<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Map
 Table of Contents
 Agricultural experiment stations...
 Staff changes
 Report of the dean for researc...
 Capital improvements
 Theses and dissertations
 International programs
 Grants and gifts
 Report of the administrative...
 Agricultural engineering depar...
 Agronomy department
 Animal science department
 Botany department
 Dairy science department
 Editorial department
 Entomology and nematology...
 Food and resource economics...
 Food science department
 Forest resources and conservation...
 Fruit crops department
 Microbiology department
 Ornamental horticulture depart...
 Plant pathology department
 Poultry science department
 Soil science department
 Statistics department
 Vegetable crops department
 Veterinary science department
 Belle Glade agricultural research...
 Bradenton agricultural research...
 Homestead agricultural research...
 Lake Alfred agricultural research...
 Quincy agricultural research and...
 Sanford agricultural research and...
 Apopka agricultural research...
 Brooksville beef cattle research...
 Dover agricultural research...
 Ft. Lauderdale agricultural research...
 Ft. Pierce agricultural research...
 Hastings agricultural research...
 Immokalee agricultural research...
 Jay agricultural research...
 National Weather Service
 Lakeland agricultural research...
 Leesburg agricultural research...
 Live Oak agricultural research...
 Marianna agricultural research...
 Monticello agricultural research...
 Ona agricultural research...
 Index


UF FLAG



Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005147/00004
 Material Information
Title: Annual research report of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Abbreviated Title: Annu. res. rep. Inst. Food Agric. Sci., Univ. Fla., Gainesville, Fla.
Physical Description: v. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida>
Place of Publication: <Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: 1971
Publication Date: 1968-
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Agriculture -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Food -- Research -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Biological abstracts
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1968-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000429247
oclc - 01408984
notis - ACH8451
lccn - 73646057 //r862
issn - 0071-609X
System ID: UF00005147:00004
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual report.
Succeeded by: Annual research report of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Map
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Agricultural experiment stations staff
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Staff changes
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Report of the dean for research
        Page 24
    Capital improvements
        Page 25
    Theses and dissertations
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    International programs
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 31
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Grants and gifts
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 38
    Report of the administrative manager
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Agricultural engineering department
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Agronomy department
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Animal science department
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Botany department
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Dairy science department
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Editorial department
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
    Entomology and nematology department
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Food and resource economics department
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
    Food science department
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
    Forest resources and conservation department
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    Fruit crops department
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
    Microbiology department
        Page 121
        Page 122
    Ornamental horticulture department
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
    Plant pathology department
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Poultry science department
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
    Soil science department
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    Statistics department
        Page 145
    Vegetable crops department
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
    Veterinary science department
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
    Belle Glade agricultural research and education center
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
    Bradenton agricultural research and education center
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
    Homestead agricultural research and education center
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
    Lake Alfred agricultural research and education center
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
    Quincy agricultural research and education center
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
    Sanford agricultural research and education center
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
    Apopka agricultural research center
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
    Brooksville beef cattle research station
        Page 209
    Dover agricultural research center
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
    Ft. Lauderdale agricultural research center
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
    Ft. Pierce agricultural research center
        Citrus section
            Page 216
            Page 217
            Page 218
        Vegetable-agronomy section
            Page 219
            Page 220
            Page 221
    Hastings agricultural research center
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
    Immokalee agricultural research center
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
    Jay agricultural research center
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
    National Weather Service
        Page 233
    Lakeland agricultural research center
        Page 233
    Leesburg agricultural research center
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
    Live Oak agricultural research center
        Page 239
        Page 240
    Marianna agricultural research center
        Page 241
    Monticello agricultural research center
        Page 242
        Page 243
    Ona agricultural research center
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
    Index
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
Full Text









ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT

of the

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida




HUME LBRARY

APR 5 1973

I.F.A.S. Univ. of Florida


1971















ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT


of the


Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida



1971


This public document was promulgated at an annual cost of $6165 or
$1.54 per copy to provide a summary of research conducted during 1971
by the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
This record is intended for use by libraries, Florida Cooperative
Extension Service county directors, scientists, growers and ranchers,
and other persons interested in agricultural research in Florida.















UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


D AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND
EDUCATION CENTERS
1. Belle Glade (cattle, forage crops, sugarcane,
vegetables)
2. Bradenton (cut flowers, vegetables)
3. Homestead (ornamentals, subtropical fruits,
vegetables)
4. Lake Alfred (citrus)
5. Quincy (cattle, field crops, fruit crops, tobacco,
vegetables)
6. Sanford (field crops, ornamentals, vegetables)

O AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTERS
1. Apopka (foliage plants, ornamentals)
2. Brooksville (Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station,
USDA)
3. Dover (strawberries, vegetables)
4. Ft. Lauderdale (animal diseases, aquatic weed control,
ornamentals, turfgrass)
5. Ft. Pierce (citrus, vegetables, forage and pasture crops)
6. Hastings (cabbage, potatoes)
7. Immokalee (forage and pasture crops, vegetables)
8. Jay (cattle, field crops, fruits, nuts)
9. Lakeland (National Weather Service)
10. Leesburg (grapes, watermelons)
11. Live Oak 'field crops, fruits, swine, tobacco)


Leesburg

() 6 Sanford
Brooksville
Der Apopka
Dover T
l- 4 W Lake Alfred
SLake-
land
@] QOna
Bradenton Ft.
a Pierce











CONTENTS


ADMINISTRATION
Agricultural Experiment Stations Staff .
Staff Changes . . . .
Report of the Dean for Research . .
Capital Improvements . . .
Theses and Dissertations . . .
International Programs .. . . .
Grants and Gifts . . . .
Report of the Administrative Manager .

MAIN STATION
Agricultural Engineering Department .
Agronomy Department . . .
Animal Science Department . . .
Botany Department . . . .
Dairy Science Department . . .
Editorial Department .. .. .
Entomology and Nematology Department .
Food and Resource Economics Department .
Food Science Department . . .
Forest Resources and Conservation Department
Fruit Crops Department . . .
Microbiology Department . .
Ornamental Horticulture Department . .
Plant Pathology Department . . .
Poultry Science Department . . .
Soil Science Departmet . . .
Statistics Department . . .
Vegetable Crops Department . . .
Veterinary Science Department . .


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND
SBelle Glade . .
Bradenton . .
/Homestead . .
Lake Alfred . .
Quincy . .
Sanford . .


EDUCATION CENTERS


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTERS
Apopka . . . . . .
Brooksville (Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station,
Dover . . . . . .
SFt. Lauderdale . . . . .
VFt. Pierce
Citrus Section . . . . .
Vegetable Agronomy Section . . .
Hastings . . . . . .
V Immokalee . . . . . .
Jay . . . . . . .
Lakeland (National Weather Service) . . .
Leesburg . . . . . .
Live Oak . . . . . .
Marianna . . . . . .
Monticello . . . . . .
Ona . . . . . .


USDA)


INDEX . . . . . . . 249





The use of trade names in this.publication is solely for the purpose
of providing specific information. It is not a guarantee or warranty
of the products named and does not signify that they are approved to
the exclusion of others of suitable composition.


4
22
24
25
25
31
38
44


46
51
60
69
72
78
93
97
106
112
117
121
123
128
132
136
145
146
150











INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

RESEARCH FACULTY

December 1971



BOARD OF REGENTS
D. Burke Kibler, III, Lakeland, Chairman
Chester Howell Ferguson, Tampa
Julius F. Parker, Tallahassee
E. W. Hopkins, Jr., Pensacola
Louis C. Murray, Orlando, Vice Chairman
J. J. Daniel, Jacksonville
Elizabeth A. Kovachevich, St. Petersburg
Mrs. E. D. (Carolyn) Pearce, Miami
R. B. Mautz, Chancellor, Tallahassee

ADMINISTRATION
Telephone University of Florida, Area Code 904

Stephen C. O'Connell, President of University, 392-1311
E. T. York, Ph.D., Vice President for Agricultural Affairs, 392-1971
J. W. Sites, Ph.D., Dean for Research, 392-1784
J. F. Gerber, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Research, 392-1799
H. H. Wilkowske, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Research 392-1786
G. R. Freeman, M.S.A., Assistant Director, 392-1748
D. R. Bryant, Jr., A.B., Administrative Assistant III, 392-1733
W. H. Jones, Jr., M. Agr., Maintenance and Construction Superintendent,
392-1984

ABBREVIATIONS
The following abbreviations after name and title of IFAS research faculty
members indicate cooperation with other organizations.
Coll.-University of Florida College of Agriculture
Ext.-University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service
DC-Florida Department of Citrus
DPI-Division of Plant Industry, Florida Department of Agriculture
FAMU-Florida A&M University, Tallahassee
Fla.-Ga. WS-Florida-Georgia Wildlife Service
USDA-United States Department of Agriculture
USFS-United States Forest Service

NOTE: Liaison appointments, as indicated following certain named in-
dividuals, represent responsibility for coordination, planning and
conduct of cooperative research with the department indicated.











UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Gainesville 32601


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT
7 Frazier Rogers Hall, 23601
Phone 904, 392-1864

E. T. Smerdon, Ph.D., Prof. (Agr. Engineer) and Chairman; also Coll.
and Ext.
L. O. Bagnall, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Engineer)
C. D. Baird, M.S.E., Int. Research Instructor
E. K. Bowman, B.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Industrial Engineer), USDA
R. E. Choate, M.S.A., Prof. (Agr. Engineer); liaison with Forestry; Coll.
R. C. Fluck, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agr. Engineer); liaison with
Ani. Sci.
J. J. Gaffney, M.S.A.E., Instructor (Asst. in Agr. Engineering), USDA
F. E. Henry, B.I.E., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Industrial Engineer), USDA
D. T. Kinard, Ph.D., Prof. (Agr. Engineer)
J. M. Myers, M.S.A., Prof. (Agr. Engineer); liaison with Agron.
R. A. Nordstedt, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Engineer)
A. R. Overman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Engineer)
L. N. Shaw, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Engineer)
W. K. Turner, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Engineer), USDA
J. C. Webb, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Engineer), USDA

(See also liaison appointments in Departments of Agronomy, Animal
Science, Soil Science.)


AGRONOMY DEPARTMENT
304 Newell Hall, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1811

D. E. McCloud, Ph.D., Prof. (Agronomist) and Chairman; also Coll. and
Ext.
F. T. Boyd, Ph.D., Prof. (Agronomist)
Fred Clark, M.S.A.. Prof. (Agronomist); liaison with Agr. Eng.
C. E. Dean, Ph.D., Prof. (Agronomist)
W. G. Duncan, Ph.D., Prof. (Agronomist)
J. R. Edwardson, Ph.D., Prof. (Agronomist); liaison with Plant Path.
L. A. Garrard, Ph.D., Research Associate
V. E. Green, Ph.D., Prof. (Agronomist)
W. W. Hanna, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agronomist)
Kuell Hinson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Geneticist), USDA
E. S. Horner, Ph.D., Prof. (Agronomist); liaison with Entomol.
G. B. Killinger, Ph.D., Prof. (Agronomist); liaison with Agr. Econ.
E. B. Knipling, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Physiologist), USDA
F. le Grand, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agronomist)
G. O. Mott, Ph.D., Prof. (Agronomist)
A. J. Norden, Ph.D., Assoc. Professor (Assoc. Agronomist)
C. B. Owens, Ph.D., Prof. (Agronomist), FAMU
P. L. Pfahler, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agronomist)
G. M. Prine, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agronomist); liaison with Soils
E. G. Rodgers, Ph.D., Prof. (Agronomist); Coll.
O. C. Ruelke, Ph.D., Prof. (Agronomist); liaison with Ani. Sci.; also Coll.











S. C. Schank, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agronomist); also Coll.
V. N. Schroder, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agronomist); liaison with
Forestry
R. L. Smith, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agronomist)
H. E. Warmke, Ph.D., Prof. (Geneticist), USDA; liaison with Plant. Path.
S. H. West, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Physiologist), USDA
Merrill Wilcox, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agronomist)
(See also liaison appointments in Departments of Agricultural Engineering,
Dairy Science, Entomology and Nematology, Forest Resources, Plant Pa-
thology, Soil Science.)

ANIMAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
2103 McCarty Hall, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1911

T. J. Cunha, Ph.D., Prof. (Animal Nutritionist) and Chairman; also Coll.
and Ext.
C..B. Ammerman, Ph.D., Prof. (Animal Nutritionist); liaison with Poultry;
also Coll.
L. R. Arrington, Ph.D., Prof. (Animal Nutritionist); also Coll.
F. W. Bazer, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Animal Physiologist); also Coll.
J. W. Carpenter, Ph.D., Prof. (Meat Scientist); also Coll.
G. E. Combs, Ph.D., Prof. (Animal Nutritionist), liaison with Agr. Eng.;
also Coll.
J. H. Conrad, Ph.D., Int. Prof. (Int. Animal Nutritionist)
G. K. Davis, Ph.D., Prof. (Animal Nutritionist); also Director, Division of
Biological Sciences
J. R. Dickey, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Physiologist and Geneticist)
J. F. Easley, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Animal Nutritionist)
J. Eggleston, M.S., Instructor (Asst. in Animal Science)
J. P. Feaster, Ph.D., Prof. (Biochemist); also Coll.
D. E. Franke, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Animal Geneticist); also Coll.
J. C. Glenn, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Animal Physiologist)
J. F. Hentges, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. (Animal Nutritionist); liaison with Vet.
Sci.; also Coll.
D. E. Koch, Ph.D., Int. Asst. Prof. (Int. Asst. Meat Scientist); also Coll.
Marvin Koger, Ph.D., Prof. (Animal Geneticist); liaison with Soils; also
Coll.
P. E. Loggins, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Animal Husbandman); liaison
with Vet. Sci.; also Coll.
L. R. McDowell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Animal Nutritionist)
J. E. Moore, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Animal Nutritionist); also Coll.
E. A. Ott, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Animal Nutritionist); also Coll.
A. Z. Palmer, Ph.D., Prof. (Meat Scientist); liaison with Food Sci.; also
Coll.
R. L. Shirley, Ph.D., Prof. (Animal Nutritionist); also Coll.
D. L. Wakeman, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Animal Husbandman); also
Coll.
H. D. Wallace, Ph.D., Prof. (Animal Nutritionist); liaison with Vet. Sci.;
Coll.
A. C. Warnick, Ph.D., Prof. and Asst. Chairman (Animal Physiologist);
liaison with Poultry; also Coll.

(See also liaison appointments in Departments of Agricultural Engineering,
Agronomy, Food and Resource Economics, Food Science, Forest Re-
sources, Soil Science, Veterinary Science.)











BOTANY DEPARTMENT
2175 McCarty Hall, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1891

Leland Shanor, Ph.D., Prof. (Botanist) and Chairman; also Coll.
D. S. Anthony, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Biochemist); also Coll.
J. Beckner, B.S.A., Research Associate
J. H. Davis, Ph.D., Prof. Emeritus (Botanist Emeritus); Coll.
J. S. Davis, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Botanist); also Coll.
E. S. Ford, Ph.D., Prof. Emeritus (Botanist Emeritus); also Coll.
G. J. Fritz, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Plant Physiologist); also Coll.
T. E. Humphreys, Ph.D., Prof. (Biochemist); also Coll.
J. W. Kimbrough, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Mycologist); Coll.
J. T. Mullins, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Botanist); also Coll.
R. C. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Botanist); also Coll.
D. B. Ward, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Botanist); also Coll.

(See also liaison appointments in Department of Plant Pathology.)



DAIRY SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
Dairy Science Building, 32601
Phone 903, 392-1981

Dairy Research Unit, Hague
Phone 904, 462-1016

H. H. Van Horn, Ph.D., Prof. and Chairman
K. C. Bachman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Biochemist); also Coll.
R. G. Becker, Ph.D., Prof. Emeritus (Dairy Husbandman Emeritus)
E. L. Fouts, Ph.D., Prof. Emeritus (Dairy Technologist Emeritus)
H. H. Head, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Physiologist); also Coll.
W. A. Krienke, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Dairy Technologist); liaison
with Food Science; also Coll.
S. P. Marshall, Ph.D., Prof. (Nutritionist); liaison with Agron.; also Coll.
L. E. Mull, Ph.D., Prof. (Microbiologist); also Coll.
K. L. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Microbiologist); also Coll.
W. W. Thatcher, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Animal Physiologist); also Coll.
J. B. White, B.S.A., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Dairy Husbandman)
C. J. Wilcox, Ph.D., Prof. (Geneticist); also Coll.
J. M. Wing, Ph.D., Prof. (Animal Nutritionist); also Coll.

(See also liaison appointments in Departments of Agronomy, Food and Re-
source Economics, Food Science, Veterinary Science.)

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT
G022 McCarty Hall, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1774

Hervey Sharpe, Ph.D., Prof. (Editor) and Chairman; also Ext.
K. B. Meurlott, M.A., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Editor); also Ext.
T. B. Pratt, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Specialist in Communications and Con-
sumer Relations); also Coll. and Ext.
Mary C. Williams, M.A., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Editor)
C. T. Woods, M.A., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Editor)











ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY DEPARTMENT
3103 McCarty Hall, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1901
W. G. Eden, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist) and Chairman; also Coll. and Ext.
Ross Arnett, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist), Tall Timbers, Tallahassee
D. L. Bailey, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist), USDA
L. Berner, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist); Biological Sciences; Coll.
F. S. Blanton, Ph.D., (Entomologist); Coll.
J. F. Butler, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist)
W. T. Callaway, M.S., Asst. Prof. Emeritus (Asst. Nematologist Emeritus);
Coll.
P. S. Callahan, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist); USDA, Gainesville
M. M. Cole, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist); USDA, Gainesville
H. L. Cromroy, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist); Radiology; Coll.
D. A. Dame, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist); USDA
G. W. Dekle, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist); DPI
H. A. Denmark, M.S., Prof. (Entomologist); DPI
R. P. Esser, Asst. Prof. (Asst. Nematologist); DPI
A. G. P. Fairchild, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist)
I. H. Gilbert, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist); USDA, Gainesville
I. H. Gouck, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist); USDA, Gainesville
D. H. Habeck, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist); liaison with Veg.
Crops; also Coll.
L. A. Hetrick, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist); Coll.
S. H. Kerr, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist); liaison with Orn. Hort.; also Coll.
L. C. Kuitert, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist); liaison with Agronomy; also
Coll.
G. C. LaBrecque, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist); USDA, Gaines-
ville
K. R. Langdon, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Nematologist); DPI
W. J. Lewis, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Nematologist); USDA, Tifton, Ga.
P. Lingren, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist), USDA, Quincy, Fla.
J. E. Lloyd, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist)
C. F. Lofgren, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist); USDA, Gainesville
R. E. Lowe, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist); USDA, Gainesville
F. O. Marzke, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist); USDA, Gainesville
M. S. Mayer, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist); USDA, Gainesville
F. W. Mead, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist); DPI
E. P. Merkel, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist); USDA, Olustee
E. R. Mitchell, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist), USDA
P. B. Morgan, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist); USDA, Gainesville
G. A. Mount, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist); USDA, Gainesville
Milledge Murphey, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist); Coll.
J. L. Nation, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist)
J. H. O'Bannon, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist); USDA, Orlando, Fla.
Herbert Oberlander, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist), USDA
B. J. Patterson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist); USDA, Gainesville
V. G. Perry, Ph.D., (Nematologist); liaison with Fruit Crops; also Coll.
W. L. Peters, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist); FAMU
F. A. Robinson, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Apiculturist)
J. A. Seawright, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist); USDA
D. Silhacek, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist); USDA, Gainesville
G. C. Smart, Jr., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Nematologist); liaison with
Soils; also Coll.
W. W. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist)











B. J. Smittle, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist); USDA, Gainesville
N. R. Spencer, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist), USDA
T. E. Summers, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist); USDA, Canal
Point
A. N. Tissot, Ph.D., Prof. Emeritus (Entomologist Emeritus)
J. H. Tumlinson III, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist), USDA
K. W. Vick, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist), USDA
R. E. Waites, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist)
T. J. Walker, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist); Coll.
H. V. Weems, Jr., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc Entomologist); DPI
D. E. Weidhaas, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist); USDA, Gainesville
M. J. Westfall, Jr., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist); Biological
Sciences; also Coll.
W. H. Whitcomb, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist)
B. R. Wiseman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Nematologist); Tifton, Ga.
R. C. Wilkinson, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist); liaison with Forestry
W. W. Wirth, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist), USDA, Washington
R. E. Woodruff, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist); DPI



FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT
1157 McCarty Hall, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1826

K. R. Tefertiller, Ph.D., Prof. (Agr. Economist) and Chairman; also Coll.
and Ext.
D. E. Alleger, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agr. Economist)
C. L. Anderson, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Assistant Area Farm Management
Specialist); also Ext., Lake Alfred
C. O. Andrew, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agr. Economist)
H. D. Brodnax, M.S., Instructor (Asst. in Agr. Economics), USDA
D. L. Brooke, Ph.D., Prof. (Agr. Economist); liaison with Veg. Crops
J. R. Brooker, M.S.A., Instructor (Asst. in Agr. Economics), USDA
T. L. Brooks, Jr., B.S., Instructor (Asst. in Agr. Economics), DC
J. C. Cato, M.S., Instructor (Asst. in Agr. Economics), USDA
H. B. Clark, Ph.D., Prof. (Agr. Economist), Coll.
J. R. Conner, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Economist)
C. G. Davis, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Economist)
J. K. Dow, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Economist)
B. R. Eddleman, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agr. Economist)
R. D. Emerson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Economist)
G. F. Fairchild, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Economist), DC
K. C. Gibbs, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Economist)
R. E. L. Greene, Ph.D., Prof. (Agr. Economist); liaison with Ani. Sci.;
also Coll.
J. R. Greenman, B.S.A., J.D., Prof. (Agr. Economist); also Coll.
G. T. Harris, M.S., Instructor (Asst. in Agr. Economics), USDA
T. S. Hipp, M.Ag., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Area Farm Management Specialist);
also Ext., Bradenton
M. R. Langham, Ph.D., Prof. (Agr. Economist); also Coll.
W. B. Lester, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Research Economist), DC
E. T. Loehman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Economist)
W. K. McPherson, M.S. Prof. (Agr. Economist); liaison with Ani. Sci.;
also Coll.
W. W. McPherson, Ph.D., Graduate Research Professor










W. T. Menasco, M.Ag., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Area Farm Management Spe-
cialist); also Ext., Quincy
L. H. Myers, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Economist), DC
J. E. Mullins, B.S., Prof. (Agr. Statistician), USDA, Orlando
C. E. Murphree, D.P.A., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agr. Economist); liaison with
Forestry; also Coll.
J. L. Pearson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Economist), USDA
L. Polopolus, Ph.D., Prof. (Agr. Economist)
A. A. Prato, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Economist)
F. J. Prochaska, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Economist)
J. E. Reynolds, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agr. Economist)
G. N. Rose, B.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agr. Economist), Orlando
C. N. Smith, Ph.D., Prof. (Agr. Economist); liaison with Orn. Hort.;
also Coll.
A. H. Spurlock, M.S.A., Prof. (Agr. Economist); liaison with Fruit Crops
J. H. Stafford, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agr. Economist)
F. H. Tyner, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agr. Economist)
W. C. Walden, M.S., Ifstructor (Asst. in Agr. Economics), USDA
C. Walker, M.E., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Area Farm Management Specialist);
also Ext., Belle Glade
R. W. Ward, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Research Economist), FOC
G. A. Zepp, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Economist), USDA

(See also liaison appointments in Departments of Agronomy, Forest Resources,
Ornamental Horticulture.)







FOOD SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
McCarty Hall, North Building, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1991

R. A. Dennison, Ph.D., Prof. (Food Scientist) and Chairman; also Coll. and
Ext.
E. M. Ahmed, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Food Scientist); also Coll.
H. Appledorf, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Nutritionist); also Coll.
R. P. Bates, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Food Scientist); also Coll. and Ext.
R. H. Dougherty, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Food Scientist); also Coll.
F. W. Knapp, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Food Scientist); liaison with Ani.
Sci.; also Coll.
J. A. Koburger, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Food Microbiologist); also Coll.
R. F. Matthews, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Food Scientist); also Ext.
V. T. Mendenhall, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Food Scientist); also Coll. and
Ext.
H. A. Moye, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Chemist); also Coll.
R. C. Robbins, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Biochemist); also Coll.
N. P. Thompson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Biochemist); also Coll.
C. H. Van Middelem, Ph.D., Prof. (Biochemist)
W. B. Wheeler, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Biochemist); also Coll.

(See also liaison appointments in Departments of Agricultural Engineering,
Animal Science, Dairy Science.)










FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT
305 Rolfs Hall, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1792

J. L. Gray, D.F., Prof. (Forester) and Chairman; also Coll.
G. W. Bengston, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Forester), TVA, Muscle Shoals,
Alabama; also Coll.
R. H. Brendemuehl, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Forester), USFS; also Coll.
G. W. Cornwell, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Forester); also Coll.
P. W. Frazer, M.F., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Forester); also Coll.
R. E. Goddard, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Geneticist) also Coll.
J. B. Huffman, D.F., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Forester); also Coll.
C. M. Kaufman, Ph.D., Prof. (Forester); liaison with Ani. Sci.; also Coll.
J. W. Miller, Jr., M.S.F., Prof. (Forester); also Coll.
D. M. Post, M.S.F., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Forester); also Coll.
R. A. Schmidt, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. ('Asst. Forester); liaison with Plant Path-
ology; also Coll.
W. H. Smith, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Forester); liaison with Soils; also
Coll.
A. E. Squillace, Ph.D., Prof. (Forester); USDA, Olustee; also Coll.
R. G. Stanley, Ph.D., Prof. (Forest Physiologist); also Coll.
R. K. Strickland, M.S.F., Int. Research Associate; also Coll.
E. T. Sullivan, D.F., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Forester); liaison with Agr.
Econ.; also Coll.
K. R. Swinford, Ph.D., Prof. (Forester); also Coll.
L. H. White, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Forester); also Coll.

(See also liaison appointments in Departments of Agricultural Engineering,
Agronomy, Entomology and Nematology, Food and Resource Economics,
Soil Science.)


FRUIT CROPS DEPARTMENT
1189 McCarty Hall, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1996

A. H. Krezdorn, Ph.D., (Horticulturist) and Chairman; also Coll. and
Ext.
J. F. Bartholic, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Climatologist)
R. H. Biggs, Ph.D., Prof. (Biochemist); also Coll.
D. W. Buchanan, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist); also Coll.
R. H. Sharpe, M.S., Prof. (Horticulturist)
W. B. Sherman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist); also Coll.
J. Soule, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist); also Coll.
W. J. Wilbank, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist); also Coll.

(See also liaison appointments in Departments of Agricultural Engineering,
Entomology and Nematology, Food and Resource Economics, Food
Science, Plant Pathology, Soil Science.)


MICROBIOLOGY DEPARTMENT
1053 McCarty Hall, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1906

Max E. Tyler, Ph.D., Prof. (Bacteriologist) and Chairman; also Coll.
A. S. Bleiweis, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Bacteriologist); also Coll.








D. E. Duggan, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Bacteriologist); also Coll. and
Biological Sciences
E. M. Hoffman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Bacteriologist); also Coll.
D. S. Nasser, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Bacteriologist); also Coll
J. F. Preston, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Bacteriologist); also Coll.
E. P. Previc, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Bacteriologist); also Coll.
P. H. Smith, Ph.D., Prof. (Bacteriologist); also Coll.

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE DEPARTMENT
105 Rolfs Hall, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1831

J. W. Strobel, Ph.D., Prof. (Ornamental Horticulturist); and Chairman; also
Coll. and Ext.
R. D. Dickey, M.S.A., Prof. (Ornamental Horticulturist)
G. C. Horn, Ph.D., Prof. (Ornamental Horticulturist); liaison with Soils;
also Coll.
J. N. Joiner, Ph.D., Prof. (Ornamental Hortciulturist); also Coll.
S. E. McFadden, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Ornamental Horticulturist);
liaison with Plant Path.
T. J. Sheehan, Ph.D., Prof. (Ornamental Horticulturist)
C. E. Whitcomb, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Ornamental Horticulturist)

(See also liaison appointments in Departments of Entomology and Nema-
tology, Food and Resource Economics, Plant Pathology, Soil Science.)

PLANT PATHOLOGY DEPARTMENT
Building 833, Radio Road, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1861

L. H. Purdy, Ph.D., (Plant Pathologist) and Chairman; also Coll. and Ext.
L. J. Alexander, Ph.D., Visiting Professor (Plant Pathologist)
S. A. Alfieri, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist); DPI
J. A. Bartz, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)
H. C. Burnett, M.S., (Plant Pathologist); DPI
A. A. Cook, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist); liaison with Veg. Crops
Phares Decker, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Patholgoist)
T. E. Freeman, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist); liaison with Orn. Hort.
S. M. Garnesy, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Plant Pathologist); USDA
E. Hiebert, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)
H. H. Luke, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist); liaison with Agronomy,
USDA
J. W. Miller, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist); DPI
H. N. Miller, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist); liaison with Orn. Hort.
D. J. Mitchell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)
D. R. Pring, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist); USDA
D. E. Purcifull, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Virologist)
W. H. Ridings, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist); DPI
D. A. Roberts, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist); Call.
N. C. Schenck, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist)
C. P. Seymour, M.S., Prof. (Plant Pathologist); DPI
R. E. Stall, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist); liaison with Veg. Crops; Coll.
F. W. Zettler, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Virologist)

(See also liaison appointments in Departments of Agronomy, Forest
Resources, Ornamental Horticulture.)










OULTRY SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
Archer Road, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1931

H. Harms, Ph.D., Prof. (Poultry Nutritionist) and Chairman; also Coll.
and Ext.
SL. Damron, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Nutritionist); also Coll.
. L. Fry, Ph.D., Prof. (Poultry Products Technologist); also Coll. and Ext.
.T. McCready, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Poultry Products Technologist)
. A. Roland, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Poultry Scientist)
.Voitle, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Poultry Physiologist)
. R. Wilson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Poultry Physiologist); also Coll.

See also liaison appointments in Departments of Animal Science, Food
Science, Soil Science, Veterinary Science.)






OIL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
106 Newell Hall, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1804

.F. Eno, Ph.D., Prof. (Soil Microbiologist) and Chairman; also Coll. and
Ext.
G. Blue, Ph.D., Prof. (Biochemist); liaison with Ani. Sci.; also Coll.
L. Breland, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Soil Chemist); also Coll.
.E. Caldwell, Ph.D., Prof. (Soil Chemist); also Coll.
.W. Carlisle, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Soil Chemist); also Coll.
. L. Coultas, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Soil Chemist); FAMU
. G. A. Fiskell, Ph.D., Prof. (Biochemist); liaison with Veg. Crops; also
Coll.
Gammon, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. (Soil Chemist); liaison with Fruit Crops;
also Coll.
.A. Graetz, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Soil Environmentalist): also Coll.
. C. Hammond, Ph.D., Prof. (Soil Physicist); liaison with Agr. Eng.; also
Coll. and Collaborator with USDA
. C. Hortenstine, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Soil Chemist)
SH. Hubbell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Soil Microbiologist); also Coll.
.S. Mansell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Soil Physicist); also Coll.
. L. Pritchett, Ph.D., Prof. (Soil Chemist); liaison with Forestry; also
Coll.
.K. Robertson, Ph.D., Prof. (Soil Chemist); liaison with Agron.
. F. Rothwell, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Soil Microbiologist); liaison
with Poultry; also Coll.
. G. Thompson, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. (Soil Chemist)
.M. Volk, Ph.D., Prof. (Soil Chemist); liaison with Orn. Hort.; also Coll.
. W. Winsor, B.S.A., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Chemist)
L. Yuan, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Chemist)
W. Zelazny, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Soil Chemist); also Coll.

ee also liaison appointments in Departments of Agronomy, Animal
Science, Entomology and Nematology, Forest Resources, Ornamental
Horticulture.)










STATISTICS DEPARTMENT
G175 McCarty Hall, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1941

William Mendenhall, Ph.D., Prof. (Statistician) and Chairman
J. A. Cornell, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Statistician)
F. G. Martin, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Statistician)
J. I. Thornby, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Statistician)



VEGETABLE CROPS DEPARTMENT
3026 McCarty Hall, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1794

G. A. Marlowe, Ph.D., (Horticulturist) and Chairman; also Coll. and Ext.
M. J. Bassett, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist)
D. D. Gull, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. HIorticulturist)
C. B. Hall, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist)
L. H. Halsey, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Horticulturist)
J. R. Hicks, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Veg. Crops Specialist); also Ext.
S. J. Locascio, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist); also Coll.
A. P. Lorz, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist); also Coll.
V. F. Nettles, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist); also Coll.
R. K. Showalter, M.S., Prof. (Horticulturist)
B. D. Thompson, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist); also Coll.

(See also liaison appointments in Departments of Agricultural Engineering,
Entomology and Nematology, Food and Resource Economics, Food
Science, Plant Pathology, Soil Science.)



VETERINARY SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
Archer Road, 32601
Phone 904, 392-1841

C. F. Simpson, D.V.M., Ph.D., Prof. (Pathologist) and Acting Chairman;
liaison with Poultry Sci., also Coll. and Ext.
R. E. Bradley, D.V.M., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Parasitologist); liaison
with Animal Sci.; also Coll.
P. T. Cardeilhac, D.V.M., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Pharmacologist); also
Coll.
D. E. Cooperrider, D.V.M., M.S., Prof. (Parasitologist); Fla. Dept. Agri-
culture
G. T. Edds, D.V.M., Ph.D., Prof. (Veterinarian); also Coll.
D. J. Forrester, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Parasitologist)
E. C. Harland, D.V.M., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Veterinarian); liaison with Ani-
mal Science
J. A. Himes, V.M.D., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Pharmacologist); liaison
with Food Sci., also Coll.
R. F. Jackson, D.V.M., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Veterinarian), Veterinary
Practice
K. D. Ley, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Virologist)
F. C. Neal, D.V.M., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Veterinarian); liaison with Dairy
Sci.: also Coll.










J. T. Neilson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Parasitologist)
W. M. Taylor, Jr., D.V.M., M.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Microbiologist), Fort
Lauderdale
F. H. White, Ph.D., Prof. (Bacteriologist); liaison with Dairy Sci.; also
Coll.

(See also liaison appointments in Department of Animal Science.)








AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTERS




AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER
BELLE GLADE
P. O. Drawer A, Belle Glade 33430
Phone 305, 996-3062
(See also Agricultural Research Center at Ft. Pierce.)

D. W. Beardsley, Ph.D., Prof. (Animal Nutritionist) and Center Director
R. J. Allen, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Pi'of. (Asst. Agronomist)
R. D. Berger, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)
H. W. Burdine, Ph.D., Prof. (Soil Chemist)
T. W. Casselman, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agricultural Engineer)
D. B. Churchill, B.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agricultural Engineer); USDA
J. E. Clayton, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agricultural Engineer); USDA
J. R. Crockett, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Animal Geneticist)
J. L. Dean, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Plant Pathologist); USDA
W. W. Deen, Jr., M.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agricultural Engineer)
G. J. Gascho, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Nutritionist)
J. P. Gentry, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agricultural Engineer); USDA
W. G. Genung, M.S., Prof. (Entomologist)
C. O. Grassl, M.A., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Botanist); USDA
V. L. Guzman, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist)
B. W. Hayes, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Animal Nutritionist)
L. P. Hebert, Ph.D., Prof. (Agronomist); USDA
N. I. James, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agronomist); USDA
M. J. Janes, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist)
S. R. Johnson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Nematologist)
J. D. Miller, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist); USDA
J. R. Orsenigo, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Physiologist)
F. M. Pate, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Animal Nutritionist)
G. J. Raleigh, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist), Fla. Lettuce, Inc.
E. R. Rice, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agronomist); USDA
G. H. Snyder, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Soil Chemist)
T. E. Summers, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist); USDA
B. G. Volk, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Soils Chemist)
E. A. Wolf, M.S., Prof. (Horticulturist)
T. A. Zitter, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)











AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER
BRADENTON
5007 60th St. East, Bradenton 33505
Phone 813, 755-1568
(See also Agricultural Research Centers at Dover and Immokalee.)

W. E. Waters, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist) and Center Director
D. S. Burgis, M.S.A., Assoc Prof. (Assoc. Horticulturist)
J. P. Crill, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)
A. W. Engelhard, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Plant Pathologist)
C. M. Geraldson, Ph.D., Prof. (Soil Chemist)
T. S. Hipp, M.Ag., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Area Farm Management Specialist),
Ext.
J. P. Jones, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist)
R. 0. Magie, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist)
F. J. Marousky, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist), USDA
Amegda J. Overman, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Nematologist)
S. L. Poe, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist)
J. C. Raulston, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Ornamental Horticulturist)
G. J. Wilfret, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Geneticist)
S. S. Woltz, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Physiologist)




AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER
HOMESTEAD
18905 S.W. 280th Street, Homestead 33030
Phone 305, 247-4624

R. A. Conover, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist) and Center Director
R. M. Baranowski, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist)
H. H. Bryan, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist)
C. W. Campbell, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist)
S. E. Malo, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist)
R. B. Marlatt, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist)
R. T. McMillan,.Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)
P. G. Orth, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Soil Chemist)
R. B. Volin, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)
D. O. Wolfenbarger, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist)
T. W. Young, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist)




AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER
LAKE ALFRED
P. O. Box 1088. Lake Alfred 33850
Phone 813, 956-1151
(See also Agricultural Research Center at Ft. Pierce.)

H. J. Reitz, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist) and Center Director
L. G. Albrigo, Ph.D:, Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist)
C. A. Anderson, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Soil Chemist)
C. D. Atkins, B.S., Prof. (Chemist), DC
J. A. Attaway, Ph.D., Prof. (Chemist), DC











R. W. Barron, B.A., Instructor (Assistant in Chemistry), DC
J. G. Blair, B.S.M.E., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Mechanical Engineer), DC
R. J. Braddock, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Food Scientist)
R. F. Brooks, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist)
G. E. Brown, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Plant Pathologist), DC
B. S. Buslig, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Biochemist), DC
G. E. Coppock, M.S., Prof. (Agricultural Engineer), DC
D. L. Deason, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Engineer)
M. H. Dougherty, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Chemical Engineer), DC
E. P. DuCharme, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist)
G. J. Edwards, B.A., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Biochemist)
A. W. Feldman, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist)
P. J. Fellers, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Food Technologist), DC
Francine E. Fisher, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathloogist)
J. F. Fisher, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Chemist), DC
H. W. Ford, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist)
Dennis Gonsolves, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)
H. B. Graves, Jr., Ph.D., Instructor (Assistant in Chemistry)
William Grierson, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist)
R. W. Hanks, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Physiologist)
F. W. Hayword, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Biochemist)
Pamela K. Hearon, B.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Librarian)
S. L. Hedden, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agricultural Engineer), USDA
E. C. Hill, B.S.A., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Bacteriologist), DC
R. L. Huggart, B.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Chemist), DC
M.A.-R. Ismail, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist), DC
R. B. Johnson, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist)
J. W. Kesterson, M.S., Prof. (Chemist)
R. C. J. Koo, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist)
C. D. Leonard, Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulturist)
S. K. Long, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Industrial Bacteriologist)
A. A. McCornack, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Horticulturist), DC
C. W. McCoy, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist)
M. D. Maraulja, B.S., Instructor (Assistant in Chemistry), DC
E. L. Moore, Ph.D., Prof. (Chemist), DC
W. F. Newhall, Ph.D., Prof. (Biochemist)
R. W. Olsen, B.S., Prof. (Biochemist)
D. R. Petrus, M.S., Instructor (Asst. in Chemistry), DC
R. L. Phillips, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist)
A. P. Pieringer, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist)
R. L. Reese, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist)
A. H. Rouse, M.S., Prof. (Chemist)
W. A. Simanton, Ph.D., Prof. (Entomologist)
Ivan Stewart, Ph.D., Prof. (Biochemist)
H. R. Sumner, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agr. Engineer), USDA
A. C. Tarjan, Ph.D., Prof. (Nematologist)
S. V. Ting, Ph.D., Prof. (Biochemist), DC
F. W. Wenzel, Ph.D., Prof. (Food Scientist)
T. Adair Wheaton, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Horticulturist)
J. W. Whiteside, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Plant Pathologist)
J. D. Whitney, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agricultural Engineer)
W. C. Wilson, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Physiologist), DC
R. W. Wolford, M.A., Prof. (Chemist), DC








AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER
QUINCY
P. O. Box 470, Quincy 32351
Phone 904, 627-9236
(See also Agricultui-al Research Center at Marianna.)

