Orientation. J. Mostella
Myers, C. Direlle Baird and Fred Clark. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc.
Fla. Proc. 31:19-21. 1971.

4236 Fungicidal Control of Corn Leaf Blights in Florida with Fixed--Wing
Aircraft. N. C. Schenck and T. J. Stelter. Fla. Soil and Crop
Sci. Soc. Proc. 31:61-64. 1971.

4237 Response of Corn Grown at Low Soil Moisture Tension to Row and
Drill Spacings. R. L. Stanley, Jr. and F. M; Rhoads. Soil
and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:42-45. 1971.

4238 Genetic Trends in Milk Production in Florida DHIA Herds. O. G.
Verde, C. J. Wilcox, F. G. Martin and C. W. Reaves. J. Dairy Sci.
44:7:1010-1012. July, 1972.

4239 Effects of Pipe Depth and Fertilizer Rates on a Cigar Wrapper
Tobacco Seedling Production in a Subirrigated Plant Bed. F. M.
Rhoads. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:155-156. 1971.

4240 Response of Strawberry to N and K Fertilization on a Sandy Soil.
E. E. Albregts and Paul Sutton. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc.
31:114-116. 1971.

4241 effect of Nitrogen and Potassium on Bell Pepper Grown on Paper Mulch.
E. E. Albregts. Fla. Soil and Crop Proc. Soc. 31:116-118. 1971.

4242 The Development of Pencil Stripe in Celery 1A. External Induction.
H. W. Burdine and R. D. Berger. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc.
31:31-37. 1971.

4243 The Development of Pencil Stripes in Celery 1B. Nutrient Element
Composition. H. W. Burdine. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc.
31:37-42. 1971.

4244 Effects of an Organic Iydrolysate Containing Keto Acids on Tomato
Yields. H. H. Bryan and P. E. Read. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
84:120-124. Nov. 1971.

4245 An Allocation Model to Determine Agriculture's Ability to Compete for
Water. John E. Reynolds and J. Richard Conner. Soil and Crop Sci.
Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:15-18. 1971.

4247 A Look at 'Arrowleaf' Clover in Florida. L. S. Dunavin and J. E.
Bertrand. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 38:58-61. 1971.

4248 Availability of Manganese in Everglades Peat as Influenced by Soil
pH, Source, and Rate of Application. G. J. Gascho, H. W. Burdine
and F. A. Taha. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:106-109. 1971.

4249 Calcium Metabolism in the Laying Hen. 3. Pattern of Feed (Calcium)
Intake as Influenced by Time of Day and Oviposition. D. A. Roland, Sr.,
D. R. Sloan, and R. H. Harms. Poultry Sci. 51:4:1388-1391.

4250 Migration of Three Pathogenic Citrus Nematodes Through Two Florida
Citrus Soils. A. C. Tarjan. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31;
253-255. 1971.

4251 Latin American Competition in the Cut Flower Market. Cecil 1. Smith.
Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci., Trop. Reg. Proc. 15:239-257. 1972.







4252 A Comparison of Magnesium Sources for Citrus. R. C. J. Koo. Soil and
Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:137-140. 1971.

4253 Gladiolus Production Costs and Returns in Southwest Florida. T. S.
Hipp. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 84:384-389. Nov. 1971.

4254 Effect of Soil pH and Micronutrient Amendments on Verticillium and
Fusarium Wilt of Tomato. John Paul Jones and S. S. Woltz. Plant
Dis. Rep. 56:2:151-153. Feb. 1972.

4255 Flash Communication in the Firefly Photuris divisa (Coleoptera:
Lampyridae). Lawrent L. Buschman. Entomol. News 83:159-164. June
1972.

4256 Performance of Six Hybrid Bermudagrasses, Pangola Digitgrass and
Pensacola Bahiagrass at Three Fertility Levels in North Central
Florida. O. Charles Ruelke and Gordon M. Prine. Soil and Crop Sci.
Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:67-71. 1971.

4257 Textural Properties of Stored and Irradiated Peaches. II. Rheological
Properties. E. M. Ahmed and R. C. Fluck. J. Texture Stud. 3:3:319-
328. 1972.

