Economic Survey of Florida : Florida's 1000 mile Circle (617)
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 Material Information
Title: Economic Survey of Florida : Florida's 1000 mile Circle (617)
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Joseph W. Young Properties
Place of Publication: Hollywood By-the-Sea
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Full Text

economic

Survey

of lorida


1000 umite
ctrcte


Research Department
Joseph W. Young Properties,
Inc.
Hollywood By-the-Sea
in Florida






Florida Ranks
Among the States
32nd in Population; 21st in Area; 36th in Popu-
lation per Square Mile.
BUT
1st in Bank Deposit Increase.
1st in Motor Registration Increase.
1st in Income Tax Increase.
1st in % Farm Value Increase.
1st in Grapefruit Production.
1st in Snap Bean Production.
1st in Phosphate Mined.
1st in per acre Crop Value.
2nd in Pepper Production.
2nd in Egg Plant Production.
2nd in Orange Production.
2nd in Cucumber Production.
2nd in Truck Gardening.
2nd in Rosin Production.
2nd in Turpentine Output.
3rd in Industrial Insurance Increase.
4th in Lath Production.
4th in Cigar Manufacture.
5th in Gasoline Tax Collections.
5th in per capital Building Permits.
5th in Timber Consumed in manufacturing veneers.
6th in Peanut Production.
6th from the bottom in % of crop needed to pay the
interest on farm indebtedness.
7th in Import Tonnage.
8th in Shingle Production.
10th in Export Tonnage.
10th in Lumber Production.
llth in Sweet Potato Production.
12th in Building Volume.
15th in per capital Bank Deposits.
17th in Automobiles and Trucks.





Three


Economic Survey of Florida
Florida
Between 24* 30' and 31" North Latitude.
Between 79* 48' and 87* 38' West Longitude.
Hollywood and Palm Beach at the east are directly
south of Pittsburgh, while at the West, Pensacola is di-
rectly south of Chicago. Florida is the most southerly
of the states. Miami is farther south than Brownsville,
Texas and the most northern point in Florida is farther
south than the most southern point in California.
Los Angeles is on the same parallel of latitude
as Columbia, S. C. (34* North) and is slightly north of
Birmingham and Atlanta.

The rail distance from Fernandina on the North to
Key West on the south is 534 miles. East and west at the
northern boundary is approximately 375 miles. Pensa-
cola to Key West by rail is 891 miles, a distance about as
great as that from Chicago to New York.
Strategy of Location
Florida lies within less than 48 hours by rail of
100,710,000 of the 118,628,000 people in the U. S. as of
July 1, 1927. 30 of the 48 states lie within 1,000 miles
of Florida.
The line that has one-half of the nation's population
on either side of it passes through Michigan between In-
diana and Ohio, passes along the western edge of Georgia
and passes through Apalachicola, Florida.
The economic significance of such location is obvious.
Florida is accessible-others can reach her easily and
her products are close to the great markets of the major
population centers of the U. S. and the Latin-American
markets as well.

Florida is located on the sea, her water frontage of
3,751 miles exceeding that of any other state.

Population.
Florida's Century of Growth
How Florida has increased steadily in population
is revealed by the population per square mile at differ-
ent periods:
Florida U. S. A;
1880 .. ......................... ................ 7.8 0.6
1840 ._..........._............. ........ 9.7 1.0
1850 ...- .................. ............ .... ........ .. 7.9 1.0
1860 .. . ................... .--..... - _. 10.6 2.6
1870...... ....-...........------ ----...... 18.0 8.4
1880- .... .. .........------ ---.......... 16.9 4.9
1890 .._.....--..........--------- ...-..------- - 21.2 7.1
1900 - ..-.... - ...... .-........ .-. .... 25.6 9.6
1910............- -....--.... ...-- - - 80.9 18.7
1920-...--.-..-------- 85.6 17.7








