• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Main
 Front Matter
 Back Cover














Inlet Beach on the Gulf of Mexico (661)
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005136/00001
 Material Information
Title: Inlet Beach on the Gulf of Mexico (661)
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Manufacturer: Press of S. C. Toof and Company
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6449
System ID: UF00005136:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
        Front Cover 3
        Front Cover 4
    Front Matter
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Main
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Front Matter
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Back Cover
        Page 35
        Page 36
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AN OPPORTUrNITY OF'IRLID BY
McCASKILL INVESTMENT CO.
DE FUNIAK SPRINGS, FLA.



If interested, write us, as we intend selling these beautiful
lots at Inlet Beach on the Gulf of Mexico, or will form a
club that will satisfy the fellow who wants real sport in
summer or winter.
R. E. L. McCASKILL, President.


























I I �



WESTERN PART QF

FLORIDA
SAME SCALE AS MAIN MAP
-c w i d.- .... %,,,"Vlr, eL't t


Page tli 'e

















I- A
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VIEW OF GULF OF MEXICO FROM HOTEL


Page four


















Where Nature in a beauteous guise
Charms every sense and soothes the mind;
Inspires the careless, cheers the wise,
Gives joy and health to all mankind.














Page five























































T-O


THROUGH THE EYE OF THE CAMERA


Page six









INLET BEACH

OWN in the southeast corner of Walton County, Florida, where the last strag-
gling reaches of the Blue Ridge are halted abruptly by the sea, there is a very
fairyland of beauty. Tucked away in this secluded spot, remote from trains
and telegraph and rushing traffic, sheltered by encircling forests and flanked by a
turquoise lake, the noble bluffs of Inlet Beach look out across snow white sands
S to the boundless Gulf of Mexico. The broad expanse of green and deepest
blue with a lacy fringe of foam capped waves stretches away to far horizons. An ever chang-
ing panorama of beauty which once seen is never to be forgotten.
It is difficult to adequately describe Inlet Beach. It is unique. It combines the loveli-
ness of wooded headlands in the Great Lakes region; the semi-tropical verdure of northern
Mexico; the invigorating air of the Maine coast; the balmy breezes of southern California;
and to all of this it adds a charm decidedly its own.
The contour of Inlet Beach is an attractive one. It is an irregular curve. On the north
and east the densely wooded bluff, concave in outline, slopes sharply down to a narrow reach
of yellow sand which borders beautiful Lake Powiller. To the southeast a rounded convex
peninsula is formed by the lake, Bayou Bews, and the snow white sands of the wide gulf beach.
On this promontory, where the view of both the lake and gulf is unobstructed, the Inlet Beach


Page seven


















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A NICE CATCH OF BREAM AND TROUT


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Hotel and cottages nestle among the great oak trees. To the southwest the bluff sweeps
away in a wide concave arc to the very edge of the gulf beach
Thus, within a stone's throw of the hotel, one may enjoy shady woodland, quiet lake, or
tumultuous sea.
Lake Powiller is a magnificent body of water about three miles long by half a mile wide;
fed by crystal clear living streams of spring water. It is surrounded, except for the narrow
outlet to the gulf, by wooded hills which form an efficient barrier against storms. The lake
is constantly playing tag with the gulf, for frequently during a heavy sea the gulf will roll in
salt water by the thousands of barrels, and then seal it up with a bar of sand, which effectually
closes the channel from lake to gulf. Then the lake chuckles to itself, and gathers its forces of
water together. Higher and higher it rises, until at last, with a jubilant rush, it sweeps away
the piled up sand and cuts a channel to the sea large enough for a boat of considerable size to
sail through.
The fishing in Lake Powiller can only be described as wonderful. One does not have to
be an expert to catch fish there-everybody does it. Big fat trout and bass and bream and
mullet; delicious crabs; toothsome shrimps, and dozens of other lesser known varieties of sea
food are found in abundance.
Rare indeed is the spot where such a charming bit of still water is found in immediate
proximity to the sea. Here one may enjoy a quiet swim in the-lake, then cross a shimmering
beach of snow white sand and plunge directly into the big white capped breakers. Fish in
quiet waters from a frail canoe, or take a sturdier boat and go out into the gulf for Pompano,