4258 The Effect of Fumigants on Non-Target Soil Microorganisms in Tomato
Seedbeds. A. J. Overman. Soil Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:256-260.
1971.

4259 Textural Properties of Stored Irradiated Peaches. I. Firmness. E. M.
Ahmed, R. A. Dennison, and R. C. Fluck. J. of Texture Stud. 3:310-
318. 1972.

4260 Odonata in the Florida Soybean Agroecosystem. T. Neal and W. I. Whitcomb.
Fla. Entomol. 55:2:107-114. 1972.

4261 Fatty Acid Distribution in Orange Juice Phospholipids. R. J. Braddock.
J. Food Sci. 37:387-388. 1972.

4262 Correlation of Soil Test and Saturated Extract Determinations with
Watermelon Tissue Analyses, Yields, and Soluble Solids. G. W.
Elmstrom, J. G. A. Fiskell, and F. G. Martin. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc.
Fla. Proc.

4264 Nitrogen Fertilization in Relation to Seasonal Pensacola Bahiagrass
(Paspalum notatum Flugge) Forage Nitrogen and Production Distribution.
W. G. Blue. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:75-77. 1971.

4265 Use of Artificial Pools for Determining Presence, Abundance, and
Oviposition Preferences of Culex nigripalpus Theobald in the Field.
W. W. Smith and D. W. Jones, Jr. Mosquito News. 32:2:244-245.

4266 Evaluation of Mixtures of Kenaf Sorghum and Corn for Silage. G. M.
Price. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:51-54. 1971.

4267 Water Repellent Soil Mulch for Reducing Fertilizer Leaching. I.
Preliminary Investigations Comparing Several Leaching Retardation
Approaches. G. H. Snyder and H. Y. Ozaki. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc.
Fla. Proc. 31:101-106. 1971.

4268 Chemical Communication in Fireflies. Dr. James E. Lloyd. Environ.
Entomol. 1:2:265-266. April 1972.

4269 Water Quality of Small Enclosures Stocked with White Amur. Jane E.
Michewicz, D. L. Sutton, and R. D. Blackburn. Hyacinth Control J.
10:22-25. May 1972.

4271 Appearance and Persistence of Pinolene Antitranspirant Sprayed on
'Valencia' Orange Leaves. L. Gene Albrigo. HortScience 7:3:247-248.

4272 Acidic Properties of Some Florida Soils. I. pH-Dependent Cation
Exchange. J. G. A. Fiskell and L. W. Zelazny. Soil and Crop Sci.
Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:145-149. 1971.

4274 Evaluation of Soil Tests for Magnesium as Predictive Tools of the
Magnesium Status in Citrus on Dolomited Soils. Carl A. Anderson and
L. G. Albrigo. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc.

4275 Effect of Bird-Resistant Sorghums and Tannic Acid on Yolk Mottling.
Jack L. Fry, Geo. M. Herrick, G. M. Prine and R. H. Harms. Poultry
Sci. LI:5:1540-1543. Sept. 1972.







4276 Interrelationship Between Sulfides, Oxygen, and Iron in Ground Water.
Harry W. Ford. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:237-239. 1971.

4277 Tne Effects of Deep Mixing and Liming on Cation Selectivities of a
Spodosol. J. G. A. Fiskell. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:
223-228. 1971.

4278 Dissolved Oxygen in Tile Drain Outflow Water Measurement and Affecting
Factors. nang-Tan-Phung. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:233-
237. Dec. 1971.

4281 The Effect of Low Protein Grower Diet on the Reproductive Perfor-
mance of Turkey Breeder Toms. R. A. Voitle, J. H. Walter, H. R.
Wilson, and R. II. Harms. Poultry Sci. LI:5:1548-1552. Sept. 1972.

4282 Theory of the Firm and the Management of Residuals. Max R. Langham.
Amer. J. Agri. Econ. 54:2:315-322. May 1972.

4283 Organic Matter Changes in Sands Under Short and Long Term Tillage.
G. M. Volk and D. R. Hensel. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:
120-124. 1971.