Florida Ranks 32nd In Population
Among the States
Florida 10 Year
Florida % Increase % Population
Population 10 Years Increase U S
1880--.......-..........-..........- 4780 ..
1840.......................--- ...-- .. 54,477 56.9 82.7%
180-................-----....----.... 87445 60.6 85.9%
1880 .................. 140,424 60.6 85.6%
1870...................-...--........ 187,748 88.7 22.6%
1880-..........----.. --.... 269,498 48.5 30.1%
1890 ...........................__... 891.422 45.2 26.5%
1900 --........-...-......_.....- 628,542 86.0 20.7%
1910 _....._........._...- .. 752.619 42.4 21.0%
1920...--............-- 978,044 28.7 14.9%
Annual %
U. 8. Census Bureau Estimates: Increase
1921....-......... . .... 1,055,000 5.82
1922 --... .. 1,112,000 6.40
1928 .. .-....... 1,170,000 6.21
1924.... .--...-. . 1,128,000 4.96
1925..--.....-...... 1,268,549 2.89
1926 .-.........--... 1,817,000 4.28
1927 .....--. ......... 1,868,000 8.49
Florida's population growth has great economic
significance, as business depends on people. Each win-
ter season Florida entertains tourist guests which out-
number the state's population.
Note what each war did to our population growth.
Since 1920 Florida has increased 36.71% in popu-
lation. The U. S. A. has grown 11.47%.
How Long Can Florida Continue
Such Population Growth?
Rhode Island .. 5...- 66.4 Louisiana ......-..... 89.6
Mass. . ---.- 479.2 Mississippi .........---.. 88.6
New Jersey . ....- 420.0 Vermont -- 88.6
Conn. ...- --..- 286.4 Arkansas ----.. --. 88.4
New York 217.9 Minnesota . 29.5
Pennsylvania ........ 194.5 Oklahoma .... --. 29.2
Maryland -.- _--145.8 Maine ------ 25.7
Ohio ---. ..-..- 141.4 California .--.....-... 22.0
Illinois 115.7 Kansas ..-- 21.6
Delaware ....h-....-. 118.5 Washington .. 20.8
Indiana - . --.-- 81.8 Texas --.---........ 17.8
Michigan 68.8 Florida 1--7-- .7
Wert Va. ---- - 60.9 Nebraska ---- 1.9
Kentucky 0-- .1 N. Dakota ---9.2
Virginia 57.4 Colorado 9-------- .1
Tennessee 56.1 S. Dakota ----8.
S. Carolina - . 55.---- -- 2 Oregon ....... - 8.2
N. Carolina 52.5 Utah 5......---- .5
Missouri 49.5 Idaho --- ------- .2
Georria .-- -... 49.8 Montana .--------- .8
N. Hampshire -- 49.1 Arizona .9------- --
Wisconsin _----- - 47.6 N. Mexieo -...---....----- 2.
Alabama _ -- -. 45.8 Wyoming ...------------ 2.0
Iowa 48.2 Nevada --------- -- .*7
Florida can grow to 11 times her present popula-
tion before becoming as densely populated as Pennsyl-
vania; 32 times to equal Rhode Island's density.
White, Foreign and
Negro Population
In Florida's population there is a much smaller
percentage of negroes than in Louisiana, Mississippi,
Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina.
65.9% of the population are white.
34.0% are negro.
0.1% are Indian, Japanese, Chinese, etc.
94.4% of Florida's people are native barn (in U. S.)
5.6% are foreign born.








Since 1850 the percentage of negro population has
quite steadily decreased.
1850 -........-46.0% of population negroes.
1860 .........--......--44.6%
1870 .-.--............48.8% From 1910-1920, while Florida's entire
1880--...............47.0% population grew 28.7%; its native white
1890 ...............4-2.5% increased 45.2%; its foreign born white.
1900..._...-........ 48.7% 27.1%; and its negroes only 6.7%.
1920 ----........--.41.0%
1920 .................84.0%


Hollywood's

* L* A a IU A
airw-^ y'ss


County Led in Growth


65 25%U


S51 �75 7
78 10 100 7

101 't 175 7-



r Mo
oft DA'1


BROWARD COUNTY NOT ONLY LED
GROWTH 1920-1925, BUT HAS DOUBLED
SINCE 1925.
Some Comparative Figures In
Florida Population
% Increase