Page nine







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L1 -4r


SHOWS LOCATION OF HOTEL AND COTTAGES ON HIGH BLUFF


Page ten


, i








Spanish Mackerel, Red Fish, Red Snapper, or a giant Silver Tarpon, king of all game fish.
There are over six hundred varieties of edible fish in Florida waters.
As a place for rest, for hunting, fishing, boating, and bathing, a place where one may go
and spend a few days or a few weeks in building up body and mind, and living a life full of
simple joy and pleasure, Inlet Beach cannot be excelled. It is the logical playground in summer
for the good folks of southern Alabama and southeast Georgia, from which it is reached through
the gateways of Brewton, Florala, Geneva, Dothan, Bainbridge, Thomasville, and Quitman.
In the winter it furnishes a highly prized refuge for northern sportsmen who desire to escape
alike the rigorous winter weather of the North and the sometimes more enervating climate of
southern points.
The climate at Inlet Beach is all that could be desired. Reports from the United States
Weather Bureau at Pensacola show only three days during the summer of 1919 when the
thermometer registered ninety degrees or over. The breezes from the gulf have a fair sweep
over Inlet Beach, making it altogether delightful. Cover will be needed practically every night.
Another splendid feature is its comparative freedom from mosquitoes, flies, and other trouble-
some insects. The winter climate is equally desirable, being warm enough for comfort out
of doors and still with just enough tang to be invigorating. In pleasant weather one accus-
tomed to cold baths may bathe here the year round in comfort.
Heretofore it has been found possible by utilizing all available space in hotel and cottages
to accommodate most of those who knew and loved Inlet Beach. As its fame has crept
abroad, however, the increasing tide of visitors has made it obvious that the present accom-


Page eleven











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A BATHING AND FISHING PARTY IN FRONT OF HOTEL


Page twelve









modations will soon be entirely inadequate. To meet the immediate emergency, comfortable
tents with board floors and sides will be erected, and it is hoped that all who come can be accom-
modated. However, the demand not only for temporary accommodations, but for permanent
homes in the beauty spot has become so insistent that it cannot longer be ignored. In order
to meet this insistent public call for more commodious quarters and for private homes, the
greater part of the available land at Inlet Beach has been sub-divided into very attractive
lots which, when ready, will be sold at reasonable prices to those interested.
In order to handle this matter in an efficient manner and provide ample funds for building
a handsome, commodious club hotel, constructing roadways, parks, etc., and beautifying the
property, it has been decided to form a corporation large enough to handle the whole matter;
an incorporation in which many may share in the pleasure and profit of creating a wonderful
city by the sea and adding to nature's handiwork the comforts of modern conveniences. Incor-
poration literature, when ready, will be promptly mailed to those who request it.
We extend to you and your friends a hearty invitation to spend your vacation at Inlet
Beach this year. Fill your soul with sunshine and good fellowship and your body with strength,
and, if you are so minded, participate in the building of a greater and still more attractive
Inlet Beach. Rates will be sent on request and reservations made to the limit of our resources.
A royal welcome and good company await you at Inlet Beach.
Come and see us.
McCASKILL INVESTMENT CO.
Main Office, De Funiak Springs, Fla.


Page thirteen











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BATHING IN GULF OF MEXICO IN FRONT OF HOTEL


Page fourteen


---- - -,W-NN1-








READ THIS LETTER FROM A PROMINENT
VISITOR AT INLET BEACH

- HAVE been requested to write for immediate dis-
tribution a description of INLET BEACH, and at
the same time am asked to turn over all photographs
of the place to the advertising man, who is preparing a
booklet which is to be the formal presentation of this
property to the public. I think this is hardly fair to
me, for every one knows what an advantage pretty illustrations give
to the writer. It is the same advantage that a good orchestra gives
to a singer-by hiding the imperfections of the voice. I am given
a fine subject, however, and in the absence of any artificial helps I
shall set out as best I may, the attractions and opportunities of a
resort which I confidently predict will soon become one of the most
popular of any on the entire western coast of Florida.
Ever since the War Trade Board, at Washington, D. C., sent
me, about two years ago, on a war mission to the ports of Florida, I
have had an unquenchable desire to make my home in this state and
along some of the many beautiful water fronts that characterize and
beautify the state, and it was during my stay at the National Cap-


Page fifteen









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FISHING PARTY ON THE BEACH


page sixteen


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ital that I read an advertisement by the R. E. L. McCaskill Co., of DeFuniak Springs, Florida,
that eventually resulted in the removal of my family to that town-soon after the close of
the war.

During our stay there I made a careful and protracted investigation of water-front prop-
erties in search of a spot combining in composite form all the beauties and attractions of sea-
shore resorts, and I finally found it at Inlet Beach, which has been aptly characterized as the
"Beauty Spot" of the western coast. It consists of about 200 acres of mostly hammock land,
located between Lake Powiller, a salt water lake of 7 miles in length, and the Gulf of Mexico;
lying well above sea level and projecting at the juncture of the lake and gulf to a heighth of
nearly fifty feet. There is considerably over a mile of beautifully shaded and elevated gulf
and lake frontage, while westward there stretches a vast open range of delightful scenery.
Less than two years ago this property was seldom frequented save by a number of old settlers
who went there annually to fish and hunt; one of them later commercialized the sport and
made a small fortune out of it. To those it was known as "Phillip's Inlet."

