Indiantown : Indiantown Farms (660)
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005135/00001
 Material Information
Title: Indiantown : Indiantown Farms (660)
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Land Company of Florida
Place of Publication: West Palm Beach, FL
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6448
System ID: UF00005135:00001

Full Text

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JlU~dIWt'II Farms


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Indianown Farms, where "Buried Treasure Lies in Tested Soil"


Indiantown Farms, where "Buried Treasure Lies in Tested Soil"


oJONG before civilization invaded the New World,
Indiantown-today's new center of the Sub-
Tropical agricultural empire of Florida-was a thriv-
ing farm area. The ancient tribes of Seminoles-
original Indian inhabitants of the Sunshine State-
with all the state from which to choose, selected the
high fertile land which now comprises Indiantown
Farms, for the production of their crops. The Sem-
inole Indians were sagacious and successful agricul-
turists. The instinctive choice of location which led
these primitives to Indiantown has been proved prac-
tical by present day scientific soil tests and the same
qualities which influenced these romantic forbears
have been the basis of the selection of the same loca-
tion by the Land Company of Florida as the center


of one of the greatest farm-lands projects ever at-
tempted in the south. Farmers who operate Indian-
town Farms begin with the advantage of the finest
location in the most fertile state in the union.
Indiantown is a new city-developed by the Land
Company of Florida-incorporated June 6, 1927, and
is already a thriving town by virtue of the extensive
development program of its builders.
Surrounding Indiantown-extending to the East-
ward toward Palm Beach and Westward to the very
shores of Lake Okeechobee-lie Indiantown Farms-
150,000 acres of the State's richest lands, capable of
raising every type of fruit and produce grown in
Florida-and offered in ten-acre units cleared, plowed,
disced and ready to plant.


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I-SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY PASSENGER DEPOT AND
AVENUE OF PALMS
3-SEMINOLE INN-HOTEL-INDIANTOWN


2-BUNGALOWS AT INDIANTOWN
4-AN INDIANTOWN BUSINESS BUILDING






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Climatic conditions play an important part in the agricul-
ture of any region. Warmth and moisture are two essential
factors in plant growth. No other state in the Union has an
annual average temperature that is more adapted to the con,
tinuous and profitable growth of a wide range of fruits and
vegetables.
The annual average rainfall of Florida is ideal for the
production of a wide variety of tropical plants and vegetables.
AVERAGE BY MONTHS OF FLORIDA TEMPERATURE
90* Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Auq Sept Oct. Nov. Dec.
85"

80 _ __
750 __


65 __

60

550

Sudden fluctuations in temperature, coupled with extreme
heat of summer and severe cold of winter, both of which
are undesirable for living and detrimental to the production
of many agricultural products, never occur in Florida.

PLANTING AND HARVESTING DATES OF TRUCK CROPS IN FLORIDA


Planting Harvestinq
A study of the above chart shows the busy months in
Florida's vegetable growing are from September to June.
This fact has interested many farmers from the North who
want to get away from the rigors of winter at home to come
to Florida, put in and harvest a winter crop and return home
in ample time to plant again there.


AVERAGE BY MONTHS OF FLORIDA RAINFALL
Jan Feb Mar Apr Maq June Julq Aug Sept. Oct Nov Dec.
7, .
3 in.








I jh.

Florida enjoys a moderate rainfall during eight months of
the year. This rainfall is evenly distributed and usually quite
sufficient for the production of fruits and vegetables. The
rainfall varies but little from year to year. It has already
been shown that the rainy season in Florida occurs in mid-
summer and that the remainder of the year-fall, winter and
spring-are periods of moderate rainfall. It is interesting to
observe how the planting and harvesting dates of crops in
Florida fit in with this yearly distribution of rainfall.


Crops and Yield

'T is a well known fact that Florida has the richest
soil in the United States as well as the most ad-
vantageous farming conditions. Government com-
parisons show that the vicinity of Indiantown Farms
has recorded a larger yield per acre than any other
place in the entire country.
Three or four crops per year at Indiantown Farms
is not a dream but a fact and a matter of constantly
repeated reality in the vicinity. The nine leading
perishable crops are:
BEANS CUCUMBERS STRAWBERRIES
CABBAGE GREEN PEAS TOMATOES
CELERY LETTUCE WATERMELON
These crops over a period of five years on various
Florida lands have yielded an average gross return of
$430.63 per acre. It is a matter of record that many
farmers have secured returns as high as $1,000 per
acre.
The chief advantage to the Indiantown farmer is
that these crops all mature at times when the farms
of the north are covered with a blanket of snow.
Winter vegetables are Florida's greatest asset and be-
cause of their arrival at the markets during the "off
seasons" command the highest prices.
Maximum return accrues to the grower who is


