CITIES
Jacksonville-
1850.. ..- . 1.045
1860......... 2,118
1870 ..---. ... 8,912
1880 ...... 7,850
1890 ---....... 17,201
1900 - .._.._ 28,429
1910 --. ...--.- 57,699
1920 --...... 91,568
1925 --.. 95,480
1927 ----.. 160,000
Miami-
1900--.... 1,681
1910 . ...... 5,471
1920..----.. 29,871
1925 -. -....... 69,784
1927-- -.. 181,286
Ft. Lauderdal--
1900---... 91
1910............. 886
1920..-..... 2,066
1925 ......... 6,688
1927- --..-. 18,187


(10


THE STATE IN
TS POPULATION


% Increase


yrs.) CITIES (10 yra.)
Tampa-
_.. -1870_ ..... . 796
102.7 1880 ..---._ 720 -9.5
226.8 1890...----__ 5,582 668.3
10.7 1900... .._ 15,889 186.8
124.8 1910 ----... -... 87,782 188.5
65.8 1920 ..- ....-. 61,608 86.6
108.0 1925----.. ---- 94,748
58.7 1927 .----.--- 154,000
West Palm Beach-
1900--.- 564
1910--..--..-. 1,789 208.8
1920-.-...__ 8,659 396.8
1925..------............ 19,146
225.5 1927 ---5_ . 0,000
440.8 Hollywood-
1922-- .._ 140
1928.- -.... 900 542.8
1924.......- 4,000 844.4
1925 ...- 18,500 287.5
(Including Dania and Hallandale)
(Junior Chamber of Commerce
survey, August, 1925)
(Feb. 1927, approx. 10.000)







Agriculture
Florida has only 2,022,284 acres of her 35,111,040
acres under cultivation. 20,000,000 acres await the
plow.

Of 80 crops produced in the U. S. and shipped in
car load lots, Florida now produces 62 of them and usu-
ally OUT OF THE NORTHERN SEASON.












1926-27 . 0
Carload . '
Fruit and
Vegetable "3'
Shipments by
Counties .

FLORIDA SHIPS 91,002 CARLOADS IN A YEAR
(One every 5 minutes)
What Nature Gives Up
To Florida Yearly
Fruit crops $ 51,000,000
Vegetables 37,928.163
Field crops 31,534.125
Lumber and Turpentine 50,000,000
Phosphate 20,000,000
Fisheries 15,000,000
Sponges 2,000,000
$207,462,288
In 1926 Florida Produced:
81% of the nation's grapefruit
61% of the nation's peppers
21% of the nation's watermelons
41% of the nation's table cucumbers
24% of the nation's table tomatoes
59% of the nation's egg plants
38% % of the nation's table snap beans
16% of the nation's early Irish potatoes
32% of the nation's celery
84% of the nation's phosphate.
S-Florida State Chamber of Commerce.
In 1926 Florida led all states in the percentage of
increase in the value of her farm lands (averaging $100O
per acre).