W. H. Chapman, M.S., Prof. (Agronomist) and Center Director
J. B. Aitken, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist)
F. S. Baker, Jr., M.S.A., Prof. (Animal Husbandman)
R. D. Barnett, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agronomist)
D. R. Davis, A.B., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Meteorologist), USWB
G. L. Greene, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist)
R. R. Kincaid, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist)
F. M. Rhoads, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Soil Chemist)
R. L. Stanley, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agronomist)
W. B. Tappan, M.S.A., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist)


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER
SANFORD
Box 909, Sanford 32771
Phone 305, 322-4134

J. F. Darby, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist) and Center Director
R. B. Forbes, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Soil Chemist)
H. L. Rhoades, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Nematologist)
W. T. Scudder. Ph.D., Prof. (Horticulutrist)
B. M. Shepard, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (A'sst. Entomologist)
J. O. Strandberg, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)







AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTERS



AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, APOPKA
Rt. #1, Box 980, State Rd. 437, Apopka 32703
Phone 305, 889-4161

C. A. Conover, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Ornamental Horticulturist)
and Center Director
J. F. Knauss, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant .Pathologist)
R. T. Poole, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Plant Physiologist)



BROOKSVILLE BEEF CATTLE RESEARCH STATION, USDA
Brooksville 33512
Phone 904, 796-3385

W. C. Burns, M.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Animal Husbandman) and Center
Director, USDA








AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, DOVER
Route 2, Box 629, Dover 33527
Phone 813, 752-7649
(See also Agricultural Research and Education Center, Bradenton.)

E. E. Albregts, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Soils Chemist)
C. M. Howard, Ph.D., Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)



AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, FT. LAUDERDALE
3205 S. W. 70th Avenue, Fort Lauderdale 33314
Phone 305, 584-6992; USDA, 583-5541; D.V.M., 525-0611, Ext. 249

B. L. James, Ph.D., Prof. (Ornamental Horticulturist) and Center Director
R. D. Blackburn, M.S., Assoc. Prof.' (Assoc. Agronomist), USDA
E. O. Burt, Ph.D., Prof. (Ornamental Horticulturist)
A. E. Dudeck, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Ornamental Horticulturist)
R. E. McCoy, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)
P. L. Neel, III, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Ornamental Horticulturist)
J. A. Reinert, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist)
K. K. Steward, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst Plant Physiologist), USDA
D. L. Sutton, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agronomist)
W. M. Taylor, Jr., D.V.M., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Microbiologist)



AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, FT. PIERCE
Box 248, Ft. Pierce 33450
Phone 305, 461-6193

Research faculty affiliated with Belle Glade Center
Phone 305, 461-6193

N. C. Hayslip, B.S.A., Prof. (Entomologist)
J. B. Brolmann, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agronomist)
A. E. Kretschmer, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. (Agronomist)
H. Y. Ozaki, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Horticulturist)
R. M. Sonoda, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)

Research faculty affiliated with Lake Alfred Center
Phone 305, 461-4371, 464-6017

Mortimer Cohen, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist)
R. C. Bullock, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist)
D. V. Calvert, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Soil Chemist)
E. H. Stewart, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Soil Physicist), USDA


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, HASTINGS
Box 728, Hastings 32045
Phone 904, 692-1792

D. R. Hensel, Ph.D., Prof. (Soil Chemist) and Center Director
J. R. Shumaker, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist)
D. P. Weingartner, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)
R. B. Workman, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist)









AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, IMMOKALEE
Rt. 1, Box 2G, Immokalee 33934
Phone 813, 657-2835, 657-2237
(See also Agricultural Research and Education Center, Bradenton.)

P. H. Everett, Ph.D., Prof. (Soil Chemist)
C. H. Blazquez, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, JAY
Route 3, Jay 32565
Phone 904, 994-5215, 994-7373

C. E. Hutton, Ph.D., Prof. (Soil Chemist) and Center Director
J. E. Bertrand, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Animal Scientist)
L. S. Dunavin, Jr., Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agronomist)
R. A. Kinloch, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Nematologist)
M. C. Lutrick, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Soil Chemist)
R. L. Smith, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agronomist)




NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AND UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, LAKELAND
Box 1068, Lakeland 33802
Phone 813, 682-4221

J. G. Georg, M.S.A., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Meteorologist) and Center Director,
NWS
L. L. Benson, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Meteorologist), NWS
J. L. Burleson, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Meteorologist), NWS
G. R. Davis, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Meteorologist), NWS
R. M. Hinson, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Meteorologist), NWS
G. W. Leber, Asst. Prof. (Asst. Meteorologist), NWS
W. F. Mincey, Asst. Prof. (Asst. Meteorologist), NWS
O. N. Norman, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Meteorologist), NWS
R. T. Sherouse, Asst. Prof. (Asst. Meteorologist), NWS
W. R. Wallis, B.S., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Meteorologist), NWS
H. E. Yates, Asst. Prof. (Asst. Meteorologist), NWS





AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, LEESBURG
Box 388, Leesburg 32748
Phone 904, 787-3423

J. M. Crall, Ph.D., Prof. (Plant Pathologist) and Center Director
W. C. Adlerz, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Entomologist)
Carlos Balerdi, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist)
C. H. Curran, D.Sc., Prof. (Entomologist)
G. W. Elmstrom, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Horticulturist)
D. L. Hopkins, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)
J. A. Mortensen, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Geneticist)










AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, LIVE OAK
Box 657, Live Oak 32060
Phone 904, 362-1725

H. W. Lundy, B.S.A., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Agronomist) and Center Director
R. H. Houser, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Animal Nutritionist)



AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, MARIANNA
Box 878, Marianna 32446
Phone 904, 594-3241
(See also Agricultural Research and Education Center, Quincy.)

D. W. Gorbet. Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agronomist)
J. C. McCall, M.A.E., Asst. Prof. (Area Rural Areas Development Specialist)
P. E. Vipperman, Jr., Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Animal Nutritionist)


AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, MONTICELLO
Route 3, Box 213B, Monticello 32344
Phone 904, 997-2597

H. W. Young, Ph.D., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Horticulturist) and Center
Director
S. S. Fluker, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Entomologist)
W. J. French, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Plant Pathologist)



AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER, ONA
Ona 33865
Phone 813, 735-3121

H. L. Chapman, Jr., Ph.D., Prof. (Animal Nutritionist) and Center Director
C. L. Dantzman, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Soil Chemist)
E. M. Hodges, Ph.D., Prof. (Agronomist)
W. G. Kirk, Ph.D., Prof. Emeritus (Animal Scientist Emeritus)
P. Mislevy, Ph.D., Asst. Prof. (Asst. Agronomist)
F. M. Peacock, M.S., Assoc. Prof. (Assoc. Animal Husbandman)








STAFF CHANGES



Appointments

George E. Allen, Professor, Ent. Dept., Oct. 16, 1971
Ross H. Arnett, Entomologist, Ent. Dept., Apr. 1, 1971, Courtesy
Kermit Correll Bachman, Assistant Biochemist, Dairy Sci. Dept., Sept. 1, 1971
Jon F. Bartholic, Associate Professor, Fruit Crops Dept., Aug. 1, 1971
Margaret Stella Browner, Interim Assistant in Entomology, Ent. Dept., Jan.
30, 1971
Frank G. Calhoun, Assistant Professor, Soil Sci. Dept., Sept. 1, 1971
Mallasheppa Chikkagoudar, Associate Professor, Statistics, July 1, 1971
Donald B. Churchill, Associate Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, Aug. 1, 1971,
Courtesy
Charles Albert Conover, Assistant Ornamental Horticulturist, ARC, Apopka, Jan.
1, 1971
Charles Edward Cornelius, Professor, Vet. Sci. Dept., July 1, 1971, Courtesy
Jack Lemuel Dean, Associate Plant Pathologist, AREC, Belle Glade, Apr. 1, 1971
Katherine Ewel, Post Doctorate Associate, Botany Dept., Aug. 20, 1971
Gary F. Fairchild, Assistant Professor, Food and Res. Econ. Dept., June 1, 1971,
Courtesy
Joe Perry Gentry, Associate Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, Aug. 1, 1971, Courtesy
Alvan R. Gilmore, Visiting Professor, Forestry Dept., Sept. 1, 1971
Leonard Jay Goldman, Interim Assistant, Ent.*Dept., July 17, 1971
Donald A. Graetz, Assistant Professor, Soil Sci. Dept., July 1, 1971
Carl O. Grassl, Associate Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, Apr. 1, 1971, Courtesy
Lee P. Herbert, Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, Apr. 1, 1971, Courtesy
James Russell Hicks, Assistant Vegetable Crops Specialist, Veg. Crops Dept.,
Mar. 1, 1971
Norman I. James Associate Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, Apr. 1, 1971, Courtesy
Bernard E. Kane, Jr., Post Doctorate Associate, Fruit Crops Dept., July 1, 1971
James Robert Kirk, Assistant Biochemist, Dairy Sci. Dept., July 1, 1971
Richard Levy, Assistant in Entomology, Ent. Dept., Nov. 13, 1971
Kenneth D. Ley, Assistant Professor, Vet. Sci. Dept., Jan. 1, 1971
Peter D. Lingren, Assistant Professor, Ent. Dept., Apr. 1, 1971, Courtesy
Paul Bain Martin, Associate in Entomology, AREC, Quincy, Aug. 16, 1971
Randolph Edward McCoy, Assistant Plant Pathologist, ARC, Ft. Lauderdale Sept.
15, 1971
Stuart Theodore McCready, Assistant Poultry Prod. Tech., Poultry Sci. Dept.,
July 15, 1971
J.D. Miller, Assistant Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, Apr. 1, 1971, Courtesy
Paul Mislevy, Assistant Professor, ARC, Ona, Nov. 1, 1971
David James Mitchell, Assistant Professor, Plant Pathology Dept., Sept, 1, 1971
Everett Royal Mitchell, Associate Professor, Ent. Dept., Aug. 1, 1971, Courtesy
Wendell Lee Morrill, Interim Assistant, Ent. Dept., Aug. 1, 1971
Percy Landreth Neel, III, Assistant Ornamental Horticulturist, ARC, Ft. Lauderdal
July 15, 1971
Thomas V. Nickless, Interim Assistant Instructor, Veg. Crops Dept., May 10, 1971
Herbert Oberlander, Associate Professor, Ent. Dept., Aug. 1, 1971, Courtesy
Sherleen L. Oldacre, Instructor, Ent. Dept., Nov. 1, 1971
Andrew Jackson Oswald, Manager, Florida Foundation Seed Producers, Inc., Res. Adm
Sept. 11, 1971
Edwin Ray Rice, Assistant Agronomist, AREC, Belle Glade, Apr. 1, 1971, Courtesy
William H. Ridings, II, Assistant Professor, Plant Pathology Dept., July 1, 1971,
Courtesy
Andrew J. Rogers, Professor, Ent. Dept., July 1, 1971, Courtesy
Harry H. Samol, Assistant Professor, AREC, Belle Glade, Dec. 1, 1971,Courtesy
Buford Merle Shepard, Assistant Professor, AREC, Sanford, Sept. 27, 1971
W. Kenneth Turner, Assistant Agricultural Engineer, Ag. Eng. Dept., Jan. 1, 1971,
Courtesy
Raymond Bradford Volin, Interim Assistant Professor, AREC, Homestead, Abg. 15, 19;
Walter C. Walden, Assistant Professor, Food and Res. Econ. Dept., Aug. 1, 1971,
Courtesy
J.C. Webb, Assistant Agricultural Engineer, Ag. Eng. Dept., Jan. 1, 1971, Courtesl
Minter J. Westfall, Associate Professor, Ent. Dept., July 1, 1971, Courtesy



Promotions

Robert F. Brooks, Professor, AREC, Lake Alfred, July 1, 1971
Bela S. Buslig, Assistant Professor, AREC, Lake Alfred, July 1,. 1971, Courtesy
James W. Carpenter, Professor, Ani. Sci. Dept., July 1, 1971
Charles A. Conover, Associate Professor, ARC, Apopka, July 1, 1971
John F. Gerber, Assistant Dean and Professor, Res. Adm., July 1, 1971
Henry H. Head, Associate Professor, Dairy Sci. Sept., July 1, 1971
Kuell Hinson, Professor, Agronomy Dept., July 1, 1971









Simon E. Malo, Associate Professor, AREC, Homestead, July 1, 1971
Hugh A. Moye, Associate Professor, Food Sci. Dept., July 1, 1971
Allan J. Norden, Professor, Agronomy Dept., July 1, 1971
Paul L. Pfahler, Professor, Agronomy Dept., July 1, 1971
John E. Reynolds, Associate Professor, Food and Res. Econ. Dept., July 1, 1971
Donald F. Rothwell, Professor, Soils Dept., July 1, 1971
Charles J. Wilcox, Professor, Dairy Sci. Dept., July 1, 1971
Robert C. Wilkinson, Jr., Professor, Ent. Dept., July 1, 1971


Resignations

Dallas E. Fox, Interim Assistant, Ag. Eng. Dept., Feb. 28, 1971
James E. Giles, Interim Assistantk Food and Res. Econ., Mar. 31, 1971
John C. Glenn, Associate Professor, Ani. Sci. Dept., Sept. 15, 1971
Wayne William Hanna, Assistant Agronomist, Agronomy Dept., Apr. 30, 1971
William T. Manley, Associate Professor, Food and Res. Econ. Dept., June 30, 1971
Archibald E.C. McIntyre, Manager, Florida Foundation Seed Producers, Inc., Res.
Adm., Aug. 31, 1971
Lawrence A. Reuss, Interim Professor, Food and Res. Econ. Dept., Feb. 28, 1971
Donald Stevenson, Professor, Forestry Dept., Nov. 30, 1971
Benigno Villalon, Assistant Plant Pathologist, AREC, Homestead, Jan. 22, 1971


Retirements

Stephen L. Beckwith, Associate Forester, Forestry Dept., Mar. 31, 1971, Emeritus
Huey Ingles Borders, Plant Pathologist, ARC, Ft. Lauderdale, Aug. 1, 1971
Rollo H. Dean, Assistant Meteorologist, ARC, Lakeland, May 15, 1971
Roy Wendell Harkness, Associate Chemist, AREC, Homestead, June 30, 1971
ouis Carl Knorr, Plant Pathologist, AREC, Lake Alfred, June 30, 1971
artin H. Muma, Entomologist, AREC, Lake Alfred, August 31, 1971
Ross Frisbie Suit, Plant Pathologist, AREC, Lake Alfred, Apr. 1, 1971
Ivin T. Wallace, Assistant Dean, Res. Adm., Mar. 31, 1971
ornelius Wehlburg, Professor, Plant Pathology Dept., July 1, 1971, Courtesy
hillip J. Westgate, Horticulturist, AREC, Sanford, Apr. 30, 1971


Terminations

Roy D. Bond, Visiting Professor, Soils Dept., Jan. 31, 1971
ernon Cunningham, Instructor, Forestry Dept., July 1, 1971
arl Farler, Interim Assistant, Food and Res. Econ., Sept. 15, 1971
raig H. Lampe, Post Doctorate Associate, Fruit Crops Dept., May 7, 1971
onald A. Lindquist, Professor, Ent. Dept., July 31, 1971, Courtesy
arol Raymond Miller, Assistant Professor, Plant Pathology Dept., July 31, 1971
ames L. Overman, Interim Associate, Dairy Sci. Dept., May 31, 1971
ohn T. Raese, Assistant Professor, ARC, Monticello, Aug. 9, 1971


Deaths

ilson Thayer Calaway, Assistant Professor, Ag. Exp. Sta., Dec. 3, 1971, Emeritus
andall R. Kincaid, Professor, AREC, Quincy, Dec. 18, 1971
alph G. Leighty, Assoicate Soil Surveyor, Soil Sci. Dept., Apr. 6, 1971
ohn E. McCaleb, Associate Agronomist, ARC, Ona, June 4, 1971
illiam H. Speir, Assistant Professor, ARC, Ft. Lauderdale, Sept. 5, 1971
Ivin T. Wallace, Assistant Dean, Res. Adm., Apr. 18, 1971


Leaves of Absence

lortimer Cohen, Plant Pathologist, ARC, Ft. Pierce to Brazil, Apr. 15, 1971 to
July 15, 1971
homas Sheehan, Ornamental Horticulturist, Orn. Hort. Dept., Mar. 1, 1971, to
Mar. 31, 1971



Transfers

erdinand le Grand, Assistant Agronomist, from AREC, Belle Glade to Agronomy
Dept., Mar. 3, 1971








REPORT OF THE DEAN FOR RESEARCH


One of the major divisions of the Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences (IFAS) is agricultural research. Working closely with the extension
and resident instruction divisions, the agricultural research program is an
extensive statewide responsibility that no other university has in Florida. Not
only does the program perform large programs of research in the production,
distribution, and processing of farm and forest products, but it also has a
responsibility in the graduate research programs on and off the Gainesville
campus, and in cooperation with the extension division to extend the new research
knowledge and information to all segments of the industry and society.
Within the IFAS research program there are 19 departments at the University
of Florida in Gainesville and 21 research centers located throughout the state.
The many locations make possible research on different soils, under varying
climatic conditions, and on many commodities such as citrus, vegetables, field
crops, pastures, livestock, ornamentals, tropical fruits, and forests. While
production research receives the most attention, much time also is devoted to
research in processing, handling, marketing, utilization, engineering, and
economics, including basic research in all disciplines.
Work is continuing upon the development of the Horse Research Center at
Lowell. The major building program at this unit has not yet gotten under way,
but an architect has been appointed and an appropriation for all the major
research buildings has been obtained. Funds were not appropriated at this time
for those building in the vocational training part of the program. All land has
now been cleaned of timber and rocks. Line fences and some of the interior
fences are erected. Kind acknowledgement is made of assistance from the Marion
County Commissioners in providing equipment to help with the land cleaning. Dr.
Edward Ott, an animal nutritionist with considerable experience with horses, has
been employed to manage and give direction in the development of this new unit.
A statewide program planning and budgeting system has been developed for
the entire research program. This has been developed around major crops,
commodities, and services rather than disciplines, and this provides another
dimension for program evaluation which was not previously possible.
The entire research program of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations
is planned and conducted by use of formal written and approved projects which
document all research. The research program is primarily a mission-oriented effo
aimed at solving the problems of agriculture. As problems arise, new projects ar
initiated. When problems are solved, projects are terminated. At the present ti
there is a continuing trend toward greater team effort than in the past. Problem
are more difficult and require the interdisciplinary approach for best results.
As now problems arise and new projects are planned, they are carefully screened
and reviewed before activation. Maximum coordination now is achieved by close
working relations within the entire system of main station departments and
numerous research centers located throughout the state.
Because of the need for research on environmental problems, as many resource
as could be spared were shifted from conventional production problems to this are
To give greater emphasis, Dr. John F. Gerber in February 1971 was appointed
Assistant Dean to give leadership in the teaching, research, and extension effort
of IFAS in the area of natural resources and environmental quality.
It was with deep regret that we lost the services of Dr. Alvin T. Wallace,
Assistant Dean for Research, who passed away April 18, 1971.
More attention has also been given to human or sociological problems of
concern to agriculture. Basic data are being collected pertinent to water use,
credit, farm labor, and rural and community development.
The current research is reported to the public in many ways, primarily
through published articles, bulletins, and books In addition, much research is
reported at conferences and meetings. Within the organization many field days,
short courses, and conferences are held, to which the public is invited. These
held throughout the year at various departments and reserach centers.
Since projects reported here are arranged by departments and research
centers, the reader is referred to the index in order to obtain complete and
detailed information on a given question, topic, commodity, or process.
We hope you will find this report informative and useful.




SJohn W. Sites
Dean for Research









CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

As of December 1971, the following major buildings were either complete or
under contract:


Horse Research Center
Lowell Residence Complete

Main Station
Gainesville Swine Unit Relocation Complete


THESES AND DISSERTATIONS

1971

Agronomy Department

R. Wayne Baumann. "Effect of Growth Regulators on Morphological Characteristics,
Seed Quality, and Yield of Peanuts in Florida and Guyana." M.S.A. Thesis. June,
1971. A. J. Norden, Chairman.

Euro Bracho. "Effect of Soil pH and Calcium Sources on the Yield, Grade and
Mineral Composition of Virginia Botanical Type Peanuts." M.S.A. Thesis. August,
1971. A. J. Norden, Chairman.

Carlle Fllori. "Effect of Backcrossing on Correlations Among Seed Yield, Percent
Protein, Percent Oil, and Other Characters in Soybeans (Glycine max. (L).
Merrill)." M.S.A. Thesis. August, 1971. K. Hinson, Chairman,

Samuel M. Funnah. "Association of Grain Yield in Corn (Zea mays L.) with Duration
of Actual Grain Filling Period and Degree-Days Accumulation." M.S.A. Thesis.
December, 1971. E. S. Horner, Chairman.

William T. Haller. "Herbicide Evaluation and Phosphorus Uptake in Two Species of
Aquatic Plants." M.S.A. Thesis. June, 1971. E. G. Rodgers, Chairman.

Sirous Tamaddoni Jahromi. "Genetic Variation on Nutrient Absorption in Slash
Pine." Ph.D. Dissertation. June, 1971 R. E. Goddard, Chairman.

Parviz Karbassi. "The Effect of Low Temperature and Gibberellic Acid on the
Amylolytic Activity and Growth of a Tropical Grass (Digitaria decumbens Stent.)."
Ph.D. Dissertation. August, 1971. S. H. West, Chairman.

Andrew An-Chung Liu. "Estimation of Genetic Variance in Maize (Zea mays L.)."
Ph.D. Dissertation. August, 1971. E. S. Horner, Chairman.

Mary Ann Newhouse Overman. "A Comparison of Another Development in Cytoplasmic
Male-Sterile and Fertile Plants of Sorghum bicolor (Linn.) Moench." Ph.D.
Dissertation. August, 1971. H. E. Warmke, Chairman.

Mazo Price. "Chromosome Breakage and Abnormal Seedling Development in Barley
(Horedeum vulgare L.) After Treatment with Tiba, Maleic Hydrazide, and Formamide.'
M.S.A. Thesis. December, 1971. S. C. Schank, Chairman.

Joe Hannah Hilliard, Jr. "Photosynthesis and Photorespiration in Monocots
Differing in Carbon Dioxide Fixation Pathways: Correlations of Structure and
Function of Chloroplasts and Leaf Microbodies." Ph.D. Dissertation. August, 1971.
S. H. West, Chairman.

:arciano Rodriguez-Gomez. "Response of Tropical and Temperate Legumes to Lime and
Sulfur on Leon Fine Sand." M.S.A. Thesis. June, 1971. V. N. Schroder, Chairman.

Gerald Alonzo Smith. "The Effects of Various Techniques on Establishing the
'ropical Legumes. (Stylosanthes humilis and Stylosanthes guyanensis) in the Low
.Ititude American Tropics." M.S.A. Thesis. March, 1971. G. O. Mott, Chairman.

oel E. Smith. "Partial Characterization of a Germination Inhibitor From Medicago
sativa L. Seed." M.S.A. Thesis. December, 1971. S. H. West, Chairman.

nimal Science Department

illiam B. Burgess. "Ovine Muscle Tenderness as Affected by Postmortem Chill
ate." M.S.A. Thesis. December, 1971. A. Z. Palmer, Chairman.

rnest Hiram Coats, Jr. "Biological Availability of Inorganic Phosphates for
uminants." M.S.A. Thesis. August, 1971. C. B. Ammerman, Chairman.









CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

As of December 1971, the following major buildings were either complete or
under contract:


Horse Research Center
Lowell Residence Complete

Main Station
Gainesville Swine Unit Relocation Complete


THESES AND DISSERTATIONS

1971

Agronomy Department

R. Wayne Baumann. "Effect of Growth Regulators on Morphological Characteristics,
Seed Quality, and Yield of Peanuts in Florida and Guyana." M.S.A. Thesis. June,
1971. A. J. Norden, Chairman.

Euro Bracho. "Effect of Soil pH and Calcium Sources on the Yield, Grade and
Mineral Composition of Virginia Botanical Type Peanuts." M.S.A. Thesis. August,
1971. A. J. Norden, Chairman.

Carlle Fllori. "Effect of Backcrossing on Correlations Among Seed Yield, Percent
Protein, Percent Oil, and Other Characters in Soybeans (Glycine max. (L).
Merrill)." M.S.A. Thesis. August, 1971. K. Hinson, Chairman,

Samuel M. Funnah. "Association of Grain Yield in Corn (Zea mays L.) with Duration
of Actual Grain Filling Period and Degree-Days Accumulation." M.S.A. Thesis.
December, 1971. E. S. Horner, Chairman.

William T. Haller. "Herbicide Evaluation and Phosphorus Uptake in Two Species of
Aquatic Plants." M.S.A. Thesis. June, 1971. E. G. Rodgers, Chairman.

Sirous Tamaddoni Jahromi. "Genetic Variation on Nutrient Absorption in Slash
Pine." Ph.D. Dissertation. June, 1971 R. E. Goddard, Chairman.

Parviz Karbassi. "The Effect of Low Temperature and Gibberellic Acid on the
Amylolytic Activity and Growth of a Tropical Grass (Digitaria decumbens Stent.)."
Ph.D. Dissertation. August, 1971. S. H. West, Chairman.

Andrew An-Chung Liu. "Estimation of Genetic Variance in Maize (Zea mays L.)."
Ph.D. Dissertation. August, 1971. E. S. Horner, Chairman.

Mary Ann Newhouse Overman. "A Comparison of Another Development in Cytoplasmic
Male-Sterile and Fertile Plants of Sorghum bicolor (Linn.) Moench." Ph.D.
Dissertation. August, 1971. H. E. Warmke, Chairman.

Mazo Price. "Chromosome Breakage and Abnormal Seedling Development in Barley
(Horedeum vulgare L.) After Treatment with Tiba, Maleic Hydrazide, and Formamide.'
M.S.A. Thesis. December, 1971. S. C. Schank, Chairman.

Joe Hannah Hilliard, Jr. "Photosynthesis and Photorespiration in Monocots
Differing in Carbon Dioxide Fixation Pathways: Correlations of Structure and
Function of Chloroplasts and Leaf Microbodies." Ph.D. Dissertation. August, 1971.
S. H. West, Chairman.

:arciano Rodriguez-Gomez. "Response of Tropical and Temperate Legumes to Lime and
Sulfur on Leon Fine Sand." M.S.A. Thesis. June, 1971. V. N. Schroder, Chairman.

Gerald Alonzo Smith. "The Effects of Various Techniques on Establishing the
'ropical Legumes. (Stylosanthes humilis and Stylosanthes guyanensis) in the Low
.Ititude American Tropics." M.S.A. Thesis. March, 1971. G. O. Mott, Chairman.

oel E. Smith. "Partial Characterization of a Germination Inhibitor From Medicago
sativa L. Seed." M.S.A. Thesis. December, 1971. S. H. West, Chairman.

nimal Science Department

illiam B. Burgess. "Ovine Muscle Tenderness as Affected by Postmortem Chill
ate." M.S.A. Thesis. December, 1971. A. Z. Palmer, Chairman.

rnest Hiram Coats, Jr. "Biological Availability of Inorganic Phosphates for
uminants." M.S.A. Thesis. August, 1971. C. B. Ammerman, Chairman.








James Ronald Dickey. "Genetic and Environmental Factors Associated with Milk
Yield in Beef Cattle." Ph.D. Dissertation. August, 1971. D. E. Franke, Co-
chairman.

Karl R. Fick. "Non-Protein Nitrogen and Energy Supplementation of Low-Quality
Roughages for Ruminants." M.S.A. Thesis. June, 1971. C. B. Ammerman, Chairman.

Diego M. Ginemez, Jr. "Effects of Two Dietary Protein Sources on Fetal Developme
in Gilts and on Growing Finishing Pigs." Ph.D. Dissertation. December, 1971.
A. C. Warnick, Chairman.

Eduardo Alfredo Hervas. "Influence of Protein Level, Slaughter Weight and Sex
on Feedlot Performance and Carcass Measurements of Swine." M.S.A. Thesis. Augus
1971. H. D. Wallace, Chairman.

William Gordon Hillis. "Non-Protein Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Magnesium in Rumina
Nutrition." Ph.D. Dissertation. August, 1971. C. B. Ammerman, Chairman.

Clyde Eric Holt. "Biological Availability of Inorganic Iron Compounds for Swine
and Rats." M.S.A. Thesis. August, 1971. C. B. Ammerman, Chairman.

Cynthia Kathleen Gold Hurley. "Blood Type and Environmental Factors Affecting the
Production of Rambouillet and Native Sheep in Florida." M.S.A. Thesis. August,
1971. D. E. Franke, Chairman.

William Edwin Maxson. "Studies With Bird-Resistant Milo A. Addition of Sulfate
and Tannins to Rat Diets B. Addition of Sulfate, Selenium and Bentonite to Swine
Rations." M.S.A. Thesis. August, 1971. R. L. Shirley, Chairman.

Finnie Ardrey Murray, Jr. "Characterization of Protein Secretions by the Porcine
Uterus and Their Relationship to Reproductive Physiology." Ph.D. Dissertation.
March, 1971. A. C. Warnick, Chairman.

Mortimer Hugh Neufville. "The Influence of High Levels of Wheat Bran on the
Performance and Carcass Quality of Growing-Finishing Swine." M.S.A. Thesis. Augu
1971. H. D. Wallace, Chairman.

Chittur V. Radhakrishan. "Eimeria Tenella: Comparative Pathology and Lesions of
Experimental Infections in Bacteria-Free, Specific Pathogen-Free and Conventional
Chickens." Ph.D. Dissertation. December, 1971. R. E. Bradley, Sr., Chairman.

Ross Eldon Salveson. "Utilization of Aquatic Plants in Steer Diets: Voluntary
Intake and Digestibility." M.S.A. Thesis. August, 1971. J. F. Hentges, Jr.,
Chairman.

Gladys Josefina Verde. "Biuret and Urea as Nitrogen Supplements for Low-Quality
Roughage for Ruminants." M.S.A. Thesis. March, 1971. C. B. Ammerman, Chairman.

Hardjosubroto Wartomo. "Effect of Breed and Season on Semen Traits in Young
Beef Bulls." M.S.A. Thesis. December, 1971. A. C. Warnick, Chairman.

Manuel Enrique Wills. "Nutrient Content of Jaraguagrass Correlated With Cattle
Performance," M.S.A. Thesis. March, 1971. J. F. Hentges, Jr., Chairman.


Botany Department

Sue Gail Bartlett. "Apparent Free Space in Excised Segments from Different Regio
of the Corn Root." M.S. Thesis. August, 1971. R. C. Smith, Chairman.

Hope Hsi-Wang Chen. "Scanning Electron Microscopy of the Chara Oospore Wall"
M.S. Thesis. June, 1971. D. G. Griffin, III, Chairman.

Bernard Evan Kane, Jr. "Regulatory Mechanisms in Cellulase Synthesis during Hyp
Morphogenesis in the Water Mold Achlya." Ph.D. Dissertation. March, 1971.
J. T. Mullins, Chairman.

Edward G. Kirby, III. "An Autoradiographic and Biochemical Study of Fucose and
Glucosamine Incorporation into Plant Cells." Ph.D. Dissertation. December, 1971
R. M. Roberts, Chairman.

Leslie P. Kish. "Culture and Cytological Development of Coprotus lacteus
(Pezizales)." Ph.D. Dissertation. December, 1971. J. W. Kimbrough, Chairman.

James Riley Milam. "Cytological Development of Iodophanus granulipolaris
(Pezizaceae, Ascomycetes)." M.S. Thesis. June, 1971. J. W. Kimbrough, Chairmal

Maria Isabel Morales. "The Lycoperdaceae of North Central Florida." M.S. Thesi
June, 1971. J. W. Kimbrough, Chairman.









Joseph Henry Whitesell. "Sugar Transport in the Maize Scutellum." Ph.D.
Dissertation. June, 1971. T. E. Humphreys, Chairman.


Dairy Science

Glenn Ervin Schaibly. "Ruminal Volatile Fatty Acid Levels and Ration Digest-
ibility in Steers Fed Various Combinations of Citrus Pulp and Corn Silage."
M.S.A. Thesis. August, 1971. J. M. Wing, Chairman.


Entomology and Nematology Department

Calvin Gale Alvarez. "Ecology and Control of the Principal Flies Associated with
a Compost Plant." Ph.D. Dissertation. March, 1971. F. S. Blanton, Chairman.

Alberto Bolivar Broce. "Response of Body Lice, Pediculus humanus humanus, L.,
to Blackbody Radiation; with Notes on Their Antennal Morphology." Ph.D.
Dissertaion. August, 1971. H. L. Cromroy, Chairman.

Donald Parker Driggers. "Field Evaluation of Blacklight Electrocutor Grid Traps
for the Control of Flies Associated with Poultry." M.S. Thesis. August, 1971.
J. E. Brogdon, Chairman.

onald Elliott Firstenberg. "Hormonal Stimulation of Growth and Feeding in Plodia
interpunctella (Hubner) During Late Larval Development." M.S. Thesis. August,
971. J. L. Nation, Chairman.

eonard Jay Goldman. "The Electroretinogram and Spectral Sensitivity of the
compound Eye of Aedes aegypti." Ph.D. Dissertation. August, 1971. J. L. Cromroy,
chairman.

ichard James Gouger. "Interrelations of Ips avulsus (Eichh.) and Associated
ungi." Ph.D. Dissertation. August, 1971. R. C. Wilkinson, Chairman.

illiam Ledyard Hasse. "Predaceous Arthropods of Florida Soybean Fields." M.S.
hesis. August, 1971. W. H. Whitcomb, Chairman.

ayne T. Hockmeyer. "Isolation of Somatic Antigens of Adult Dirofilaria immitis."
h.D. Dissertation. F. S. Blanton, Chairman.

usan B. Hyforn. "Food Preferences of Chrysopa rufilabris Burmeister in North
central Florida." Ph.D. Dissertation. December, 1971. W. H. Whitcomb, Chairman.

rnest Morton Irons, Jr. "A Survey of the State of Florida for the Incidence of
merican Trypanosomiasis in Insect Vectors and Reservoir Animals." M.S. Thesis.
ugust, 1971. J. F. Butler, Chairman.

ichard Levy. "The Relationship Between Insect Mineral Content and Radiation
sensitivity Ph.D. Dissertation. December, 1971. H. L. Cromroy, Chairman.

endell L. Morrill. "Ecology, Economics, and Behavior of the Fall Armyworm in
ield Corn." Ph.D. Dissertation. December, 1971. G. L. Greene, Chairman.

ichard Joseph Nielsson. "The Taxonomy of the Myzini (Homoptera: Aphididae) of the
astern United States." Ph.D. Dissertation. June, 1971. D. H. Habeck, Chairman.
chairman.

ohn Francis Reinert. "Genus Aedes Subgenus Aedimorphus Theobald in South-
sast Asia." Ph.D. Dissertation. August, 1971. F. S. Blanton, Chairman.

aime Mauricio Salazar. "Bionomics of the Horn Fly in North Florida." M.S.
'hesis. August, 1971. J. F. Butler, Chairman.

heldon Andrew White. "The Effect of Ionizing Radiation on the Stable Fly,
tomoxys calcitrans (Linnaeus)." Ph.D. Dissertation. August, 1971. F. S. Blanton
chairman.

avid Grier Young. "The Phlebotomine Sand Flies of Colombia (Diptera,
sychodidae)." M.S. Thesis. June, 1971. F. S. Blanton, Chairman.

ood Resource and Economics Department

hmad Mahdzan bin Ayob. "An Econometric Analysis of United States Import Demand
nd Prices of Natural Rubber." M.S.A. Thesis. June, 1971. A. A. Prate, Chairman.

allas Robert Fox. "Policy Analysis and Simulation Modeling For Basic Grain
commodity Systems With Special Reference to Rice." M.S.A. Thesis. March, 1971.
.K. Boutwell, Chairman.









Lee Wayne Hall. "An Analysis of the U. S. Regional Demands and Marketing Costs
for Selected Florida Processed Citrus Products." M.S.A. Thesis. March, 1971.
L. H. Myers, Chairman.

Bharat Jhunjhunwala. "Minimum Cropland Requirements for Specified Income Levels
in Selected Counties of North and West Florida." M.S.A. Thesis. June, 1971.
F. H. Tyner, Chairman.

William D. Ricker, Jr. "An Analytical Approach to the Consolidation of Counties
in North and West Florida Based on Educational Efficiency Criteria." M.S.A.
Thesis. December, 1971. F. H. Tyner, Chairman.

James Nicholas Royal, Jr. "Factors Affecting Differences Between Use-Value and
Market Value Assessments of Land -- Alachua County, Florida." M.S.A. Thesis.
March, 1971. W. K. McPherson, Chairman.

Michael Schwartz. "Input Productivity in Agriculture on the North Coast of
Colombia." Ph.D. Dissertation. December, 1971. W. W. McPherson, Chairman.

Donna F. Wyatt. "Factors Affecting Farmland Values in Florida and the Southeast."
M.S.A. Thesis. December, 1971. J. E. Reynolds, Chairman.


Food Science Department

Stevan Alex Angalet. "Effectiveness of Antioxidants in Extending the Store-
Life of Frozen Ground Mullet (Mugil cephalus L.) Fillets." M.S.A. Thesis. June,
1971. R. A. Dennison, Chairman.

Ricardo W. Drescher. "Yield of Peel Oil in Lemons as Related to Budwood and
Rootstocks." M.S.A. Thesis. June, 1971. R. A. Dennison, Chairman.

Margie Lee Gallagher. "Protease Inhibitors and Nutritional Value of Selected
Legumes." M.S.A. Thesis. August, 1971. F. W. Knapp, Chairman.

Thomas R. Schmidt. "Effect of Peeling Method on the Mechanical and Textural
Properties of Unprocessed and Processed Irish Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum)."
M.S.A. Thesis. March, 1971. E. M. Ahmed, Chairman.

Michael A. Surma. "A Microbial Survey of Imported Shrimp." M.S.A. Thesis.
December, 1971. J. A. Koburger, Chairman.


Forest Resources and Conservation Department

Fred L. Botti. "Wildlife Populations Associated With Planted Pines in North-
Central Florida." M.S.F. Thesis. June, 1971. S. L. Beckwith, Chairman.

Patrick John Caldwell. "Nest Microclimate and Nesting Behavior in the Mallard
(Anas platyrhynchos) at Delta, Manitoba." M.S.F. Thesis. August, 1971. G. W.
Cornwell, Chairman.