4285 Response of Broiler Chicks to a Single Dose of Aflatoxin. E. C.
Schroeder, K. P. C. Nair, P. T. Cardeilhac. Poultry Sci. LI:5:
1552-1556. Sept. 1972.

4286 Suppression of Aphids, Mites, and Nematodes with Foliar Applications
of Chemicals. A. J. Overman and S. L. Poe. Proc. Fla. State Hort.
Soc. 84:419-422. Nov. 1971.

4287 Sugar Uptake in the Maize Scutellum. J. H. Whitesell and T. E.
Humphreys. Phytochemistry 11:2139-2147. 1972.

4288 Description and Control of Pythium Root Rot on Two Foliage Plant
Species. J. F. Knauss. Plant Dis. Rep. 56:3:211-215. March 1972.

4289 Long-Term Growth-Retardant Effects of (+) Limonene Derivatives on
Citrus. William F. Newhall and A. P. Pieringer. HortScience 7:3:
254-255. June 1972.

4290 Nitrate-Nitrogen Movement into Drainage Lines Under Different Soil
Management Systems. D. V. Calvert and R. T. Phung. Soil and Crop
Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:229-232. 1971.

4291 Melothria pendula Plants Infected with Watermelon Mosaic Virus I
as a Source of Inoculum for Cucurbits in Collier County, Florida.
W. C. Adlerz. J. Econ. Entomol. 65:5:1303-1306. Oct. 1972.

4292 Streptomycin Residue Determination in Field-Grown Tomatoes. Robert T.
icliillan, Jr., Vincent J. Carroll and Ruth F. Wallace. J. Agri. and
Food Chem. 20:4:886-887. July-Aug. 1972.

4294 Differences in Tibia Strength and Bone Ash Among Strains of Layers.
L. O. Rowland, Jr., Jack L. Fry, R. B. Christmas, A. W. O'Steen
and R. H. Harms. Poultry Sci. LI:5:1612-1615. Sept. 1972.

4295 Oxidative Rancidity in Raw Fish Fillets Harvested from the Gulf of
Mexico. V. T. Mendenhall. J. Food Sci. 37:547-550. 1972.

4296 Stomate Density and Size as Related to Ozone-Induced Weather Fleck
in Tobacco. C. E. Dean. Crop Sci. 12:547-548. July-Aug. 1972.

4298 Commercial Utilization of the Products of Recurrent Selection for
Specific Combining Ability in Maize. E. S. Horner, W. H. Chapman,
H. W. Lundy, and M. C. Lutrick. Crop Sci. 12:602-604. Sept.-Oct.
1972.

4299 Lutzomyia Ignacioi, A New Species of Phlebotomine Sand Fly from
Venezuela (Diptera: Psychodidae). David G. Young. J. Med. Entomol.
9:4:312-314. Aug. 1972.

4300 Seasonal Variation in Rainfall Distribution and Its Effect on Soil
Fertility and Corn (Zea mays L.) Yields. W. K. Robertson, C. E.
Hutton. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:55-58. 1971.

4301 Effects of Parental Age at Oviposition on Progeny of Chrysopa rufila-
bris. S. B. Hydorn and W. H. Whitcomb. Fla. Entomol. 55:2:72-85.
1972.







4302 Dust Bag Treatments in Improved Pastures to Control Horn Flies and
Cattle Grubs. B. W. Hayes, M. J. Janes, and D. W. Beardsley. J.
Econ. Entomol. 65:5:1368-1371. Oct. 1972.

4303 Utilization of Inorganic Sulfate by Turkey Poults. D. R. Sloan and
R. H. Harms. Poultry Sci. LI:5:1973-1975. Sept. 1972.

4305 Ethephon for Postharvest Degreening of Oranges and Grapefruit. W.
Grierson, Fawzeya H. Ismail, and Marion F. Oberbacher. J. Amer.
Soc. Hort. Soc. 97:4:541-544. July 1972.

4309 Group Ashing vs. Individual Ashing of Bones in Phosphorus Assays.
T.L. Andrew, B. L. Damron and R. H. Harms. Nutrition Reports
International. 5:1:301-304. April 1972.