Seoew


Manufactures

What People Work At
In Florida
Percentage Percentage
FLORIDA of Total U. S. A. of Total
(1920 CENSUS) Number Pop. So Number Pop. So
Engaged Engaged Engaged Engaged
in % in %
Agriculture, Forestry ---............... 108,911 11.2 9,869,080 9.8
Minerals .--- --..........-......-...... 2,962 0.8 1.087,852 1.0
Manufacturing ................ 89,804 9.3 10,777,183 10.2
Transportation -......-....-. ---...... 28,819 2.9 2,850,528 2.7
Trade -.... ------------................. . 80,874 8.1 8,575,187 8.4
Public Service -.........--...........- . 7,492 0.8 748,666 0.7
Professions ..-..---------------- 10,158 1.5 1,127,891 1.0
Domestic and Personal Service 12,552 1.8 1,217,968 1.1
Clerical Occupations ._-....--.... 9,488 0.9 1,700,425 1.6
300,050 81.8 82,958,787 81.0
Total Population (1920) .-..-... 968,470 105,710,620
Rank of Florida's 1919
Industrial Products
1. Lumber and Timber Products .---....---.....------........$42,98,000
2. Tobacco Products ..--... -----------.....--....-..-...... .-- 87,926,000
8. Shipbuilding (steel) (war) . . -..............----- 24,284,000
4. Turpentine and Rosin _--..---....... ------.. . 21,609,000
5. Fertilizers . - ------------.....-----------------. 10,686,000
6. Cars and Shop Construction, Steam R. R ......------ 8,468,000
7. Shipbuilding-Wooden .-------------- ... 8,428,000
8. Slaughtering and Meat Packing .....----------...... .. ,816,000
9. Lumber-Planing Mill Products ..............- 5,271,000
10. Bread and Bakery Products .........-- .......... 5,144,000
11. Printing-Newspapers and Periodicals .----.......-. 4,101,000
12. Ice-Manufactured ...... .... 4,052,000
18. Foundry and Machine Shop Products ...... 8,508,000
14. Mineral and Soda Waters ---...-..----.-... ------.. 2,690,000
15. Boxes-Wooden Packing 2_ ...................----- 2,540,000
16. Wood-Distillation ----------------- - -.---- 2,005,000
17. Gas - .------. ..------------------------ 1,989,000
18. Ground Minerals and Earth -. ...............--- ----- 1,780,000
19. Boxes-Cigar .----- -- ---- 1,688,000
20. Coffee-Roasting and Grinding ---.........-........-- 1,602,000
21. Printing-Books . ------- - 1,518,000
22. Cooperage ......... ... 1,122,000
28. Confectionery and Ice Cream ...-.......--....--- - 1,112,000
All Others ---------- ---------------- 14,046,000
Value of Products Manufactured in Florida ---.218,827,000
(Census of 1920)
In 1880 Florida produced $5,000,000 in manufac-
tures; in 1925 2,500 plants produced $250,000,000 of
manufactures; in 1926, $300,000,000.

New industries are coming southward into the Caro-
linas, into Georgia, into Texas, into Florida. Florida
offers exceptional inducements.
1. In freedom from many taxes.
2. In encouragement to industry.
3. In all year production.
4. Climate reduces capital outlay.
5. Savings account of less sickness.
6. Permanence of labor because of general living advantages.
7. Water-borne raw materials and products.
8. Relative proximity to great population centers and to
Latin-America.
At Miami, Hialeah, Hollywood, Bay Mabel and
Fort Lauderdale, concerted action is bringing in big in-
dustries at the present time, even before the Bay Mabel
deep sea port is open.







Transportation
Florida has transportation by rail, by motor, by
water and by air.
Railroads
In 1925 the railroads of Florida had a total in-
vestment in the state of $263,581,815.47 with a mileage
of 5,550.
The Florida East Coast Railroad in 1923-24-25
spent 40 million on new facilities and 21 million more
in 1926.
The Atlantic Coast Line from January 1, 1925 to
June 9, 1926 spent $39,700,000.
The Seaboard Air Line has now invested a total of
$55,000,000 in Florida.
In 1926 the Louisville & Nashville though operat-
ing but 246 miles spent nearly a half million in new
equipment.
Car Loads, Six Months, January to June, 1926
% Increase
Over 1925
Loaded-282,810 cars ___ 1%
Unloaded-302,517 cars -__ _ -193%
While 1925 saw 1,014,279 car loads of freight
handled, 1926 surpassed that record.
Florida's Main Line Trackage By Years
1880 1900 1910 1924 1925 1926
518 3,299 4,432 5,451 5,550 5,783
Shows its steady increase in rail facilities. Added
facilities are needed in the U. S. Rail tonnage doubled
in 16 years. It was 10 tons per capital in 1893 and now
exceeds 25 tons per capital.
The extension of the Seaboard on the East Coast
gives Hollywood and Miami double rail outlet.
Highway Transportation
Complete statistics on highway motor transporta-
tion are difficult to secure. It doubled in a 4-year period.
It involves a minimum of overhead and maintenance
costs as the highways are maintained at public expense.
The pleasure automobile has assumed economic im-
portance. In a decade they increased from 2,000,000
to over 22,000,000. This has been both a cause and
an effect. Paved highways and car increase are inter-
related.
In 1904 Florida was 4th from the bottom in high-
way expenditures among the 16 southern states; in 1926
she was 4th from the top.