Archie Fairly Carr, III. "The Commercial Snook (Centropomus undecimalis)
Fishery of Lake Izabal, Guatemala." M.S.F. Thesis. August, 1971. G. W. Cornwel
Chairman.

Alan C. Clark. "Population Dynamics and Movements of Feral Pigeons." M.S.F.
Thesis. December, 1971. S. L. Beckwith, Chairman.

Gilbert T. Crosby. "Ecology of the Red-cockaded Woodpecker in the Nesting Season
M.S.F. Thesis. December, 1971. C. M. Kaufman, Chairman.

Reynaldo E. De La Cruz. "Effects of Inoculation with Mycorrhizal Fungi on the
Growth and Survival of Slash Pine (Pinus elliottii var. elliottii Engelm)
Seedlings." M.S.F. Thesis. December, 1971. W. H. Smith, Chairman.

Jonathan Craig Emmons. "Experimental Introduction of the Gadwell, Anas strepera,
on a Florida Coastal Marsh." M.S.F. Thesis. June, 1971. G. W. Cornwell,
Chairman.

Herbert Guillermo Nanne. "Factors Influencing Gadwall Reproduction in a Florida
Gulf Coastal Marsh." M.S.F. Thesis. August, 1971. G. W. Cornwell, Chairman.

Richard Pellek. "A Study of Site Factors Associated with the Growth of Teak
Plantations in Trinidad." M.S.F. Thesis. March, 1971. S. L. Beckwith, Chairmar

Robert Dale Sage. "Plantation Yield Comparisons Between Pinus caribaea var.
hondurensis in Surinam and Pinus elliottii var. elliottii in the Southeastern
United States." M.S.F. Thesis. June, 1971. C. M. Kaufman, Chairman.









Fruit Crops Department

William Stanley Castle. "The Root Distribution of Citrus Rootstocks and Their
Influence on the Mineral Content of 'Orlando' Tangelo Leaves." M.S.A. Thesis.
August, 1971. A. H. Krezdorn, Chairman.

James Gonder Georg. "A Numerical Model for Prediction of the Nocturnal
Temperature in the Atmospheric Surface Layer." M.S.A. Thesis. August, 1971.
J. F. Gerber, Chairman.

Ricardo E. Gomez. "Anatomical Aspects of Avocado Stems and Their Relation
to Rooting." Ph.D. Dissertation. December, 1971. J. Soule, Chairman.

Robert Julian Lindsey. "Environment and Citrus Cold Hardiness." M.S.A. Thesis.
August, 1971. W. J. Wiltbank, Chairman.

Andrew John Rose. "The Macronutrient Status of 'Robinson' Tangerine." M.S.A.
Thesis. August, 1971. A. H. Krezdorn, Chairman, R. C. J. Koo, Co-chairman.

Nicos Ioannou Vakis. "Some Physiological and Biochemical Aspects of the Chilling
Syndrome in Tropical and Subtropical Fruits." Ph.D. Dissertation. March, 1971.
J. Soule, Chairman.


icrobiology Department

oward M. Etlinger. "Correlation Between the Immune Hemolytic Susceptibility of
rythrocytes and Anticomplementary Material from Red Blood Cell Membranes."
.S. Thesis. June, 1971. E. M. Hoffman, Chairman.

arold Edwin Hirsch. "Inactivation of Human and Guinea Pig Complement Components
y Oxyphenylbutazone." M.S. Thesis. June, 1971. E. M. Hoffman, Chairman.

ancy A. Johnson Marsh. "Studies on Transductionally Shortened Merogenotes."
.S. Thesis. August, 1971. D. E. Duggan, Chairman.

lizabeth Watson Moulton. "Response of Enzymes in the Aromatic Amino Acid Pathway
f Vibrio MB 22 to Varying End Product Concentrations." M.S. Thesis. June, 1971.
elill S. Nasser, Chairman.

aul W. Reno, Jr. "Complement Potentiated Hemagglutination Inhibition by Early
gM Antibody Against Influenza Virus A2/Aichi/2/68." M.S. Thesis. June, 1971.
. M. Hoffman, Chairman.

arry Wayne Robertson. "Electron Microscopic Determination of Bacterial
imensions." M.S. Thesis. August, 1971. E. P. Previc, Chairman.


ornamental Horticulture Department

ichael T. Ayer. "Phytotoxicity of Preemergence Herbicides to Poa annual, 5
verseeded Cool Season Grasses and 'Tifgreen' Bermudagrass (Cynodon Sp.)." M.S.A.
hesis. December, 1971. G. C. Horn, Chairman.

arold C. Jones. "Effects of Container Size, Fertilizer Level and Watering
frequency on Growth, Root/Shoot Ratio, Chemical Composition and Establishment
n a Roadway Stress Environment of Ligustrum japonicum and Juniperus chinensis
Pfitzer Blue'." M.S.A. Thesis. December, 1971. T. J. Sheehan, Chairman.

eorge Dominic Pickhardt. "Effects of Three Levels Each of Nitrogen, Potassium
nd Magnesium on Growth and Chemical Composition of Philodendron oxycardium and
ieffenbachia picta 'Exotica'." M.S.A. Thesis. August, 1971. J. N. Joiner,
chairman.

ugh Allen Poole. "Effects of Nutrition and Media on Growth and Chemical
composition of Mericloned Plants of Cattleya." M.S.A. Thesis. August, 1971.
. J. Sheehan, Chairman.


ant Pathology Department

ejandro Z. Ferrer. "Techniques to Identify the Tomato Race of Pseudomonas
lanacearum and to Screen for Resistance in Tomato." Ph.D. Dissertation.
memberr, 1971. R. E. Stall, Chairman.

rvin Edward Miller. "Association of Microbodies with Induced Resistance to
*bacco Mosaic Virus in Hypersensitive Tobacco." Ph.D. Dissertation. June, 1971.
A. Roberts, Chairman.









Felix Appiah Ofori. "Nigrospora Stem Rot and Other Diseases of Kenaf." M.S.
Thesis. June, 1971. D. A. Roberts, Chairman.

John Louis Saladini. "Characterization and Transmissibility of a Strain of
Sugarcane Mosaic Virus Infecting St. Augustinegrass in Florida." M.S. Thesis.
August, 1971. F. W. Zettler, Chairman.

Johanna Frederina Schulman. "Etiology of a Disease Complex in Chamadorea elegans.
M.S. Thesis. August, 1971. H. N. Miller, Chairman.

Widjanarko Soerjobroto. "Pathogen-Suscept Interactions in Phytophthora Foot-
and Root-Rot of Some Citrus Rootstock Cultivars." M.S. Thesis. March, 1971.
D. A. Roberts, Chairman.

Florence A. Young. "Effects of Certain Mineral Elements on Cercospora Leafspot of
Peanuts." Ph.D. Dissertation. December, 1971. L. H. Purdy, Chairman.


Poultry Science Department

Charles Franklin Hinton, III. "Evaluation of Methods of Measuring Carotenoid
Levels in Egg Yolks." M.S.A. Thesis. March, 1971. J. L. Fry, Chairman.

Thomas S. Powell. "A Comparison of Wire vs. Litter Floor for Starting and
Growing Pullets." M.S.A. Thesis. December, 1971. C. R. Douglas, Chairman.

Joseph Henry Walter. "Effect of Photoperiod during Incubation on Embryonic and
Post-Embryonic Development." M.S.A. Thesis. June, 1971. R. A. Voitle, Chairman


Soil Science Department

Russell MacBain Burns. "Enzyme Activity as an Index of Growth Superiority of
Pinus clausa var. clausa on Two Soils." Ph.D. Dissertation. August, 1971. W. L
Pritchett, Chairman.

Frank Gilbert Calhoun, Jr. "Micromorphology and Genetic Interpretations of
Selected Colombian Andosols." Ph.D. Dissertation. August, 1971. V. W. Carlisle,
Chairman.

Veerabhadrappa Jyothi. "Miscible Displacement of 2, 4-D Herbicide During Constan
Liquid Flow Velocity into Initially Dry Soils." Ph.D. Dissertation. August, 197
L. C. Hammond, Chairman.

Donald J. Mead. "Movement of Added Nitrogen and Phosphorus in a Pine Forest
Ecosystem." Ph.D. Dissertation. December, 1971. W. L. Pritchett, Chairman.

Jose V. Parra. "Effect of an Underground Asphalt Barrier on Hydraulic Properties
of Lakeland Fine Sand." M.S.A. Thesis. June, 1971. L. C. Hammond, Chairman.

Javaid N. Qureshi. "Relative Value of Zinc Sulphide as a Source of Zinc." M.S.A
Thesis. August, 1971. N. Gammon, Jr., Chairman.

Saturnino Mata Rodulfo. "The Availability to Forage Plants of Accumulated
Phosphorus in Leon Fine Sand, a Spodosol." M.S.A. Thesis. August, 1971. W. G.
Blue, Chairman.

Anton Schori. "A Pedologic Approach to Soil Survey for Highway Construction."
M.S.A. Thesis. August, 1971. V. W. Carlisle, Chairman.

Michael William Silvey. "Zinc Uptake by Hyparrhenia rufa (Nees) Stapf and
Indigofera hirsuta L. in Selected Eastern Panamanian SEos." Ph.D. Dissertation.
March, 1971. V. W. Carlisle, Chairman.

Genaro O. San Valentin. "Availability of Slowly Soluble Potassium Fertilizers
in Sandy Soils and Their Effects on Yield and Quality of Flue-Cured Tobacco
(Nicotiana tabacum L.)." M.S.A. Thesis. December, 1971. W. K. Robertson,
Chairman.


Vegetable Crops Department

Thomas V. Nickless. "Fertilizer Source and Placement Effects on Bean (Phaseolus
vulgaris L.) and Pepper (Capsicum annum L.) Production and Soil Nutrients."
M.S.A. Thesis. June, 1971. V. F. Nettles, Chairman.

Laurence A. Sistrunk. "The Influence of Soil and Water Incorporation of Two
Herbicides on Weed Control in Watermelons (Citrullis vulgaris SCHRAD)." M.S.A.
Thesis. March, 1971. S. J. Locascio, Chairman.








Veterinary Science Department

M. Arokiasamy. "Toxicity Studies on Extracts of Seeds of Sarcolobus Globosus."
M.S. Thesis. June, 1971. G. T. Edds, Chairman.

Yvonne Synthia Barber. "The Effects of Porcine Uterine Protein Secretions on
Ovarian Luteal Cell Function." M.S. Thesis. December, 1971. G. T. Edds,
Chairman.

Henry Fields Carwile. "Studies on the Toxicity, Tissue Distribution and Urinary
Excretion of 2-Thiouracil in the Chicken." M.S. Thesis. August, 1971. P. T.
Cardeilhac, Chairman.

Guy Richard Keim, Jr. "Methotrexate Toxicity in Ponies." M.S. Thesis. June, 1971,
J. A. Himes, Chairman.

Raul Silvestri. "Effects of Repeated Oral Administrations of Coumaphos in Sheep
and Interactions with Other Drugs." M.S. Thesis. June, 1971. G. T. Edds,
chairman.

ance Kenyon Weidle, Jr. "Safety Evaluation of an Amicarbalide Isethionate
ormulation in Ponies." M.S. Thesis. June, 1971. G. T. Edds, Chairman.


INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS


All activities which build or strengthen the international dimensions of IFAS
re administered by the Office of International Programs. Major activities include
administration of contract and grant technical assistance, training of foreign
ationals, and supporting research in tropical agriculture.
The Center for Tropical Agriculture, as a major component of the Office of
international Programs, assists with policy determination and is responsible for
coordination within IFAS of tropically oriented research and service projects. It
provides research and travel grants to faculty and graduate students, assists
academic departments in curricula development, supports development of library
nd laboratory facilities, and publishes and disseminates results of tropical
research.
International Programs serves as a liaison office for IFAS with the State
department of Agriculture and Florida agribusiness in carrying out international
activities that complement state programs. Projects administered by International
programs develop technology applicable to Florida, attract agriculturally oriented
industry to the state, open agribusiness investment opportunities for Florida
private enterprise, and expand markets for Florida's goods and services.
IFAS is increasingly being called on to advise in the production, marketing,
nd processing of agricultural products in the tropics. Participation in inter-
ational research programs strengthens expertise in these areas. In solving many
f the problems it is beneficial to use an interdepartmental approach. For
ample, in carrying out research on tropical and subtropical livestock production
d pasture improvement, scientists from the Animal Science, Agronomy, Food and
source Soil Science, and Veterinary Medicine Departments are cooperating. It is
ticipated that much of the tropical research in the future will require a
Itidisciplinary systems approach. IFAS, through its Office of International
ograms, is well prepared to accept this challenge.
Research, training, and technical assistance were provided through 10
ntracts and one grant during 1971. Staff from almost all units of the Institute
rticipated in some phase of these activities.
Three contracts with the Agency for International Development involved
chnical assistance for educational institution building in Costa Rica, El
Ivador, and Vietnam. Two AID contracts called for special studies in Panama and
ger. A research project, funded by the Office of the War on Hunger, was
ntinued to develop feed composition tables for South and Central America. This
eject is complementary to a Ford Foundation grant.
Additional projects included a small contract with the Central Bank of
caragua for technical assistance on tropical crops and beef cattle production.
distance was provided to the Jamaica School of Agriculture for curriculum
velopment and faculty training through a loan from the World Bank. Technical
distance to upgrade the agricultural production of Guyana and to assist in the
tablishment of a research facility at the Ebini Livestock Station in that country
s continued under as AID grant to the Government of Guyana. Work under a
ntract funded by the Inter-American Development Bank was initiated to develop
ricultural economic research programs in Ecuador.
These international research and service programs supplement and reinforce
ate programs. Florida agriculture derives many direct benefits. For example,
AS scientists are screening Digitaria crosses from the Florida grass breeding
ogram for pangola stunt-virus resistance. This dangerous disease already has
mpletely destroyed pangola grass in two South American countries. While it is
t yet in Florida, the state's livestock industry is in jeopardy until scientists








develop a stunt-virus resistant grass. The only way to do this is to test breedin
lines in areas where the virus exists. IFAS is doing this in Guyana, Venezuela,
and Brazil. Already, Florida scientists have lines which show stunt-virus
resistance. Other crop varieties are also being tested in similar fashion.
Most of the grasses and legumes used for pasture and forage in the tropical
and subtropical areas of the United States, including Florida, Puerto Rico, and
Hawaii, originated in tropical Africa, Latin America, and the Far East. There
remains in these areas a vast pool of unexploited varieties and strains of forage
species which may be useful in future forage-livestock production systems. U.S.
agriculture stands to gain as much or more than the developing countries from a
comprehensive evaluation scheme that would include collections for these unexplore
regions.

PROJECT A38: COSTA RICA

Sources of Funds: Agency for International Development

Objectives: To provide technical advice and assistance to the Government of
Costa Rica in implementation of an Agricultural Technical School, establishment
of a Food Technology Laboratory, and on short-term consulting basis as may be
agreed upon.

Personnel:

Muller, A. S. Chief of Party and Education Specialist
Bates, R. P. Food Scientist

Publications:

Muller, A. S., "Project for Assistance to Agricultural Education in Costa Rica,"
End-of-Tour Report, March 31, 1971.


PROJECT A42: ECUADOR

Source of Funds: Inter-American Development Bank

Objectives: To provide technical assistance to Institute Nacional de
Investigaciones Agropecuarias (INIAP) in its efforts to diversify, improve its
staff and develop more rapidly its various research programs.

Personnel:

Dow, J. K. Chief of Party and Agricultural Economist
Schwartz, M. Agricultural Economist
Mathis, K. Agricultural Economist
Tefertiller, K. R. Agricultural Economist

Publications:

Dow, J, K., "Department of Agricultural Economics Annual Report of Activities,"
1971.


PROJECT A33: EL SALVADOR (AID/la-586)

Source of Funds: Agency for International Development

Objectives: To render technical advice and assistance to the Government of El
Salvador for the purpose of improving the quality of graduates of the National
School of Agriculture and to assist the school in its eventual integration into
CENTA-- envisioned as a coordinated National Center for Teaching, Research and
Extension in Agriculture.

Personnel:

Peirce, H. E. Chief of Party and Education Specialist
Christiansen, W. C. Animal Scientist
Greenman, J. R. Agricultural Economist
Prine, G. B. Agronomist
Glenn, J. C. Animal Scientist
Ammerman, C. B. Animal Scientist
Wallace, H. D. Animal Scientist
Bazer, F. W. Animal Scientist
Kuitert, L. C. Entomologist
Perry, V. G. Nematologist
Dennison, R. A. Food Scientist
Wilcox, C. J. Dairy Scientist
Thatcher, W. W. Dairy Scidntist








Miller, C. R. Plant Pathologist
Purdy, L. H. Plant Pathologist
Ford, E. Botanist
McCall, W. Soil Scientist
Lorz, A. P. Vegetable Crop Scientist
Bertrand, J. E. Animal Scientist
Smith, R. L. Agronomist
McCaleb, J. E. Agronomist
Tarjan, A. C. Nematologist
Malo, S. E. Horticulturist
Tergas, L. E. Consultant on Pastures & Forages
Eno, C. F. Soils Research
arlowe, G. A., Jr. Vegetable Crops Research
cCloud, D. E. Agronomy Research
merdon, E. T. Agricultural Engineering Research
efertiller, K. R. Agricultural Economics Research
an Horn, H. H. Dairy Science Research
unlap, H. N. Consultant on Dairy Processing Equipment

publications:

cCaleb, J. E., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Forages and Pastures),"
February 1971.
ilcox, C. J., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Dairy Science)," March,1971.
ord, E. S., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Botany)," May 1971.
ennison, R. A., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Food Science)," May,1971.
allace, H. D., "Swine Nutrition and Management," March 1971 & November, 1971.
cCall, W. W., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Soils)," May 1971.
rine, G. M., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Corn and Sorghum)," June,1971.
arjan, A. C., "Plant-parasitic Nematodes of Various Crops in El Salvador,"
August,1971.
eirce, H. E., "Semi-annual Report," February, 1971.
reenman, J. R., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Agricultural Economics),"
April and September, 1971.
ergas, L. E., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Pastures and Forages),"
September, 1971.
erry, V. G. and Purdy, L. H., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Nematology and
Plant Pathology)," September, 1971.
erry, V. G. and Miller, C. R., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Nematology and
Plant Pathology)," February, 1971.
rz, A. P., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Vegetable Crops)," March, 1971.
lenn, J. C., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Animal Science)," March, 1971.
ith, Ralph, "AID Project Consultant's Report (Soybean Production)," August, 1971.
rtrand, J. E., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Beef Cattle Production),"
April and October, 1971.
rry, V. G., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Nematology)," February and
September, 1971.
itert, L. C., "AID Project Consultant's Report (Entomology)," February and
September 1971.





OJECT A31: FEED COMPOSITION STUDY

urce of Funds: Agency for International Development

jectives: To find low cost feeds-- (1) survey of existing data and analysis
feeds, fodder and agricultural by-products; (2) analysis of other available
eds; and (3) development of cattle feeding trials and systems utilizing
digenous feeds to fill in the gaps of existing research.

rsonnel:

ristiansen, W. C. Project Leader; Animal Scientist
Dowell, L. R. Animal Scientist
gleston, J. Assistant in Animal Science
enn, J. C. Tropical Livestock Project Leader
rris, L. E. Consultant on Feed Compilation Tables

avel Included: Peru; Ecuador; Venezuela; Colombia; El Salvador; Brazil;
Rome, Italy; Australia; Guatemala; Honduras; Nicaragua.

blication:

ristiansen, W. C., "Livestock Feeds and Feeding in Latin America," Agriculture
Development Paper, April, 1971.









Christiansen, W. C.,"Recommendations for Establishing an Australian Feed
Information Center in the Department of Primary Industries," Commonwealth
of Australia, October, 1971.
Christiansen, W. C., "Feeding Regimes and Nutritional Supplements During the
Dry Season."


PROJECT A23: GUYANA (GOG)

Source of Funds: AID Grant to Government of Guyana

Objectives: To provide technical assistance to the Government of Guyana in
its efforts to diversify and develop its agricultural economy.
Personnel:

Mott, G. 0. Ebini Livestock Project Leader
Smerdon, E. T. Agricultural Engineer
Shaw, L. N. Agricultural Engineer
Myers, M. Agricultural Engineer
Skinner, T. C. Agricultural Engineer
Grigsby, S. Agricultural Educationalist
Straughn, A.. Agricultural Extension Specialist
Eddleman, B. R. Agricultural Economist
Hooker, P. Agricultural Economist
Whitty, E. B. Agronomist
Prine, G. B. Agronomist
Norden, A. J. Agronomist
Ammerman, C. B. Animal Scientist
Dickey, J. R. Animal Scientist
Koger, M. Animal Scientist
Bates, R. P. Food Scientist
Halsey, L. H. Vegetable Crops Specialist
Gull, D. D. Vegetable Crops Specialist
Locascio, S. J. Vegetable Crops Specialist
Marlowe, G. A., Jr. Vegetable Crops Specialist
Hinson K. Agronomist
Davies, C. B. Consultant on Fisheries
Geraldson, C. M. Soils Specialist
Ross, J. E. Administrative Review
Davis, C. G. Agricultural Economist
Glenn, J. C. Tropical Livestock Project Leader
Popenoe, H. L. Administrative Review
Beasley, Robert, Consultant on Agricultural Engineering



Publication:

Dickey, J. R., "Trip Report," August, 1971.
Smerdon, E. T., "Trip Report," July, 1971.
Skinner, T. C., "Comments on Trip to Ebini Research Station and Kibilibiri
Production Area (Preliminary Draft)," August, 1971.
Boyd, H. F., Dickey, J. R., and Eddleman, B. R., "Estimated Resource Requirements
Costs and Returns for Five Beef Production Alternatives in the Intermediate
Savannahs of Guyana," October, 1971.
Bates, R. P., "Trip Report," October, 1971.
"Annual Report of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences Contract between the Government of Guyana and the University of
Florida," March, 1971.
USAID/Guyana Project, "Diversification and Development of Agriculture--Part I--
Project Design," May, 1971.
Dickey, J. R., "Cattle Breeding and Management Systems for Beef Production in
the Intermediate Savannahs of Guyana," July, 1971.
Koger, M. and Dickey, J. R., "1971 Data Summary for Beef Cattle Breeding Project?
Ebini Research Station," July, 1971.
Beasley, R. P., "Report on Trip to the Kibilibiri Production Area," October, 1971
Marlowe, G. A., Eddleman,.B. R., Geraldson, C. M. & Bates, R. P.,"Vegetable
Crops Production Potential Conference Report," December, 1971.


PROJECT A16: JAMAICA SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE

Source of Funds: World Bank

Objectives: To assist the Jamaica School of Agriculture in the expansion and
improvement of its present program by supplying technical assistance as may be
agreed upon.








Personnel:

Soule, J. Fruit Crops Specialist
Sauve, R. Plant Pathologist (Teaching)
Green, V. E., Jr. Agronomist
Boyd, F. T. Agronomist
Miller, H. N. Plant Pathologist (Teaching)
Ross, J. E. Administrative Review

Publications:

Soule, James, "Lectures & Laboratory Outlines for Fundamentals of Tropical Fruit
Production," July, 1971.
"Progress Report," period ending June 30, 1971.
Soule, J. and Gomez, R. E., "Manual of Tropical Fruit Crops, Volumes I and II,"
June, 1971.
"Progress Report," period ending December 31, 1971.
Miller, H. N., "Consultants Report" (Plant Pathology), November, 1971.
Soule, J., "Report on Trip as Consultant to Jamaica School of Agriculture,"
October, 1971.


PROJECT A24: NICARAGUA (CB)

Source of Funds: Central Bank of Nicaragua

objectives: To provide technical advice and assistance to the Central Bank of
icaragua in the improvement and/or development of tropical fruits, investigations
n tropical beef cattle and such additional areas as may be agreed upon.

personnel:

lenn, J. C. Animal Scientist
ennison, R. A. Food Scientist
hapman, H. L Animal Scientist
alo, S. E. Horticulturist

publications:

hapman, H. L., Jr., "Preliminary Report on Beef Cattle Research in Nicaragua,"
May, 1971.
ennison, R. A., "Evaluation of the Food Technology Laboratory as it Relates to
the Food Processing Industry of Nicaragua," September, 1971.
hapman, H. L., Jr., "Beef Cattle Feeding Experiments (Final Report)," 1971.


PROJECT A50: NIGER (AID/afr-815)

ource of Funds: Agency for International Development

objectives: To study and recommend requirements for the construction of a
efrigerated slaughterhouse in Maradi, Niger. The study will include economic
justification and technical designs for plant and equipment.

personnel:

inard, D. T. Agricultural Engineer
rris, W. H. Agricultural Economist
iefer, E. Meats Specialist

blications: None


OJECT A47: PANAMA (AID/la-686)

urce of Funds: Agency for International Development

jectives: To assist the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock to evaluate
e present agricultural research and higher agricultural education programs in
nama and make recommendations for a five year program designed to accelerate
e development of new farm level technology in Panama and to improve the
lated educational function of the University of Panama School of Agriculture.

rsonnel:

owning, C. B. Agricultural Education Advisor; Animal Scientist
tes, J. W. Agricultural Research Advisor; Plant Scientist
penoe, H. L. Agricultural Education Advisor









Publications:

Sites, J. W., Browning, C. B., and Popenoe, H. L., "Agricultural Research and
Higher Education in Panama," September, 1971.

PROJECT A22: TROPICAL LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION

Source of Funds: Ford Foundation

Objectives: To conduct research and training in tropical animal production.

Projects supported by the grant include:

1. Title: Determination of Mineral Composition of Livestock Feeds in Venezuela.
Location: Central University and Ministry of Agriculture, Maracay.
Objectives: To gather existing data on feed composition and conduct analyses
where data is incomplete and publish the information obtained in a usable form.
Survey liver and blood composition of cattle from contrasting environmental regio
of Venezuela. Conduct mineral balance trials on cattle using common feedstuffs.
Investigators: Ray Shirley, Claudio Chicco, Jose Perdomo
Statue: Digestibility trials with sheep on four fresh forages are completed,
except for the laboratory analyses of approximatley eight minerals in the feed an
excrement collections which are underway. In addition, digestability trials are
underway on silages.

2. Titj.: Nutritive supplementation of tropical and subtropical forages for
cattle.
Location: Ministry of Agriculture, Maracay, Venezuela
Objectives: To develop feeding supplements and supplementation programs which
will improve the performance of cattle grazing tropical and subtropical forages
during periods when they provide inadequate nutritent intake.
Investigators: C. B. Ammerman, C. Chicco and others.
Status: Research data obtained during the active phase of the project are
continuing to be summarized and prepared for publication. The basic research
program is being continued to a limited degree as funds permit. Practical resear
is under way to test certain of the observations made under more basic conditions
Publications:
Ammerman, C. B., W. C. Burns, P. E. Loggins, J. E. Moore and R. R. Oltjen. 1969.
Urea as a Nitrogen Supplement for Low Quality Hay. J. Animal Sci. 28: 134,
January (Abstract).
Oropeza, L., C. F. Chicco, A. A. Carnevali, T. A. Shultz, C. B. Ammerman. 1971
Uso de la Urea y el Ciuret en la Suplementacion de Pastos de Corte. Jornada
Agronomicas Acarigua, Vol. VII, Venezuela. March (Abstract).
Verde, Gladys, J., C. B. Ammerman, Olga Fresnillo, P. E. Loggins and C. F. Chicc
1970. Biuret as a Nitrogen Supplement for Low Quality Forage. J. Animal Sc-
30: 331, February (Abstract).
Chicco, C. F., T. A. Shultz, A. A. Carnevali, L. Oropeza and C. B. Ammerman. 19
Biuret and Urea in Supplements with Green Chop Elephant Grass. J. Animal
Sci., 31: 238, July (Abstract).
Fick, K. R., C. B. Ammerman and P. E. Loggins. 1971. Effect of Biuret and Ener
upon the Use of Low Quality Forage. J. Animal Sci., 32: 379, February
(Abstract).
Hillis, W. G., C. B. Ammerman, Sarah Miller and J. E. Moore. 1971. Nitrogen
Source and Rumen NH, pH and Blood Urea. J. Animal Sci., 32: 379, February
(Abstract).
Chicco, C. F., A. A. Carnevali, T. A. Shultz, Eleana Shultz and C. B. Ammerman.
1971. Yuca y Melaza en la Utilizacion de la Urea en Corderos. III. Reunio
Latinoamericana de Produccion Animal, p. 31, April (Abstract).
Chicco, C. F., A. A. Carnevali, T. A. Shultz, Eleana Shultz and C. B. Ammerm
1971. Yuca y Melaza en la Utilizacion de la Urea en Corderos. Memorial,
Asociacion Latinoamericana de Produccion Animal, 6: 7, April.
Ammerman, C. B., G. J. Verde, K. R. Fick, J. C. Glenn and C. F. Chicco. 1971.
Supplementos de nitrogeno no Proteico para Forrajes de Baja Calidad. Memori
Asociacion Latinoamericana de Produccion Animal, 6: 100, April (Abstract).
Chicco, C. F., T. A. Shultz, A. A. Carnevali, L. Oropeza and C. B. Ammerman. 19
Biuret and Urea in Supplements for Bovines Fed Green Chop Elephant Grass. J
Animal Sci., 33: 133, July.
Chicco, C. F., T. A. Shultz, Elena Shultz, A. A. Carnevali and C. B. Ammerman.
1971. Molasses-Urea for Restricted Forage Fed Steers. J. Animal Sci., l3:
July (Abstract).
Verde, Gladys J. 1971. Biuret and Urea as Nitrogen Supplements for Low Quality
Roughage for Ruminants. M. S. Thesis, University of Florida.
Fick, K. R. 1971. Non-Protein Nitrogen and Energy Supplement of Low Quality
Roughage for Ruminants. M. S. Thesis, University of Florida.
Hillis, W. G., C. B. Ammerman, Sarah M. Miller, J. E. Moore and P. E. Loggins.
1972. Remen pH and NPN on Rumen NH3 and Blood Urea. J. Animal Sci., 2U: 36
February (Abstract).
Chicco, C. F., T. A. Shultz, Elena Shultz, A. A. Carnevali and C. B. Ammerman.








Veterinary Science Department

M. Arokiasamy. "Toxicity Studies on Extracts of Seeds of Sarcolobus Globosus."
M.S. Thesis. June, 1971. G. T. Edds, Chairman.

Yvonne Synthia Barber. "The Effects of Porcine Uterine Protein Secretions on
Ovarian Luteal Cell Function." M.S. Thesis. December, 1971. G. T. Edds,
Chairman.

Henry Fields Carwile. "Studies on the Toxicity, Tissue Distribution and Urinary
Excretion of 2-Thiouracil in the Chicken." M.S. Thesis. August, 1971. P. T.
Cardeilhac, Chairman.

Guy Richard Keim, Jr. "Methotrexate Toxicity in Ponies." M.S. Thesis. June, 1971,
J. A. Himes, Chairman.

Raul Silvestri. "Effects of Repeated Oral Administrations of Coumaphos in Sheep
and Interactions with Other Drugs." M.S. Thesis. June, 1971. G. T. Edds,
chairman.

ance Kenyon Weidle, Jr. "Safety Evaluation of an Amicarbalide Isethionate
ormulation in Ponies." M.S. Thesis. June, 1971. G. T. Edds, Chairman.


INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS


All activities which build or strengthen the international dimensions of IFAS
re administered by the Office of International Programs. Major activities include
administration of contract and grant technical assistance, training of foreign
ationals, and supporting research in tropical agriculture.
The Center for Tropical Agriculture, as a major component of the Office of
international Programs, assists with policy determination and is responsible for
coordination within IFAS of tropically oriented research and service projects. It
provides research and travel grants to faculty and graduate students, assists
academic departments in curricula development, supports development of library
nd laboratory facilities, and publishes and disseminates results of tropical
research.
International Programs serves as a liaison office for IFAS with the State
department of Agriculture and Florida agribusiness in carrying out international
activities that complement state programs. Projects administered by International
programs develop technology applicable to Florida, attract agriculturally oriented
industry to the state, open agribusiness investment opportunities for Florida
private enterprise, and expand markets for Florida's goods and services.
IFAS is increasingly being called on to advise in the production, marketing,
nd processing of agricultural products in the tropics. Participation in inter-
ational research programs strengthens expertise in these areas. In solving many
f the problems it is beneficial to use an interdepartmental approach. For
ample, in carrying out research on tropical and subtropical livestock production
d pasture improvement, scientists from the Animal Science, Agronomy, Food and
source Soil Science, and Veterinary Medicine Departments are cooperating. It is
ticipated that much of the tropical research in the future will require a
Itidisciplinary systems approach. IFAS, through its Office of International
ograms, is well prepared to accept this challenge.
Research, training, and technical assistance were provided through 10
ntracts and one grant during 1971. Staff from almost all units of the Institute
rticipated in some phase of these activities.
Three contracts with the Agency for International Development involved
chnical assistance for educational institution building in Costa Rica, El
Ivador, and Vietnam. Two AID contracts called for special studies in Panama and
ger. A research project, funded by the Office of the War on Hunger, was
ntinued to develop feed composition tables for South and Central America. This
eject is complementary to a Ford Foundation grant.
Additional projects included a small contract with the Central Bank of
caragua for technical assistance on tropical crops and beef cattle production.
distance was provided to the Jamaica School of Agriculture for curriculum
velopment and faculty training through a loan from the World Bank. Technical
distance to upgrade the agricultural production of Guyana and to assist in the
tablishment of a research facility at the Ebini Livestock Station in that country
s continued under as AID grant to the Government of Guyana. Work under a
ntract funded by the Inter-American Development Bank was initiated to develop
ricultural economic research programs in Ecuador.
These international research and service programs supplement and reinforce
ate programs. Florida agriculture derives many direct benefits. For example,
AS scientists are screening Digitaria crosses from the Florida grass breeding
ogram for pangola stunt-virus resistance. This dangerous disease already has
mpletely destroyed pangola grass in two South American countries. While it is
t yet in Florida, the state's livestock industry is in jeopardy until scientists









1972. Molasses-Urea for Restricted Forage Fed Steers in the Tropics. J.
Animal Sci., (In press).
Fick, K. R., C. B. Ammerman, C. H. McGowan, P. E. Loggins and J. A. Cornell. 1972.
Influence of Supplemental Energy and Biuret Nitrogen on the Utilization of Low
Quality Roughage by Sheep. J. Animal Sci., (In press).

3. Title: Nutritive evaluation of tropical and subtropical forages.
Locations: Central University of Venezuela, Maracay Venezuela, University of
Zulia, Ministry of Agriculture and University of Florida
Objective: To determine the voluntary intake and nutrient digestibility of
various tropical and subtropical forages harvested or grazed under various
conditions in Florida and the tropics. To refine laboratory methods for estimating
forage nutritive value.
Investigators: J. E. Moore, G. O. Mott, C. Chicco
Status: In progress.
Publications:
Moore, J. E., O. C. Ruelke, C. E. Rios and D. E. Franke. 1970. Nutritive
Evaluation of Pensacola Bahiagrass Hays. Soil and Crop Science Society of
Florida. Contributed Papers (Crops Section). Proceedings, Volume 30.
Moore, J. E., G. O. Mott, D. G. Dunham, and R. W. Omer, 1971. Large Capacity in
Vitro OM Digestion Procedure. J. Animal Sci., 35: (Abstract, in press).
Ventura, Max, J. E. Moore, D. E. Franke and 0. C Ruelke. 1971. Nutritive
Evaluation of Pangola Digitgrass Hays. J. Animal Sci., 35: (Abstract, in
press).
Adams, C. B., F. Cevallos, R. de La Torre, E. Golding, J. E. Moore and O. C. Ruelke.
1971. Nutritive Evaluation of Bermudagrass Hays. J. Animal Sci., 35:
(Abstract, in press).


4. Title: Effect of Lime, Potassium and Environmental Factors on the Phosphorus
Nutrition of Tropical Legumes.
Location: Lake Izabal, Guatemala
Objective: To provide some of the basic information that will be needed to
develop leguminous forages for livesotck in the tropics.
Investigator: V. M. Urrutia (graduate student)
Status: Dissertation being written.

5. Title: Pasture Grazing Trials
Objective: Two trials are to be conducted (now being planted) at Carrasquero
nd El Guayabo, State of Zulia, Venezuela. At Carrasquero the pastures being
tudied are Elephant Grass, Guinea and Para. At El Guayabo Guinea, Para and Alema
ill be included in the test.
Investigators: D. H. Timm, G. O. Mott, Euro Rimcon, C. F. Chicco
Status: In progress.

STitle: Breeding and Management Systems for Beef Production in Central
nerica.
Location: Pan American Agricultural School, Zamorano, Honduras.
Objective: To compare the fertility rate, pre-weaning growth, post-weaning
rowth and carcass characteristics of various breed groups, including Brahman-
uropean crisscrosses.
Investigators: M. Koger, D. A. Franke
Status: In progress.

Graduate student research support resulted in the following dissertations and
hesis:
owner, A. V., "Factors Affecting Fertility of Selected Brown Sand Soils of Guyana."
ick, K. R., "Nonprotein Nitrogen and Energy Supplementation of Low-Quality
Roughages for Ruminants."
alveson, R. E., "Utilization of Aquatic Plants in Steer Diets: Voluntary Intake
and Digestibility."
ilvey, M. W., "Zinc Uptake by Hyparrhenia rufa (Nees) Stapf and Indigofera
hirsuta L.in Selected Eastern Panamanian Soils."
lith, G. A., "Comparative Study of Genus Stylosanthes in British Honduras."
Graduate student research still in progress includes Mr. F. Calderon who is
.rking in Colombia on an evaluation of tropical feedstuffs.

rsonnel:

merman, C. B. Venezuela; Colombia
kinson, W. Ecuador
'ckey, J. R. Honduras; Venezuela
enn, J. C. Guatemala
ad, H. H. Colombia
tt, G. O. Venezuela
irley, R. L. Venezuela
mm, D. H. Venezuela; Colombia
n Horn, H. H. Colombia
rnick, A. C. Colombia, Venezuela









West, S. H. Venezuela
Wilcox, C. J. Colombia; Ecuador
Wing, J. M. Colombia


PROJECT A18: VIETNAM (AID/vnO24)

Source of Funds: Agency for International Development

Objectives: To provide technical advice and assistance to the National
Agricultural Center to strengthen the Center and to insure basic economic and
rural development in Vietnam.

Personnel:

Carpenter, J. W. Animal Scientist
Marvel, M. Chief of Party and Vegetable Crops Scientist
Llwewllyn, W. R. Soils and Horticulture Specialist
Roberts, E. G. Forestry Specialist
Smerdon, E. T. Agricultural Engineer
Spinks, D. 0. Administrative Review
McCloud, D. E. Agronomist
Harms, R. H. Poultry Scientist
Tefertiller, K R. Agricultural Economist
Eden, W. G. Entomologist
Freeman, G. R. Campus Planning
Glenn, J. C. Animal Scientist
Krezdorn, A. H. Fruits Scientist
Loften, W. T. Agricultural Education Specialist
York, E. T., Jr. Administrative Review
Gray, J. L. Forestry Scientist
Kaufman, C. M. Forestry Scientist
Morrill, J. G. Vietnamese Student Advisor
Dennison, R. A. Food Scientist
Holmsen, A. A. Consultant on Fisheries

Publications:

Glenn, J. C., "Development Report, College of Veterinary and Zootechnical
Sciences, National Agricultural Center, Saigon, Vietnam," April, 1971.
Project Status and Accomplishments Report, "Fifth Semi-Annual Report,"
January 1, 1971 June 30, 1971.
Project Status and Accomplishments Report, "Sixth Semi-Annual Report,"
July 1, 1971 December 31, 1971.
Carpenter, J. W., End-of-tour report as Animal Science Education Specialist
and Acting Chief of Party, January, 1971.
National Agricultural Center Staff and University of Florida Task Force, "A
Development Plan for the National Agricultural Center of Vietnam," May, 1971
Morrill, J. G., Terminal Report of Educationist-Supervisor for Vietnamese Studen
November, 1971.
Dennison, R. A., "Food Science Report for National Agricultural Center," Decembe
1971.