4310 Use of Muncipal Compost in Reclamation Phosphate-Mining Sand Tailings.
C. C. Hortenstine and D. F. Rothwell. J. Environ. Quality. 1:4:
415-418. 1972.

4313 Amino Acids of Citrus Seed Meal. R. J. Braddock and J. W. Kesterson.
J. Amer. Oil Chemists' Soc. 49:11:671-672. Nov. 1972.

4314 Concentrations of N. P. K. and Total Soluble Salts in Soil Solution
Samples from Fertilized and Unfertilized Histosols. R. B. Forbes
and C. C. Hortenstine. J. Environ. Quality 1:4:446-449. Oct.-
Dec. 1972.

4315 Effect of Lime on Extractable Iron and Aluminum, and Phosphorus
Sorption in a Tropical and a Temperate Soil. Julian Velez and W. G.
Blue. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:169-173. 1971.

4316 Tracheal Organ Cultures for the Bioassay of Nanogram Quantities of
Mycotoxins. P. T. Cardeilhac, K. P. C. Nair, William M. Colwell.
J. Ass. of Official Analytical Chemists 55:1120-1121. Sept. 1972.

4317 Chromosome Numbers in Eleven New Hemarthris (Limpograss) Introductions.
S. C. Schank. Crop Sci. 12:550-551. July-Aug. 1972.

4318 Foliar Blight of Dionaea muscipula Ellis Incited by Colletotrichum
gloeosporioides (Penz.) Sacc. J. F. Knauss. Plant Dis. Rep. 56:
5:391-393. May 1972.

4319 Resistance of Xanthomonas Dieffenbachiae Isolates to Streptomycin.
J. F. Knauss. Plant Dis. Rep. 56:5:394-397. May 1972.


4320 Agronomy in Florida. Fred Clark. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc.
31:1-7. 1971.

4321 Adrenocorticotrophin Alteration of Bovine Peripheral Plasma Concen-
trations of Cortisol, Corticosterone and Progesterone. F. C.
Gwazdauskas, W. W. Thatcher and C. J. Wilcox. J. Dairy Sci. 55:
8:1165-1169. Aug. 1972.

4323 Labial Morphology of Belonolaimus Longicaudatus as Revealed by the
Scanning Electron Microscope. G. C. Smart, Jr., R. D. Hartman and
T. C. Carlysle. J. Nematology. 4:3:216-218. July 1972.

4324 Vocalization in Marmota Monax. James E. Lloyd. J. Mammal. 53:1:
214-216. March, 1972.

4325 Infrared Spectra of Selected Colombian Andosols. F. G. Calhoun and
V. W. Carlisle. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:157-161. 1971.

4326 Low Light Intensity Effects on Gra in Sorghum at Different Stages of
Growth. G. W. Pepper and G. M. Prine. Crop Sci. 12:590-593. Sept.-
Oct. 1972.

4327 Special Characteristics of Zinc Sulfide, A Potential Source of
Fertilizer Zinc. Javaid N. Qureshi and Nathan Gammon, Jr. Soil and
Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:125-257. 1971.

4328 Utilization of Various Sources of Plant Phosphorus by the Turkey
Poult. T. L. Andrews, B. L. Damron and R. H. Harms. Nutrition
Rep. Int. 6:5:251-257. Nov. 1972.

4330 Control of Fragrant Waterlily (Nymphaea Odorata). Willey Durden
and Robert D. Blackburn. Hyacinth Control J. 10:30-32. May 1972.







4331 Mating Behavior of a New Guinea Luciola Firefly: A New Communicative
Protocol (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) James E. Lloyd. Coleopterists
Bull. 26:4:195-164. 1972.

4335 Sexual Reproduction in Panicum Maximum Jacq. Rex L. Smith. Crop
Sci. 12:624-627. Sept.-Oct. 1972.

4336 A Comparison of Wire vs. Litter Floors for Starting and Growing
Pullets. T. S. Powell, C. R. Douglas and R. H. Harms. Poultry Sci.
LI:6:1951-9955. Nov. 1972.