BEAN FIELD
NORTH OF CANAL


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willing to cultivate a citrus grove at Indiantown
Farms, for the soil is particularly adapted to that pur-
pose. Bananas, pineapples, coconuts, mangoes, avo-
cados and many other tropical varieties grow here,
but the orange, grapefruit and tangerine are the most
prolific fruit crops. The Bowers Grove, now produc-
ing, is one of the most successful enterprises of this
Character in Florida.
W^ Dairying, poultry raising, bee culture and other
lucrative lines of endeavor present an opportunity at
Indiantown, all of these phases of industry being
WARFIELD SCHOOL needed to supply the actual Florida demands today.
AT INDIANTOWN
Co-operation for the Farmer
HE productive value of the land and its advan-
tageous marketing situation are not the only
factors of supremacy to be considered in connec-
tion with Indiantown Farms. The Seaboard Airline
Railway, through its department of agriculture is
conducting experiments in the culture, production
and up-breeding of all Florida crops. Purchasers of
farm lands here are spared the time and expense of
experimentation. They go into production under
systems and methods which have been tried and
proved successful. They are entitled at all times, to
advice and assistance of this agricultural department
which, it is well known, is one of the most successful
\ and extensive in this country.
Marketing and Profits
Every physical marketing advantage exists for In-
diantown farmers. In addition to this, every assist-
ance is given by the Land Company of Florida and
the Seaboard Airline Railway. Cooperative market-
ing association for the purpose of protecting the pro-
ducer will safeguard every investment.
No part of Florida today is producing enough food
SDELI VERED stuffs for its own consumption. The entire south-
READY FOR PLANTING eastern part of the state, which is the greatest gather-
ing place for winter tourists in the world, forms a
lucrative market for Indiantown crops. A few
hours transportation to Palm Beach, Miami and other
resorts of the lower east coast by water, rail and
highway is available.
20th Century Pioneering
Climate -- Living and Wl.orking Conditions
The new arrival at Indiantown Farms meets none
of the hardships and uncertainties that assailed the
S ..pioneer of former days and yet has all the advantages.
-l ... .-.... i He comes to a new land of promise with settling sim-
plified for him-with all of the preliminary steps and
" 'risks taken by the Land Company of Florida.


ONE OF THE LATERAL DRAINAGE DITCHES AT
INDIANTOWN FARMS






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THE BOWERS' ORANGE GROVE AT INDIANTOWN


Location and Transportation


/NDIANTOWN and Indiantown Farms comprise
a large proportion of Martin County, lying 34
miles from the Port of Palm Beach-traversed by the
Warfield State Highway, at a point where the main
line of the Seaboard Air Line Railway crosses the St.
Lucie Canal-the third largest canal of its type in the
world. Transportation to the East and West Coasts
of Florida by highway, rail and water, is thus readily
available-giving Indiantown Farms accessibility as
an added feature to extremely productive soil.
The test of any business proposition is the revenue
which may be derived therefrom. All farmers realize
the importance of choosing those crops which are
conducive to the greatest return, yet the selecting of
crops to plant is of no more importance than the
selection of the location to produce them profitably.
The high elevation of Indiantown Farms together
with a complete system of canals and laterals now
constructed gives positive gravity surface drainage
and moisture control over the entire area.


Riche& Soil in Florida


( HE soil comprising Indiantown Farms is of the
type that has proved most successful in the pro-
duction of Florida's wide diversity of winter fruits
and vegetables. It is a dark grayish, sandy loam with
a dense substratum about 36 inches under the surface.
This dense base is of great advantage in retaining
moisture and controlling the water table. The loam
itself retains the heat of previous days which protects
the crops from short infrequent cold snaps. The ter-
ritory surrounding Indiantown has been proven vir-
tually frostproof, thus eliminating the greatest of all
farming hazards.
Added to all other physical advantages of Indian-
town is assurance of ample water supply. The devel-
opers at the outset of the improvement prograin
made exhaustive water tests and the field is now
proven from this standpoint. Wells recently drilled
have shown a volume and pressure that will meetj
every reasonable requirement, and water, of course,
is an important factor in farming and livingcon-
ditions.