GRANTS AND GIFTS

197 1


Commercial grants and gifts accepted as support for existing programs
during the year ending December 31, 1971. Financial assistance is
hereby gratefully acknowledged.

ABBOTT LABORATORIES
AREC, Quincy; AREC, Homesteac; ARC, Leesburg; AREC, Belle Glade--$2,000
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
AMCHEM PRODUCTS, INC.
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$1,000
AMERICAN BRAHMAN BREEDER'S ASSOCIATION
Animal Science Department--$3,758
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY
Microbiology Department--$56,250
AMERICAN CYANAMID
AREC, Homestead--$2,350
Veterinary Science Department--$2,500
AMERICAN POTASH INSTITUTE, INC.
Soils Department--$1,500
AMERICAN POULTRY AND HATCHERY FEDERATION
Poultry Science Department--$1,000









APPLIED BIOCHEMISTS, INC.
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$4,000
H. J. BAKER AND BRO., INC.
AREC, Bradenton--$500
ARC, Immokalee--$150
Poultry Science Department--$3,000
BASIC, INC.
AREC, Lake Alfred--$2,000
BERKSHIRE CHEMICALS, INC.
Plant Pathology Department--$700
BORDEN CHEMICAL COMPANY, SMITH-DOUGLAS DIVISION
Poultry Science Department--$3,000
BRUNSWICK PULP AND PAPER
Soils Department--$3,107
Forest Resources and Conservation Department--$2,000
THE BUCKEYE CELLULOSE CORPORATION
Soils Department--$3,107
Entomology and Nematology Department--$500
Forest Resources and Conservation Department--$2,000
CAMPBELL INSTITUTE FOR FOOD RESEARCH
Food Science Department--$5,000
CELLUPONIC SYSTEMS, INC.
AREC, Bradenton--$5,600
AREC, Homestead--$600
CHAROLAIS RANCHES
Animal Science Department--$1,500
CHEMAGRO CORPORATION
AREC, Sanford--$1,400
AREC, Bradenton--$500
CHEVRON CHEMICAL COMPANY
ARC, Apopka--$600
Entomology and Nematology Department--$1,000
ARC, Hastings--$500
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$1,000
Veterinary Science Department--$500
AREC, Quincy--$200
ITIES SERVICE COMPANY
Soils Department--$3,107
AREC, Homestead--$500
.H. CLAPP
Fruit Crops Department and Agricultural Engineering Department--$2,000
HE COCA-COLA COMPANY
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
COMMERCIAL SOLVENTS CORPORATION
Animal Science Department--$3,000
ONTAINER CORPORATION OF AMERICA
Soils Department--$3,107
Forest Resources and Conservation Department--$2,000
NTINENTAL CAN COMPANY, INC.
Soils Department--$3,107
Forest Resources and Conservation--$2,000
UNCIL FARMS, INC.
AREC, Bradenton--$7,500
AMOND SHAMROCK CORPORATION
Ornamental Horticulture Department--$500
AREC, Bradenton--$500
ARC, Apopka--$500
STILLERS FEED RESEARCH COUNCIL
Poultry Science Department--$2,000
VER CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING COMPANY
Ornamental Horticulture Department--$500
W CHEMICAL COMPANY
ARC, Jay--$250
Entomology and Nematology Department--$750
I. DUPONT DE NEMOURS, INC.
Entomology and Nematology Department--$1,000
AREC, Bradenton--$500
AREC, Sanford--$500
AREC, Homestead--$500
GLE MACHINE COMPANY, LTD.
ARC, Live Oak--$500
:RGLADES GOLF COURSE SUPERINTENDENT'S ASSOCIATION
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$500
,ST NATIONAL BANK OF GAINESVILLE
Forest Resources and Conservation Department--$34.54
:NT RIVER MILLS
Animal Science Department--$500
*RIDA CELERY EXCHANGE
AREC, Belle Glade--$500









FLORIDA CITRUS COMMISSION
Dairy Science Department--$4,720
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$8,168
FLORIDA FOUNDATION SEED PRODUCERS
Research Administration--$14,343.75
FLORIDA GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION
Veterinary Science Department--$7,370
Food Science Department--$10,000
Forest Resources and Conservation Department--$1,250
FLORIDA HEART ASSOCIATION
Veterinary Science Department--$9,900
FLORIDA PEACH CORPORATION OF AMERICA, INTERNATIONAL DIVISION
Fruit Crops Department--$300
FLORIDA STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND CONSUMER SERVICES
Forest Resources and Conservation Department--$2,000
FLORIDA STATE ROAD DEPARTMENT
Soils Department--$6,841.20
Ornamental Horticulture Department--$19.560.00
FLORIDA SUGARCANE LEAGUE
AREC, Belle Glade--$5,000
Entomology and Nematology--$8,000
FLORIDA WEST COAST GOLF COURSE SUPERINTENDENT'S ASSOCIATION
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$500
FMC CORPORATION
Plant Pathology Department--$500
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
ARC, Live Oak--$500
GEIGY AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS, DIVISION OF CIBA-GEIGY CORPORATION
ARC, Apopka--$1,000
AREC, Belle Glade--$1,000
AREC, Homestead--$2,500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$1,000
AREC, Sanford--$200
AREC, Quincy--$1,000
Agronomy Department--$10,000
Soils Department--$1,500
Soils Department and Food Science Department--$4,500
GILMAN PAPER COMPANY
Forest Resources and Conservation Department--$2,000
GOLF COURSE SUPERINTENDENT'S OF AMERICA
Ornamental Horticulture Department--$1,500
GREAT SALT LAKE MINERALS AND CHEMICALS CORPORATION; FRENCH POTASH AND IMPORTS;
and POTASH IMPORT AND CHEMICAL CORPORATION
AREC, Lake Alfred--$3,000
GREAT LAKES CHEMICAL CORPORATION
Entomology and Nematology Department--$250
AREC, Bradenton--$500
W. R. GRACE AND COMPANY
ARC, Fort Pierce--$600
DR. E. C. HARLAND
Veterinary Science Department--$908
HECTER SUPPLY COMPANY
Veterinary Science Department--$13,316
HERCULES, INC.
Soils Department--$3,107
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$1,000
HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY MARKETING COMMISSION
AREC, Bradenton--$4,000
HORRMAN-LAROCHE, INC.
Poultry Science Department--$2,500
HUDSON PULP AND PAPER CORPORATION
Soils Department--$3,107
Forest Resources and Conservation--$2,000
HUMAC COMPANY
AREC, Lake Alfred--$2,000
INTERNATIONAL PAPER COMPANY
Soils Department--$3,107
ITT RAYONIER, INC.
Soils Department--$3,107
Forest Resources and Conservation--$2,600
JAQUIN-FLORIDA DISTILLING COMPANY
Animal Science Department--$3,000
KENNECOTT COPPER CORPORATION
ARC, Apopka--$1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$1,000
AREC, Homestead--$500








ELI LILLY AND COMPANY
ARC, Monticello--$500
AREC, Quincy--$500
MALLINCKRODT CHEMICAL WORKS
Plant Pathology Department--$1,500
MERCK AND COMPANY, INC., MERCK CHEMICAL DIVISION
Plant Pathology Department--$550
AREC, Bradenton--$2,000
AREC, Homestead--$1,000
MERCK COMPANY FOUNDATION
Veterinary Science Department--$5,000
MILLER CHEMICAL AND FERTILIZER CORPORATION
AREC, Belle Glade --$500
AREC, Homestead--$1,000
ARC, Immokalee-$500
MINERAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
ARC, Apopka--$250
3-M COMPANY
Entomology and Nematology Department--$500
Ornamental Horticulture Department--$1,000
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$3,000
MOBIL CHEMCIAL COMPANY
Agronomy Department--$500
Entomology and Nematology Department--$1,000
AREC, Belle Glade--$1,000
AREC, Bradenton--$800
AREC, Lake Alfred--$300
AREC, Quincy--$1,600
AREC, Sanford--$500
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$750
ARC, Hastings--$500
ARC, Jay--$1,000
MONSANTO COMPANY
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
AREC, Sanford--$1,000
ARC, Hastings--$500
NATIONAL FEED INGREDIENTS ASSOCIATION
Animal Science Department--$3,000
DR. FRED C. NEAL
Veterinary Science Department--$1,488
NESTLE COMPANY, INC.
Animal Science Department--$2,000
GERALD NORMAN, DEPUTY DIRECTOR, AMERICAN SOCIETY OF PHOTOGRAMMETRY
Hume Library--$94
OWENS-ILLINOIS, FOREST PRODUCTS DIVISION
Soils Department--$3,107
Forest Resources and Conservation Department--$2,000
S. B. PENICK AND COMPANY
Entomology and Nematology Department--$3,200
PENNWALT CORPORATION
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$2,000
ARC, Live Oak--$735
PFIZER, INC.
Animal Science Department--$3,000
PHELPS DODGE REFINING CORPORATION
AREC, Lake Alfred--$2,500
PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS INDUSTRIES
ARC, Apopka--$2,000
THE PROCTER AND GAMBLE COMPANY
Agronomy Department--$1,000
ROBERT REAMS
ARC, Apopka--$2,000
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO, INC.
Agronomy Department--$4,000
RHODIA, INC.
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
ARC, Hastings--$500
OCKFELLER FOUNDATION
ARC,Fort Lauderdale--$25,000
OCKING K RANCH
Animal Science Department--$26,010
T. JOE PAPER COMPANY
Soils Department--$3,107
T. REGIS PAPER COMPANY
Soils Department--$3,107
Forest Resources and Conservation Department--$2,000
ANDOZ-WANDER, INC.
AREC, Homestead--$10,000








ANDREW SCHULER
Animal Science Department--$1,500
SCOTT PAPER COMPANY
Soils Department--$3,107
Forest Resources and Conservation Department--$2,000
G. D. SEARLE AND COMPANY
Animal Science Department--$12,600
SHELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY
Agronomy Department and ARC, Jay--$1,500
Entomology and Nematology Department--$2,300
Ornamental Horticulture Department--$500
Veterinary Science Department--$3,500
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
AREC, Bradenton--$250
AREC, Quincy--$500
ARC, Apopka--$600
SIERRA CHEMICAL COMPANY
AREC, Bradenton--$1,000
ARC, Apopka--$1,000
A. O. SMITH HARVESTORE
ARC, Jay--$2,000
SOUTH FLORIDA GOLF COURSE SUPERINTENDENT'S ASSOCIATION
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$1,000
SOUTH FLORIDA GROWERS ASSOCIATION
Food Science Department--$2,000
SOUTHERN MATERIALS CORPORATION
Poultry Science Department--$1,000
SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$2,000
STANDARD SPRAY AND CHEMICAL COMPANY
AREC, Bradenton--$1,000
STAUFFER CHEMICAL COMPANY
Entomology and Nematology Department--$500
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
AREC, Homestead--$500
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$500
SWIFT AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS CORPORATION
Ornamental Horticulture Department--$500
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$500
COLONEL AND MRS. C. J. TIPPETT
Animal Science Department--$10,000
TORO MANUFACTURING CORPORATION
Ornamental Horticulture Department--$5,000
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$1,000
DR. G. R. TOWNSEND
AREC, Belle Glade--$100
UNION CAMP CORPORATION
Soils Department--$3,107
UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
UNITED STATES BREWERS ASSOCIATION, INC.
Poultry Science Department--$3,000
UNITED STATES SUGAR CORPORATION
Dairy Science Department--$10,000
AREC, Belle Glade--$1,200
THE UPJOHN COMPANY
AREC, Lake Alfred--$500
AREC, Sanford--$500
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$150
ROBERT VAN WORP
ARC, Ocala--$20,750
VELSICOL CHEMICAL CORPORATION
Entomology and Nematology Department--$1,000
AREC, Bradenton--$500
WATER AND AIR RESEARCH
Food Science Department--$1,320
MITCHELL WOLFSON
ARC, Ocala--$450



Grants for basic research were accepted from national agencies as follows:

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION
Agronomy Department--$7,540
Entomology and Nematology Department--$7,500
NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF HEALTH
Entomology and Nematology Department--$44,950








Microbiology Department--$21,230
Microbiology Department--$24,093
AREC, Lake Alfred--$58,496
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
Soils Department--$26,400
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Agricultural Economics Department--$4,000
Agricultural Economics Department--$5,000
Agricultural Economics Department--$6,600
Agronomy Department--$500
Agronomy Department--$35,000
Agronomy Department--$42,000
Agronomy Department, Plant Pathology Department, ARC, Jay--$102,000
Agronomy Department and AREC, Homestead--$127,000
Entomology and Nematology Department -$30,000
Entomology and Nematology Department--$15,000
Entomology and Nematology Department--$20,000
Entomology and Nematology Department--$75,000
Entomology and Nematology Department--$35,000
Entomology and Nematology Department--$30,000
Entomology and Nematology Department--and AREC,Belle Glade--$20,000
Entomology and Nematology Department and AREC, Quincy--$1,000
Food Science Department--$80,000
Soils Department--$72,000
Soils Department--$1,000
Soils Department--$3,000
Soils Department--$4,200
Soils Department--$2,000
Soils Department; AREC, Belle Glade; ARC, Fort Lauderdale; and
Extension Service--$65,000
AREC, Lake Alfred and Agricultural Engineering Department--$1,000
AREC, Lake Alfred--$2,250
AREC, Lake Alfred--$7,500
AREC, Bradenton--$2,500









West, S. H. Venezuela
Wilcox, C. J. Colombia; Ecuador
Wing, J. M. Colombia


PROJECT A18: VIETNAM (AID/vnO24)

Source of Funds: Agency for International Development

Objectives: To provide technical advice and assistance to the National
Agricultural Center to strengthen the Center and to insure basic economic and
rural development in Vietnam.

Personnel:

Carpenter, J. W. Animal Scientist
Marvel, M. Chief of Party and Vegetable Crops Scientist
Llwewllyn, W. R. Soils and Horticulture Specialist
Roberts, E. G. Forestry Specialist
Smerdon, E. T. Agricultural Engineer
Spinks, D. 0. Administrative Review
McCloud, D. E. Agronomist
Harms, R. H. Poultry Scientist
Tefertiller, K R. Agricultural Economist
Eden, W. G. Entomologist
Freeman, G. R. Campus Planning
Glenn, J. C. Animal Scientist
Krezdorn, A. H. Fruits Scientist
Loften, W. T. Agricultural Education Specialist
York, E. T., Jr. Administrative Review
Gray, J. L. Forestry Scientist
Kaufman, C. M. Forestry Scientist
Morrill, J. G. Vietnamese Student Advisor
Dennison, R. A. Food Scientist
Holmsen, A. A. Consultant on Fisheries

Publications:

Glenn, J. C., "Development Report, College of Veterinary and Zootechnical
Sciences, National Agricultural Center, Saigon, Vietnam," April, 1971.
Project Status and Accomplishments Report, "Fifth Semi-Annual Report,"
January 1, 1971 June 30, 1971.
Project Status and Accomplishments Report, "Sixth Semi-Annual Report,"
July 1, 1971 December 31, 1971.
Carpenter, J. W., End-of-tour report as Animal Science Education Specialist
and Acting Chief of Party, January, 1971.
National Agricultural Center Staff and University of Florida Task Force, "A
Development Plan for the National Agricultural Center of Vietnam," May, 1971
Morrill, J. G., Terminal Report of Educationist-Supervisor for Vietnamese Studen
November, 1971.
Dennison, R. A., "Food Science Report for National Agricultural Center," Decembe
1971.

GRANTS AND GIFTS

197 1


Commercial grants and gifts accepted as support for existing programs
during the year ending December 31, 1971. Financial assistance is
hereby gratefully acknowledged.

ABBOTT LABORATORIES
AREC, Quincy; AREC, Homesteac; ARC, Leesburg; AREC, Belle Glade--$2,000
AREC, Belle Glade--$500
AMCHEM PRODUCTS, INC.
ARC, Fort Lauderdale--$1,000
AMERICAN BRAHMAN BREEDER'S ASSOCIATION
Animal Science Department--$3,758
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY
Microbiology Department--$56,250
AMERICAN CYANAMID
AREC, Homestead--$2,350
Veterinary Science Department--$2,500
AMERICAN POTASH INSTITUTE, INC.
Soils Department--$1,500
AMERICAN POULTRY AND HATCHERY FEDERATION
Poultry Science Department--$1,000













REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER

Summary of Expenditures of Federal Funds 1970-71




Regional Total
Hatch Research McIntire Federal
Funds Funds Stennis Funds

Salaries & Wages 654,665.36 108,652.65 86,397.22 849,715.23

Travel 3,159.34 5,167.00 3,491-.03 11,817.37

Transportation & Communication 204.65 1,377.20 2,241.13 3,822.98

Utilities -0- 6,160.00 2,859.36 9,019.36

Printing 120.83 436.69 82.15 639.67

Repairs & Maintenance 1,244.70 1,242.14 976.64 3,463.48

Contractual Services 1,118.55 749.67 1,460.54 3,328.76

Rentals 318.57 -0- -0- 318.57

Other Current Charges & Obligations -0- 30.00 60.00 90.00

Materials 18,346.85 23,108.05 8,168.00 49,622.90

Equipment 68,600.43 1,903.99 3,020.25 73,524.67

Land & Buildings 14,564.07 -0- -0- 14,564.07

TOTAL FEDERAL EXPENDITURES 762,343.35 148,827.39 108,756.32 1,019.927.06







REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER

Summary of Expenditures of State Funds 1970-71


Fla. Agricultural
Experiment Station Incidental Grants and Total
General Revenue Funds Funds Donations Funds State Funds
Salaries, Wages & Fringe Benefits 9,947,986.05 180,223.80 776,420.04 10,904,629.89

Travel 221,189.22 20,541.34 86,094.31 327,824.87

Transportation & Communication 125,753.19 15,413.27 8,452.58 149,619.04

Utilities 212,064.16 29,461.47 4,291.03 245,816.66

Printing 71,517.51 1,493.36 2,962.86 75,973.73

Repairs & Maintenance 80,860.90 13,141.64 25,101.73 119,104.27

Contractual Services 71,172.07 16,646,89 27,591.68 115,410.64

Rentals 76,971.39 30,442.61 1,864.79 109,278.79

Other Current Charges & Obligations 18,814.30 4,129.34 2,996.78 25,940.42

Supplies and Materials 783,719.18 456,892.76 158,305.36 1,398,917.30

Equipment 284,509.94 80,547.30 118,541.93 483,599.17

Land and Buildings 125,696.36 14,276.39 87,880.33 227,853.08

Transfers -0- -0- -0- -0-

Special Appropriation-Building Fund -0- -0- -0- -0-

TOTAL STATE FUNDS 12,020,254.27 863,210.17 1,300,503.42 14,183,967.86








AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT


Research was conducted under 17 projects with preliminary research in
five areas. Three projects were terminated and two projects were initiated.
A major research effort is being directed toward applied problems related to the
environment. This includes studies of ways to effectively dewater aquatic
weeds for possible beneficial uses such as for animal feed, research on disposal
of dairy farm waste through lagoons or through direct land application, and
studies of land disposal of treated municipal waste water through irrigation
systems.
Mechanization of fruits and vegetable production and harvesting also
remains a major area of research thrust in the Department.
Laboratories to house pollution control research were completed during
the year, and faculty housed in temporary quarters have been moved back in
the main building. Also during the year, Dr. Dennis Buffington joined the
faculty to work in the area of structures and environmental housing.







FLA-AG-00001 SMERDON E T

PRELIMINARY AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Construction of a direct heat, continuous type soil pasteurizer was completed.
Preliminary tests were made with a half and half wet soil mix of peat and fine
sand. Soil temperatures reached were 180-1900F. Material was placed in a
wooden pallet bin and remained at temperatures greater than 1500F for two to
three hours. More tests are planned with inoculated batches of material to
test effectiveness of process. Preliminary work on renovation of municipal
wastewater through application to land has been conducted. Effluent has been
applied at rates of 1, 2, 4, and 8 inches per week through sprinkler irrigation
to forage crops. Analyses include yield, dry matter, and nitrogen content.
Feeding trials were conducted to determine forage quality. Studies of waste
handling and wastewater impoundment for confinement and semi-confinement
cow-calf operations on Florida flatwoods soils are now planned. Groundwater
quality under unpaved lots will be studied. The handling and disposal of horse
manure from large horse farms and racetracks in Florida will also be studied at
the new Horse Research Center at Lowell. A monitoring program is now underway
on the disposal of wastewater from a sanitary landfill on pasture to study
problems resulting from this practice.







FLA-AG-00627 MYERS J M

PASTURE PROGRAMS AND CATTLE BREEDING SYSTEMS FOR BEEF PRODUCTION

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
This report covers the sixth year of a seven year study on cow-calf production
responses to several different pasture production programs. One of the pasture
programs includes seepage irrigation as a cultural practice. Approximately one
half of the acreage in the program is subjected to irrigation. The program
using irrigation is compared to other pasture production programs of different
levels of intensification but without irrigation. Water is applied in
sufficient quantities to prevent the water table from receding below the soil
surface more than 24 inches during winter and spring and 30 inches during summer
and fall. Rainfall during the annual period (October 70 September 71) was
about nine inches below normal. Rainfall was adequate only during part of the
winter and during the summer months. Twelve applications totaling 30.7 inches
of water were applied during the annual period. Response to irrigation in 1971
was extremely small. The irrigated pasture program produced 26 pounds of calf
per acre (6.0%) more than the check program. The dry year coupled with the
relatively large amount of irrigation was expected to produce a much larger
differential in yield between the irrigated and non-irrigated treatment.
Irrigation as practiced in this experiment has not proved to be economical;
however, the physical characteristics of the experimental area are poorly suited
for seepage irrigation.








MYERS J M BAIRD C D CLARK F


CONTINUOUS HARVESTING-CURING SYSTEM FOR BRIGHT-LEAF TOBACCO

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Growers of cigar wrapper tobacco in North Florida are experiencing heavy economic
pressures. These pressures result from the failure of labor productivity to keep
pace with wage rates and to a reduction in demand for this type tobacco. Curing
in bulk has been accepted by the Bright leaf tobacco industry and has resulted in
a reduction in labor requirements for harvesting and curing by 25 percent or more.
It appears that it may be feasible to apply bulk curing technology to cigar
wrapper production if suitable operational management techniques can be devised.
Preliminary studies were initiated in 1971 in an effort to identify the para-
meters that may need investigation to develop operation techniques for bulk
curing cigar wrapper tobacco. Laboratory bulk curing facilities, formerly used
for bulk curing studies on bright leaf tobacco, were modified to handle cigar
wrapper tobacco. A factorial experiment was conducted in these facilities.
Factors used were (1) Loading density; 7 and 14 pounds of uncured leaf per square
foot (4 and 8 times normal density) (2) Air flow rate; 10, 20 and 30 feet per
minute entering velocity. The air flow was continuous during the 21 day curing
period and supplemental heat was not added. The results appear promising. There
were visual indications that free moisture may have condensed on some leaf surfaces
during the early stages of curing causing minor damage. Supplement heat used at
the proper time probably would have prevented this occurrence. Leaf colors were
generally satisfactory. Further evaluations are being made on samples of the
tobacco.


FLA-AG-01123 MYERS J M

STRAWBERRY CULTURE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Usually strawberries are grown in Florida in sandy soil on high beds covered with
vinyl plastic material. Conventionally the berries are irrigated by either the
sprinkler or furrow method of application. To a large extent, most of the water
applied by either of these methods must reach the soil in the root zone by capillary
movement. It is suspected the capillary force is not adequate to properly wet the
soil of the root zone for many of the soils on which strawberries are grown. Also,
both of these irrigation methods would tend to increase the salt concentration in
the root zone. A field plot experiment has been established to measure the
influence of several irrigation methods on strawberry production and soil moisture
conditions in the root zone. Two different types of drip application methods
and a check treatment will be compared with the two application methods mentioned
previously. The drip method, where water is applied at the top of the bed of soil
under the vinyl cover, may provide better soil moisture distribution and reduce
salt.concentration in the plant root zone.


FLA-AG-01203 FLUCK R C SHAW L N

A SYSTEMS APPROACH TO VEGETABLE HARVESTING

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
stripper mechanism for bell pepper removal utilizing rubber covered tines on
he connector link of a spatial four-bar mechanism was designed and constructed.
Preliminary tests show that the mechanism effectively removes all but the small
fruit on standing plants with minimum damage to the plants. Aid was given the
manufacturer who is constructing the previously developed cabbage harvester.


'LA-AG-01250 CHOATE R E

AFTER CONTROL FOR FORESTRY PRODUCTION

PROGRESSS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
n periods of high rainfall extensive areas of Florida's flatwoods forest lands
re inundated. These studies are designed to evaluate the effect of surface and
internal drainage upon tree development and to establish criterion for minimum
acceptable drainage practices for forest lands on flatwoods soils. Three
rainage treatments are under study; 2 feet, 5 feet and no artificial drainage.
ater table levels have been recorded, on a weekly basis, since February 1969.
eedling trees were planted during the winter of 1968. The water table level
under the plots with deeper drainage has been consistently lover than on plots
ith less drainage depth. The degree of difference however has been small.
average tree height variation with respect to type of drainage is as follows:
o drainage 3.0 ft, 2 ft drainage 3.4 ft, 5 ft. drainage 3.5 ft. Trees on beds
ear 5 ft. drains are not as tall as trees further away from these drains.


FLA-AG-01034










GENETICS AND ENVIRONMENT OF BEAT TOLERANCE IN LAYING HENS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
After 4 generations of selection, high and low heat tolerance lines have been
obtained. These tests have been conducted using the survival time of 5 week old
white leghorn chicks, in a controlled high heat stress environment, as the index
to heat tolerance. In an effort to find a more desirable index to heat
tolerance, tests have been conducted on chicks selected for high and low oxygen
consumption lines. Presently, the correlation between these lines is not
satisfactory. The rate of embryonic and post-embryonic development was
determined for chicken and quail eggs incubated under continuous light,
continuous dark, or 12 hours light and 12 hours dark. Development of the
embryos was accelerated by increased length of light exposure. There were no
significant differences in hatching body weight of chicks, nor in subsequent
body weights. The incidence of healed navels was increased with greater length
of light exposure during incubation.




FLA-AG-01406 FLUCK R C BAGNALL L 0 SHAW L N

VARIETY DEVELOPMENT, CULTURAL PRACTICES AND MECHANICAL HARVESTING SYSTEMS FOR
FRESH MARKET TOMATOES

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Simulated sand penetration tests and flat plate compression tests on 5 varieties
resulted in no significant differences in sand penetration force, rate of force
increase, or energy between varieties but there were differences in flat plate
compression characteristics, indicating that resistance to sand penetration may
not vary as much among varieties as do some other theological characteristics.
Flat plate compression of mechanically harvested and flume handled mature green
tomatoes showed no changes in firmness or every absorbing capacity as compared t
carefully hand harvested tomatoes, indicating no measureable flesh degradation
due to the added handling. Model and prototype fluming tests demonstrated
feasibility of bulk unloading and partly established the ranges of parameters.




FLA-AG-01411 KINARD D T

MECHANICAL HARVESTING OF TEA

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
A new harvester bar of full size and simpler mechanical design was constructed
to replace a smaller harvester bar on an experimental mechanical harvester and
was used in tests to determine more accurately optimum combinations of cyclic
rates and forward speed as indicated by harvester efficiency. Quantity of
desirable tea leaves harvested as compared to the quantity available exceeded 90
percent at cyclic rates of 250 to 500 cycles per minute with a forward speed of
1/2 mile per hour. The quantity of trash and undesirable material collected
continues as a problem but seems not to be critical and can be corrected
somewhat.



FLA-AG-01458 OVERMAN A R

DISPOSAL OF DAIRY FARM WASTE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Dairy wastes from the University Dairy Research Unit were applied to crops
through sprinkler irrigation. Application rates for oats were 1/4, 1/2 and 1
inch per week and were 1/2, 1 and 2 inch per week for sorghum. Vegetation was
harvested for green crop. Yields were analyzed in terms of the Mitscherlich
concept of fertility, where emphasis is placed upon percent of optimum yield
rather than absolute yields. Plant samples were collected from the sorghum
plots during growth to determine moisture content and plant element composition.
Similar analyses will also be performed on the manure slurry, which has about
0.2 percent solids. Efficiency of nutrient uptake can then be calculated.
Nitrogen recovery by oats was estimated at 153, 92, and 55% at 1/4, 1/2, and 1
inch per week. These values for sorghum-sudangrass were 105 and 63% at 1 and 2
inches per week. At 1 inch per week of effluent oats produced 88 percent of
their maximum yield (12.5 metric tons per hectaire) while sorghum-sudangrass
showed 55 percent of maximum (90.7 metric tons per hectaire).


FLA-AG-01251


BAIRD C D










NUTRIENT 8 WATER INPUTS E OUTGO FROM THE ORGANIC & MINERAL SOILS IN THE LAKE
APOPKA AREA

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
An area of approximately 450 acres was selected for study of groundwater
recharge for possible disposition of drainage water from the Zellvood Muck
Farms. Rainfall was followed with a recording rain gage. Fluctuations in
levels of ponded water were monitored with a water stage recorder. Weekly
measurement of piezometric head were obtained at'a well on the same property.
Correlations of these data should allow estimates of groundwater recharge and
permeability of the upper strata.



FLA-AG-01478 OVERMAN A R ROGERS J S

SYSTEMS FOR TILE DRAIN SLUDGE CONTROL FOR CITRUS WITH HIGH NATER TABLE IN
FLORIDA

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
The Department of Agricultural Engineering is a member of the interdisciplinary
team that is attacking this problem. Agricultural Engineering has major
interest in the magnitude and direction of subsurface water movement. Data on
drain outflow, water table levels and piezometric pressures are being collected.
Measurements from tensionmeters installed along a boundary ditch indicate that
most of the water above the spodic layer moves laterally along the top of the
layer during drainage. There are indications that entrapped air is present
under the spodic layer, thus reducing the rate of vertical flow beneath the
horizon. A system was developed for scanning pressure profiles during
infiltration and drainage. Hydraulic conductivity was measured at various water
contents and compared to calculated values for Lakeland fine sand. A resistance
analog was used to simulate drainage of an Oldsmar profile. Comparison with
field data indicated restrictions near the tile with reduced tile outflow.



FLA-AG-01481 BAGNALL L 0

PROCESSED AQUATIC PLANTS FOR ANIMAL NUTRITION

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Preliminary harvesting-pressing-dehydration tests showed cost of processing and
potential for improvement. Water hyacinth and hydrilla were pressed and dried
for extended beef and swine feeding trials. Water hyacinth silage was made for
beef and sheep acceptability trials; additives are necessary. Static pressing
tests showed pressing properties of hyacinth. Drying tests at various flow
rates and temperatures showed drying characteristics of hyacinth and hydrilla.
Tension, compression and shear strength of hyacinth stems were found. A
harvester model has been tested and a prototype built. Some dry matter can be
recovered from hyacinth juice by filtering or centrifuging.



FLA-AG-01493 NORDSTEDT R A

DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF A HULTI-STAGE LAGOON SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF DAIRY
FARM WASTE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Results from the first twelve months of operation indicate an average influent
BOD(5) of 661 mg/l at a flow rate of approximately 80-100 thousand gallons per
day. BOD(5) reductions of 88, 60 and 24% in the first, second and third
lagoons, respectively, have been achieved for a total reduction of 96%. The
quality of the effluent from the third lagoon has been very good on an average
basis, however, a large degree of variability occurs. A severe algal bloom
occurred in the third lagoon in the twelfth month of operation, dropping the
dissolved oxygen content from an average of 6.7 mg/l to zero. The effluent from
the system has had no detectable adverse effects on the seepage-irrigated
permanent pasture. Groundwater near the lagoons has been sampled from 10 ft.
leep wells. Although these samples show some contamination at a distance of 15
ft from the anaerobic lagoon, these levels have diminished to background levels
100 ft from the lagoon. The soil in the area is underlain with clay layers and
groundwater movement is lateral. Raw manure entering the lagoon system has a
7otatile solids content of about 80%. Sludge samples were collected from the
hree lagoons.


OVERMAN A R


FLA-AG-01468










CHARACTERIZATION OF THEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Impact loading of fruits and vegetables was investigated to gain better
understanding of the impact process and enable design of harvesting and handling
systems to minimize damage resulting from impacts. A test apparatus has been
developed which gives a recording of force generated between a failing weight
and a stationary object during impact. Impact curves have been obtained with
tomatoes, green peppers, summer squash, cucumbers, peaches and several citrus
fruits. Sensitivity to impact damage varies considerably among species with
peppers being extremely sensitive to internal failure. In general, peak force
and total impulse increase and impulse duration decreases with increasing drop
height. Peak force decreases, total impulse remains essentially constant and
impulse duration increases with increasing drop weight. Impact of a less firm,
for instance riper, fruit results in a lower peak force, longer impulse duration
and essentially no change in total impulse. Attempts are underway to associate
flesh failure with impact curve characteristics. Creep tests were performed
with squash, cucumbers, and peppers to define weight-time static loading limits.
Flat plate compression and puncture loading tests were performed on squash and
peppers to determine slow loading limits.




PLA-AG-01550 KINARD D T BAIRD C D GAFFNEY J J

FORCED AIR PRECOOLING OP FLORIDA VEGETABLES

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
A research facility was designed and constructed for performing forced-air
precooling tests on various products. This unit has a large product chamber;
high refrigeration capacity; precise control and measurement of air flow rates,
air temperature and relative humidity; product reheating capabilities; and
equipment for weighing the product before and after cooling. Preliminary tests
were performed on cooling of snap beans and bell peppers in bulk at various
rates of air flow.





FLA-AG-01572 OVERMAN A R

FERTILIZERS AND ORGANIC WASTES APPLIED TO SOILS IN RELATION TO ENVIRONMENTAL
QUALITY

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Dairy wastes from the University Dairy Research Unit was applied to crops through
sprinkler irrigation. Application rates for oats were 1/4, 1/2 and 1 inch per we
and were 1/2, 1 and 2 inches per week for sorghum. Vegetation was harvested for
green crop. Yields were analyzed in terms of the Mitscherlich concept of fertili
where emphasis is placed upon percent of optimum yield rather than absolute yield
Plant samples were collected from the sorghum plots during growth to determine
moisture content and plant element composition. Similar analyses will also be
performed on the manure slurry, which has about 0.2 percent solids. Efficiency o
nutritent uptake can then be calculated. Nitrogen recovery by oats was estimated
at 153, 92, and 55% at 1/4, 1/2 and 1 inch per week. These values for sorghum-
sudangrass were 105 and 63% at 1 and 2 inches per week. At 1 inch per week of
effluent oats produced 88 percent of their maximum yield (12.5 metric tons
per hectaire) while sorghum-sudangrass showed 55 percent of maximum (90.7 metric
tons per hectare).


FLA-AG-01495


LUCK R C








AGRONOMY DEPARTMENT


Agronomic research was conducted under 30 projects. Some highlights
of agronomic research in 1971 follow.
Some 20 new male sterile cytoplasms are being incorporated into southern
corn inbreds.
A patent is pending on Hemarthria sp., a grass with beverage properties
having tea-like taste and odor.
In overseas tests, some ten digitgrass hybrids and eight introductions
show resistance to the pangola stunt virus; this disease has been identified
at Ebini, Guyana.
Low temperature at germination was found to be critical for sugarcane
and is thought to contribute to the variety decline observed in the field.
The starch assimilating enzyme in Pangola has been discovered to be
inactivated by 50F temperatures; this system is responsible for the low
cool-season production of most of the tropical grasses.
From the agronomy international agricultural program, a new high yielding,
high quality peanut variety, Altika, has been released cooperatively with
Guyana.
The computerized corn simulation model, SIMAZ, has been used to delineate
factors responsible for low corn yield barriers in Florida corn production.
From the agronomy international agricultural program, the Jupiter
soybean, a new variety adapted to the tropics, was released cooperatively
ith the United States Department of Agriculture.
A new growth regulator has shown promise for controlling tobacco suckers,
and a promising new family of herbicides has been discovered which is especially
effective against grasses.
Up to two inches per week from a dairy barn waste disposal system has
een successfully applied to several crops.
Bahiagrass was shown to have lower intake and digestibility than either
angola or bermudagrass, and the rate of digestion is much lower for bahiagrass.
hese factors are believed to be the cause of lower levels of animal performance
n bahiagrass.
A sexually reproduced guineagrass has been discovered, making genetic
improvementt of this grass now possible for the first time. New forage grasses
should result from this bredding program.
Pasture grass growth has shown to be markedly influenced by sting
ematodes; soil temperatures of 200 to 30PC favored nematodes and reduced
rass growth, and temperatures above 340C reduced nematode damage and favored
increased grass growth.


LA-AY-00295 HARRIS H C

ASTURE GRASS AND LEGUME RESPONSES TO FERTILIZER AND MANAGEMENT

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
e are investigating antimicrobial effects of herbicides. The work will be
reported at a later date.



LA-AY-00374 HORNER E S

ORN BREEDING

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
wo long-term selection experiments were evaluated in 1970 and 1971 by testing
crosses between selected populations from each cycle and three testers. In an
experiment involving selection for combining ability with F44 x F6, a gain in
rain yield of 18 percent was made during the first 5 cycles, but there was a
oss in the 6th cycle. Ear height was reduced about 12 percent and lodging 10
percent during the 6 cycles of selection. These gains were noted both in
crosses of selected populations with the tester F44xF6, which was used to
velop the populations, and with an unrelated, broad-base tester. The second
experiment involves a comparison of three types of testers: an inbred line, a
:oad-base variety, and yield of S(2) lines per se. Selected populations from
ie first 5 cycles of these parallel programs were crossed with two broad-base
esters, and the test crosses were grown in a total of 60 replications. On the
rerage for both testers, grain yield was improved 18 percent by the inbred
tster method, 9 percent by the broad tester method, and 8 percent by the inbred
leld method. The inbred tester method (selection for specific combining
Jility) appears to be about twice as effective as either of the other methods
ir improving general combining ability. These results, along with those of the
Lrst experiment discussed above, are good evidence that narrow-base testers are
Effective for increasing the frequency of genes having additive effects.










PASTURE PROGRAMS AND CATTLE BREEDING SYSTEMS FOR BEEF PRODUCTION

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
For the sixth season of the third phase of the Beef Research Unitpasture-cattle
program systems, clover-grass forage yields were about average even with a 10
inch deficit of rainfall compared to the 60 year average. Three programs in phase
three involve: moderate fertilization, moderate fertilization with renovation,
and higher fertilization with seepage irrigation. Forage yields recorded in
1971 were 7556, 6168, and 5705 pounds per acre of oven-dry forage respectively.
Below average rainfall in the fall of 1970 and winter and spring of 1971 coupled
with 30 days with temperatures of 320F or below accounted for late and low
clover production as well as grass growth. The third phase of this project will
be concluded in 1972 with a final summary of forage yields and forage and
botanical composition.






FLA-AY-01087 WILCOX M

CHENICALe-iROL OF NEEDS IN FIELD CROPS

PROGRESS RB OQT: 71/01 71/12
Preemergent applications of 2 lbs of BON-097 per acre controlled broadleaf and
gramineous weeds and without cultivation allowed yields as high as a cultivated
control treatment. Paarlan appeared to be very similar to benefin in its various
effects in tobacco weed control. The most effective treatment was vernolate +
paarlan + diphenamide, the last applied post-transplant over the tops of the plant
where the first two had been applied pre-plant incorporated. DCPA plus linuron
at 8 + 1 lbs/a was again the most effective treatment for weed control in soybeans
Several combinations involving prometryne, alachlor, CIPC, maloran, preforan,
and amiben ester were also effective.