4337 Effect of Phosphorus, Potassium, Copper and Zinc on the Yields of
Corn (Zea Mays L.) and Soybeans (Glycine Max L. Merrill) and on
Soil Fertility for a Drained Spodosol. L. G. Thompson, Jr., and
W. K. Robertson. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. 31:141-144. 1971.

4338 Suboptimal Temperature and Assimilate Accumulation in Leaves of
'Pangola' Digitgrass (Digitaria Decumbens Stent.) L. A. Garrard,
and S. H. West. Crop Scr. 12621-623. Sept.-Oct. 1972.

4339 Transmissibility of an Attenuated Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis
Vaccine Virus. W. M. Taylor and Elsie Buff. J. Amer. Vet. Med. Ass.
161:2:159-163. July 1972.

4341 Microbiological Effects from Liming Soils. David H. Hubbell. Soil
and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:196-199. 1971.

4342 Influence of Zn, P, and Ca on Yield and Chemical Composition of Hairy
Indigo in Eastern Panama. M. W. Silvey and V. W. Carlisle. Soil and
Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Prbc. 31:26-31. 1971.

4345 Plant Responses to Iron, Leaching, and Time After Liming a Virgin
Alluvial Entisol from Eastern Costa Rica. M. I. Zantua and W. G.
Blue. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:165-169. 1971.

4348 Ultrastructure of Cuticular Surfaces and Stomata of Developing Leaves
and Fruit of the 'Valencia' Orange. L. Gene Albrigo. J. Amer. Soc.
Hort. Sci. 97:6:761-765. Nov. 1972.

4352 The Influence of Delactosed Whey and Supplemental Biotin in Turkey
Starter Diets. B. L. Damron, D. P. Eberst and R. H. Harms. Nutrition
Reports Int. 5:6:391-394. June 1972.

4353 The Use of Extremely Low Dietary Calcium to Alter the Production
Pattern of Laying Hens. C. R. Douglas, R.H. Harms and H. R. Wilson.
Poultry Sci. LI:6:2015-2020. Nov. 1972.

4355 Toxicity of a Substituted Hydrazine for Turkeys. Charles F. Simpson,
M. V. Barrow, and J. A. Himes. The Archives of Environmental Health
25:349-353. Nov. 1972.

4356 Wing Movements in Calling Katydids: Fiddling Finesse.. T. J. Walker
and Donald Dew. Science 178:174-176. Oct. 1972.

4357 Acidic Properties of Some Florida Soils. II. Exchangeable and Titrat-
able Acidity. L. W. Zelazny and J. G. A. Fiskell. Soil and Crop Sci.
Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:149-154. 1971.

4359 Relative Susceptibility of Some Tomato Genotypes to Bacterial Spot.
Pat Crill, John Paul Jones and D. S. Burgis. Plant Dis Rep. 56:
6:504-507. June 1972.

4361 Use of the Yelow-Green (yg) Character in Reducing the Number of Harvest
in Cigar-Wrapper Tobacco. C. E. Dean. Tobacco Sci. 175:2:29-30.
Nov. 1972.

4362 Improving Manganese Nutrition of Sugarcane Grown on High pH Organic
Soils. H. J. Andreis and G. J. Gascho. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla.
Proc. 31:110-113. 1971.

4364 Acid-Soluble Nucleotides of Juice Vesicles of Citrus Fruits. Charles
R. Barmore and R. H.. Biggs. J. Food Sci. 37:712-714. 1972.

4365 The Relationship of Disease to Methods of Inoculation of Ficus Elastica
with Aphelenchoides Besseyi. Robert B. Marlatt. Plant Dis. Rep.
56:6:471-472.

4366 Growth Characteristics of Ficus Elastica Roxb. Robert B. Marlatt.
Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 7:4:416. Aug. 1972.


94







4368 Movement of Acarol and Terbacil Pesticides During Displacement Through
Columns of Wabasso Fine Sand. R. S. Mansell, W. B. Wheeler, Lita
Elliott and Mark Shaurette. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:
239-243. 1971.