Nine


Florida Highway Expenditures
1904 1914 1925 1926 1927
$487,184 $2,280,255 $81,608,214 (82.000,000 (Apprx. $80,000,000)
Florida's paved mileage now exceeds 6,250 miles.
Motor Vehicle Registered
1925 1926 Inerese
United States .............-..............-...- 19,954,847 22.001,898 10.8%
Florda ......................... ..... 816,845 401,562 40.2%
Florida led all other states in percent of registra-
tion increase in 1926 as well as in preceding year.
In the number of people per car Florida was only
excelled by California which had one car for every 2.4
people as compared with Florida's one for every 3.3
people.

Water Transportation
The South handles over 1/3 of the nation's foreign
trade-in 1926 nearly 35% of the import tonnage and
over 38% of the export.
Florida with 17.16 per cent of the nation's 21,862
mile ocean front is in a strategic position for ocean com-
merce. She has 1221 miles of Atlantic frontage and
2530 miles of Gulf coast line.
Florida has 45 ports, rivers, canals, bays and water-
ways recognized by the Federal Government for water
transportation uses. Florida has 486 miles of navigable
canals covering the state.
The growth of her water borne commerce has been
tremendous.
Total Water Borne
Commerce of Florida
1916 $_242394,205
1919 438,431,752
1923 ._______ 540,905,286
1924 _____765,607,918
1925 -______..1,026,570,307
1926 .- 1,066,723,815
Florida's Total Water Borne
Commerce-1926
Tons Value
Foreign ---3,767,574 $130,216,192
Coastwise . 6,508,215 347,503,697
Internal 1,083,461 37,974,601
Local _ 2,378,332 17,152,26
Gen'l Ferry 243,191 242,041,560
Transit 1,441,076 291,835,539
1926 Total 15,421,949 $1,066,723,815
1924 Total 11,874,934 824,609,760
1916 Total -7,863,973 242,894,205
1926 Tonnage 96.1% over 1916; 29.9% over 1924.
1926 Value 340.1% over 1916; 29.4% over 1924.
Florida ranked seventh in import tonnage and
tenth in export in 1926.








Florida is expending approximately $42,000,000 in
port development at the present time.
Of these the Bay Mable world port now building to
35 feet at low tide, is the deepest and most strategically
located. It lies between Hollywood and Fort Lauder-
dale in the Greater Miami area. It will be open Dec.
25, 1927 to 20 foot and be ready for 35 foot vessels one
year later according to the engineering schedule. It
will then be the deepest port below Norfolk.

Florida Port Controlling
Depths
Apalachicola _......... 10 feet Miami ....-- 17' 6" (25 building)
Bay Mabel .........-- (85 building) Pensacola .. 80
(Hollywood-Ft. Lauderdale) St. Andrews ...-.........-. ... 22
Boca Grande ........ . 26% St. Augustine ................ ---- 24
Fernandina ...- ......-...-- 27 Tampa -....-...........-- .....------ .... 27
Jacksonville ...-----------..-. ..... 28 W. Palm Beach .........._........ 16
Key West ..-...... 26 (wharves)
The U. S. Customs House report concerning the
above ports shows the following value of foreign com-
merce.
Year Imports Exports Total
1917 ....__ .. ... $10,060,554 $42,697,260 $52,757,814
1922 _.. ......... 17,956,076 45,233,556 63,189,632
1926 _ 35,848,266 56,647,504 92,495,770
These increases reveal the growing importance of
the Latin-American trade.

Total Value of Merchandise
Exported from the South
(By Customs Districts and Individual Ports, Calendar Year)
District and port 1900 1910 1925 1926
Florida District -.$20,560,800 $87,699,800 $78,818,988 $56,679,876
Tampa ............... 1,457,000 4,896,000 8,855,075 8,183,515
Apalachicola -...... 425,000 205,800 200,177 102,601
Fernandina and St.
Mary's Ga. --.---.... 2,594,000 5,899,500 2,186,859 1,802,660
Jacksonville ...... 269,000 2,891,000 10,878,146 9,295,949
Key West ....---...-- . 1,895,000 1,088,000 45,789,929 84,814,407
Pensacola ....-...... 14,414,000 22,645,000 8,096,412 6,611,416
Miami ----- -----.--. -----..--------- 941,244 771,118
The Florida exports in 1926 were seriously cut by crowded
rail conditions and the rail embargo.
Total Value of Merchandise
Imported Through the South
(By Customs Districts and Individual Ports, Calendar Year)
District and port 1900 1910 1925 1926
Florida District ....$ 1,887,720 $ 8,227,400 $81,219,665 $85,912,964
Tampa .--...-...- 1,285,000 4,428,000 10,012,757 12,184,557
Apalachicola ....-..... 4,700 .-...._.. 70 ... 0
Fernandina and St.
Mary's, Ga ......... 10 105,100 - .111
Jacksonville ...... 22,080 618,000 9,926,128 18,098,488
Key West --......... 546,000 1,266,000 5,048,989 5,472,786
Pensacola - 76,450 1,806,000 8,686,160 2,847,461
Miami -- ---............... ....-..--.. ---.---.. 2,582,505 2.197.958
Air Transportation
In addition to the local air service available at the
principal Florida centers, there is also being developed
in the early fall of 1927, several through lines into the
state for mail, freight and passengers.