FLA-AY-01134 EDWARDSON J R WARMKE H E

THE ROLE OF THE CYTOPLASH IN HEREDITY OF HIGHER PLANTS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
The inheritance of Petunia atkinsonia fertility restoring genes in Phybrida
cytoplasm is being investigated. Dominant male-sterility genes in s-type corn
cytoplasm are being studied. Some twenty of the new male-sterile cytoplasms are
being incorporated into adapted Florida corn inbreds. The sterilizing abilities
of these and their stabilities and responses to restorers also are being
investigated. It has been shown that Helminthosporium maydis and Fusarium
moniliforme may be seed transmitted in corn, especially in lines of T cytoplasm.
Cytological and seed transmission studies of the Q-virus are in progress.
Studies of viruses and their induced inclusions are continuing with light and
electron microscopy. Studies of crystalline bodies in healthy and virus
infected tobacco tissues also are continuing. Induction of resistance to
Helminthosporium maydis infection in T-type sterile corn with irradiation and
chemicals is being attempted. Fertile progenies from gamma irradiated T-type
sterile corn have shown resistance to H. maydis infection. Cytological
comparisons of tissues from cytoplasmic male sterile and normal lines of several
species, including corn and sorghum, are inprogress.






FLA-AY-01135 EDWARDSON J R WARMKE" H E

BREEDING DISEASE RESISTANT LUPINES

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
A sweet, cold resistant, disease resistant (resistance to Stemphylium and
Authrocnose) blue lupine selection continues to show promise in improved seed
production over Frost blue lupine. This report terminates Hatch project 1135,
Breeding Disease Resistant Lupines.


FLA-AY-00627


KILLINGER G B










BITE CLOVER AND ALFALFA BREEDING

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Alfalfa populations representing the 3rd through 7th cycles of selection for
?ersistence were planted in a replicated test in 1969 to determine selection
progress. Survival percentages in May, 1971 were 21, 27, 42, 49, and 45 for
:ycles 3,4,5,6, and 7, respectively. These results indicate steady progress
through the 6th cycle, but a slight loss in persistence occurred in the 7th
ycle. A possible explanation of the latter is that the 7th cycle population
ias only two years old when seed was harvested, which was not long enough to
1low effective selection for persistence. In all the other cycles, stands had
een left for three years before selections were made. Seed was harvested from
urviving plants in stands planted in 1967, and new plantings were established
o begin the 8th cycle of selection for persistence. White Clover,-A number of
varieties and composites were screened for potential as sources of breeding
material. Those having the most promise, based on vigor and summer survival,
ere the following: The Italian varieties 'Gigante Lodigiano' and 'Espanso';
pen-pollinated progenies of selected plants harvested from a spaced-plant
ursery in 1970; and several populations developed by intercrossing clones
elected for persistence at the Beef Research Unit. Clones are being
established from these populations for further evaluation.






LA-AT-01166 KILLINGER G B

VALUATION OF INTRODUCED PLANT SPECIES AND VARIETIES FOR ECONOMIC USES

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
replicated sunflower (Helianthus annus) test with NK-HO1, Predovik, and
asnodaret varieties yielded 2548, 2418, and 2360 pounds of seed per acre
spectively. Three irrigations of 1/5 to 1 inch of water were applied during
e dry month of May. These seed contained 41.7, 44.4, and 44.4 percent oil on
dry basis as determined by the Richard B. Russell Agricultural Research
nter, Athens, Georgia. Twenty-two introductions of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus
) and two roselle (8. sabdariffa L.) were evaluated for stem growth and
sease resistance. PI 326025 and 329185 made the most growth and were free of
sease. Five commercial varieties, planted in replicated plots and treated
th methyl di-bromide, nemagon, and mo-cap for root-knot control, were evaluated.
ot-knot was controlled for a six to eight week period by all three fumigants.
cause of mild temperatures and no killing frosts through November 22nd to
foliate the kenaf, yields of dry stem will be made at a later date. All
mmercial varieties and most introductions grew to a height of 16 to 18 feet.
elections of light and dark colored seed were made from pigeonpeas, PI 218066,
ajanus cajan) 'Norman' variety. A patent is pending on Hemarthria spp. as a
average plant with the end product having tea-like properties as to taste and
or.







-AY-01167 BOID F T PRINE G M

LUATION OF INTRODUCED AND NATIVE PLANT SPECIES FOR PASTURE, FORAGE AND OTHER
S

GRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
sses.-UF1 digitgrass continues to show considerable resistance to the sting
atode (Belonolaimus longicaudatus Rau). This forage accession has good
wth and forage qualities for Florida areas south of the 300 north latitude.
now has been planted in acreage plantings in three Florida locations. In
ro digestibility analyses have been conducted in cooperation with the Animal
ence Department and have given favorable results. Palatability and intake
dies have been initiated with material prepared for such use. Planting
erial has been sent to Surinam, S.A., and to Jamaica,W.I., for further growth
disease evaluation. Release of this variety is anticipated. Legumes.-
ennial peanut (Arachis sp.) accessions which produced highest forage yields
1971 were P.I. 262826, P.I. 262818, G.S-1 Arb, and P.I. 262840 with dry
ter yields of 9580, 8580, 8180 and 7800 pounds per acre, respectively. These
nuts were planted in 1965 and have been harvested twice each year since 1967.


PLA-AY-01154


HORNER E S










IMPROVEMENT BY INTERSPECIFIC HYBRIDIZATION WITHIN THE GENUS DIGITARIA

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Digitari hybridizations accomplished since this project was initiated in 1964
have totaled 1460. Approximately 6300 spaced plants have been grown in the
interim, with selections made primarily for winter hardiness and pangola stunt
virus (PSV) resistance. Breeding lines have been distributed to more than
twenty other stations, including Quincy, Florida; Ft. Pierce, Fla; Ona, Fla;
Brooksville, Fla; Beaumont, Tex; Corozal, Puerto Rico; Paramaribo, Surinam;
Ebini, Guyana; Brisbane, Aust.; Tucapita, Venezuela; El Guyabo, Venezuela;
Bogota, Columbia; San Salvador, El Salvador; Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Iquitos,
Peru; Carresguerro, Venezuela; Jamaica, West Indies; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil;
Tegucigalpa, Honduras and Ibadan, Africa. Screening for resistance to PSV has
been accomplished best in the Surinam location. Approximately 10 hybrids and 8
introductions have resistance to PSV. PSV was also found in samples collected
at Ebini, Guyana. Screening for winter hardiness among USDA plant introductions
has been done cooperatively at Gainesville, Fla, and Experiment, Ga. Ninety
hybrid digitgrasses were evaluated at both Gainesville, Fla. and Quincy, Fla.
Cytogenetic work on the digitgrasses has shown apomixis is not present, and that
interspecific hybridization is not only possible, but a very effective way of
obtaining additional genetic variation.





FLA-AY-01262 PRINE G H

PLANTING AND FERTILIZER APPLICATIONS ON THE YIELD OF CORN, SOYBEANS, SORGHUM,
AND SMALL GRAINS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
corn, forage, sorghum and kenaf both alone and in mixture with each other were
studied as to their yield of grain and silage. Corn gave the highest yield of
grain and silage in 1971. However, the corn-sorghum mixture gave the most
consistent high yields of grain and silage over a 3-year period. Tall crop
silage mixtures offer the possibility of fewer crop failures, more consistent
yields and quality of silage and a longer silage harvest season. A number of
crops, including pigeonpeas, peanuts, cowpeas, soybeans, sorghum, pearlmillet
and kenaf were planted in corn middles at layby for the purpose of having a
second summer crop. Pigeonpeas made the best growth and soybeans and peanuts
are promising if some modification can be made in the normal plant growth
habits. Non-legumes suffered from N deficiency. Two grain sorghums, a forage
sorghum and a sorghum-sudangrass hybrid were effectively seeded in Pensacola
bahiagrass sod controlled by 5 lb/A a.e. of dowpon applied 3 weeks before
seeding and 1/2 lb/A a.e. paraquat and 2 pounds per acre a.e. of atrazine.






FLA-AY-01286 PINE G M SCHRODER V N RUELKE 0 C

MICROCLIMATIC INFLUENCES ON FIELD CROPS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Temperature at the time of germination of sugarcane was found to be critical.
Low and high soil temperatures prolong the time until emergence. When
vegetative seed pieces were obtained from 1st ratoon sugarcane, which had
germinated at 100C, first emergence occurred later (13 days after planting) and
rate of growth was slower. Also, this seed material was not able to withstand
temperatures below 200o for a period of 30 days and survive. This would
indicate that low temperatures at the time of germination contribute to a
decline of a variety. Studies of the soil temperature effect on shoot and root
growth of Pangola, Slenderstem digitgrass, Coastal bermudagrass and Pensacola
bahiagrass were carried out using a series of controlled soil temperatures
between the limits of 13 and 43oc. The soil temperatures in Florida at a 4-inch
depth usually ranged from 27 to 320 and both root and shoot growth were
excellent in this range. At 210 soil temperature root growth was still good but
shoot growth declined greatly. At 400 soil temperature root growth had
essentially ceased but shoot growth was excellent in all except the P.
bahiagrass. Plants were grown in the greenhouse with normal light and ambient
air temperature. Evolution of CO(2) from muck soils only slightly enriched the
CO(2) content of air surrounding corn plants grown under field conditions.


PLA-AY-01227


SCHANK S C








FLA-AT-01302


A BIOCHEMICAL STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENT ON THE GROWTH OF HIGHER
PLANTS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
In the recent past we have shown that the growing season of Pangola (Digitaria
decumbens) is short because photosynthesis is locked in the chloroplasts by cool
temperatures. In the past year we have shown that the sensitivity of starch
degrading enzymes to low temperatures is responsible for the lack of movement
from the chloroplasts. The accumulation of starch phenomenon is local to the
chloroplasts receiving the low temperature treatment. I.e., if only a single leaf
on an intact plant gets the low temperature, it will accumulate starch. We have
now found that one of the common growth regulators completely eliminates the
effects of low temperature on growth, on the activity of the enzymes, and
prevents starch accumulation. We have shown also that the starch accumulation
causes injury to the chloroplasts and this may explain why the grass starts to
grow so late in the spring. We are now trying to see if starch accumulation
alone will cause injury or if there must be a combination of starch accumulation
and low temperature. In screening type tests it appears that selections that
grow better in cool temperatures also accumulate less starch. In another phase
of our efforts we have shown that differences in certain sub-cellular
morphological characteristics that have been proposed to account for
photosynthetic efficiency differences between temperate and tropical plants are
not consistent with our observations. We have proposed a morphological
characteristic that does account for these differences in photosynthetic
efficiencies, and this is being tested extensively by the international
scientific community.


LA-AY-01303 NORDEN A J

ARIETAL IMPROVEMENT OF PEANUTS (ARACHIS HYPOGAEA L.)

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
modifications of the basic techniques and simplifying the procedures for
identifying hybrid seeds have resulted in improved efficiency of artificially
ybridizing peanuts. Products other than gypsum have recently become available
or supplying Ca to peanuts. Field and greenhouse studies revealed no
significant differences in yield and grade of peanuts among four sources of
calcium; gypsum, magi-cal spray, magi-cal dust and Claw-El Calcium. Soil pH
evels significantly affected the yield of kernels and vines and the mineral
composition of the plants. UF 70109 was released by the Florida Experiment
station under the name "ALTIKA" as a new peanut variety for the tropics. This
ine was found to be well suited to the long rainy season in Guyana. It was not
released in the USA because its pods were too small for Virginia type
lassification and its yielding ability was not better than Florigiant and other
trains of Virginia peanuts. The yield of UF 70115, an early maturing Virginia
unch line, has exceeded Florigiant in Gainesville tests for the
ast four years. This line was entered in National Regional Variety Tests in
971. New crosses were made to develop lines resistant to toxin producing molds
nd leaf spot disease, to improve quality and yield, and to study the inheritance
nd implications of pod pubescence and cotyledonary lateral branch development.


LA-AY-01358 KILLINGER G B RUELKE O C

ASTURE AND LEGUME VARIETY EVALUATION

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
performance comparisons were made of six hybrid bermudagrasses, Pangola digitgrass
id Pensacola bahiagrass; Coastal produced the highest average yield (9140
;s DM/A) at 3 fertility levels. First cutting yields of Coastal, Coastcross-1
id Pangola were 2540, 1650, and 830 Ibs DM/A respectively, indicating their
dlative spring regrowth potential. Coastcross contained 11.1% more IVOMD% than
)astal. Crude protein content of Coastcross-1 and Coastal exceeded 12%.
.elds were significantly higher from increased fertilization up to 480 lbs/A
* N from a 4-1-3 ratio. Satisfactory stands and yields (6.15 T/A) of Florida 66
.falfa were obtained during the 3rd year when fertilized after the 1st, 3rd,
:h and 7th cutting with 500 lbs/A of 0-10-20. Cutting the alfalfa at 1st
oom reduced the yield by half, and stands were almost completely eliminated
, the end of the 3rd year. Sixteen annual ryegrass and 12 white clover varieties
ire seeded in four replicate randomized block experiments. Fritted trace elements
13 (FTE 503) were applied at 30 pounds per acre on half the replicates. Oven-
y ryegrass yields averaged from 2352 to 5140 pounds per acre with Wintergreen,
mmercial, Magnolia, and Florida RR the highest yielding. Oven-dry white clover
elds averaged from 3207 to 4534 pounds per acre with Tillman, Regal, Ladino
d Florida S-68 the highest yielding. Ryegrass and white clover yields were
creased by 3 and 22 percent respectively from applied FTE.


WEST S H










SOYBEAN BREEDING

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Jupiter soybeans, adapted primarily to tropical and subtropical locations, was
released in May 1971. In addition, breeding lines F63-4000 and F66-1166 which
combine high yield and good resistance to the rootknot nematode Meloidogyne
incognita were approved for release. Field plots of Hardee soybeans inoculated
with zygospores of the endomycorrhizal fungus Endogone calospora yielded 53%
more seed than did uninoculated plots, but inoculaion with E. calospora did not
significantly increase the yield of non-nodulating Hardee. In an experiment
where nodulated Hardee yielded 32 bu/a and non-nodulated Hardee yielded 2 bu/a,
270 lbs/a N was required on non-nodulating plants for 32 bu/a yields. Recovery
of applied nitrogen in seed was about 47% for application rates of 90, 180, and
270 lbs/a N and for several application dates. However, recovery was much lower
for applications made 5 weeks before maturity and for initial applications made
after pods had formed.









FLA-AT-01375 CLARK F

EFFECT OF CULTURAL MANAGEMENT ON BLACK SHANK AND ON QUALITY AND QUANTITY OF
FLOE-CURED TOBACCO

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Three registered herbicides (pebulate, vernolate, diphenamide) for use on
tobacco were tested with four new chemicals for their efficiency in weed
control. These materials were also tested in combinations at several dosage
levels on pre and post-transplant applications of tobacco seedlings. Pebulate,
alone, produced the lowest yields; however, there were no significant difference
in yield in comparison with the check. All plots were cultivated one time.
Florida pursley and crabgrass were the predominant weed pests. More tests will
be needed to evaluate the effectiveness of the combination treatments. Ten
chemical treatments for sucker control were tested in the advanced tests and
twenty-eight in the preliminary tests;and fourteen of the treatments in the
preliminary test will be considered for the advanced tests, where smoke tests
are conducted before final acceptance as a new control agent. Florida selection
480 and 481 rated high in blackshank resistance in the regional field tests
evaluations. These selections are candidates for new varieties: however,
additional agronomic and smoking tests will have to be evaluated.









FLA-AY-01377 PFAHLER P L

QUANTITATIVE GENETIC STUDIES IN HIGHER PLANTS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
A new method was developed to determine narrow sense heritability values using
actual selection gains. Using this method, heritability estimates obtained for
grain yield in oats indicated that a negative response was found if selection
was made in most individual years. No appreciable increase in the precision of
selection was obtained when increasing numbers of years were combined at random.
Apparently, selection for grain yield is quite ineffective in this environment.
A method was developed to correlate selection for one quantitative trait on a
second quantitative trait. A highly significant negative correlation was
obtained between grain yield and environmental variability. Studies on the
effect of gamma irradiation in the in vitro germination characteristics or maiz
pollen grains indicated that a negative, linear relationship existed between
exposure and per cent germination and pollen tube length. From the regression
equation, a LD(50) value of 54.1 kR was obtained for per cent germination. A
positive, linear relationship was found between ruptured per cent and exposure,
indicating that the primary effect of irradiation was associated with the
structure and/or the synthesis of the cell membrane.


FLA-AY-01359


HINSON K











BIOCHEMISTRY OF HERBICIDES

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
One of the new families of herbicides reported last year has been found to
control tobacco suckers very well. A new family of herbicides, especially
effective against grasses, has also been discovered. Some control of tobacco
uckers also has been noted among these compounds. Residues of dalapon, used to
control smutgrass in bahiagrass, Pangola digitgrass, and bermudagrass, disappear
apidly enough so that regrowth is relatively free of residues. Approval is
zpected for this treatment by EPA (cooperative with J. McCaleb, W. T. Scudder,
. H. Van Middelem). Three additional compounds with citrus abscission
activity but without phytotoxicity have been discovered. A compound more
ctive in the tomato epinasity test than 2,4-D, picloram, or dicamba has been
discovered. Its molecular configuration would almost certainly cause it to be
ore rapidly biodegradable than any of these known auxins; therefore it is being
valuated as an auxin herbicide.

LA-AY-01458 PRINE G M

AND DISPOSAL OF DAIRY FARN WASTE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
temporary crops were selected to be grown on the dairy waste disposal soil area
o that surface organic matter residues could be worked into soil in preparation
or each next crop. Small grains and ryegrass are being used as the winter crop
nd sorghum-sudangrass or hybrid pearlaillet is being used as the summer crop.
irrigation water containing dairy manure is applied at rates of 0, 1/2, 1 and 2
inches per week on the crops except during land preparation and until next crop
s emerged in good stand. So far no difficulty has occurred in growing crops
which is traceable to the various rates of manure and water applied to the
oil.

LA-AY-01475 MOTT G 0

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROPERTIES OF SOUTHERN FORAGES AND ANIMAL RESPONSE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Pangola hays harvested after 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 wk regrowth were fed to
keep. Voluntary organic matter intakes were 68.5, 64.2, 57.1, 40.6, 39.7 and
1.4 g/kg wa 4 respectively; organic matter digestibilities were 69.7, 65.9,
i.3, 62.4, 54.2 and 54.8%, respectively. 2) Suwannee bermudagrass hays were
irvested after 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 wk regrowth and fed to sheep. Voluntary
:ganic matter intakes were 70.5, 69.9, 66.1, 50..6, 50.4, and 48.0 g/kgW3/
respectively. Organic matter digestibilities were 65.2, 58.5, 55.6, 48.7, 45.8,
id 45.9% respectively. 3) In vitro organic matter digestions (two stage) were
inductedd on 47 grass samples (bahia, pangola, bermuda) having known in vivo
fganic matter digestibilities. The following correlation co-efficients were
stained : all samples (n=47) 0.849; bahiagrass only (n=10) 0.968; pangola and
=rmuda (n=37) 0.909; pangola and bermuda hays from similar experiments (n=16)
.978; and pangola and bermuda greenchop (n=8) 0.953. For a given in vivo
gestibility, the in vitro digestion of bahiagrass after 48 hrs fermentation
s lower than that of pangola or bermuda. Time studies indicated that the in
tro fermentation time required to reach the in vivo digestibility coefficient
s only about 36 hours for pangola but was about 70 hours for bahia. 4)
finding hay samples through the bronze screen of a Wiley mill increased the
parent copper content of the hay.

A-AY-01478 KNIPLING E B WEST S H

STEMS FOR TILE DRAIN SLUDGE CONTROL FOR CITRUS WITH HIGH WATER TABLE IN
ORIDA

OGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
instruction phases of the Soil-Water-Atmosphere-Plant (SWAP) Project's 50 acre
eld experiment on poorly drained flatwood soils at Fort Pierce, Florida were
apleted in 1971. The objectives of this experiment are to evaluate the
fects of three soil modification-management systems on the development of iron
pound sludging of two drain line systems and on the growth responses of
elve citrus rootstock/scion combinations. The experimental site was
strumented with sensors and recorders to measure hydrologic, physical, and
enical events that occur within the treatments and to characterize the
il-water-atmosphere environment of the experimental citrus trees. Although the
ep soil tillage treatment reduced soil hydraulic conductivities and rates of
ter table drawdown and appears to have resulted in some drain line clogging,
ep tillage apparently is favorable to root and shoot development of young
trus trees because of the mixed soils' water holding capacity during periods
drought and nutrient retention properties.


FLA-AY-01444


WILCOX M










FORAGE GRASS GENETICS AND BREEDING PRIMARILY PANICUAS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
A search for sexual plants in the apomictic species Panicum maximum was
successful and sexual plants from three sources have been isolated. In
addition, hybrids have been recovered based upon transfer of isoenzyme markers.
Preliminary data indicate that apomixis is genetically controlled, possibly by
recessive genes. The frequency of sexual plants was 20 times higher among
"off-type" plants than among "typical" plants within lines. Genetic improvement
is now possible in this important tropical forage species. In tests to improve
germination, 20 ppm gibberellic acid or 0.2% KNO(3) about doubled germination of
6 month old P. maximum seed while the other treatments applied did not increase
germination. Both GA and KNO(3) together did not improve germination over
either alone. In adaptation studies at Gainesville, none of the 186 lines of P,
maximum lines tested had adequate winter survival, but P.I. 277911 survived
best. Breeding work was continued on buffelgrass,and 20 hybrids were selected
on the basis of low winter damage and early spring growth, for further
evaluation and progeny testing for mode of reproduction. One aposictic line
(B1-45) was selected for advanced testing and several sexual plants were
selected for hybridization. Peroxidase and esterase isoenzyme patterns were
established and used in the practical identification of 'Pangola', 'Slenderstem'
and 'UF-1' digitgrasses.

FLA-AY-01520 BOYD F T

THE BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF NEMATODES AFFECTING AGRONOMIC CROPS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Seasonal temperatures have been shown to influence four plant-parasitic nematodes
in different degrees. Florida midwinter soil temperatures were found most
favorable to lesion (Pratylenchus brachyurus) and root-knot (Meloidogyne sp.),
while sting nematodes (Belonolaimus longicaudatus) were present in highest number
during April and May. Ring nematodes (Criconemoides sp.) have shown little
preference between different seasonal temperatures. Greenhouse temperature-
gradient studies showed sting nematodes most favored by soil temperatures
between 20C and 30*C. When temperatures were maintained above 34C the numbers
of sting nematodes were greatly reduced, allowing favorable growth of grasses
otherwise susceptible to injury from sting nematodes.

FLA-AY-01571 HORNER E S EDWARDSON J R

BREEDING FOR RESISTANCE TO SOUTHERN CORN LEAF BLIGHT

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
A large number of lines, hybrids, and varieties from both domestic and foreign
sources were evaluated for resistance to Helminosporium madis under epiphytotic
conditions. Thirty accessions representing a wide range of geographic origin
were found to have good level of resistance. Crosses were made among these
varieties, many of which are very late in maturity, to begin a program of
recurrent selection for higher levels of resistance. Additional crosses between
early and late sources are planned in a winter planting, with the object of
developing resistant populations with maturities usable in the USA. Progenies
from normal and T-cytoplasm corn treated with gamma irradiation and chemical
mutagens are being studied for mutations on cytoplasmic factors controlling male
sterility and susceptibility to Helminthosporium maydis. New sources of male
sterile cytoplasm are being incorporated into Florida inbreds. The responses of
these cytoplasms to maintainer and restorer genotypes are being studied.

FLA-AY-01573 PRINE G M SCHRODER V N

MINIMIZING HAZARDS AND INCREASING POTENTIALS FOR SOUTHERN SOYBEAN PRODUCTION

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Nutritional problems occurring with soybean production on flatwoods soil are
being investigated using pot studies in the greenhouse, and indications are that
toxicities due to acid soil conditions may be involved. Leaf analyses studies
relating mineral content, fertilizer treatments, and yields under field
conditions are being carried out with special reference to potassium.
Preliminary studies have been carried out in conjunction with the Plant
Pathology Department (1) to relate the effect of soil temperature on growth and
mineral nutrition, and (2) to relate the interactions of temperature and
mycorrhiza and rhizobium on growth of soybeans. All plants on a 3-acre planting
of Bragg soybeans seeded in early April were screened for later flowering
plants. Eleven apparent late flowering plants were found and are being
evaluated further. Bragg soybeans were shaded at weekly intervals at 75% of
daylight intensity for 10 weeks beginning 4 weeks after seeding.


SMITH R L


FLA-AY-01511









FLA-AY-01590 GREEN V E JR


PRINE G M


WHITTY E B


FIELD CROP VARIETY TESTING

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Sorghum varieties used for making grain, silage, and fresh-chop feed, along with
millets and sorghum-sudangrass crosses were put into tests on a uniform basis
throughout the state and under the direction of agronomists at Jay, Marianna,
Quincy, Gainesville, Belle Glade, and Homestead, or from northeast Florida to
extreme southern Florida. Soils at these locations include sandy, mucky, and
marly types. The results of these tests are available in the 1971 version of the
Agronomy Department Report of Field Crop Variety Testing. Many of the commercial
varieties tested at each location gave large tonnages of material highly suitable
for livestock feeds for Florida ranch and dairy operations.








ANIMAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

During the past year research was conducted on 34 projects. The
department has continued to enlarge its cooperation in additional projects
with other departments and branch stations on nutrition, breeding, physiology,
genetics, feeding, meats, and management studies. The Meats Laboratory
slaughtered over a thousand animals for carcass and meat quality studies in
cooperative projects. The Nutrition Laboratory likewise made thousands of
determinations for over 30 different substances in feeds, blood, and other
animal tissues and excretions in cooperative studies. A 320-acre horse research
center is being.developed near Ocala. A horse project on "Physiology of
Digestion in the Horse" was initiated during this year.
Other physical improvements included moving the swine research unit to
a new location. Continued development occurred in the part of the Purebred
Beef Experimental Unit which is being moved to an area near the Dairy Unit
at Hague.
During the past year the faculty in Animal Science published 152
scientific and professional articles. The faculty's research program has
continued to receive national and international recognition via awards and
invitations to present papers throughout the world.





FLA-AL-00627 KOGER M

PASTURE PROGRAMS AND CATTLE BREEDING SYSTEMS FOB BEEF PRODUCTION

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Pasture programs being investigated include: (1) clover-grass fertilized at
the rate of 300 lbs. of 0-10-20 per acre annually, (2) comparable pastures with
one fourth of the area being renovated annually by fall plowing and planting to
winter cereal pasture (oats and ryegrass), and (3) clover-grass pastures one
half of which is identical to program (1) and the remaining half irrigated by
seepage and fertilized at the rate of 500 lbs. of 0-10-20 annually. All
pastures are grazed by cows and calves. Annual calf production per cow has
averaged 509, 491 and 511 pounds, respectively, for the three programs.
Production per acre averaged 365, 336 and 387 pounds, respectively. Lowered
productivity to program 2 is explained by requirement of more than a year for
renovated areas to return to full production. Cattle breeding systems initiated
in 1957 include: (1) grading to British bulls (Angus and Hereford) and three
2-breed-of-sire rotations, including (2) Angus-Hereford, (3) Angus-Brahman and
(4) Hereford-Santa Gertrudis. Foundation females were Brahman-British-Native
crosses. Production per 1000 Ibs. of cow bred from 1965-1969 has averaged 397,
420, 391 and 390 pounds, respectively, for the four systems.





FLA-AL-00738 COMBS G E

NOTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF PIGS WEANED AT AN EARLY AGE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/06'
Three experiments, involving 114 pigs weaned at approximately 3 weeks of age,
were conducted to determine the effects of supplementing swine diets with
dietary ascorbic acid. In all experiments the pigs were housed in
concrete-floored pens equipped with self-feeders and automatic waterers. The
pigs were fed either a semi-purified diet or a fortified corn soybean meal diet.
The data showed that with the corn-soybean meal diet additions of ascorbic acid
at levels of 100 and 200 gm. per ton were ineffective in stimulating rate or
efficiency of gain. Daily gain was increased nine percent when pigs were fed
the semi-purified diet supplemented with 200 gn. per ton of ascorbic acid. With
the same basal diet levels of either 100 or 2000 ga. per ton were not effective
in stimulating rate or efficiency of gain. Several studies were conducted to
formulate and evaluate diets for use in determining the biotin requirement of
young pigs. When housed in concrete-floored pens pigs fed a purified diet
consisting of cane sugar, corn sugar, corn starch and 30% dried egg white did no
exhibit symptoms of a biotin deficiency within a seven week feeding period. Pig
housed in similar pens and fed a semi-purified diet containing two percent of
succynosulfathinzole failed to show symptoms of a biotin deficiency after a six
week period. A diet containing two percent of phthalysulfathiazole was also
ineffective in producing a biotin deficiency in a four week feeding period.
Results of other trials where different dietary formulas were compared indicated
the most acceptable formula to be: dried egg white (30%); pearled starch (27%);
corn sugar (27%) and stabilized lard (12%).









AMHERMAN C B LOGGINS P E


THE NUTRITIONAL AVAILABILITY OF COMPONENTS OF LIVESTOCK FEEDSTUFFS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Feeding trials involving 132 weaning lambs were conducted to study the influence
of added dietary alfalfa meal and sulfur on animal performance when urea served
as the major source of supplemental nitrogen. A 2x2 factorial arrangement was
used in which alfalfa meal (20% protein) was added at 0 and 3% and sulfur at 0
and 0.06% of the diet. The diet was based on corn, and urea was included at a
level of 2.00% in Trial 1 and 1.85% of the diet in Trial 2. No natural protein
supplements were fed. Lamb performance was as follows, with and without alfalfa
and with and without supplemental sulfur, respectively. Average daily gains in
grams were: Trial 1; 130 and 122; 127 and 125; Trial 2; 135 and 125; 142 and
117 (P<.01). Feed required per unit gain averaged 9.22 and final live slaughter
grader averaged choice with neither measurement influenced by treatment.



LA-AL-00809 WARNICK A C BAZER F H

EFFECT OF HORMONES ON PHYSIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION IN CATTLE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
ifty-seven crossbred beef heifers that had been cycling were assigned to an
strous synchronization study using Norethandrolone. The objective was to
determine the effect of stage of cycle on estrous synchronization and subsequent
ertility. At the first injection 50 mg Norethandrolone plus 5 mg Estradiol
alerate was injected followed 7 days later with an injection of 250 mg
orethandrolone. Injections began on day 2, day 7, day 13 and day 18 of the
ycle plus one group that served as a control and were injected with 0.9%
aline. The percentage of heifers showing estrus in different groups within a 3
ay period beginning 15 days from first injection was: Control-30%; day 2-59%
ay 7-81%; day 13-68% and day 18-57%. The percentage of heifers showing estrus
within a 5 day period beginning 14 days from first injection was: Control-35%;
ay 2-73%; day 7-86%; day 13-86% and day 18-86%. Overall estrous
ynchronization for the hormone treated groups was 65% during 3 days and 81%
during 5 days compared to 30% and 35% in the respective control heifers. The
pregnancy rate using frozen semen from the first two services following hormone
treatment was: Control-70%; day 2-67%; day 7-55%; day 13-55%; and day 18-731.
he pregnancy rate of all synchronized heifers was 60% compared to 70% for the
control heifers.



LA-AL-00938 WARNICK A C BAZER F W KOGER M

)NTROLLED TEMPERATURE AND REPRODUCTION IN BEEF CATTLE

ZOGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
inous blood samples were obtained from cows at the Brooksville Beef Cattle
'search Station, Brooksville, Florida and at the U.S.D.A. Range Cattle Station,
Lles City, Montana for thyroid hormone determination. Iodine 125 was used with
'rum in an in vitro determination of T(3) or % uptake of I(1) (2) (5) and T(4) or
:g thyroxin per 100 ml serum. There were 418 Hereford animals at the two
nations and 109 Angus at the Brooksville station. The levels of T(4) at
ooksville were significantly higher in 1969 (5.05 mcg/100 ml) compared to 1970
.47 mcg/100 ml). There were no differences in either T(3) or T(4) values
ong the 3 lines of Hereford cattle. The values of T(3) and T(4) in Hereford
ttle were both significantly higher in Montana compared to Florida. T(3) and
4) values at Montana were 39.85% and 5.41 mcg/100 ml respectively compared to
.80% and 4.47 mcg/100 ml at Brooksville. The Angus cattle at Brooksville had
gnificantly higher T(4) values (6.26 mcg/100 ml) compared to the Herefords
.24 mcg/100 ml). These differences in thyroid activity may be associated with
me of the production traits of cattle in different years, at different
cations and of different breeds.



A-AL-00975 PLAYER A Z CARPENTER J W

ACTORS INFLUENCING BEEF TENDERNESS

3GRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/06
ty-two U.S. Standard, Good and Choice carcasses from straightbred and crossbred
ers, 14 to 20 months of age, provided shortloin steaks for Warner-Bratzler
ar and trained taste panel tenderness comparisons among sired and breed groups.
a obtained are being combined with the previous 6 years' data for computing
f tenderness heritability and the relationship of marbling and tenderness.


FLA-AL-00755


MOORE J E










MANAGEMENT AND COST FACTORS RELATED TO MULTIPLE FARROWING

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Work under this project was largely curtailed during the reporting period due to
the construction of new facilities and relocation of the sow farrowing facility.
A new farrowing barn with twenty-eight individual farrowing stalls on partially
slatted metal floors has been completed. The first group of sows was farrowed
in this facility in July of this year. This group of sows and two subsequent
groups farrowed in September and December were used to determine the feasibility
of feeding a high level of ASP-250 (aureomycin, sulfamethazine and penicillin)
during the critical periods of breeding and farrowing. The data presently
available indicate no beneficial effects on conception percentage but do
indicate a marked effect on pig weaning weights. An experiment to determine the
effect of feed level during gestation on sow longevity and total.production as
measured by breeding efficiency, farrowing, and lactation performance has been
initiated but results are not yet available.









FLA-AL-00995 KOGER M

AGE OF HEIFERS AT FIRST BREEDING AS RELATED TO BEEF PRODUCTION

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
From 1958-1967, one half of the heifers at the Beef Research Unit were bred as
yearlings to calve first at 2 years of age (1) while the remaining half were
bred to calve first at three years of age (2). The pounds of calf weaned by
two-year old heifers has amounted to 281 pounds per heifer bred with death loss
in heifers being comparable to that for heifers which were not bred until two
years of age. Production per cow subsequent to two years of age has averaged
420 lbs. for (1) and 395 lbs. for (2). In 1970 the net economic advantage for
(1) amounted approximately to $62 for each two-year old and $7.50 for each older
cow in the herd.









FLA-AL-00999 COMBS G E

FLORIDA FEEDS AND BY-PRODUCTS FOR SWINE FEEDING

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Southern corn leaf blight (Helminthosporium maydis) was a serious disease on the
1970 corn crop. This fungus produces a toxin which damages the corn plant but
is not necessarily injurious to animals. Because the nutritional value of corn
from blight infected fields may have been altered and there also existed the
possibility of toxicity with swine, two experiments were conducted to study
these factors. The blighted corn came from fields that produced about 10
bushels per acre and although the kernels were small only about 10% were
discolored and shriveled. The comparative chemical composition of blighted and
normal corn showed that blighted corn contained slightly less energy than normal
corn, and this reduction was reflected by a reduction in fat and starch content.
Blighted corn contained 1.3 percentage units more total protein than normal
corn. The percentage of protein coming from nitrate and nitrite was egual for
both corn samples; ammonical nitrogen and amino acid nitrogen was higher with
the blighted corn. The guantitiy of phosphorus, calcium and copper was similar
for the two corn samples. Magnesium was highest in the normal corn, whereas
iron, zinc and manganese were highest with the blighted corn. Daily gain and
feed efficiency data with finishing swine and with young swine indicated that
blighted corn free from molds can be satisfactorily used in swine diets. With
growing-finishing swine, rate and efficiency of gain was improved an average 7%
and 5% respectively when zinc bacitracin was added at levels ranging from 10 to
gm/ton. The response to levels and sequence of levels varied considerably but
most rapid rate of gain was associated with the highest dietary levels of zinc-
bacitracin.


FLA-AL-00977


WALLACE H D COMBS G E


KOGER M











BE EVALUATION OF FEED ADDITIVES FOR SWINE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
various levels of wheat bran up to 27% of the diet did not significantly affect
he performance of growing-finishing pigs. A level of 39% wheat bran depressed
performance but allowed the production of leaner carcasses. The addition of
ysine or methionine to the above diets improved daily gain of pigs but caused
o significant effects on the carcasses. Two experiments were conducted to
determine the interrelationships of sex, dietary protein level and slaughter
eight on pig performance. The data indicate that gilts need more protein than
arrows and may be finished to heavier weights than barrows without as much
arcass penalty. An experiment designed to test the performance promoting
ability of two commercial sources of unidentified growth factors (UNF-40,
diamond Shamrock Co., and Fermacto 500, Borden Chemical Co.) has been completed.
he results indicate no benefit from the feed supplements. In this study pigs
ed a basal diet containing ASP-250 (aureomycin, sulfa-methazine and penicillin)
ained significantly faster than unsupplemented pigs. Barrows gained faster
ban gilts,but gilts converted feed more efficiently.


LA-AL-01003 KOGER M

INHERENT BODY SIZE IN CATTLE AS RELATED TO ADAPTATION

BOGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
his project is cooperative with the Florida State Prison, Raiford. Most of the
tivity to date has been devoted to generating populations with desired
aracteristics. Beginning in 1971 representative calves from the two
pulations were placed under identical environments to evaluate feed lot
rformance. During 1972 comparisons will be expanded to add information on feed
t performance and include additional performance traits.


.A-AL-01010 WARNICK A C BAZER F W WALLACE H D

FECT OF NUTRITION ON THE REPRODUCTIVE PERFORMANCE OF SWINE

OGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
e objective of this research was to compare reproductive performance in gilts
d proteins from either Fish meal (FM) or Soybean meal (SM) at 20 and 60 days
gestation. The average number of corpora lutea per gilt was 11.75 on FM and
.15 on SM. The number of embryos at 20 and 60 days was 10.50 and 9.25 in
lts on FM and 11.67 and 10.25 in gilts on SM a non-significant protein
fference. The percent protein in the embryos, fetal membranes and fetal
uids was not significantly influenced by protein source. The percent protein
the embryonic tissue and in fetal fluids was significantly higher at 60 days
,spared to 20 days. The amount of protein (mg/ga tissue) in embryos at 20 and
days was 4.54 and 27.68, respectively on the FM ration and 6.25 and 29.34 on
e SM ration. Sephadex separation of proteins in fetuses at 60 days indicated
o fractions I and II which was similar for the amniotic fluid. The
astocoelic fluid at 20 days showed fractions I, II, III, IV and V. The amount
protein at 20 days was lowest in embryonic tissue, intermediate in
astocoelic fluid and highest in the embryonic membranes. The protein content
the 20 day embryo represented only 2.06% of the total protein in the
nceptus.