To-day there is an attractive little hotel, a number of cottages, a lighting plant, water-
works, bath houses, walks, and drive-ways, and a number of workmen are rapidly providing
additional and substantial improvements and developments for the large number of guests
expected this season. The property has been laid out by a civil engineer into lots and streets,
the hotel is in charge of a most competent lady of large hotel experience, and the board is a
feature of the place. (Fish in plenty.) Several parties from Georgia, Alabama, and Florida


Page seventeen'l





























BOAT LEAVING FREEPORT FOR INLET BEACH


" )i.FT'Ni 1K-FREEPORT ROAD


MOTORING ON THE LAKE


W�lllrr~rr-rru. ~IIW-�


Page elshtee..









have already been entertained there this season, and the goodbyes are always accompanied
by the satisfied refrain, "We are certainly coming again."
The beach is a dream, and only a short walk from the hotel. The beautiful lake fur-
nishes canoeing and all sorts of boating. The air is a joy, the scenery picturesque and restful,
and there is dancing at evenings.
It Appeals to the Rich!-Because wealth resents the demand of a penalty for the genius
which acquired it.
It Appeals to the Business Man!-Because it offers genuine relaxation and recuperation.
Sports without the "spot-light", and comforts without conventionality.
It Appeals to the Old!-Because of the simplicity of its natural charm. At evening the
roar of the friendly breakers lulls to sleep, and the gentle sea breezes smooth out the wrinkles
of age and care.
It Appeals to Lovers !-Because it arouses the noblest sentiment, and hearts become respon-
sive which were hitherto pulseless and cold.
It Appeals to Children!-Because unmolested they can romp and play in the sea-washed
sand that does not despoil the daintiest fabric.
To the Profiteer!-Its gates are forever closed. People come here to escape and forget him,
and nothing will be allowed which will suggest his despicable countenance. He has preyed
upon the guests of the fashionable East Coast resorts until there was an absolute demand for
the development of the equally attractive resort properties of the West Coast, where normal


Page nineteen















































FISH ARE ALWAYS PLENTIFUL AT INLET BEACH


Page twenty














I


people could have their normal desires gratified without inordinate
extortion, and Inlet Beach invites his enmity by decreeing his
expulsion.
A lot and cottage here is within the reach of every frugal family,
and is much cheaper than the building of a monument in the ceme-
tery over those who were over-worked and knew nothing of play.
Place your order now for one of the new booklets being gotten out
and which will present in most attractive form the opportunities,
prices, etc., of this really wonderful property.
In the meantime prepare to bring your family here this sum-
mer. The rates are very very reasonable. Come and seek repose in
nature's own garden; untouched by the blight of commercialism and
of stress. You will build a "nest" here if you come, and from it the
fledglings of many a buried hope and disappointed fancy will be
realized from year to year, and you will thank me for this letter
and invitation.
Sincerely,
BEN A. NEAL.


Page twenty-one































--4.-.


VIEW OF THE COTTAGES


Page twenty-two


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Inlet Beach, Fla., July 15, 1921.
Dr. C, A. Butler,
Redfield, S. D.
Dear Brother:-
I have been down here two months. We are about 35 miles south of DeFuniak Air Line, but have
to cross the river at Cow Ford, and it is about 60 by auto.
This is the finest place that I have ever seen on the gulf. Grayton Beach has a little better
bathing beach, but this place has everything--good bathing in the gulf for those who want that, shallow
water in the inlet and lake for the children and the timid ones, and the best fishing that I have ever seen
anywhere. The lake is large and most of the time is connected with the gulf, and the fish are always com-
ing in. We have the salt and fresh water trout and red fish. These make sport for those who like to fish
with hook and line, or rod and reel. Then we have the flounder that are sometimes caught with hook, but
generally caught with torch and spear. Mullet and pompano, and many other kinds, are caught in nets. Out
a mile and a half you get red snapper and grooper. A few weeks ago one Saturday morning two fishing crews
got 23,000 pounds of Spanish mackerel, one crew getting 15,000 and the other 8,000 at a haul.
Then we have between the lake and the gulf a bluff 30 or 40 feet high, covered with trees, that
makes a fine building place and gives a fine view of the gulf, and you ought to see the colors in the
water--some days they are grand, The drinking water is most excellent, just cool enough to suit me as it
is freshly pumped. There are about 180 acres of the property, and some of it the finest kind of fruit and
garden land. There is an old Indian field full of shell and broken pottery.
We have fish nearly every meal and they are fine, and biscuit and Tupelo honey that I am very fond
of and plenty of chickens raised right on the place, and tomatoes and vegetables from the garden. When
we want to go to the gulf, all we have to do is to go down stairs and walk across the wet hard sand, and
when we want to fish, all we have to do is to go down the back stairs and step into a boat and go fishing.
I wish you could see some of the strings of fish that they bring in, and the big sea turtle and
porpoise, and the sea birds and the beautiful phosphorescent lights on the crest of the waves. This is
surely a wonderful place. You can't get John or Burt to talk of any other place since they have seen this.
Come down and see us.
Your brother,


Page twenty-three




















































HOTEL AND COTTAGES


Page twenty -four







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PARTY AT HOTEL


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KODAKS


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ON THE GULF BEACH


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KODAKS


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