Eleven


Bay Mabel Deep Sea World Port
Location
In Hollywood and Fort Lauderdale, 17 miles north
of Miami and Hialeah.
In Greater Miami Industrial Area, 50 miles south
of Palm Beach.
On Florida East Coast and Seaboard Roalroads.
On New York to Miami Inland Waterways.
On cross state canals to Lake Okeechobee and the
Gulf.
Adjacent to Dixie Motor Highways with 200-foot
Boulevard connection.
(Port entrance 1/2 mile from south-bound
ship lanes.)
(Port entrance 1 mile from north-bound
Gulf Stream.)











ENGINEER'S PLAN OF PORT AND INDUSTRIAL AREA
Engineering Data
11 slips 300 feet by 1200 feet.
10 double docks 500 feet by 1200 feet.
300 acres of water in inner harbor.
275 acres protected yacht basin.
2200 acres industrial sites being rock filled to
7 to 10 feet above sea level.
Adequate trackage and warehouse facilities.
15 minutes easy entrance from lanes to berths.
Practically fogless area (20 hours yearly!)
Sand only found for 1500 feet from shore-this
jettied out-hence very small future maintenance dredg-
ing.
Coral Polyps binding native jetty rock into one
solid mass.
Engineering Schedule
20 foot vessels by close of 1927.
35 foot vessels one year later.





Twelve


Tourist Business
Florida's God-given balmy winters guarantee a per-
manent winter tourist business.


The railroads hauled in 500,000 people in 1926.
The Jacksonville toll bridge, one of the many motor
arteries entering the state, in 1926 collected tolls from
271,111 south bound passengers in cars with non-Florida
licenses. It is improbable that the Jacksonville bridge
received more than 1/3 of the incoming traffic.


THE JACKSONVILLE TOLL BRIDGE RECORD


271,111 South Bound in 1926!
Probably 60,000 came into the state by boat. In
all the tourist guests probably exceeded the state's popu-
lation of 1,370,000.

The Miami Chamber of Commerce estimated that
tourists in 1925 left $100,000,000 in that city alone.

The total for the state has been variously estimated
from $150,000,000 up. There are no absolute figures.
The Research Department of the Joseph W. Young
Properties, Inc. estimates the state's tourist business at
$250,000,000 to $500,000,000.

The South East Coast, Palm Beach County, Brow-
ard County and Dade County have 12% of the state's
population but 42% of its hotel capacity. The young
city of Hollywood has a capacity of over 6,000 tourist
guests.






Thirteen


Building In Florida
Florida ranks 32nd among the states in population
but has ranked from 5th to 12th in building volume the
past few years.
According to the S. W. Straus reports of New York
City, Florida's building permits were:
1922 $ 25,213,799
1923 _..___ 34,013,302
1924 ---___ ..._ 73,528,991
1925 ............_. ____... .._.... 257,198,146
1926 ._..- 177,077,974

For the first six months of 1927 Florida ranks 12th
in volume and 5th on a per capital basis.