A-AL-01079 AMMERMAN C B

TERAL REQUIREMENTS OF CATTLE

)GRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
) influence of excess dietary iron as ferrous sulfate or ferric citrate was
died with sheep. Experimental diets were as follows: basal, basal plus
fate, basal plus 1,600 ppm iron as ferric citrate, and basal plus 0.28X sup-
!mental sulfate as sodium sulfate. Both diets containing excess iron were the
ist readily consumed. Plasma copper was influenced by treatment (P<.05) with
>se lambs fed ferrous sulfate or sodium sulfate having lower levels and those
Sferric citrate or the basal diet having higher plasma copper levels. Plasma
cium, phosphorus and magnesium were not influenced by treatment. Feeding
00 ppm iron as either ferrous sulfate or ferric citrate resulted in increased
n in kidney, liver and spleen (P<.05). Levels of copper, zinc, magnesium
manganese in tissues were not influenced by treatment. In general, increasing
dietary sulfate concentration as sodium sulfate resulted in tissue mineral
centrations similar to those for the basal diet, indicating that effects of the
tary ferrous sulfate were due primarily to iron.


FLA-AL-01002


WALLACE B D











A STUDY OF RESPONSE TO SELECTION AND GENETIC-ENTIROMENTAL INTERACTION IN
HEREFORD CATTLE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Reciprocal exchanges of cattle from unrelated lines developed at Brooksville,
Fla. and Miles City, Montana were made during the period 1962-1964. Thus, two
genotypes (lines) are being compared in each of two environments (locations).
Highly significant genotype x environment interactions (GEI) have been observed
for birth weight, weaning weight and post-weaning gain on pasture. These
interactions occurred for both foundation cattle, half of which had been
transferred, and in subsequent generations where all cattle were born and reared
at the location where comparison was made. Interestingly, there was no GET for
feed-lot gain where the cattle were not on pasture. In addition to the above
trial with unrelated lines, the comparison is being repeated with closely
related lines selected in each of the two environments. The foundations of
these related lines were random samples from an inbred group, Montana Line 1.
Confirmation of the above preliminary indications of GEI in traits of economic
importance would have significant implications for genetic improvement of
cattle, especially in the use of bulls in AI studs. The level of circulating
blood thyroid hormone was determined on 260 head of cattle at the two locations
during 1968-69. Both locations and origin of cattle (line) had significant
effects with the Brooksville classifications being high in both cases.




FLA-AL-01204 CARPENTER 3 N PALMER A Z

QUALITY ATTRIBUTES OF THE BEEF PRODUCED FROM YOUNG BULLS STEERS AND HEIFERS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
All data have been statistically analysed and manuscripts are being prepared for
publication.





FLA-AL-01205 PALMER A Z

PHYSIOLOGICAL AGING OF CATTLE AND CARCASS MATURITY

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Twenty grade Angus calves of similar breeding were allocated to slaughter ages
of 9, 15, 21, 27, 33, 39, 45, 60, 72 and 84 months. To date, seventeen steers,
heifers and cows have been slaughtered up through 66 months of age; the three
remaining cows will not be used in this study. Chemical analysis, blood,
cartilage and bone as itemized in previous reports are completed. Data will be
statistically analysed and compared for appropriate publication.




FLA-AL-01313 LOGGINS P E

SELECTION FOR RESISTANCE IN SHEEP TO ABOMASAL PARASITIC NEMATODES

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Five lamb crops have been produced from the selection study on resistance to
internal nematodes in the Florida Native and Rambouillet ewe flocks (R=
Rambouillet, N=Native, H=High, L=Low resistance groups). Due to heavy death
losses the BH and RL groups were combined and routine anthelmentic treatments
have continued in order to maintain a more susceptible group. The percent lamb
crop in 1971 were 70, 105 and 87 for RHL, NH and NL respectively. Forty-one
parasite-free lambs raised from the 1971 lamb crop were challenged with known
number of Haemonchus contortus (H.c.) infective larvae at 5-1/2 months of age.
The lamb hemoglobin types by breed groups were RA, 1; RAB, 3: RB, 3; NA, 15;
NAB, 11 and NB, 8. A high level of infection was obtained in the experimentally
challenged lambs with patency occurring on the 17th day in Rambouillet and on
the 21st day in Florida Natives. Significantly higher EPG values for the RHb
(A) (AB) (B) than for NBb (A) (AB) (B) were obtained. At necropsy significantly
higher adult H.c. counts were recovered from R than N lambs. The larvae counts
were significantly higher indicating N resistance to normal H.c. development.
Hemoglobin types were not significantly correlated with infection levels; however
this years data further confirms previous results indicating that N lambs have
greater resistance to H.c. than R.


PLA-AL-01186


KOGER M








FLA-AL-01442


FEEDING AND MANAGEMENT OF SWINE RAISED IN CONFINEMENT

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
total of 112 pigs were used in two feeding trials to determine the influence
f sex on protein requirements of growing-finishing swine. This study confirmed
hat gilts require somewhat more dietary protein than barrows for optimum
arcass development in terms of average backfat thickness loin eye area and %
our lean cuts. In another study, 148 crossbred pigs were used to compare ailo
ith corn diets in terms of resulting pork carcass meatiness and quality.
arcasses of pigs from the two diets were similar in average backfat thickness,
% four lean cuts and loin eye area. Marbling, color, texture and firmness of the
ongissimus between the 10th and 11th ribs were similar to carcasses from milo and
orn diets.







LA-AL-01460 SHIRLEY R L EASLEY J F HENTGES J F

OIIC SUBSTANCES AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF HYACINTHS AND OTHER WATER PLANTS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
digestion trial with steers on utilization of nine elements, ash,
and-silica, and three toxicants that may occur at hazardous levels in plants
demonstrated these substances are absorbed and/or retained from the aquatic
ant. In these steer trials two aquatic plants, hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata)
d water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), and a land forage, coastal Bermudagrass
ynodon dactylon), were compared as 33% of the organic matter in pelleted diets
r steers. The experimental design was a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square. The
in criteria were voluntary feed intake, net retention of Ca, P, Na, Mg, Mn,
SFe, Cu and Zn and apparent absorption of oxalates, tannins and nitrates.
e mean net retention percentages for CB, hydrilla and hyacinth were as
allows respectively: Ca 54,16 and 19; P 42, 25 and 35; Na 44, 54 and 51; Mg
S23 and 7; Mn 49, 5 and 75; s 13, 12 and 7; Fe 39, 14 and 22; Cu 73, 33 and
; Zn 69, 67 and 52. Corresponding values for apparent absorption of ash and
nd-silica for the above three dietary groups were as follows, respectively:
h 45, 7 and 31; and sand-silica 71, 61 and 40. Selected sampling of hydrilla,
:ratophyllum, potamogeton, chara and valisneria aquatic plants were made
roughout the year from lakes, rivers and ditches and analyzed for protein,
ude fiber ether extract, ash, Ca, P, Mg, Mn, Fe, K, Zn, Cr, Cu, Na and
anide. The data show these aquatic plants are liberally supplied with many
trients required by livestock. It is apparent that time of year and water from
ich the plants are obtained are factors affecting variation in composition.






A-AL-01462 BAZER F W WARRICK A C WALLACE H D

ERINE FACTORS AFFECTING EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT AND CORPUS LUTEUM FUNCTION

OGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
cine uterine protein secretions, particularly Fraction II (MW = 200,000)
elected on day 15 of the estrous cycle were lytic to porcine granulara cells
Ltured in vitro. Study of the effects of superovulation (PMS) and unilateral
riectomy-hysterectomy on uterine protein secretions indicated that both
atments resulted in compensatory uterine secretary activity. In order to
late the key hormones responsible for uterine protein secretions,
riectomized gilts were treated with corn oil (C), progesterone (P), estrogen
or estrogen and progesterone (EP). The C, E, P and EP treated gilts
reted 13.7, 14.1, 77.8- and 167.5 mg protein, indicating that progesterone is
key hormone involved in porcine uterine protein secretions. In a subsequent
dy, ovariectomized gilts treated with progesterone only, for 19 days, had
litative and quantitative changes in the uterine protein secretion milieu
ch were quite similar to those for intact gilts during the estrous cycle.
al porcine uterine protein secretions and Fractions I (MW = 400,000+), II
= 200,000), III (MW = 90,000), IV (MW = 45,000) and V (BM = 17,500) were
luated for possible stimulatory effects on the growth of mouse embryos from
8-cell to inner-cell-mass stage. Fractions I, II and v were most
mulatory of the fractions, but no individual protein fraction was as
mulatory as total uterine protein. The rate of development and the final
ge of development of the embryos were enhanced by these proteins.


PALMER A Z










FETAL SURVIVAL TO 105 DAYS GESTATION IN SWINE ON VARIOUS HORMONAL AND NUTRITIONAL
REGIMES

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Gilts were individually fed a balanced corn-soybean meal ration so that the
total daily feed intake was either: 4 lb per day to day 40 of gestation and
then 8 lb per day to term; (A) 4 lb per day to day 60 of gestation and then 8 lb
per day until term (B) or 4 lb per day for 77 days and then 8 lb per day until
term. (C) Two replicates of this experiment were conducted with 7 animals per
treatment in each replicate. Data were collected on sow weight gain from
breeding until farrowing, live pigs born, pigs weaned, weaning percent, pig
birthweights, litter weight and weight per day of the pigs at weaning. None of
these differences were statistically significant. Average sow weight gains were
170, 159 and 148 Ibs for groups A, B and C, respectively, in the first replicate
and 144, 130 and 126 lbs for females in the same treatment groups in the second
replicate. These data support the concept that an adequate level of nutrition
is necessary for proper reproductive performance and normal fetal growth, but
excessive nutrient intake does not appear to be reflected in either increased
reproductive performance or birthweights of the piglets.








FLA-AL-01467 FEASTER 3 P

EFFECTS OF LOW LEVEL DIETARY PESTICIDES ON RATS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Feeding pesticides to rats for 90 days at the low levels used initially did not
affect them adversely. Therefore, effects of feeding pesticides at high levels
are being studied. Three pesticides (DDT, Parathion and Sevin) representing the
three chemical classes are being fed at 100 and 500 times the concentrations
found in the average human diet, to female rats started on the diets at weaning
and continued through pregnancy. In a second such study conducted recently, as
in the study reported previously, no adverse effects were observed from the diet
containing 100X average human dietary concentration, but the 500X level reduced
feed intake and weight gains and caused 40% mortalities among the growing
females. In the females which lived to maturity, breeding produced fewer pups
per litter (6.8 vs 9.9 for controls) and smaller newborn (4.0g vs 4.9g).
Tissues of maternal rats and newborn have been analyzed for content of DDT and
its metabolic derivatives DDD and DDE. Maternal fat from 500X females contained
4498 ppm DDT, and livers contained 16.1 ppm. Rats fed 100X human concentration!
with no apparent adverse effects showed 1857 ppm DDT in fat and 4.2 ppm in
livers. Of significant interest was the free passage of DDT across the placenta
to fetuses. Concentrations in livers of fetuses of rats fed both 100X and 500X
human dietary concentrations were twice those in livers of their mothers.
Offspring comprising the second generation have been continued on the same
dietary pesticide levels, and at maturity will be tested for reproductive
capability.








FLA-AL-01471 FRANKE D E

BEEF AND DAIRY X BEEF CROSS CATTLE FOR BEEF PRODUCTION IN NORTHERN FLORIDA

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
This dairy x beef crossbreeding study is a cooperative effort between the
Florida Experimental Station System and Apalachee Correctional Institution,
Sneads, Florida, and is in the third year. weaning weights for straightbred
Angus and Hereford, F(1) dairy (Brown Swiss and Holstein) x beef (Hereford and
Angus) and three-breed cross (Charolais x F(1) dairy-beef females) calves were
340, 347 and 458 pounds, respectively. Palpation rates on straightbred British,
F(1) yearlings, F(1) first calf heifers, and F(1) second calf females were 95.3,
80.8, 75.0 and 81.5 percent, respectively. It appears the nutritional
requirement for rebreeding of the F(1) female is critical.


FLA-AL-01463


BAZER F W WARNICK A C


WALLACE H D











RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROPERTIES OF SOUTHERN FORAGES AND ANIMAL RESPONSE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
1) Pangolagrass hays harvested after 2,4,6,8,10 and 12 wk regrowth were fed to
sheep. Voluntary organic matter intakes were 68.5, 64.2, 57.1, 40.6, 39.7 and
41.4 g/kg W3 4, respectively; organic matter digestibilities were 69.7, 65.9,
65.3, 62.4, 54.2 and 54.8%, respectively. 2) Suwannee bermudagrass hays were
harvested after 2,4,6,8,10 and 12 wk regrowth and fed to sheep. Voluntary
rganic matter intakes were 70.5, 69.9, 66.1, 50.6, 50.4 and 48.0 g/kg W3 *,
respectively. Organic matter digestibilities were 65.2, 58.5, 55.6, 48.7, 45.8
nd 45.9%, respectively. 3) In vitro organic matter digestions (two stage)
ere conducted on 47 grass samples (bahia, pangola, bermuda) having known in
ivo organic matter digestibilities. The following correlation coefficients
ere obtained: all samples (n=47) 0.849; bahiagrass only (n 10) 0.968; pangola
nd bermuda (n=37) 0.909; pangola and bermuda hays from similar experiments (n=
6) 0.978; and pangola and bermuda greenchop (n=8) 0.953. For a given in vivo
igestibility, the in vitro digestion of bahiagrass after 48 hrs fermentation
as lover than that of pangola and bermuda. Time studies indicated that the in
itro fermentation time required to reach the in vio digestibility coefficient
as only about 36 hours for pangola but was about 70 hours for bahia. 4)
grinding hay samples through the bronze screen of a Wiley mill increased the
parent copper content of the hay.
LA-AL-01480 HENTGES J F JR

NUTRITION AND GROWTH RESPONSE OF BEEF AND DAIRY X BEEF CALVES

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
he objective of this study was to compare the postweaning performance of
traightbred beef (Angus or Hereford), crossbred beef (Angus x Hereford) and
rossbred beef x dairy breeds (Holstein and Brown Swiss) of steers. Criteria
:ed were liveweight gain, efficiency of utilization of diets differing in
itrient density, namely a self-fed concentrate and a supplemented silage diet,
daughter yield (dressing percent), estimated carcass yield (boneless trimmed
'tail cuts from round, rib loin and chuck) and USDA carcass quality and yield
ades. Heterosis was apparently expressed in both the crossbred beef and
ossbred dairy x beef steers as a larger genetic potential for growth during a
8-day feedlot period, but this trait was expressed only when adequate nutrients
*re available from the concentrate diet and as a larger appetite or voluntary
nsumption of feed per unit of bodyweightyand this trait was expressed only
:en the more highly digestible concentrate diet was fed, thereby avoiding any
imitation from silage bulk or "gastrointestinal tract-fill". Carcass
aracteristics and value were not widely different between crossbred beef and
iry x beef crossbreds when slaughtered at almost equal stages of maturity and
,gree of fatness.
.A-AL-01481 HENTGES J F JR SHIRLEY R L COMBS G E JR

OCESSED AQUATIC PLANTS FOR ANIMAL NUTRITION

OGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
luntary intake and apparent digestion of dry matter (DM), organic matter (On),
ude protein (CP), and cellulose were determined for pelleted cattle diets
ntaining 33% (ON basis) of either a standard land forage, coastal bermudagrass
ynodon dactylon); a floating aquatic plant, water hyacinth (Eichhornia
asies) or asubmersed aquatic plant, Florida elodea (Hydrilla verticillata).
arling steers in total collection digestion trials remained apparently healthy
d in positive nitrogen balance on all diets. Voluntary intake of diets (g OM
r kg body weight) was higher (P<.01) for diet CB (Coastal bermudagrass)
pared with diet HY (Hydrilla v.) but about equal to diet WH (water hyacinth).
parent digestion coefficients (%) for diets CB, HV and NH respectively were as
lows: O 72.4, 70.5 and 66.0; CP 65.2, 47.9 and 51.7; cellulose 37.3, 54.1
S31.3. Estimated digestible energy intake was larger for diet CB than diet
(P<.01) and diet WH (P<.05). Estimated digestible energy in diets CB, HV and
respectively was 3.3, 2.7 and 2.8 Mcal/kg DM and 3.4, 3.2 and 3.0 Mcal/kg OM.
:ritive value exists in the energy-yielding but apparently not in the
trogenous components of the aquatic plants HV and WH, as processed for these
dies.

A-AL-01501 KOGER M FRANKE D E

ENDING METHODS FOR BEEF CATTLE IN THE SOUTHERN REGION

GRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
breeding value of highly fertile grade cattle with good calf survival is
ng compared with that of purebreds in inter-se, backcross and first cross
ings. The first matings were made in 1971. Pregnancy rate was higher for
des than for purebred cows.


PLA-AL-01475


MOORE J E








PALMER A Z CARPENTER J 9


FACTORS RESPONSIBLE FOB TENDERNESS VARIATIONS IN MEAT

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
In a study of bovine collagen extractability, ten lonqissimus muscles from "A"
maturity carcasses were selected with "slight" or "moderate" marbling to study
effect of intramuscular fat on determination of hydroxyproline (OHP). Marbling
level and fat extraction did not influence color-metric determination of OHP.
In comparing two methods (Mohr, V. and J.R. Bendall (1969), Nature 223:404 vs.
McClain, P.E. (1969) Nature 221:404) of isolation of intramusculat connective
tissue (InCT), the former provided a 90% recovery of INCT and the latter a 10%
recovery. Twenty-four ewes were used to study influence of post-mortem (PM)
chill rates on muscle. The carcasses were split PM, one side used as a control
(0-30C conventional chill) and the other side subjected to one of four delayed
chill (DC) treatments (1,3,5,&7 hrs). Muscle pH declined more rapidly in DC
muscles resulting in protein denaturation significantly detrimental to muscle
quality as indicated by transmission values and water holding capacity. Allo
Kramer Shear values of eight muscles showed that only with the 7 hr DC treatment
were all treated muscles more tender than corresponding controls. With DC of
shorter duration, some muscles were more tender and other muscles less tender
compared to controls.






FLA-AL-01528 ARRINGTON L R SHIRLEY R L

NUTRIENT REQUIREMENTS OF LABORATORY ANIMALS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Effects of graded intakes of fat upon growth and efficiency of feed utilization
were studied in growing rabbits, guinea pigs and gerbils. Practical diets were
iso-nitrogenous with fat contents of 2 to 14 percent for rabbits, 4 to 12
percent for guinea pigs and 3 to 15 percent for gerbils. Weight gain of the
different species was not significantly increased but efficiency of feed
utilization improved with increases in fat. The protein requirement for growing
gerbils was studied using a practical diet with graded levels of total protein
supplied from different sources. Weight gain and feed efficiency were improved
with protein intakes to 16.7 percent of the diet but not improved above 16.7
percent.






FLA-AL-01545 OTT E A FEASTER J P

PHYSIOLOGY OF DIGESTION IN THE HORSE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Rations containing an indigestible marker (polyethylene powder) have been fed to
cecal fistulated horses. Samples collected from the ileo-cecal orifice have
been compared to fecal samples. Results indicate that considerable digestion
and absorption occurs prior to the cecum. Quantitation has been complicated by
the indication that the marker does not pass through the tract at the same rate
as the digest. Tests are underway to clarify this problem and determine
whether other markers will minimize this problem.


FLA-AL-01527








BOTANY DEPARTMENT


During the year work was continued on seven regular projects and several
non-projected studies. The major efforts on project research have been
concentrated in the areas of plant physiology, taxonomy, and mycology. Non-
projected research on environmental problems, on hydrobiology of salt evaporation
ponds, on morphology of both vascular and non-vascular plants, and on
entemogenous fungi has been continued. Dr. D. B. Ward spent six months
collecting plants in Mexico and the Southwest for comparison with related plants
in Florida.
There have been several staff changes during the year. Dr. E. S. Ford
retired July 1971; Dr. G. J. Fritz transferred as of April 1, 1972 to the
Department of Agronomy. Dr. J. T. Mullins was transferred from University
College to the Station budget as of July 1, 1971. Mr. John Beckner resigned
December 31, 1971, as Research Associate in the Vascular Plant Herbarium, and
his place has been filled temporarily on an interim basis by Mr. D. W. Hall.








FLA-BT-01042 FRITZ G J

METABOLISM OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN BY PLANTS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
during the past two years the goal of this research project has been the in vivo
demonstration of incorporation of molecular oxygen into three phenolic
erivatives which function as lignin precursors in higher plants. It is well
ocumented in the literature that enzyme preparations from tissue of higher
lants are able to catalyze the in vitro hydroxylation of phenylalanine (to
orm tyrosine), of cinnamic acid (to form p-coumaric acid), and of p-coumaric
cid (to form caffeic acid). Each of these hydroxylations involves the direct
addition of molecular oxygen to substrate. To demonstrate oxygen fixation into
hese compounds in vivo requires incubation of living plant tissue in
tmospheres enriched with oxygen-18, followed by the isolation, purification,
nd mass spectrometric analysis of each of the compounds (i.e., tyrosine,
-coumaric acid, and caffeic acid). To date, procedures for isolation from
lant tissues of samples of tyrosine, p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid sufficiently
ure for mass spectrometric analysis have been perfected. In addition, caffeic
cid obtained from sunflower seedlings grown for several days in an atmosphere
abeled with oxygen-18 has been shown to be labeled in the hydroxyl groups. A
companion experiment, i.e., demonstration of the lack of labeling in the
ydroxyl groups of caffeic acid obtained from seedlings grown in an unlabeled
atmosphere but with their roots in water labeled with oxygen-18, is in progress.
till to be completed are the labeling experiments for p-coumaric acid and for
yrosine.









.A-BT-01118 WARD D B

FLORA OF FLORIDA

IOGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
:tivities were directed toward the acquisition of vascular plant materials of
ae circum-Gulf flora of Mexico and Texas, for use in the study of related
.orida species. Extensive collections were made in the states of Nuevo Leon,
Imaulipas, Veracruz, Tabasco, Campeche, Yucatan, and Quintana Roo, Mexico, in
)manche County, Oklahoma, and in Refugio and San Patricio counties, Texas.
rrbaria were visited, and studies were made of critical specimens, at the
liversidad Nacional and at the Institute Politecnico, in Mexico City, as well
; the Field Museum, Chicago, the Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, the
diversity of Oklahoma, Stillwater, the University of Georgia, Athens, the
diversity of Texas, Austin, the Welder Wildlife Foundation, Sinton, Texas, and
Pauw University, Greencastle, Indiana.








KIMBROUGH J W


TAXONOMY OF SPECIES OF THE TRIBE THELEBOLEAE.

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
A monograph of North American species of Coportus (Thelebolaceae) was completed,
submitted, and has been accepted for publication in the Canadian Journal of
Botany. Cultural, cytological, and developmental studies are complete for
Thelebolus polysporus and for l.asibhols mnna&seu the latter a new species
discovered locally. Manuscripts for similar studies on Iodophanus
granulipolaris and Coprotus lacteus are presently being prepared to submit for
publication. Two papers were presented by invitation to the 1st International
Mycology Congress in Exeter, England, "Apothecial ontogeny, ascal structure, and
a natural classification of the Thelebolaceae" and "Ascus structure and
Discomycete classification". While abroad, three herbaria in England, Holland,
and France were visited and a number of coprophilous discomycetes were studied,
especially species of Lasiobolus. Studies leading to a monograph of Lasinbolus
are currently underway. Types specimens from a number of herbaria are on
request, as well as those of confused genera such as Patella, Cheilvmenia, and
Scutellinia, A number of discomycetes were obtained in pure culture within the
past year. These include Thelebolus stercoreus, Coprotus lacteus Iodophanus
bermauensis and Fimaria sp. rimaria is of great interest in that it fruits
quickly on artificial media, has an undescribed conidial stage, and represents a
new family for comparative study.








FLA-BT-01287 WARD D B

THE LEGUME FLORA OF FLORIDA

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
As a primary objective of an extended trip along the western Gulf Coast, for the
purpose of collecting and studying species of vascular plants related to those
in Florida, legumes were collected in six states of Mexico, in coastal Texas,
and in Oklahoma. Particular emphasis was given to native herbaceous species of
complexes which have representatives in the southeastern United States. The
genus Crotalaria series Alatae was of special interest, and field observations
have confirmed taxonomic distinctions presumed from previous work in Florida. A
partial listing of other genera collected and studied includes: Acacia,
Aeschynomene, Bauhinia, Casesalpinia, Cassia, cercis Desmanthus, Desmodium,
Indigofera, Lespedeza, Mimosa, Neptunia, Rhynchosia, Schrankia, and Sesbania.








FLA-BT-01387 MULLINS J T

CULTIVATION OF COELOMOMYCES, A FUNGAL PARASITE OF MOSQUITOES

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Field collections of mosquito larvae infected with the fungus Coelomomyces were
first made in August, 1967, in the Gainesville, Florida area. These same areas
have continued to produce infected larvae each succeeding year, including the
1971 period. The extent of infection among the larvae collected has varied from
5-50%. This record of the survival of the parasite in natural areas and the
continuing infection of larvae is an important aspect of the possible
utilization of Coelomomyces for the biological control of mosquitoes. Efforts
to establish laboratory colonies of infected mosquitoes have not yet been fully
successful. Most of our field collections of infected larvae are of Psorophora
howardii, and we have not been able to obtain large numbers of eggs of this
species. We have not been able to infect Anopheles guadrimaculatus, our most
available colony mosquito, with Coeloomyces from sorophora. We plan to do
similar infection experiments with tissue culture cells from mosquitoes,
provided we can obtain and maintain these cell lines in the laboratory. We have
continued to test a variety of nutruent media for their ability to support
growth of Coelomomyces. These tests have utilized many types of natural
extracts and sera. No growth of Coelomomyces has yet been obtained. A brief
survey of the key enzymes involved in the basic energy metabolism of infected
and non-infected larvae has been made.


PLA-BT-01226








FLA-BT-01401


HOMPHREYS T E


CARBOHYDRATE SYNTHESIS AND TRANSPORT IN PLANTS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
The results of our studies on sucrose leakage from the corn scutellum (both
sliced and whole) are consistent with the idea that sucrose leakage originates
in the sieve tubes of the phloem and is the end result of a series of events
which includes intercellular sucrose transport, vein loading and phloem
transport. This idea implies that sugar transport processes in the scutellum
slices are functioning in a manner similar to those of the intact seedling
except that the bathing solution instead of the root shoot axis serves as the
ultimate sucrose sink. Three kinds of evidence favor this idea; (1) the whole
scutellum leaked appreciable amounts of sucrose only after the root-shoot axis
was removed; (2) the leakage process was a labileone; and (3) there was a
sucrose pool that could be emptied by leakage into a tris solution but whose
level was maintained in the presence of tris and fructose (the fructose served
as a sugar source for sucrose synthesis). In the presence of fructose the
initial rate of sucrose leakage was equal to sucrose production (ca 25 mumoles
per hour per g. fresh wt.). The rate of sucrose leakage (but not the rate of
sucrose production) declined with time of incubation in fructose, but the
initial rate could be maintained in the presence of HCl, ATP, or certain
buffers. It is suggested that these compounds inhibit phloem plug formation
perhaps by removing or by completing with Caz+ or MG2+.








DAIRY SCIENCE DEPARTMENT



Dairy research was conducted on 18 projects relating to dairy production
and dairy foods. Faculty in the department published 30 journal articles and
abstracts of papers at scientific meetings which represent the data generated
from these research projects. Dr. K. C. Bachman was added to the faculty
September 1, 1971, and will be initiating research on proteins in dairy foods
and protein-lipid interactions in dairy foods.
Transfer of dairy cattle and equipment from the West Florida Dairy, Unit
was completed during 1971. During 1971 an Automatic Modular Gamma-Scintillation
System was obtained through an interdepartmental grant for use in measuring
protein hormones in physiology research.
Projects 1047, 1137,1213, and 1422 reported herein, were terminated
effective December 31, 1971.
FLA-DY-00001 VANHORN B H

PRELIMINARY RESEARCH IN DAIRY PRODUCTION AND DAIRY PRODUCTS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
The effect of high temperature, short duration storage on the keeping quality of
milk was studied. It was found that in the summertime the temperature in the
trunk of an automobile will exceed 49C. To simulate conditions to which milk
might be exposed by a shopper, samples of milk were removed from refrigeration
at 4C and placed in an incubator at 49C for 30, 60 or 90 minutes. After 90
minutes the temperature of the milk had risen to 30C. All samples for
organoleptic and bacteriological analyses were removed on Monday, Wednesdayand
Friday for as long as the milk was acceptable for drinking. The standard plate
count (SPC) and the psychrophylic count (PC) tended to be highest for the milk
exposed to 49C for 90 minutes. After a few days storage at 4C the SPC and PC
were similar. Bacterial growth rates varied widely among brands of milk.
Judges were asked to rank the samples in ascending order of preference.
Analysis of the data showed that the judges were able to distinguish differences
among the samples. The control samples were rated highest and heat exposed
samples rated lowest.

FLA-DY-00213 WING J M

ENSILABILITY OF FLORIDA FORAGE CROPS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Kenaf (K), Corn(C), and Sorghum (S) were investigated alone and in combination.
Yields in tons per acre of forage, dry matter and protein were: K, 24.90, 3.39,
.52; C, 17.10, 2.54, .20; K + C, 15.80, 1.63, .18; C+S, 7.8, 1.25, .10; S,
15.20, 2.24, .17; K + S, 16.5, 1.70, .14. All forages were ensiled and are
being fed to steers for determination of acceptability and digestibility of dry
matter, energy, and protein. Nutrient recovery will be calculated from silo
in-put, out-put data.
FLA-DY-00575 WILCOX C J HEAD H H THATCHER W W

PRODUCTION, REPRODUCTION AND CONFORMATION OF THE FLORIDA STATION DAIRY HERD

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
First calf heifers (625 lactation records, 50 paternal half-sib groups) at the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station averaged 2,773 kg milk, 5.22% milk fat
and 144 kg milk fat overall for 1931-68. Weighted regression analyses of least-
squares year constants, with sires included or omitted from the model, provided
estimates of annual trends. Genetic trends for milk and fat yields and fat
percentage were 37.5 6.4 kg, 1.45 0.31 kg, and -.016 .004%, respectively;
environmental trends were -14.0kg, -.29 kg, and +.017, respectively. If negative
environmental trends in yields were accepted at face value, possible explanation:
include gradual increase in herd size, other management practices which might
have led to increased competition between heifers and older cows, and the additi<
of animals of the four other major dairy breeds.

FLA-DY-01047 WILCOX C J KRIENKE N A HEAD H H

GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES UPON COMPOSITION OF MILK

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Interregional aspects of this project have now been completed and published.
Efforts now are in the analysis of Florida data, whereby several factors will be
evaluated which could not be studied in the interregional project.
Environmental and genetic parameters for milk yield, milk composition (including
contents of fat, SNF, protein and chloride) and body weight will be estimated.
All data from 1959-67 have been placed in IBM cards, with remaining years
(1968-70) nearly complete. Statistical analyses are scheduled for early 1972.











VARIATIONS OF MILK AND FAT YIELDS OF FLORIDA DAIRY CATTLE

PROGRESS REPORT: 69/11 71/12
First-lactation records of 4,779 Holstein, Jersey and Guernsey paternal
half-sibs, representing 155 sires and 181 herds for 1958-67, were subjected to a
series of least-squares analyses. Average age at freshening was 27.4, 26.4 and
29.5 months, respectively, for the three breeds. Average production was 4,712
kg milk, 3.70% fat and 173 kg fat for Holsteins; corresponding values for
Jerseys and Guernseys were 3,144 kg, 4.99% and 156 kg, and 3,227 kg, 4.57% and
147 kg. Estimates of trends were obtained from weighted regressions of
least-squares year constants on years, with and without sire having been
included in the mathematical model. Annual genetic trends were estimated for
Holsteins to be: 33 kg milk, -0.034% fat and -0.7 kg fat; for Jerseys 22 kg,
0.008% and 1.3 kg: for Guernseys, 92 kg, -0.048% and 2.8 kg. Environmental
trends for milk yield were positive for Holsteins (57 kg) but negative for
Jerseys and Guernseys (10 kg and 23 kg). Although estimates of genetic change
in Guernsey yields appeared higher than most reports in the literature,
estimates for Jerseys and Holsteins were in good agreement. Results seem
noteworthy in light of the unusual environmental conditions of Florida and the
use of AI sires for the most part selected, housed and proven in northern U.S.




FLA-DY-01185 MARSHALL S P SMITH K L

FEEDING SYSTEMS, NUTRIENT INTAKE AND GROWTH OF DAIRY CALVES

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
An evaluation of the use of high fat levels in diets of young calves was made
using 3, 6 and 9% milkfat levels in milk diets. The milks were fed ad libitum
to calves 2 to 22 days of age. At each fat level, three calves were fed each of
undiluted diets and three each diet diluted with 1.5 parts of water. Although
fluid intake increased, energy intake decreased as diet energy levels diminished,
and dilution can be used to influence nutrient intake on milk rations. Body
weight gains averaged 21.3, 16.4, 16.9, 10.3, 13.4 and 13.2 kg on the undiluted
3, 6 and 9, and the diluted 3, 6, and 9% milks, respectively. Metabolizable
energy intakes on these respective rations averaged 124, 121, 140, 59, 76, and
103 thousand kilocalories. Metabolizable energy intakes per gram gain in body
aere significantly lower (5.8 to 5.9 kcal) on the undiluted 3% and diluted 3 and
.X milks than on the undiluted 6 and 9% and diluted 9% milks (7.4 to 8.3 kcal).
'he metabolizable energy intakes above resting metabolism requirements per gram
lain in weight ranged from 2.5 kcal on 3% diluted milk to 6.2 on the 9% milk.
then the values for the different diets were adjusted for differences in intake
Levelsthe adjusted means were 3.6, 4.5 and 5.2, kilocalories, respectively, for
:he 3, 6 and 9% milks. The differences were significant and indicate that
Efficiency of energy utilization for body weight gain declined as the milkfat
Level was increased.



LA-DY-01213 HEAD H H WILCOX C J

;ROTH HORMONE AND INSULIN EFFECTS ON THE METABOLISM OF GLUCOSE AND ACETATE IN
AIRY CATTLE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
replicated 4 x 4 Latin Square to determine Growth Hormone (GH, 0.2 mg/kg body
t, i.v.) and fasting (24 hr) effects on blood metabolite and insulin levels has
een completed. Fasting (24 hr) significantly reduced blood glucose, plasma
lucose and plasma insulin levels and elevated plasma non-esterified fatty acid
NEFA) levels; plasma free amino acid-nitrogen (FAA-N) levels were not altered.
significant differences due to GH were not detected for any of the dependent
ariables studied in either fed or fasted animals. Eight male calves (5 mo old)
ere used in a single reversal trial to determine GH effects during and extended
ast (72 hr). Four calves were given a single i.v. injection of GH (0.2 mg/kg
ody wt) and four calves saline 72 hr after feeding. Two weeks later the
treatment sequence was reversed. Fasting and GH effects on blood metabolite and
insulin levels were evaluated. Fasting blood and plasma glucose levels declined
rom 53.3 + or 1.50 and 81.69 + or 2.01 (4 hr), to 35.65 + or 1.29 and
1.41 + or 1.08 mg/100 ml (96 hr) respectively. Plasma insulin declined from
-.7 + or 1.7 (4 hr) to 6.1 + or 1.2 muu/ml (96 hr). Plasma NEFA levels
creased from 144 + or 11 (4 hr) to 1260 + or 88 mueq/L (96 hr), and plasma
A-N levels remained unchanged. Rapid intravenous injection of GH (13-20 mg)
d not produce an insulin-like phase or significant alterations in these blood
tabolites in the fasted animal.


FLA-DY-01137


WILCOX C J









WILCOX C J THATCHER W W


GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS UPON REPRODUCTION OF FLORIDA DAIRY CATTLE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Data collected from 1939-71 have been transcribed for punching into IBM cards
during the past several years, with the job now over 90% completed. Objectives
are to estimate the contribution of nonadditive genetic variance to the total
variability in reproductive performance, as measured by life span, age at first
calving, service interval, gestation length and calving interval. Hopefully the
data will be ready for statistical analyses during late 1972. An additional
herd ceased operation during 1971; presently three herds are contributing data
to the project representing a living cow population of 800 animals.



FLA-DY-01255 WING J M

ENERGY SOURCE AFFECTING DIGESTIBILITY OF CELLULOSE, PROTEIN, & BUMEN
FERMENTATION IN DAIRY CATTLE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
The effects of citrus pulp on rumen fermentation patterns were studied in two
replications of a 4 x 4 Latin Square balanced for carry-over effects using
rumen-fistulated steers. Corn silage dry matter was replaced at levels of 0,
33, 67, and 100 percent by citrus pulp in rations made isonitrogenous using
soybean meal. As citrus pulp varied from 100 to 67, 33, and 0 percent of the
ration, molar percentages of acetic propionic, and butyric acids measured at two
hours after feeding varied respectively as follows: 65.1, 13.9, 21.6; 68.8,
13.5, 16.8; 62.1, 12.8, 23.5; 70.8, 11.5, 16.3. The only difference of
significance among treatments was between the acetic/propionic ratios in rumen
liquor of animals receiving 67 or 100 percent citrus pulp at two and four hours
after feeding. The acetic/ propionic ratio of the 100 percent ration increased
and that of the 67 percent ration decreased during both intervals. Similar
results were observed with complete rations, and normal milk production and
composition occurred in hay or sugar-cane bagasse rations with either pelleted
or conventional citrus pulp.



FLA-DY-01264 WILCOX C J

VITAL STATISTICS OF BEEF AND DAIRY SIRES USED IN ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Collection of data on U. S. and Canadian sires continues on schedule. A living
population of about 2000 sires contribute 500-700 completed life span records
annually. The next survey of studs will be conducted in early 1972. The last
summary of data included sires which had left service through 1967; a resummary
is planned for late 1972. The data bank now consists of about 10,000 completed
beef and dairy sire records.




FLA-DY-01271 HEAD H H

GLUCOSE AND FREE FATTY ACID METABOLISM IN THE IMMATURE RUMINANT

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Additional statistical analyses have been carried out to estimate age, diet and
glucose concentration effects on glucose utilization in milk-fed and grain-fed
calves. Age and body weight were more important than plasma glucose
concentration in accounting for within animal variability of glucose utilization
regardless of feeding regime. Glucose utilization rates in milk-fed calves
remained generally higher throughout 22 wk than in calves which were weaned at 81
wk of age. Positive effects of age on glucose utilization were detected which
were not explained when glucose concentration and body weight were included in
the analysis. Weekly fasting (16 hr) blood samples obtained from 18 calves havs
been analyzed for blood and plasma glucose and for various blood lipid fraction
(cholesterol, cholesterol ester, total esterified fatty acids, non-esterified
fatty acids, and triglycerides) and the statistical analyses to determine age
and diet effects on these components is in progress. Thirty palmitic acid-1-14
constant-infusion isotope dilution experiments conducted on 6 of the calves (16
hr fast) at 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 days of age have been performed and
chemical analyses, radioactive assay and compositional analyses are being
performed.


FLA-DY-01234










COMPLETE RATIONS FOR LACTATING COWS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Pelleted sugarcane bagasse containing 9% of molasses was compared with cottonseed
hulls and with a mixture of cottonseed hulls and bagasse pellets as a roughage
source in complete rations of lactating cows. Bagasse pellets contained 2.6%
crude protein, 0.6% ether extract, 39.6% cellulose, 10.6% lignin, and 1.9% ash.
Percentage of ingredients in ration 1 was: bagasse pellets, 25; citrus pulp, 37;
corn, 26; soybean meal, 10; Duophos, 1.1; Urea, 0.5; and salt, 0.4%. Cottonseed
hulls replaced one-half the bagasse pellets in ration 2 and all in ration 3.
Each ration was fed ad libitum to 6 cows during a 10-week continuous trial.
Daily dry matter intake as % of body weight, milk production, solids-corrected
milk and fat test on the rations averaged 3.9, 4.1, 4.1; 47.8, 49.6; 49.0, 47.3,
44.3; and 4.12, 3.75 and 3.17 for rations 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Comparative
differences were not significant (P<0.05) and bagasse pellets appear to be an
acceptable substitute for cottonseed hulls in dairy rations.