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INDIANTOWN IARMS---- - ."
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Gaineville alatk a oalve,

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STUDY THE MAP o j
Note the maoyB ,eaa
Advantages f unnello De land Smrna

INDIANTOWN ]FARMS I nvers0. sanfor
from the Standpoint of Tit u v111 e,
Location and Tran portation Ol and Cape
K issirnnee ana
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d Melbourne
A" LakeLand.W vaen

S Petersbvr Ft. Meade Avon Pa-k. Vero Beach
Sebtn
P Iket Wauchola, Flt. Pele -.
5racent-or Manatee
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Indiantown--The City Itself

( TARTED a short time ago-today, a thriving
"1 town. That, in brief, is the history of In-
diantown. There was a reason behind its found-
ing-there's a reason behind its growth. Potentially,
the shipping center of tremendous agricultural pro-
duction, there is every reason why growth should be
-- -rapid and substantial. And these very reasons are
.... ..... BEANFIELD the assurance of ideal living conditions for those who
settle here and for the farmers who come to this
vicinity to live, as well as a profitable investment for
those who see the opportunity presented by taking
advantage of the project at its initial stage.
4, The work and money that have already gone into
its development are evidenced today by many splen-
did buildings. A railway roundhouse, railway ad-
ministration building, beautiful depot and other rail-
road structures-an electric light and power plant,
l water filtration plant, a twelve-grade school building,
PAR IND IANHOWN a 37 room hotel, many modern residences, a number
APARTMENT HOUSE
of modern stores-church and social gatherings-
these are the substantial marks of growth which al-
ready exist.
Today there is an kpportunity for agricultural and
industrial enterprise at Indiantown. New residents
are encouraged to come here and start with a growing
community, with assurance of growing prosperity.

it Developed by an organization equipped with capital
MODERN FARMING for carrying out of its tremendous plans, Indiantown
INDIANTOWN FARMS is assured of success, and the rapid development of
Indiantown Farms is no less a certainty.
Write to us for further information.

THE LAND COMPANY
- OF FLORIDA
SEugene Kifer, Vice-president and General Manager
jHarvey Building, West Palm Beach, Florida


ASK ANY SEABOARD TICKET AGENT


ST. LUCIE CANAL BRIDGE AT INDIANTOWN















GRICULTURAL development of Florida-last frontier of
a prosperous nation-has for many years held potential
promise to thousands who have recognized the tremendous
natural advantages of the sunshine state,-its known possi-
bilities for great yield per acre by virtue of multiplicity of
crops, unusual length of producing season and its opportunity
for high return per unit of production as a result of maturity
of crops during seasons which in other states are non-pro-
ductive.
It has remained, however, for organizations of unques-
tioned integrity and reliability and with sufficient capital for
large scale operation to; open the way to this potential wealth
of opportunity for the individual farmer-to overcome market-
ing resistance, conduct drainage operations in the most fertile
territories, and to make experiments that would be costly to
the small operator.
The Land Company of Florida is meeting this condition
today by making available to individuals who would enjoy
the pleasures and advantages of living in a healthful, sub-
tropical climate and at the same time profit from the super-
lative agricultural advantages it has to offer-with every other
facility for profitable farming-accessibility-known methods
of production through extensive research and experiment-as-
sured safe marketing through cooperative methods-preserva-
tion of produce through provision for rapid transit to con-
sumer-in fact, every advantage that the farmer could ask,
from the standpoint of co-operation and protection.
The richest agricultural sections of Florida have hitherto
been more or less inaccessible. Today the Seaboard Airline
Railway intersects an agricultural empire which, when com-
pletely settled, will provide a formidable percentage of the
nation's food supply-which is within 36 hours transportation
by express of more than 85 per cent of the country's popula-
tion-surely the logical source of winter food supply-a verit-
able land of plenty for those taking part in its development.


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THE LAND COMPANY OF FLORIDA
WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA

EUGENE KIFER
VICK PRESIDENT GENERAL MANAGER April 30, 1928
CR





Mr. Victor K. Case
Knoxville, Pa.
Dear Sir:

Your recent inquiry regarding Indiantown
Farms received and we take pleasure in enclosing here-
with our illustrated descriptive folder, giving their
location and other information.

The ten acre farm units we are now offer-
ing for sale are especially attractive, being located
in the center of over 150,000 acres of rich agricultural
lands famed as the winter market basket of the South
Florila Indians. The prices range from $800,00 per
acre upwards, CLEARED DRAINED, PLOWED and DISCED
ready for the seed MAKING YOUR COST EQUIVALENT T6 THAT
OF LANDS SELLING AS LOW AS $50.00 AN ACRE. The terms
are 25% cash and the balance in ten semi-annual payments.

Due to the productivity of the soil and
high selling prices of winter vegetables and fruits,
an Indiantown Farm prepays its cost in a very short
period of time. With the additional co-operation of
the experienced agricultural experts of the Seaboard
Air Line Railway Company, the usual farming and market-
ing problems are very few.

Arrange for a visit to Indiantown Farms
now secure your location and enjoy the health and
profit which, this section of Florida offers to you.

Thanking you for your interest and await-
ing your reply, I am

Very truly yours,


Vice-Presi t & Gener Manager.
t/�




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