4371 Iodinated Casein Supplementation of Laying Hen Diets Containing
Various Levels of Sulfur Amino Acids. B. L. Damron and R. H. Harms.
Poultry Sci. LI:6:2084-2087. Nov. 1972.

4372 Spider Ant Symbiosis: Cotinusa ssp. (Araneida: Salticidae) and
Tapinoma Melanocephalum (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Merle Shepard
and Flash Gibson. The Canadian Entomol. 104:12:1951-1954. Dec. 1972.

4375 Trunk Treatment with Systemics for Aphid Control on Florida Citrus.
Robert C. Bullock. Fla. Entomol. 55:3:165-172. 1972.

4376 Thinning Short-Cycle Peaches with N-1-Naphthylphthalamic Acid. J. B.
Aitken, D. W. Buchanan and J. W. Sauls. HortScience 7:3L255-256.
June 1972.

4377 Weed Control in Young Vineyards. C. F. Balerdi. Amer. J. Enol. and
Viticul. 23:2:58-60. 1972.

4378 Keeping Quality of Milk Exposed to High Temperature as Experienced
During Transport in Automobiles. K. L. Smith, L. E. Mull, C. B. Lane
and A. J. Baggott, Jr. J. Milk and Food Technol. 35:10:588-590.
Oct. 1972.

4379 Comparison of Measured and Calculated Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity
for Lakeland Fine Sand. A. R. Overman, L. C. Hammond, H. M. West.
Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:221-222. 1971.

4380 A New Patagonian Biting Midge of the Genus Monohelea, Isthmohelea
(Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). W. W. Wirth and F. S. Blanton. Fla.
Entomol. 55:3:173-176. 1972.

4382 New Distribution and Host Record for. the Parasitoid, Eumicrosoma
Benefica. James A. Reinert. Fla. Entomol. 55:3:143-144. 1972.

4386 Formation of Virion-Occluding Proteinic Spindles in a Baculovirus
Disease of Aedes Triseriatus. Brian A. Federici and Darrell W.
Anthony. J. Invertebrate Pathol. 20:1:129-138. .July 1972.

4387 A Natural Definitive Host for Catatropic Johnstoni Martin, 1956
(Trematoda: Notocotylidae), with notes on Experimental Host Speci-
ficity and Intraspecific Variation. Albert O. Bush and John M.
Kinsella. J. Parasitol. 58:4:263-265. 1972.

4389 Preliminary Studies on the Ants of Florida Soybean Fields. W. H.
Whitcomb, H. A. Denmark, A. P. Bhatkar and G. L. Greene. Fla. Entomol.
55:3:129-142. 1972.

4391 Measurement of Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity by the Constant
Outflow Method. Allen R. Overman, Herbert M. West. Amer. Ass. Agri.
Eng. 15:6:1110-1111. 1972.

4392 Naturally Occurring Pepper Virus Strains in South Florida. T. A.
Zitter. Plant Dis. Rep. 56:7:586-590. July 1972.

4393 Momordica Charantia L. as a Source of Watermelon Mosaic Virus 1 for
Cucurbit Crops in Palm Beach County, Florida. W. C. Adlerz. Plant
Dis. Rep. 56:7:563-564. July 1972.

4395 Spatial Patterns and Overcrowding of the Bean Leaf Roller, Urbanus
Proteus (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae). Merle Shepard. Annals Entomol.
Soc. Amer. 1124-1125. Sept. 1972.

4396 Sorghum Midge Infestation Relationship with Distance from Field
Margin. D. O. Wolfenbarger. Fla. Entomol. 55:4:263-265. 1972.

4397 The Response of Eurasian Wtermilfoil to Various Concentrations and
Exposure Periods of 2, 4-D'. Richard A. Elliston and Kerry K. Steward.
Hyacinth Control J. 10:38-40. May 1972.

4399 Mineralogy of Florida Aeric Haplaquods. L. W. Zelazny and V. W.
Carlisle. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:161-164. 1971.

4401 Drainage Characteristics of Oldsmar Sand Simulated on a Resistance
Network. J. S. Rogers, C. L. Simmons, and L. C. Hammond. Soil and
Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 31:218-220. 1971.

95