FLA-DY-01408 WILCOX C J

QUANTITATIVE GENETICS OF MILK PRODUCTION

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Some 5,987 records for 1946-1966 from three herds in north-central Venezuela
were evaluated. Breeds included 1/2 Holstein-1/2 native, 3/4 Holstein-1/4
native, 7/8 Holstein-1/8 native, pure imported Holstein and mixed. First calf
heifers (1,678 recrods) had calving age, length of record and milk yield
averages of 32 months,81 days and 2,639 kg, respectively. Older cows (4,309
records) averaged 278 days, 116 days and 2,982 kg for length of record, previous
dry period and milk yield, respectively. They exceeded first calf heifers by
343 kg in milk yield. Age effects on milk yield were not significant for first
calf heifers but were significant for older cows. An increase in milk yield up
to lactation eight with an increase of 30% in yield from first lactation to
.aturity was observed. Lactation length had a significant curvilinear effect on
milk yield. On a within-breed within-farm basis, analyses showed that up to 59%
f total variation in milk yield could be attributed to variation in age at
alving and length of record. It was not possible to detect effects of
previous dry period on yield. Year of calving and sire were found to be
significant. Month of calving was significant on one of two farms. On a
ithin-farm basis, breed averages increased as the percentage of Holstein blood
increased. Results were in agreement with most previous research conducted in
tropical areas of the world.








LA-DY-01409 WILCOX C J HEAD H H THATCHER W R

ELECTION FOR MILK YIELD IN JERSEYS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
his selection project is in its early stages. Objectives are to place major
emphasis in selection upon a single trait, milk yield, and to estimate the
maximum amount of genetic progress which can be made. Genetic changes in other
raits of economic importance, but which are not subjected to selection
pressure, will also be estimated. All measurements are progressing according to
Lan. These include milk yield, milk composition (fat, SNF, protein and
Iloride), body size (weight and wither height at various ages), udder structure
id milking rates, mastitis status (as measured by manual palpation, strip cup
id leucocyte count) and other standard productive and reproductive measures.
ie herd numbers 103 females. The rolling herd average for 1971 was 8,487 lb.
Llk and 422 lb. milk fat. Estimated net energy consumption was 14% from
Llage, 31% from other succulents and 55% from concentrates. In the control
)rtion of the herd, semen from 14 young sires is being used; the 3 highest AI
:oven sires available in the U.S. are being used this year in the selection
:oup.


FLA-DY-01399


MARSHALL S P


VAN HORN H H








WILCOX C J LANE C B


EFFECTS OF METHODS OF PRODUCTION AND HANDLING OF MILK UPON DEVELOPMENT OF
LIPOLYTIC RANCIDITY

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Inspection of 477 dairy farms (essentially a 100% sample) was conducted by
representatives of the State Department of Agriculture. Breed composition of
Florida's 191,000 dairy cows was Holstein, 59%; Jersey, 22%; Guernsey, 14%;
Brown Swiss, 3%; Ayrshires, 1%; others, 1%. Estimated energy intakes were in
the form of concentrates, 78%; silage, 2%; hay, 4%; green chop, 2%; grazing,
13%. Milking machine units in active service numbered 2756 (range per farm, 0
to b4), of which 21% were brand A; 68X, brand B; 4%, brand C; and 7% others.
Average length of milk lines under vacuum was 52.4m; average milk tank capacity
was 7040 liters. Milk was processed on the farm in 28 cases, trucked directly
to the plant in 415 cases, and marketed through a cooperative in 375 cases.
Milking parlors were used on 156 farms, pipeline milking on 283, other systems
on 38. Steel milk lines were most widely, 58%, with glass, 31%, combination,
3%, and none, 8%.







FLA-DY-01458 WING J M

LAND DISPOSAL OF DAIRY FARM WASTE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Gahi millet was irrigated at rates of 1/2, 1, or 2 inches weekly with liquid
manure from holding and milking facilities. Yields of forage, dry matter and
protein in pounds per acre varied respectively with increasing application as
follows: 7200, 935, 92.5; 7175, 918.4, 128.5; 12825, 1379.3, 156.4. All
forages were ensiled for recovery, acceptability and digestibility studies which
are in progress.







FLA-DY-1475 WING J M

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROPERTIES OF SOUTHERN FORAGES AND ANIMAL RESPONSE

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Thirty-six lots were completed with facilities for determining feed intake of
individual animals. Pensacola bahiagrass was harvested as hay at three stages
of maturity and dairy heifers have been reserved for assay of voluntary intake
and growth response.







FLA-DY-01488 THATCHER W W HEAD H H WILCOX C J

LACTATIONAL, PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL RESPONSE OF DAIRY COWS TO CORTICOID
HORMONES

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Holstein cows received either saline (n=3) or 200 IU ACTH (n=4) intravenously in
a single reversal trial. Blood was (30 ml) collected from jugular catheters at
-60, 0 pre-injection, and 5, 15, 30, 45, 60, 120, 180 and 240 min. post
injection. Purification by LH-20 chromatography and competitive protein-binding
(CPB) analysis were used to quantify plasma cortisol (F), corticosterone (B) and
progesterone (P). Mean levels of F (ng/ml) at the respective sampling times
were 2.6-3.6 (saline-ACTH), 5.2-9.3, 6.1-33.5, 10.0-30.0, 4.7-47.0, 4.5-31.8,
3.1-30.3, 4.4-37.7, 2.3-29.5 and 5.6-35.3. Corticosterone increased (P<.01) to
8.7 ng/ml at 30 min. Mean levels of P (ng/ml) were 2.7-1.7, 1.4-2.0, 2.1-2.3,
2.0-3.9, 2.4-4.3, 2.4-4.2, 1.7-3.7, 2.1-1.8, 2.4-2.6 and 1.9-1.7, respectively.
The increase of P was significant (P<.01) between 15 to 60 min. post injection,
and adrenal P may add to the systemic P pool.


FLA-DY-01422








FLA-DY-01525 THATCHER W W SMITH K L WILCOX C J

POST-MILKING TEAT DIP AND DRY COW DEDICATION FOR HASTITIS CONTROL

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
The nastitis control project is in its early stages with approximately 25% of
the animals having completed the study. It is anticipated that the remaining
animals will complete the test dipping-dry cow treatment sequence during the
1972 calendar year. At that time, the main effects of teat dipping (TD), dry
cow medication (DCH) and the TD-DCM interaction will be evaluated as to the
incidence of intra mammary infections.








EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT



During the year a new high speed collating and folding machine was
added to Editorial's facilities, which permitted quicker service to the
researchers' duplicating needs.
Radio stations continued to use taped materials developed by the department
in cooperation with researchers. Approximately 50 researchers appeared on the
television program "Sunshine Almanac."
News and feature stories quoting researchers and reporting on news-worthy
events were mailed to all media outlets in Florida. These averaged about
nine releases per week, and reached an estimated 2,208,000 readers per month.
Value of commercial time and space "donated" by these mass media
outlets was estimated at $400,000.





PUBLICATIONS

The Station printed 59,000 copies of six new bulletins totaling 252
pages and 26,000 copies of three new circulars totaling 32 pages. Four bulletins
were reprinted, one with revision. These totaled 20,000 copies and 108 pages.
During the year two 16-page issues and two 20-page issues of Research Report
were printed and distributed to 8,000 subscribers.

Publications printed were:
Number
Pages Printed
Bul. 744 Selected Ground Covers for Florida
Homes. R. D. Dickey, E. W. McElwee,
and J. M. Crevasse, Jr.............. 44 20,000

Bul. 745 The Dairy Cow Replacement Problem--
An Application of Dynamic Programming.
B. J. Smith............................ 52 5,000

Bul. 746 Using Florida Grown Foliage Plants.
C. A. Conover, T. J. Sheehan, and
D. B. McConnell... .................... 64 10,000

Bul. 747 Soil Temperature in Florida Citrus
Groves. E. P. DuCharme............... 16 6,000

Bul. 748 Vitamin A and E in Steer Fattening
Rations. H. L. Chapman, Jr., R. L.
Shirley, A. Z. Palmer, and J. W.
Carpenter ............................. 32 8,000

Bul. 749 Florida Citrus Oils. J. W. Kesterson,
R. Hendrickson, and R. J. Braddock... 180 10,000

Cir. S-211 Smokeylee, A High-Quality Watermelon
with Resistance to Anthracnose and
Fusarium Wilt. J. M. Crall......... 12 8,000

Cir. S-212 Florida MH-1, Florida's First
Machine Harvest Fresh Market
Tomato. Pat Crill, J. W. Strobel,
D. S. Burgis, H. H. Bryan, C. A.
John, P. H. Everett, J. A. Bartz,
N. C. Hayslip, and W. W. Dean..... 12 7,500

Cir. S-213 Sunrich, A New Nectarine for North
Florida. H. W. Young and R. H.
Sharpe............................ 8 10,500

Publications reprinted were:

Bul. 536 B Recommended Fertilizers and
Nutritional Sprays for Citrus.
H. J. Reitz, et al............... 24 5,000

Bul. 634 A An Annotated List of Predators and
Parasites Associated with Insect and
Mites on Florida Citrus. M. H. Muma,
A. G. Selhime, and H. A. Denmark...... 48 5,000








Bul. 677 Citrus Molasses. R. Hendrickson and
J. W. Kesterson....... ............ 28 5,000

Bul. 718 Pangolagrass. E. M. Hodges, G. B.
Killinger, J. E. McCaleb, and 0. C.
Ruelke............................. 32 5,000


Technical Journal Articles

Papers by research staff members continue to be printed in large numbers.
These appear in technical journals in the United States and a few in foreign
countries. Those included in the Journal Series are forwarded to the journals
by the Station editorial staff, and reprints are ordered for distribution when
they are printed. The series now contains more than 4,500 listings.
Following is a list of Journal Series articles printed during the year
and those not previously listed.

2725 Effect of Deep Profile Mixing and Amendment Additions on Soil Characteristics
and Crop Production of a Spodosol. W. K. Robertson and G. M. Volk. Ninth
Internat. Cong. Soil Sci.

2968 Physical Endurance of Rats Increased by Rutin. K. M. Brooks and R. C.
Robbins. J. Fla. Acad. Sci. 33:2:119-123. June 1970.

3266 A Critical Period of Ear Development in Maize. G. M. Prine. Crop Sci.
11:782-786. Nov.-Dec. 1971.

3274 Colorimetric Estimation of Total Aldehydes in Aqueous Orange Essence Using
N-Hydroxybenzenesulfonamide. M. A. Ismail and R. W. Wolford. J. Food
Sci. 35:300-301. 1970.

3292 The Response by Tobacco to Modifications in Bulk Curing Environment. J. M.
Myers and C. D. Baird. Amer. Soc. Agr. Eng. 14:1:182-186. 1971.

3416 Effects of Twenty Natural Amino Acids on Pathogenesis of Homestead 24
Tomato by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici Races 1 and 2. S. S.
Woltz and J. P. Jones. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:175-170. 1970.

3418 Concentration of Same Major and Trace Elements in Honeybees, Royal Jelly
and Pollens, Determined by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. J. L.
Nation and F. A. Robinson. J. Apicultural Res. 10:1:35-43. 1971.

3427 Reliability of the Diphenylamine Nitrate Test for Celery and Sweet Corn.
V. L. Guzman. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 29:57-62. 1969.

3450 Extraction of Protein from Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes). K. G.
Taylor, R. P. Bates, and R. C. Robbins. Hyacinth Control J. 9:1:20-22.
July 1971.

478 Use of Low Protein Grower Diets to Delay Sexual Maturity of Broiler Breeder
Males. H. R. Wilson, L. O. Rowland, Jr., and R. H. Harms. British
Poultry Sci. 12:157-163. 1971.

479 Electron Microscopic Comparison of Babesia sp. and Hepatic Changes in
Ponies and Mice. C. F. Simpson. Amer. J. Vet Res. 31:10:1763-1768.
Oct. 1970.
480 Computer Calculation of Poultry and Egg Pigmentation Data. J. L. Fry and
B. L. Damron. Food Technol. J. 25:1:44-45. 1971.

485 Male to Female Ratios for Commercial Broiler-Type and Egg Production-Type
Breeders. H. R. Wilson and R. H. Harms. British Poultry Sci. 12:327-331.
1971.

486 Intensity and Balance Concept of Soil Testing as an Approach to Optimal
Production. C. M. Geraldson. Sixth Internat. Colloquim on Plant Anal.
and Fertilizer Problems 352-364.

505 The Ultrastructure of Heinz Bodies in Horse, Dog, and Turkey Erythrocytes.
C. F. Simpson. Cornell Veterinarian LXI:2:228-238. Apr. 1971.

523 The Evaluation of Pyrantel Hydrochloride as an Anthelmintic in Dogs. R. E.
Bradley and D. P. Conway. Vet. Med. 65:8:767-769. Aug. 1970.

527 Effect of Hydrogen Ion on Sucrose Leakage from Corn Scutellum Slices:
Evidence for Two Kinds of Sucrose Pool within the Slice. L. A. Garrard
and T. E. Humphreys. Phytochemistry 10:2:243-253. 1971.








3552 Effectiveness of Foliar Sprays for Control of Diaprepes abbreviata (L.)
on Florida Citrus. R. C. Bullock. Trop. Agr. 48:2:127-131. Apr. 1971.

3556 Precooling Fruits and Vegetables in the Southeast. R. K. Showalter and W.
Grierson. Amer. Soc. of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Eng.
Symposium Bul. SF-4-70.

3563 Preliminary Studies on Environmental Manipulation to Control Injurious
Insects and Mites in Florida Citrus Groves. M. H. Muma. Proc. Tall
Timbers Conf. 23-40. Feb. 1970.

3565 Fate of Heinz Body-Laden Erythrocytes in the Spleen and Liver of Dogs and
Turkeys. C. F. Simpson. Pathologia Veterinaria 8:2:119-129. 1971.

3570 On Dispersion of the Giant African Snail, Achatina fulica Bowdich. D. O.
Wolfenbarger. J. Fla. Acad. Sci. 34:1:48-52. Mar. 1971.

3588 Foliar Applications of Nitrogen to Slash Pine Seedlings. P. J. Eberhardt
and W. L. Pritchett. Plant and Soil 34:3:731-740. June 1971.

3597 In Vitro Germination and Pollen Tube Growth of Maize (Zea mays L.) Pollen.
IV. Effects of the Fertility Restoring Rfi Locus. P. L. Pfahler. Canadia
J. Bot. 49:55-57. Jan. 1971.

3599 Attempts to Increase Tolerance of Grapefruit Seedlings to the Burrowing
Nematode (Radopholus similis) by Application of Phenolics. A. W. Feldman
and R. W. Hanks. Phytochemistry 10:4:701-709. 1971.

3602 Slash-Pine Sawfly, Neodiprion merkeli (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae).
I. Description of Life Stages and Oviposition Pattern. R. C. Wilkinson.
Annals Entomol. Soc. Amer. 64:1:241-247. Jan. 1971.

3605 Fatty Acid Composition in Ips calligraphus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)
during Postembroyonic Development. J. S. Richeson, J. L. Nation, and
R. C. Wilkinson. Annals Entomol. Soc. Amer. 64:1:251-254. Jan. 1971.

3610 Effect of Fusicoccin on Abscission, Cellulase Activity and Ethylene
Production in Citrus Leaf Explants. A. W. Feldman and A. Graniti. NATO
Advanced Study Institute on Phytotoxins in Plant Disease 1:2:115-122. 1971

3612 Uptake of Copper in Hydrilla. D. L. Sutton and R. D. Blackburn. Weed
Research 11:47-53. 1971.

3617 Effect of Deficient B-Carotene Rations and Supplement Vitamin A on Gain,
Feed Utilization, and Liver Vitamin A of Calves. W. F. Kirk, R. L. Shirle3
J. F. Easley, and F. M Peacock. J. Anim. Sci. 33:2:476-480. Aug. 1971.

3619 Influence of Dietary Iron and Phosphorus on Performance, Tissue Mineral
Composition, and Mineral Absorption in Steers. J. F. Standish, C. B.
Ammerman, A. Z. Palmer, and C. F. Simpson. J. Anim. Sci. 33:1:171-178.
July 1971.

3621 Biochemical Composition of Maize (Zea mays L.) Pollen. II. Effects of the
Endosperm Mutants, Waxy (wx), Shrunken (sh2), and Sugary (sul) on the
Carbohydrate and Lipid Percentage. P. L. Pfahler and H. F. Linskens.
Theoretical and Applied Genetics 41:2-4. 1971.

3623 Influence of Diet Composition on Availability of Phosphorus to the Chick.
T. L. Andrews, B. L. Damron, and R. H. Harms. Poultry Sci. L:1:104-108.
Jan. 1971.

3625 The In Vitro Sensitivity of Erythrocyte Aggregation to Quinine:
Assessment by a Serial Blood Sedimentation Procedure. Clinical Chem.
17:1:31-33. 1971.

3629 Plantlet Formation from Flowers of Trifolium reopens. Vimla Vasil and S. H.
West. Canadian J. Bot. 49:327. Feb. 1971.

3631 Calcium Suppression of Electrolyte Loss from Pepper Leaves Inoculated with
Xanthomonas vesicatoria. A. A. Cook and R. E. Stall. Phytopathology
61:5:484-487. May 1971.

3632 Analysis of Terbacil by Electron Capture Gas Chromatography. W. B. Wheele*
N. P. Thompson, B. R. Ray, and Merrill Wilcox. Weed Sci. 19:3:307. May 1l

3636 Toxic Myopathy of Chicks Fed Cassis occidentalis Seeds. C. F. Simpson,
B. L. Damron, and R. H. Harms. Avian Diseases 15:2:284-290. Apr.-June 193









3637 Sucrose Leakage from the Maize Scutellum: Evidence for the Participation of
the Phloem. T. E. Humphreys and L. A. Garrard. Phytochemistry 10:5:981-995.
1971.

3638 Economic Damage Level of Bean Leaf Roller Populations on Snap Beans. G. L.
Greene. Entomol. Soc. Amer. 64:3:673-674. June 1971.

3642 Phosphorus Adsorption and Movement in Some Forest Soils. F. R. Humphreys
and.W. L. Pritchett. Soil Sci. Soc. Amer. 35:3:495-500. May-June 1971.

3643 A Colorinietric Method for the Quantitative Determination of Total Aldehydes
in Coldpressed Orange and Grapefruit Oils. M. H. Dougherty and C. R. Petrus.
Anal. Chem. 54:33-36. June 1971.

3644 Comparison of Thyroid Hormone Levels in Hereford and Brahman Cattle. J. J.
Cowley, J. H. Gutierrez, A. C. Warnick, J. F. Hentges, Jr., and J. P. Feaster,
J. Anim. Sci. 32:5:981-983. May 1971.

3646 Endotrophic Vesicular-arbuscular Mycorrhizae on Soybean in Florida. N. C.
Schenck and K. Kinson. Mycologia LXIII:3:672-675. May-June 1971.

3647 Lysis of Cariogenic and Noncariogenic Oral Streptococci with Lysozyme.
S. E. Coleman, Ivo van de Rijn, and A. S. Bleiweis. J. Dental Res.
50:4:939-943. July-Aug. 1971.

3648 Effect of Phenyl Substituents in Benzyl Quaternary Ammonium Derivatives of
(+)-Limonene on Plant Growth-Retardant Activity. W. F. Newhall. J. Agr.
and Food Chem. 19:2:294-297. Mar.-Apr. 1971.

3650 Effects of Fluorides on Metabolism and Visible Injury in Cut-Flower Crops
and Citrus. S. S. Woltz, W. E. Waters, and C. D. Leonard. Fluoride
4:1:30-36. Jan. 1971.

3653 Mating Behavior of Nemobiine Crickets (Hygronemobius, Nemobius, and
Pteronemobius) Orthoptera: Gryllidae. D. L. Mays. Fla. Entomol. 54:2:
113-126. 1971.

3654 Chemical Compositions of Purified Cell Walls of Cariogenic Streptococci.
A. S. Bleiweis, R. A. Craig, D. D. Ziner, and J. M. Jablon. Infections
and Immunity 3:1:189-191. Jan. 1971.

3655 The Effect of Rootstock and Budwood Selections on the Peel Oil Content
of 'Valencia' Oranges. R. Hendrickson, J. W. Kesterson, and M. Cohen.
Prov. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:259-262. 1970.

656 Concentrating Very Small Specimens for Pariffin Sectioning: A "Mini"
Multiple-Compartment Casting Mold. J. E. Wyatt and A. P. Lorz. Stain
Technol. 46:2:96-97. March 1971.

658 Copper Accumulation in Citrus Roots and Desorption with Acid. A. E. Brams
and J. G. A. Fiskell. Proc. Soil Sci. Soc. Amer. 35:5:772-775.
Sept.-Oct. 1971.

659 Tree Responses to Fertilizers in Field and Pot Experiments. D. J. Mead
and W. L. Pritchett. Proc. Soil Sci. Soc. Amer. 35:2:346-349. Mar.-Apr.
1971.

660 Effect of an Asphalt Barrier on Soil Water and on Yields and Water Use
by Tomatoes and Cabbage. G. K. Saxena, L. C. Hammond, and H. W. Lundy.
J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 96:2:218-222. Mar. 1971.

661 Effect of Mechanical Harvesting on Quality of Florida Citrus Fruit for the
Fresh Fruit Market. R. L. Rackham and W. Grierson. Hort. Sci. 6:2:163-165.
Apr. 1971.

662 Nematode Status of 'Carrizo' Citrange. H. W. Ford. Proc. Fla. State
Hort. Soc. 83:87-88. 1970.

663 Environmental Physiology in the Sub-Tropics. I. Effect of Continuous
Environmental Stress on Some Hematological Values of Beef Cattle.
H. Gutierrez-De La R., A. C. Warnick, J. J. Cowley, and J. F. Hentges,
Jr. J. Anim. Sci. 32:5:968-973. May 1971.

665' Partial Purification of Inclusions Induced by Tobacco Etch Virus and
Potato Virus Y. E. Hiebert, D. E. Purcifull, R. G. Christie, and
S. R. Christie. Virology 43:3:638-646. Mar. 1971.








3666 Influence of Herbicides on the Uptake of Copper in Hydrilla. D. L.
Sutton, R. D. Blackburn, and K. K. Steward. Weed Res. 11:2/3:99-105.
June/Sept. 1971.

3668 Evidence for Protein Storage in Laying Hens and Its Utilization under
Nutritional Stress. R. H. Harms, R. S. Moreno, and B. L. Damron.
Poultry Sci. L:2:592-595. Mar. 1971.

3670 A Comparison of Phosphorus Assay Techniques with Chicks. 8. Evaluation
of Two Dietary Levels of Plant Phosphorus for Use in Phosphorus Assays.
R. B. Christmas, B. L. Damron, and R. H. Harms. Poultry Sci. L:2:596-601.
Mar. 1971.

3671 Cabbage Looper Control at Hastings and Sanford, Florida, during 1970.
R. B. Workman and G. L. Greene. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:166-167.
1971.

3673 An Improved Portable Automatic Sampling Spore Trap. T. W. Casselman and
R. D. Berger. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:191-195. 1970.

3675 Effect of Various Foliar Sprays on the Maturity of Tomato. W. J. Southam
and V. F. Nettles. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:212-216. 1970.

3676 Pycnidial Release and Survival, of Diplodia natalensis Spores. G. E.
Brown. Amer. Phytopath. Soc. 61:5:559-561. May 1971.

3677 Epiphytology of Celery Late Blight. R. D. Berger. Proc. Fla.
State Hort. Soc. 83:208-212. 1970.

3678 New Species and Synonymy of Florida Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogoniadae).
W. W. Wirth and F. S. Blanton. Fla. Entomol. 54:1:73-78. 1971.

3679 Life History and Control of White Peach Scale, Pseudaulacaspis pentagon
(Homoptera, Coccoidae). John Van Duyn and Milledge Murphey. Fla. Entomol.
54:1:91-95. 1971.

3680 A Critical Evaluation of the Commercial Gladiolus Cultivars Grown in
Florida. G. L. Wilfret. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:422-427. 1970.

3681 Efficient Detection of Asparagus Monoploids for the Production of
Colchiploid Inbreds. M. J. Bassett, R. J. Snyder, and F. F. Angell.
Euphytica 20:299-301. 1971.

3683 Heritability Estimate for Grain Yield in Oats (Avena sp.). P. L. Pfahler.
Crop Sci. 11:378-381. May/June 1971.

3684 The Genus Hyalomyzus (Homoptera: Aphididae) with the Description of a New
Species. R. J. Nielsson and D. H. Habeck. Annals Entomol. Soc. Amer.
64:4:883-887. July 1971.

3685 New Solpugids (Arachnida: Solpugida) from Puerto Rico. M. H. Muma and
M. L. Nazario. J. Agri. Univ. of Puerto Rico LV:4:506-512. Oct. 1971.

3868 Some Climatic Effects of on Flowering and Fruiting of 'Brewster' Lychees
in Florida. T. W. Young. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:362-367. 1970.

3687 Clinicopathologic Studies on Calves Fed Corn Damaged by Southern Corn Leaf
Blight. E. C. Harland, K. P. C. Nair, and P. T. Cardeilhac. J. Amer. Vet.
Med. Assoc. 158:8:1376-1378. Apr. 1971.

3688 Reaction Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Pesticides. I. On-Column
Transesterification of N-Methylcarbamates by Methanol. H. A. Moye.
J. Agr. and Food Chem. 10:3:452-455. May/June 1971.

3689 Food Habits of Phytoseiidae (Acarina: Mesostigmata) Including Those of
Common Species on Florida Citrus. M. H. Muma. Fla. Entomol. 54:1:21-34.
1971.

3690 A New Ammotrechella Roewer (Solpugida: Ammotrechidae) from Jamaica.
M. H. Muma. Fla. Entomol. 54:1:97-99. 1971.

3693 Corn Earworm, Heliothis zea: Susceptibility to Insecticides. S. H. Kerr.
Fla. Entomol. 54:2:179-182. 1971.

3694 Effectiveness of Treatments with Hot Water plus Benzimidazoles and Ethrel
in Controlling Fusarium Disease of Gladiolus. R. O. Magie. Plant Di.
Reporter 55:1:82-85. Jan. 1971.

3698 Fumigants for the Control of Verticillium Wilt of Tomato. J. P. Jones,
A. J. Overman, C. M. Geraldson. Plant Dis. Reporter 55:1:26-30. Jan. 1973

82








3701 Effects of 8-10 Day 50C Storage and Floral Preservatives on Snapdragon
Cut Flowers. J. C. Raulston and F. J. Marousky. Proc. Ela. State Hort.
Soc. 83:415-419. 1970.

3702 Evaluations of Pesticides for Phytotoxicity on Chrysanthemum Flowers.
S. L. Poe. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:469-471. 1970.

3703 Evaluation of Pectins from Florida Lemons Harvested from Young Trees.
A. H. Rouse and L. C. Knorr. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:281-284.
1970.

3704 Mulches Reduce Soil Temperatures Under Tomato and Tobacco Plants in Florida.
D. R. Davis, R. R. Kincaid, and F. M. Rhoads. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
83:117-119. 1970.

3705 Fruit Thinning of 'Early Amber' Peaches With Ethrel (1) and Nia 10637 (4).
H. D. Stiles, D. W. Buchanan, and R. H. Biggs. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
83:396-399. 1970.

3706 Comparison of Different Iron Formulations For Effectiveness in Correcting
Chlorosis in Citrus. F. M. Basiouny, C. D. Leonard and R. H. Biggs. Proc.
Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:1-6. 1970.

3707 Botrytis-like diseases of Rose, Chrysanthemum, Carnation, Snapdragon and
King Aster Caused by Alternaria and Helminthosporium. A. W. Engelhard.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:455-457. 1970.

3708 Differential Graywall Development in Tomato Stocks Infiltrated with Bacteria.
C. B. Hall, R. E. Stall, J. W. Strobel. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:179-
182. 1970.

3709 Nematode Problems of Turfgrasses in Florida and their Control. V. G. Perry,
G. C. Smart, Jr., and G. C. Horn. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:489-
492. 1970.

710 Cucumber Mosaic and Western Celery Mosaic--Two-Aphid-Transmitted Virus
Diseases of Florida Celery. T. A. Zitter. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:
188-191. 1970.

711 Storage Life of Prepared Grapefruit Halves. W. F. Wardowski, G. E. Brown,
P. J. Fellers. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:232-235. 1970.

712 Pattern of Fertilization for Watermelons: 1. Influence on Plant Growth
and Fruit Yield. S. J. Locascio, J. G. A. Fiskell, H. W. Lundy. Proc.
Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:144-148. 1970.

713 Influence of Alar on Central Florida Peaches. C. E. Arnold and D. W.
Buchanan. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:399-402. 1970.

714 Respiration, Ethylene Evolution and Enzymatic Changes of Florida Peaches
and Nectarines as Affected by Storage Temperature. N. Vakis and J. Soule.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:285-290. 1970.

715 Grove Application of Benlate for Control of Postharvest Citrus Decay. G.
E. Brown and L. G. Albrigo. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:222-225. 1970.

716 Effect of Plot Size and Layout on Ground and Aerial Application of Fungicides
to Vegetable Crops. C. H. Blazquez, H. S. Potter, G. A. Brandes, D. W.
Lander. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:196-203. 1970

717 Interaction of Cultivars, Nematodes, and Fumigants on Development of
Verticillium Wilt on Tomatoes. A. J. Overman, J. P. Jones, and C. M.
Geraldson. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:203-208. 1970.

718 Fruit Chilling and Ripening Studies for Evaluation of Breeding Lines of
Fresh Market Tomatoes. D. S. Burgis. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:135-
137. 1970.

719 Comparison of Tomato Varieties and F1 Hybrids for Yield and Uniformity.
P. Crill and D. S. Burgis. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:12-122. 1970.

720 Problems in Using 'Milam' Rootstock as'a Biological Barrier. H. W. Ford.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:84-86. 1970.

721 Celery Acceptability in Tomato-Celery Juice Blends. R. P. Bates and C.
W. Wilson, III. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:240-244. 1970.

22 Color Standardization of Pigmented Grapefruit Juices. R. L. Huggart and
S. V. Ting. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:273-281. 1970.








3723 Phytotoxic Responses of Euphorbia pulcherrima to Light, Temperature and
Cycocel Levels. C. A. Conover. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:457-461.
1970.

3724 Minor Tropical Fruit Cultivars in Florida. C. W. Campbell. Proc. Fla.
State Hort. Soc. and Tropical Region ASHS 83:353-356. 1970.

3726 Response of Grower-Available Sebago Potato Seed Stocks to Different Seed
Piece Treatments. J. R. Shumaker and D. P. Weingartner. Proc. Fla. State
Hort. Soc. 83:183-188. 1970.

3727 Milkweedvine Control in Florida Citrus Groves. R. L. Phillips and D. P. H.
Tucker. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:26-29. 1970.

3728 Peel and Internal Quality of Oranges as Influenced by Grove Applications
of Pinolene and Benlate. L. G. Albrigo, G. E. Brown, and P. J. Feller.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:263-267. 1970.

3729 Response of 'Stover' Grape to Soil Applications of Magnesium. C. F. Balerdi
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:387-390. 1970.

3730 Arsenate Sprays on 'Temple' Oranges: Rates, Timing, and Residues. R. L.
Reese. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:15-20. 1970.

3731 Renovating Old Citrus Groves in Indian River Area. R. C. J. Koo and P. J.
Driscoll. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:71-74. 1970.

3732 Status of Postharvest Fungicides for Citrus Fruit. A. A. McCornack. Proc.
Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:229-232. 1970.

3733 Some Effects of Air-Borne Flourine on Growth and Yield of Six Citrus
Varieties. C. D. Leonard and H. B. Graves, Jr. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
83:34-41. 1970.

3734 Frost Protection is Practical for Peaches. J. F. Gerber and D. W. Buchanan
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:391-395. 1970.

3735 The Chemical Physical and Salinity Characteristics of Twenty-seven Soil
Media. W. W. Waters, William Llewellyn, and James NeSmith. Proc. Fla. Sta
Hort. Soc. 83:482-488. 1970.

3736 Influence of Growth Regulators on Stem Elongation and Rooting Response of
Foliage Plants. R. T. Poole. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:497-502. 197

3737 Relationship of Snapdragon Response Groups to Cultivar Performance in Flori
Field Production. J. C. Raulston. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:449-
454. 1970.

3738 Calcium Deficiency and its Effects on Growth and Quality of Container Grown
Viburnum suspensum Lindl. R. D. Dickey. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
83:45 1. 1970.

3739 Poultry Manure as a Soil Amendment for Container-grown Ligustrum aponicum
and Podocarpus macrophylla maki. E. W. McElwee. Proc. Fla. State Hort.
Soc. 83:427-432. 1970.

3741 Breeding Grapes for Central Florida. J. A. Mortensen. HortScience 6:2:149
153. 1971.

3742 Biochemical Changes in Grapefruit and 'Murcott' Citrus Fruits as RElated
to Storage Temperature. N. Vakis, J. Soule, R. H. Biggs, and W. Grierson.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:304-310. 1970.

3743 Increasing Yields of the 'Minneola', 'Robinson' and 'Osceola' Varieties
with Gibberellic Acid Sprays and Girdling. A. H. Krezdorn and H. D. Brown.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:29-34.' 1970.

3744 Detachment Characteristics of Soup Bean Pods and Pedicels. R. K. Showalter
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:248-252. 1970.

3745 Nematode Control on Potatoes by Soil Fumigants, Band and in Furrow
Applications of Contact Nematicides. D. P. Weingart and D. W. Dickson.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:154-161. 1970.

3746 Recent Advances in Mechanization of Fresh Market Tomato Harvesting in
Florida. W. W. Deen, Jr., N. C. Hayslip, H. I. Bryan, and P. H. Everett.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:131-135. 1970.









3747 Evaluation of Fruit-Pedicel Separation of Fresh Market Tomato Varieties for
Mechanical Harvest. B. Villalon and H. H. Bryan. Proc. Fla. State Hort.
Soc. 83:127-130. 1970.

3748 Rangpur Lime as a Citrus Rootstock in Florida. M. Cohen. Proc. Fla. State
Hort. Soc. 83:78-84. 1970.

3749 Pattern of Fertilization for Watermelons: II. Influence on Nutrient
Distribution in Soil and Plant Uptake. J. G. A. Fiskell, S. L. Locascio,
F. G. Martin. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:149-154. 1970.

3750 Mineral Composition of Leaves from Citrus Trees Affected with Declines of
Unknown Etiology. C. A. Anderson and D. V. Calvert. Proc. Fla. State Hort.
Soc. 83:41-45. 1970.

754 Breeding Blueberries for Low-Chilling Requirement. R. H. Sharpe and W. B.
Sherman. HortScience 6:2:145-147. Feb. 1971.

755 Breeding Rubus for Warm Climates. W. B. Sherman and R. H. Sharpe.
HortScience 6:2:147-149. Feb. 1971.

756 Anatomy of the Budunion in Mango. J. Soule. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 96:3:380-
383. May 1971.

757 Artificial Hybridization of Peanuts. A. J. Norden and V. A. Rodriguez.
Oleagineux 26:3:159-162. Mar. 1971.

758 Leaf Microbodies (Peroxisomes) and Catalase Localization in Plants
Differing in their Photosynthetic Carbon Pathways. J. H. Hillard, V. E.
Gracen, and S. H. West. Planta. 97:93-105. 1971.

759 A Method for Estimating the Acid Sulfate Potential of Florida Soils.
H. W. Ford and D. V. Calvert. Soil and Crop Sci. Fla. Proc. 30:304-307.
1970.

161 Uptake of Copper by Parrotfeather. D. L. Sutton and R. D. Blackburn.
Weed Sci. 19:3:282-285. May 1971.

762 Dactylaria Leaf Spot, A New Disease of Philodendron oxycardium Schott.
J. F. Knauss and S. A. Alfieri, Jr. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:
441-444. 1970.

763 Evaluation of Cold-Hardy Avocados in Florida. A. H. Krezdorn. Proc.
Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:382-386. 1970.

64 The Effect of Fertility and Plant Populations on the Yields of Okra.
Paul Sutton and E. E. Albregts. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:140-144.
1970.

765 Response of Temple' Oranges to Varying Rates of Nitrogen, Potassium and
Magnesium. D. V. Calvert. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:10-15. 1970.

766 Peel Injury of Florida Navel Oranges. A. A. McCornack. Proc. Fla. State
Hort. Soc. 83:267-270. 1970.

67 Sauerkraut Fermentation of Some Florida Cabbage Cultivars. R. F.
Matthews and R. P. Bates, Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:236-240, 1970.

68 Hormonal Regulation of Citrus Fruit and Leaf Abscission. M. A. Ismail.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:256-269. 1970.

69 Effectiveness of Copper when Combined with Nu Film 17 for Control of
Avocado Scab. R. T. McMillan, Jr. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:386-388.
1970.

70 Seasonal Variation in Magnitude of Foliage Growth in Florida Citrus
Groves. W. A. Simanton. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:49-54. 1970.

73 Soil Temperature and Development of Cuttings and Seedlings of Tropical
Foliage Plants. R. T. Poole and W. E. Waters. HortScience 5:463-464.
Oct. 1971.

76 Effects of Pesticide Combinations on Rose Flower Yields. H. N. Miller,
S. E. McFadden, and L. C. Kuitert. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:493-497.
1970.

77 Slow Release Fertilizer Effects on Growth of Nandina domestic in Containers.
S. E. McFadden and C. A. Conover. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:472-475.
1970.








3778 Effects of Levels of Phosphorus and Potassium on Growth, Composition and
Incidence of Leaf-Tip Die-Back in Cattleya Orchids. H. A. Poole and
T. J. Sheehan. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:465-469. 1970.

3779 Effects of Media and Container Type on Herbicidal Activity in Container-
Grown Woody Ornamentals. S. G. Dean, C. E. Whitcomb, and C. A. Conover.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:502-507. 1970.

3780 Chemical Pruning and Disbudding of Chrysanthemum morifolium. J. N. Joiner
and G. D. Pickhardt. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:461-465. 1970.

3782 Insecticides for Budworm Control in Central and South Florida. G. L.
Greene and M. J. Janes. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:168-170. 1970.

3783 Toxicity of Solanum sodomaeum and Solanum malacoxylon to Chicks. E. Ross,
C. F. Simpson, L. O. Rowland, Jr., and R. H. Harms. Poultry Sci. L:3:870-
873. May 1971.

3784 A Comparison of Herbicide, Mechanical Tree Hoe, and Flaming Treatments in
a 2-Year Weed Control Experiment. J. D. Whitney, R. L. Phillips, and
D. P. H. Tucker. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:22-25. 1970.

3785 Acidification of Lye Peeled Tomatoes and Sodium Level of the Canned
Tomatoes. R. F. Matthews. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:244-248. 1970.

3786 Growth Stimulation of a Sporobolus oiretii by Aphelenchoides bessei.
R. B. Marlatt and V. G. Perry. Phytopathology 61:6:740. June 971

3787 Precision Nutrient Gradients--A Component for Optimal Production. C. M.
Geraldson. Soil Sci. and Plant Anal. 1:6:317-331. 1970.

3788 Response of Eggplant to Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium Fertilization.
Paul Sutton and E. E. Albregts. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc.
30:1-5. 1970.

3789 Southern Blight of Schefflera. S. S. Alfieri, Jr., and J. F. Knauss.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:432-435. 1970.

3790 Disease and Insect Control for Direct Seeded Cabbage in Florida. J. O.
Strandberg and G. L. Greene. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:170-174. 197(

3791 The Effects of Post-Bloom Chemical Sprays on Grapefruit. B. S. Buslig,
R. D. Carter, G. E. Good, and J. A. Attaway. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc.
83:299-304. 1970.

3792 Occurrence of Strawberry Angular Leaf Spot, Xanthomonas fragariae, in
Florida. C. M. Howard. Plant Dis. Reporter 55:2:142. Feb 1971.

3793 In Vitro Germination and Pollen Tube Growth of Maize (Zea mays L.) Pollen.
V. Gamma Irradiation Effects. P. L. Pfahler. Radiation Bot. 11:3:233-237
1971.

3794 Uptake of Copper by Water Hyacinth. D. L. Sutton and R. D. Blackburn.
Hyacinth Control J. 9:1:18-20. July 1971.

3795 Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, Males Captured at Three Florida
Locations in Traps Baited with Virgin Females. G. L. Greene, M. J. Janes,
and F. W. Mead. Fla. Entomol. 54:2:165-166. 1971.

3796 Continuous Flow Separation of Carotenoids by Liquid Chromatography. Ivan
Stewart and T. A. Wheaton. J. Chromatog. 55:2:325-336. 1970.

3798 Cold Hardiness of Selected Citrus Varieties as Determined by Freezing
Detached Leaves. C. E. Hutcheson and W. J. Wiltbank. Proc. Fla. State
Hort. Soc. 83:95-98. 1970.

3799 Control of Strawberry Anthracnose with Benomyl. C. M. Howard. Plant
pis. Reporter 55:2:139-141. Feb. 1971.

3800 Winter Hardiness in Digitaria. A. J. Oakes, W. R. Langford, and S. C.
Schank. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:222-229. 1970.

3804 Evaluation of Cucumber Varieties for Resistance to Corynespora cassiicolaj
J. O. Strandberg. Plant Dis. Reporter 55:2:142-144. Feb. 1971.

3805 Pathology of a Mosquito Iridescent Virus (MIV) Infecting Aedes
taeniorhynchus, D. W. Hall and D. W. Anthony. J. Invertebrate Phtol. 18:1
61-69. July 1971.








3807 Carbofuran and 3-Hydroxycarbofuran Determination in Lettuce by Alkali-Flame
Gas Chromatography. C. H. Van Middelem, H. A. Moye, and M. J. Janes.
J. Agri. and Food Chem. 19:3:459-461. May/June 1971.

3808 Weed Problem Changes Affecting Central Florida Vegetable Production. W. T.
Scudder. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:138-141. Oct. 1970.

3809 Abnormalities of the Pelvic Girdle and Limbs of a Broiler Chick. J. H.
Walter and H. R. Wilson. Poultry Sci. L:1:306-307. June 1971.

3810 A Reservoir-Equipped Moericke Trap for Collecting Aphids. W. C. Adlerz.
J. Econ. Entomol. 64:4:966-967. Aug. 1971.

3811 Effects of Ethephon and Benzimidazoles on Corm and Cormel Production by
Gladiolus Cormels. R. O. Magie. HortScience 6:4:351-352. Aug. 1971.

3813 The Association of Chloroplast Peripheral Reticulum and Low Photorespiration
Rates in a Photorespiring Plant Species. J. H. Hilliard and S. H. West.
Planta 99:352-356. 1971.

3814 Twolined Spittlebug Adults Severely Damage Sweet Corn Seedlings. M. J.
Janes. J. Econ. Entomol. 64:4:976-977. Aug. 1971.

3815 Effect of Excess Dietary Iron as Ferrous Sulfate and Ferric Citrate on
Performance and Tissue Mineral Composition of Sheep. J. F. Standish and
C. B. Ammerman. J. Anim. Sci. 33:2:481-484. Aug. 1971.

816 Response of Calves Fed Ad Libitum to Variations in Milk Diet Composition.
S. P. Marshall and K. L. Smith. J. Dairy Sci. 54:7:1064-1067. July 1971.

817 Effect of Nitrogen and Potassium Levels and Methods of Planting and on
Yield and Quality of Chinese Cabbage. V. F. Nettles and Mohammad Bin Md.
Ali. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:16-19. 1970.

818 The In Vitro Effect of Immune Serum upon the Phosphate Metabolism and
Re-establishment of Adult Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. J. T. McL. Neilson.
J. Parasitol. 57:4:818-822. Aug. 1971.

819 Microfaunal Populations on Gladiolus Corms. S. L. Poe. Fla. Entomol.
54:2:127-133. 1971.

821 Production of Gladiolus Fruit and Seed from Detached Spikes. G. J. Wilfret.
HortScience 6:3:208-209. June 1971.

822 Effect of Controlled Burning on Production of Cows on Native Range.
W. G. Kirk and E. M. Hodges. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc.
30:341-343. 1970.

823 Corn Yields with Optimal Nutrients and Water. G. M. Geraldson and W. G.
Duncan. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:259-262. 1970.

824 Preliminary Report on the Response of Grain Sorghum to Applied Nitrogen.
M. C. Lutrick. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:46-50. 1970.

825 Keeping the Micronutrients Micro--A Study in Conservation and Pollution
Control. Nathan Gammon, Jr. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:30-33.
1970.

826 Supplemental Feeding of Steers on Pangolagrass and Pensacola Bahiagrass
Warm Season Pastures. E. M. Hodges, W. G. Kirk, F. M. Peacock, and J. E.
McCaleb. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:337-341. 1970.

827 White Clover, Red Clover, and Ryegrass for North Central Florida. G. B.
Killinger. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:331-336. 1970.
128 Suppresion of Pierce's Disease Symptoms by Tetracycline Antibiotics.
D. L. Hopkins and J. A. Mortensen. Plant Dis. Reporter 55:7:610-612.
July 1971.

29 Crimson Clover and Argentine Bahiagrass Yields as Related to Fertilizer
Rate and Time of Application. R. L. Stanley, Jr., and R. W. Wallace,
Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:90-99. 1970.

30 Hybridization of Digitarias Having Winter Hardiness. S. C. Schank,
J. W. Carmichael, and R. L. Stanley. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc.
30:229-232. 1970.

31 Preliminary Studies on the Effects of Cold Stress on Sugarcane. G. J.
Gascho, O. C. Ruelke, and S. H. West. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc.
30:233-240. 1970.









3832 Nutrient Uptake and Fiber Yields of Four Fiber-Bearing Plant Species under
North Florida Conditions. J. M. Dempsey and R. W. Baumann. Soil and Crop
Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:34-45. 1970.

3833 Laboratory Investigations of a Pressure Scanning System for Soil Water
Analysis. D. G. Cobb, A. R. Overman, and J. S. Rogers. Soil and Crop
Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:283-288. 1970.

3834 Influence of Host Plant Physiology on Tetranychus urticae (Arcarina:
Tetranychidae) Infesting Strawberry Plants in Peninsular Florida. S. L.
Poe. Fla. Entomol. 54:2:183-186. 1970.

3835 Effects of Phenyl Benzo-y-Pyrone Derivatives (Flavonoids) on Blood Cell
Aggregation: Basis for a Concept of Mode of Action. R. C. Robbins.
Clin. Chem. 17:5:433-437. 1971.

3836 Methoxylated Phenyl Benzo-Y-Pyrone Derivatives (Flavonoids) that Highly
Inhibit Erythrocyte Aggregation. R. C. Robbins, R. H. Hammer, and C. F.
Simpson. Clin. Chem. 17:11:1109-1113. 1971.

8837 The Yield of Corn (Zea mays L.) as Affected by Leaf Removal and Aluminum
Foil Reflectors. G. M. Prine. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:343-3
1970.

3838 Dolomitic Limestone as a Source of Magnesium for Citrus. C. A. Anderson.
Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:150-157. 1970.

3839 The Recovery of Autumn and Winter Applied Potassium by a Warm-Season Grass
from Leon Fine Sand. W. G. Blue. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:9
1970.

3840 Redistribution of Fertilizer Salts in Soil Columns After Leaching with Wat
F. M. Rhoads. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. 30:298-304. 1970.

3841 Sodium and Calcium Selectivity in a Spodosol. J. G. A. Fiskell and R. B.
Reneau, Jr. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:158-166. 1970.

3842 Control of Mobility of Soil Organic Matter after Trenching. J. G. A.
Fiskell, E. H. Stewart, and D. V. Calvert. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla.
Prof. 30:122-130. 1970.

3843 Correlation between Soil Test and Saturated Extract Determinations. J. G.
Fiskell, F. G. Martin, J. NeSmith, and H. L. Breland. Soil and Crop Sci.
Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:288-298.

3845 Descriptions of the pupae of Aedes (Ochlerotatus) atlanticus and Aedes (0.
tormentor (Diptera: Culicidae). J. F. Reinert. Fla. Entomol. 54:2:171-T7
1971.

3846 The Effect of Lime on Retention of Fertilizer Phosphorus in Leon Fine Sand
W. G. Blue. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 39:141-150. 1970.

3848 Effect of Cellulase, Lipase, Pectinase, Protease and Ribonuclease on the
Cloud of Citrus Juice. R. H. Biggs and J. E. Pollard. Fla. State Hort.
Soc. Proc. 83:314-318. 1970.

3849 The Influence of Rootstocks on Tree Growth, Fruiting and Fruit Quality of
'Orlando' Tangelos. A. H. Krezdorn and W. J. Phillips. Proc. Fla. State
Hort. Soc. 83:110-116. 1970.

3850 Slash Pine Root Biomass and Nutrient Concentrations. E. H. White, W. L.
Pritchett, and W. K. Robertson. IUFRO Congress 165-176.

3852 Comparisons of Three Nematicides for The Control of Meloidogyne incognita
on Gardenia. H. N. Miller. Plant Dis. Reporter 55:4:357-360. Apr. 1971.

3853 Reproduction in Brahman, Shorthorn and Crossbred Cows on Different Pastul
Programs. F. M. Peacock, M. Koger, W. G. Kirk, E. M. Hodges, and A. C.
Warnick. J. Anim. Sci. 33:2:458-465. Aug. 1971.

3854 Effect of Reduced Night Temperatures on Growth Rate of Tropical and
Temperate Grasses. R. L. Smith and C. R. Pettiford. Soil and Crop Sci.
Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:246-251. 1970.

3855 Effects of Seasonal Temperatures and Certain Cultural Treatments on Sting
Nematodes in Forage Grass. F. T. Boyd and V. G. Perry. Soil and Crop Sc
Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:360-365. 1970.








856 Raw Sugar as an Energy Source in Steer Finishing Rations. D. W. Beardsley,
F. M. Pate, B. W. Hayes, A. Z. Palmer, and J. W. Carpenter. J. Anim. Sci.
33:3:706-710. Sept. 1971.

857 Nutritive Evaluation of Pensacola Bahiagrass Hays. J. E. Moore, O. C.
Ruelke, C. E. Rios, and D. E. Franke. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc.
30:211-221. 1970.

858 CO2 Evolution from Florida Organic Soils. E. B. Knipling, V. N. Schroder,
and W. G. Duncan. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:320-326. 1970.

859 Phosphorus Absorption by and Distribution in Water Hyacinths. W. T. Haller,
E. B. Knipling, and S. H. West. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:64-68.
1970.

860 .Growth Characteristics, Yield Potential, and Nutritive Content of Water
Hyacinths. E. B. Knipling, S. H. West. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc.
30:64-68. 1970.

861 An Epizootic of Spicaria rileyi on the Velvetbean Caterpillar, Anticarsia
gemmatalis, in Florida. G. E. Allen, G. L. Greene, and W. H. Whitcomb.
Fla. Entomol. 54:2:189-191. 1971.

862 Translocation of Terbacil in Purple Nutsedge. B. R. Ray, Merrill Wilcox,
W. B. Wheeler, and N. P. Thompson. Weed Sci. 19:3:306-307. May 1971.

63 Effects of Sulfur-Coated Urea and Potassium Chloride on Watermelon Production
and Soluble Salts. S. J. Locascio and J. G. A. Fiskell. Soil and Crop Sci.
Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:113-122. 1970.
64 Microscopic and Biochemical Observations of Aortae of Turkeys Fed Copper-
Deficient Diets with and without Ascorbic Acid. C. F. Simpson, R. C. Robbins
and R. H. Harms. J. Nutrition 101:10:1359-1366. Oct. 1971.

65 Biological Control of Aquatic Weeds. R. D. Blackburn, D. L. Sutton, and
Thomas Taylor. Proc. Amer. Soc. Civil Eng. 421-432. Sept. 1971.

66 Carbon Dioxide Treatment of Gladiolus Corms Reveals Latent Fusarium
Infections. R. 0. Magie. Plant Dis. Reporter 55:4:340-341. Apr. 1971.

67 Sucrose Leakage from the Maize Scutellum. T. E. Humphreys and L. A. Garrard.
Phytochemistry 10:12:2891-1904. 1971.

68 The Influence of Soil and Water Incorporation of Two Herbicides on Weed
Control in Watermelons. L. A. Sistrunk and S. J. Locascio. Proc. Southern
Weed Sci. Soc. 24:212-218. 1971.

71 Influence of Hormone Supplementation, Dietary Protein Level and Sex on
the Performance and Carcass Quality of Swine. E. W. Luca, H. D. Wallace,
Z. A. Palmer,.and G. E. Combs. J. Anim. Sci. 33:4:780-786. Oct. 1971.

73 Parasitism of Armored Scale Insects in Commercial Florida Citrus Groves.
M. H. Muma. Fla. Entomol. 54:2:139-150. 1971.

74 The Effect of High Dietary Calcium on the Performance of Laying Hens.
R. H. Harms and P. W. Waldroup. Poultry Sci. L:3:967-969. May 1971.

15 Effect of Low Night Temperature on Growth and Amylolytic Activities of
Two Species of Digitaria. P. Karbassi, L. A. Garrard, and S. H. West.
Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:251-255. 1971.

'6 The Effects of Five Different Methods of Establishing Stylosanthes humilis
and Stylosanthes guyanensis in the Non-Arid American Tropics. G. A. Smith.
Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:68-74. 1970.

8 Blight of Spanish Moss. D. A. Roberts, A. S. Jensen, and G. F. Weber.
Plant Dis. Reporter 55:5:390-392. May 1971.

12 Some Factors Affecting the Occurrence and Development of Foor Rot on
Citrus Trees. J. O. Whiteside. Amer. Phytopathol. Soc. 61:10:1233-1238.
Oct. 1971.

3 Chemical Control of the Sting Nematode, Belonolaimus longicaudatus, on
Direct Seeded Cabbage. H. L. Rhoades. Plant Dis. Reporter 55:5:412-414.
May 1971.

4 Habitat Relationship and Seasonal Abundance of Four Species of Evarthrus
(Coleoptera: Carabidae). D. L. Harris and W. H. Whitcomb. Coleopterists
Bul. 25:2:67-72. 1971.








3885 Ciodrin Spray and Dust Formulations for Horn Fly, Haematobia irritans,
Control on Brahman and Crossbred Cattle. N. I. Greer, M. Murphey, and
M. J. Janes. Fla. Entomol. 54:3:231-325. 1971.

3886 Control of Fusarium Wilt of Tomato with Lime and Soil Fumigants. J. p.
Jones and S. S. Woltz. Phytopathology 61:12:1415-1417. Dec. 1971.

3887 A Preliminary List of Ants Associated with Aphids in Florida. R. J.
Nielsson, A. Bhatkar, and H. A. Denmark. Fla. Entomol. 54:3:245-248. 1971

3889 Influence of Varying Calcium Levels on the Utilization of Calcium Meta-
and Pyrophosphate in Chick Diets. B. L. Damron and R. H. Harms. Poultry
Sci. L:5:1423-1428. Sept. 1971.

3892 Effects of Crop Sequences, Chemicals and Varieties on the Incidence of
Black Shank of Flue-Cured Tobacco in Florida. C. R. Miller and Fred
Clark. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:376-379. 1970.

3893 Toxicities of Thiotepa, Tepa, Metepa, and Hempa to Late Aquatic Stages
of Culex nigripalpus Theobald. W. W. Smith. Mosquito News 31:3:390-394.
Sept. 1971.

3894 Chemical Control of Cercospora Leafspot of Peanuts. C. R. Miller, T. A.
Kucharek, and R. W. Lipscomb. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:371-
376. 1970.

3895 Management of a Typic Paleudult (Orangeburg) in North Florida. I.
Rotational Cropping for General Crops. W. K. Robertson, R. W. Lipscomb,
and F. G. Martin. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:174-185. 1970.

3896 Management of a Typic Paleudult (Orangeburg) in North Florida. II.
Major Plant Nutrient Requirements for General Crops. W. K. Robertson,
R. W. Lipscomb, W. H. Chapman. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:
185-195. 1970.

3897 Management of a Typic Paleudult.(Orangeburg) in North Florida. III. Lime
Requirements for General Crops. W. K. Robertson and R. W. Lipscomb. Soil
and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. 30:195-200. 1970.

3898 Corn Yield Response to Fertilizers, Varieties, Row Spacing, and Plant
Population on an Entisol. W. K. Robertson and H. W. Lundy. Soil and
Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. 30:20-27. 1970.

3899 Distribution of Radiocarbon in Valencia Oranges after Treatment with
14-C-Cycloheximide. J. F. Fisher. J. Agri. and Food Chem. 19:6:1162-
116F. Nov./Dec. 1971.

3902 Repletion and Depletion of Pigmentation in Broiler Skin and Shanks. G. M.
Herrick, J. L. Fry, and R. H. Harms. Poultry Sci. L:5:1467-1475. Sept. 1

3903 Effectiveness of the Chromatographic Method for Detecting Exocortis Virus
Infection in Poncirus trifoliata. A. W. Feldman, G. D. Bridges, R. W.
Hanks, and H. C. Burnett. Phythopathology 61:11:1338-1341. Nov. 1971.

3905 Interaction of Flower Preservative Components and Light on Fresh Weight
and Longevity of Snapdragon Cut Flowers. F. J. Marousky and J. S. Raulst<
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:445-448. Oct. 1970.

3906 Influence of Controlled Atmospheres During Corm Storage on Subsequent
Flowering of Gladiolus. F. J. Marousky, R. H. Cubbedge, and R. O. Magie.
Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 83:419-492. 1970.

3907 Agistemus floridanus (Acarina: Stigmaeidae), a Predatory Mite, on Florida
Citrus. M. H. Muma and A. G. Selshime. Fla. Entomol. 54:3:249-258. 197

3908 Experimental Control of Cabbage Loopers on Collards in Florida. G. L.
Greene and R. B. Workman. J. Econ. Entomol. 64:5:1331-1332. Oct. 1971.

3909 Biological Availability to Chicks of Manganese from Different Inorganic
Sources. L. T. Watson, C. B. Ammerman, S. M. Miller, and R. H. Harms.
Poultry Sci. L:6:1693-1700. Nov. 1971.

3911 The Availability to Forage Plants on Accumulated Phosphorus in Leon Fine
Sand. Saturino Rodulfo and W. G. Blue. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla.
Proc. 30:167-174. 1970.

3912 Single Comb White Leghorn Cockerels Versus Broiler Chicks for Use in
Phosphorus Assays. T. L. Andrews, B. L. Damron, and R. H. Harms. Poultr
Sci. L:5:1485-1488. Sept. 1971.









914 Interpretation of Soil pH in Liming Practice. T. L. Yuan. Soil and Crop
Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:201-210. 1970.

915 Response of Aquatic Plants to Combinations of Endothall and Copper. D. L.
Sutton, R. D. Blackburn, and W. C. Barlowe. Weed Sci. 19:6:643-646. Nov.
1971.

918 An Easy and Inexpensive System for Measuring Individual Feed Consumption.
D. A. Roland, Sr., D. R. Sloan, and R. H. Harms. Poultry Sci. L:4.
July 1971.

919 Efficacy of Benzimidazole Dips, Drenches and Sprays for the Control of
Cylindrocladium on Azalea. A. W. Engelhard. Plant Dis. Reporter. 55:8:
679-682. Aug. 1971.

920 Temperature Tolerance and Necessary Stocking Rates of Marisa cornaurietis L.
for Aquatic Weed Control. R. D. Blackburn, T. M. Taylor, and D. L. Sutton.
Proc. Eur. Weed Res. Coun. Third Internat. Symp. Aquatic Weeds 79-86. 1971.

921 Growth of the White Amur (Ctenopharyngodon idella Val. on Selected Species
of Aquatic Plants. R. D. Blackburn and D. L. Sutton. Proc. Eur. Weed
Res. Coun. Third Internat. Symp. Aquatic Weeds. 87-93. 1971.

22 Growth Response of Plants under Sprinkler Irrigation with Dairy Waste.
A. R. Overman, C. C. Hortenstine, and J. M. Wing. Proc. Internat. Symp.
on Livestock Wastes 334-337.

23 Orchelium carinatum, A New Meadow Katydid from the Southeastern United
States (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae). T. J. Walker. Fla. Entomol 54:4:
277-281. 1971.

25 The Influence of Partially Delactosed Whey, Fish Meal and Supplemental
Biotin in Broiler Diets. B. L. Damron, D. P. Eberst, and R. H. Harms.
Poultry Sci. L:6:1768-1771. Nov. 1971.

26 Nitrogen and Potash Timing Trials in Florida Citrus. D. P. H. Tucker and
T. E. Crocker. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:5-9. 1971.

29 Rhizoctonia Blight of 'Florida Ruffle' Fern and Its Control. J. F. Knauss.
Plant Dis. Reporter 55:7:614-616. July 1971.

31 Instar Distributions, Natural Populations, and Biology of the Bean Leaf
Roller. G. L. Greene. Fla. Entomol. 54:3:213-219. 1971.

32 Reduction of Incidence of Diethylstilbestrol-Induced Aoric Ruptures of
Turkeys with Methimazole. C. F. Simpson, J. T. McL. Neilson, and R. H.
Harms. Toxicol. and Appl. Pharmacol. 20:3:412-418. Nov. 1971.

37 Effect of Dietary Magnesium on Voluntary Feed Intake and Rumen Fermentations
C. B. Ammerman, C. F. Chicco, J. E. Moore, P. A. van Walleghem, and
L. R. Arrington. J. Dairy Sci. 54:9:1288-1293. Sept. 1971.

38 Occurrence of Fusarium moniliforme and Helminthosporium maydis on and in
Corn Seed as Related to T Cytoplasm. H. E. Warmke and N. C. Schenck.
Plant Dis. Reporter 55:6:486-489. June 1971.

9 Coniopterygids (Neuroptera) on Florida Citrus Trees. M. H. Muma. Fla.
Entomol. 54:4:283-288. 1971.

12 Wastewater Renovation through Soil and Plants. C. C. Hortenstine, J. M.
Wing, and A. R. Overman. Environmental Letters 1:4:245-254. 1971.

3 Fungi in Foods. II. Some Observations on Acidulants Used to Adjust Media
pH for Yeast and Mold Counts. J. A. Koburger. J. Milk and Food Technol.
34:10:475-477. Oct. 1971.

8 Predation of Gasteracantha cancriformis (Arachnida: Araneidai) Eggs in
Florida Citrus Groves by Phalacrotophora epeirae (Insecta: Phoridae)
and Arachnophaga ferruginea (Insecta: Eupelmidae). M. H. Muma and K. J.
Stone. Fla. Entomol. 54:4:305-310. 197.1.

9 Biological and Behavioral Notes on Gasteracantha cancriformis (Arachnida:
Araneidae). M. H. Muma. Fla. Entomol. 54:4:345-352. 1971.

6 Relations Between Fe in Irrigation Water and Leaf Quality of Cigar Wrapper
Tobacco. F. M. Rhoads. Agron. J. 63:938-940. Nov.-Dec. 1971.

9 Physiochemical Properties of Citrus Essential Oils from Florida. R. W.
Wolford, J. W. Kesterson, and J. A. Attaway. J. Agri. and Food Chem.
19:6:1097-1105. Nov.-Dec. 1971.








3960 Malonaldehyde in Aqueous Orange Juice Essences. R. J. Braddock and D. R.
Petrus. J. Food Sci. 36:1095-1097. Nov.-Dec. 1971.
3963 Effects of Temperatures on the Immature Stages of Anastrepha susensa
(Diptera: Tephritidae). J. A. Prescott III, and R. M. Baranowski. Fla.
Entomol. 54:4:297-303. 1971.

3968 Textural and Elastic Properties of Irish Potatoes. T. R. Schmidt and E. M.
Ahmed. J. Texture Studies 2:4:460-474. 1971.

3972 Citrus Abscission. R. H. Biggs. HortScience 6:4:388-392. Aug. 1971.

3977 Overwintering of Helminthosporium maydis in Florida. N. C. Schenck. Plant
Dis. Reporter 55:11:949-951. Nov. 1971.

3987 Leakage of Hexose Phosphates from the Maize Scutellum. T. E. Humprhreys.
Pthytochemistry 11:2:541-545. 1971.

3988 Etiology and Chemotherapy of Pythium Root Rot on Chrysanthemums. A. W.
Englehard, H. M. Miller, and R. T. DeNeve. Plant Dis. Reporter 55:10:851-
855. Oct. 1971.

3990 Clay Mineral Differential Thermograms as Affected by Fired Asbestos.
R. B. Reneau and V. W. Carlisle. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc.
30:315-320. 1970.

3998 The Effect of Gibberellic Acid on In Vitro Pollen Germination in Digitaria
pentzii Stent. J. W. Carmichael. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc.
30:255-258. 1970.

3999 Control of Leatherleaf Fern Borer (Lepidotera: Pyraustidae) on Leatherleaf
Fern with Systemic Insecticides. D. E. Short, D. P. Driggers, L. C. Kuite
and C. R. Roberts. Fla. Entomol. 54:4:325-328. 1971.

4005 Soil Temperature Effect on Shoot and Root Growth of Pangolagrass, Slenders
Digitgrass, Coastal Bermudagrass, and Pensacola Bahiagrass. V. N. Schrode
Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:241-245. 1970.

4009 Neodiprion excitans (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae) on Sand Pine in Florida.
R. C. Wilkinson. Fla. Entomol. 54:4:343-344. 1971.

4011 A New Distribution Record for the Mosquito Iridescent Virus (MIV). D. W.
Hall and R. E. Lowe. Mosquito News 31:3:448-449. Sept. 1971.

4019 Effect of Soil pH and Calcium Sources on Yield, Grade and Mineral Composit
of Virginia Botanical Type Peanuts. E. A. Bracho, E. B. Whitty, W. G.
Blue, and A. J. Norden. J. Amer. Peanut Res. and Education Assoc. 3:1. 1

4024 Reversal of Low Temperature Effects on a Tropical Plant by Gibberellic
Acid. P. Karbassi, L. A. Garrard, and S. H. West. Crop Sci. 11:755-757.
Sept.-Oct. 1971.

4030 Texture Profile of Mangoes and Peaches. E. M. Ahmed and R. A. Dennison.
J. Texture Studies 2:489-496. 1971.

4048 Demodectic Mange of Swine. E. C. Harland, C. F. Simpson, and F. C. Neal.
Amer. Vet. Med. Assoc, 159:12:1752-1754. Dec. 1971.

4050 Wetting Coefficients for Water Repellent Sand. Bozarg Bahrani, R. S.
Mansel, and L. C. Hamond. Soil and Crop Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:270-274.
1970.

4053 Effect of Surface Roughness and Pore Shape on Water Repellence of Sandy S1
R. D. Bond and L. C. Hammond. Soil and Crop. Sci. Soc. Fla. Proc. 30:308
315. 1970.
4055 Optimal Allocation of Generic Advertising Budgets. E. L. McClelland,
Leo Polopolus, and L. H. Myers. Amer. J. Agr. Econ. 53:4:565-572. Nov.

4059 Natural Infection of Lettuce and Endive by Bidens Mottle virus. D. E.
Purcifull, S. R. Christie, T. A. Zitter, and M. J. Bassett. Plant Dis.
Reporter 55:12:1061-1063. Dec. 1971.








ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY DEPARTMENT

Efforts were continued to further coordinate research conducted in
entomology and nematology by the faculty throughout the State of Florida.
Terminated projects are being replaced by new ones with broader scope and
with multiple leaders. The research is balanced between fundamental and
applied areas and with ever increasing efforts to decrease any possibilities
for environmental pollution. Research on pests of aquatic weeds for possible
biological control, integrated pest control measures and investigations of
love bugs were augmented. Dr. T. J. Walker was added to the faculty, transferring
from Biological Sciences.








LA-EY-00001 EDEN W G

PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATIONS IN ENTOMOLOGY AND NEHATOLOGY

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
n outbreak of the slash pine sawfly, Neodiprion merkili Ross, in South Florida
as observed to be controlled by natural epizootic of a virus. A eulopid cocoon
arasite from Europe was propagated for release to control a pine sawfly.
infections by Fusarium lateritium on slash pine were noted to be closely
associated with the subtropical pine tip moth. A survey was continued for the
ncidence of American Trypanosomlasis, and natural infection of Trypanosoma cruzi
r a similar parasite was detected in reservoir animals. Several chemicals were
valuated for flea control. A simple field key has been developed for
recognition of coccinellid larvae found in Florida. Several nematicides were
valuated for nematode control on various crops. Studies were made of seasonal
ife histories of 75 species of gryllids and tettigoniids.







A-EY-00678 KERR S H

OLOGY AND CONTROL OF INSECT AND RELATED PESTS OF TURPGRASSES

OGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
eld studies indicate that populations of Orthomorpha coarctata (Saussure) and
idus gracilis Koch. continue development through the winter at least northward
the Tampa Bay region. Populations remained generally small through 1971. In
e laboratory, several attempts to cross these strikingly similar millipedes
iled, and it appears that they are indeed distinct species. Additional
xicological,tests with several toxicant were run. Methomyl provided the
ghest mortality. These tests are not complete at this time, however.
ditional species of millipedes have been collected, but the above two still
pear to be the most important species around structures.








.-EY-01108 WILKINSON R C

3LOGY OF IPS BARK BETTLES (COLEOPTERA: SCOLTYIDAE) ATTACKING SLASH AND
NGLEAF PINE

GRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
lery form and F(1) brood production of Ips avulsus (Eichh.), grandicollis
chh.), and calligraphus (Gera.) were not adversely affected when beetle
rs in nuptial chambers were artificially inoculated with 800-900 second-stage
vae of the pathogenic nematode, Neoaplectana dutkyi Turco (DD-136), and
ubated for 3 or 17 days at 300C. Infection by N. dtkyi_was not evident.
ractant components of I. calligraphus male frass from Florida were analyzed
the Boyce-Thompson Institute (unpublished).










BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF INSECTS AND BITES ATTACKING STONE FRUITS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Biol. Cont. of Insects Attacking Stone Fruits. White peach scale surveys made
in commercial peach orchards indicate good control is obtained when growers
follow present recommendations. The coccinellid predators including the twice
stabbed lady beetle, Chilocorus stigma (Say), Linmdrus. Lphanthae, (Blaisdell),
and two hymenopterus parasites, Prospaltella b~rlaesi (Harvard) and
spidiotiphagus citrinus (Crawford), were present at all times but failed to
exer adequate pressure to control this scale. The peach tree borer,
Sanninoideo exitiosa, and lesser peach tree borer, Synanthedon pictipes were
active throughout the year. Infestations were more numerous in orchards where
mechanical harvesters had been used. Efforts to establish a laboratory colony
have failed.










FLA-EY-01332 BLANTON F S

CERATOPOGONIDAE (BITING MIDGES) OF MIDDLE AMERICA

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Several thousand slidemounts were prepared during this period, approximately
50,000 additional specimens were picked out from light trap collections made in
both North and South America. Seven manuscripts were prepared and are now being
edited. 1. New Western Culicoides of the stonei Group. In press. 2.
Culicoides of the Amazon. In press. 3. Culicoides of Trinidad. Being edited.
4. Culicoides of the West Indies. Being edited. 5. Culicoides of Florida.
(Manuscript almost finished. Art work not complete). 6. The genera and
subgenera of the Ceratopogonidae of the world. (Current project.)










FLA-EY-01353 KUSTERT L C

BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF INSECT AND RELATED PESTS ON ORNAMENTAL PLANTS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Seven systemic insecticides were evaluated at 2 rates of application to control
leatherleaf fern borer (Undulambia polystichalis Capps) infesting leatherleaf
fern. Results indicate this pest was effectively controlled with carbofuran 10
G (8#A/A), monocrotophos and dicrotophos E. C. (2#A/A) for periods of 5 weeks.
Some phytotoxicity was observed in the monocrotophos plots and definite growth
response was rated in the carbofuran plots. Excellent control of 2-spotted
mites infesting various rose cultivars was obtained with Galecron (an ovicide),
and no phytotoxicity resulted from treating 77 varieties. Granular formulation:
of the systemic insecticides aldicarb, benomyl, carbofuran and phorate were
evaluated for controlling white flies infesting gardenias, tea scale and aphids
infesting camellias and mites and aphids infesting roses. Carboturan 10 G at 1
gram/sq. ft. and raked into the soil provided excellent control of all these
pests for periods of 6-8 weeks. Pressurized aqueous spray formulations of
allethrin, designed for use in urban areas, were evaluated for phytotoxicity an
effectiveness. Good knockdown of mosquitoes and polistes wasps was obtained
along with control of immature mealybugs, aphids, white flies, bean beetles and
cutworms. These sprays did not control adult mealybugs, scale insects, ants,
mites or chewing insects. Four insecticidal treatments were evaluated for
phytotoxicity on 10 varieties of Hibiscus. Malathion and diazinon sprays and
granular formulations of zectran and carbofuran showed no symptoms of
phytotoxicity. Infestations of the dogwood twig borer, Xyloborus compactus wer
controlled with 2 applications of diazinon spaced at 3 week intervals made at
the time the new foliage is developing.
i


FLA-EY-01307


KUITERT L C








BUTLER J F WASTES R E


BIONOBICS AND CONTROL OF ARTHROPOD PARASITES OF LIVESTOCK

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
UBPOSE: To survey and study the bionomics of arthropods affecting livestock in
lorida. To develop control measures for the important parasites. IHPORTANCE:
rthropod damage to Florida livestock reduces production up to 49.3%. APPROACH:
urveys were made with determinations on species, population numbers and effect
n the host. Ecological studies were continued on horn flies, common cattle
rubs, cattle tail lice, hog lice, and horse flies. Control evaluations were
ade on horn flies, house flies, hog lice, and manure breeding flies.
treatments included residual sprays, dusts, feed additive insecticides and
juvenile hormone mimics. RESULTS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Bionomics on major pest
species were compiled. Horn fly populations were lover than 1970 with peak
nfestations on beef at Gainesville in September at 1080 flies per animal.
their arthropod populations were about the same as 1970 except the common cattle
rub which had lower rates. The hog follicle mite was found producing economic
damage to swine. Basic biology data was complied on horn flies. Arthropod
control: Summer hog louse control was achieved at 96+% with Rabon R WDS 0.25%
esidual spray. Horn fly residual spray activity tests to determine longevity
f single sprays of Rabon R (0.35%-EC, WDS, WP) gave excellent control for 3
ays and was effective for 9-11 days. Feed additive Rabon R 50% B 1.5 mg/kg/day
n beef cattle gave significant control of horn flies and reduced the number of
insects in the manure paddies. Production evaluation by removal of horn fly
damage to pastured beef cattle was tested using dust bags a 97.5% control.
significant weight differentials (P.01) of 24.5% were exhibited (0.2308 lb/day).
ifferentials (P .05) of various breeds ranged from 0 to 49.3% reduction,




A-EY-01489 NATION J L

YSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY OF INSECTS

OGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
e Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspense (Loew) is a destructive pest of
ft fruits such as peaches, guava, surrinan cherry, and others, in south and
ntral Florida. Studies are being made to better understand the biology and
ting behavior of the flies, and to determine if a sex attractant is involved
bringing the sexes together. Male flies between the age of 5 days and 20
ys can attract female flies of the same age range. An average of 20.6% more
males were attracted to caged sales in the laboratory than were attracted to
e food supplied to flies. Female flies are not able to attract males in the
boratory. The growth of the ovaries in females and a sex-specific enlargement
the salivary gland in males have been studied. Histological studies on the
le salivary gland and a layer of epidermal cells just beneath the cuticle in
e abdomen are in progress. Gas chromatographic analyses of fatty acids and
erols in A. suspense flies are in progress. Saturated fatty acids with chain
ngths of 12, 14 5, 16, 18 and 20 carbons and unsaturated acids with 16 and
carbons are present. The most abundant fatty acid is oleic acid, and large
aunts of palmitic acid are also present. The principal sterol in adult flies
P-sitosterol. Campesterol and cholestanol are present in both sexes, but
ce cholestanol is present in males than in females. An artificial salt
gture was incorporated into a diet for honeybees, but the diet proved
ideguate to support brood rearing during an eight weeks trial.




-EY-01505 HABECK D H WAITES R E

LOGY AND CONTROL OF INSECT PESTS OF VEGETABLES

GRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
ut forty varieties and breeding lines of cantaloupes were evaluated as
dlings for resistance to the spotted-and banded cucumber beetles in the
oratory. Significant differences between cultivars were found in resistance
both beetles. Intervarietal differences were more pronounced when varieties
e tested in the same cage than when tested in separate cages. More than 500
ieties and plant introductions of cucurbits have been screened for resistance
the melon aphid Aphis gossypii. One hundred ten resistant of susceptible
es were retested to verify the results and thirty F1 crosses were made to
dy the inheritance of this resistance. Some F2 and back crosses to
ceptible and resistant plants have been made and this work is continuing.
oratory studies are now underway comparing melon aphid biology on resistant
susceptible varieties.


PLA-EY-01438








PERRY V G DICKSON D W


THE BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF NEMATODES AFFECTING AGRONOMIC CROPS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
Experimental data showed that populations of sting nematodes moved vertically in
the soil with changing temperatures. Thus as hot, dry weather increased soil
temperatures in late spring, the nematodes moved down and the forage grasses
produced deeper roots and increased top growth. Further tests under controlled
conditions were initiated. Field tests of nematicides were conducted for
control of the root-knot nematode, Miloidogyne arenaria on peanuts. The
nematicide DBCP applied with 2 chisels per row gave best control and largest
yield increase.









FLA-EY-01549 WHITCOMB V H

BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF ARTHROPODS

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
A survey of soybean predators and parasites was developed. Six hundred species
have been identified; an equal number are in the hands of specialists. Progress
was made on determining factors affecting the more important predators in
soybeans. Basic biological and ecological information was obtained on the green
lacewing, Chrysopa plorabunda. Mass production techniques are being developed.
Sonychus indicator, an assassin bug, was studied in the laboratory and
preparations made for field release against noctuid larval in vegetables. The
original home of the imported fire ant was discovered at Cuiaba in the Mato
Grosso of Brazil. An investigation of natural enemies of this insect in Brazil
is underway. Factors affecting the survival of fire ant queens was investigated
in Northern Florida. Seven species of ants were found to attack the queen after
the mating flight. The effect of the imported fire ant on native predators was
investigated; this was particularly severe on native ants. The effect of dates
of plowing on predator populations was investigated in Leon County. Significant
effect on Lebia virides populations was noted.










FLA-EY-01557 KERR S H

TOXICOLOGY OF INSECTICIDES AND MITICIDES

PROGRESS REPORT: 71/01 71/12
The toxicology of the green lacewing Chrysopa rufilabris Burmeister is being
studies. Ethion, one of the most widely used toxicants in citrus groves, has
shown virtually no toxicity to larvae of_. rufilabris which is an important
predator in several crops. Other pesticides are being tested but fewer data
have been accumulated for them to date. Limited toxicological studies were made
on the southern green stinkbug, Nezara viridula (L.), but insufficient numbers
were available for conclusive work.


FLA-EY-01520