The Twelve Leading States
In Building Volume, 1926
Halfyear Per Capita Per
Permits Amount Capita
Population Jan.-June 1927 of Building Rank
1-New York ...... 11,808.296 $605,766,491 $58.59 1
2-Illinois ... .......... 7,202,988 251,814,847 84.96 8
8-California .._.-- 4,816,459 167,612,947 88.80 2
4-Michigan ............. 4,895,651 115,264,646 26.22 4
5-Pennsylvania ...... 9,618,70 106,964,865 11.12 11
6-New Jersey .......... 8.680,482 99,546,659 21.61 6
7-Ohio ............... 6,600,146 97,146,788 14.72 8
8-Massachusetts .... 4,197,288 64,705,619 15.41 7
9-Texas ............ 5,812,661 62,576,750 9.89 12
10-Indiana .............. 8,124,499 48,610,475 18.92 10
11-Wisconsin .......... 2,884,784 40,885,986 14.15 9
12-Florida ..-........ 1,817,160 81,890,228 24.21 5
General Building Decline
Building activities throughout the nation have suf-
fered a steady decline month by month up to September
1927, the date of publication of this study.
City Building Permits
Jacksonville Miami Tampa
1922 -...-.---. ... $ 5,868,287 $ 4,647,744 $ 8,086,109
1928 --- ......... 7.586,557 7,201,267 8,568,575
1924 ......--.. .... 7,811,497 17,088,144 5,496,055
1925 ....-...---.. 14,766,906 60,026,180 28,418,886
1926 -__---_ 21,898,945 85,844,819 16,872,772

Hollywood, Florida, built $30,000,000 of new build-
ings in the five years from February 1922 to February,
1927.

Postal Receipts


Jacksonville Miami Tampa
1920 _... S 712,722 8 208,966 $ 608,877
1921 -....... 788,822 229,768 709,049
1922 .....- 7688,406 268,401 688,697
1928 .-. 828,664 848,461 688,946
1924 --_ 890,568 490,587 718,059
1925 ..--... 1,184,726 1,029,060 962,008
1926 1,822.041 1,248,082 1,051,918

The Hollywood Postal Receipts
(The Hollywood Office was opened Dec. 1, 1922)
Yearly Totals
1923 1924 1925 192(
$4,241.53 10,876.97 $46,567.82 $62,74


Entire State
$8,178,644
8,686,421
8,789,411
4,027,578
4,624,681
5,492,488
8,405,118


S
.64
6.64





Fourteen


Oil
The records of the State Comptroller indicate that
taxes were paid in 1926 on 286,856,705.5 gallons of
gasoline, an increase of 45% over 1925.
Oil men state that the following percentages of the
gasoline gallonage indicates the average Florida sales
of the other oil products:
Lubricating Oil __ 20% Asphalt -- 3%%
Kerosene - 12%% Roofing __ 1%
Fuel Oil - 5%
Dade County (Miami) leads all other counties in
gasoline consumption; Tampa's county being second and
Jacksonville's third.
Gasoline Consumption (gallons):
County 1924 1925 1926
Broward .....................-- 1,853,689 5,471,816 8,978,88
Dade --_............. 16,085,240 34,066,109 48,805,023
Palm Beach -_.._. ... 5,999,794 11,914,804 17,282,882
The State -..-......-.... 121,955,901 198,040,469 286,856,705
Oil refineries are planned at Bay Mabel Harbor, to
bring in Venezuela crude, making possible new price
levels.

Electric Power
Florida electric output thousandss of kilowatt hours.)
(000 omitted)
1907 1912 1917 1922 1924 1925 1926
11,766 25,896 50,888 131,390 218,288 318,134 509,670
In the past three years Florida's annual per cent of
electric generation increase has been 4 TIMES that of
the U. S.!
Typical of the preparation for Florida's industrial
growth is the Florida Power and Light Company serving
112 communities in Florida.
The report to the board of directors on April 25,
1927 contains the following pithy statements:
"The management of your company has been perhaps as
intimately connected with the development of the State of Florida
as anyone within the past three years. At all times it expected
the deflation in real estate values which has occurred and was sur-
prised only that it was so long deferred. Your company's con-
struction program was consequently undertaken not on the basis
of inflated values in real estate but because Florida, in addition
to and entirely apart from its attractiveness as a winter resort,
possesses many large and varied potentialities as an agricultural
and horticultural state and as the source of valuable raw materials
for industrial and manufacturing purposes. The management of
your company confidently expects the development of the state
to continue along these lines and proposes to maintain your com.
pany in such a position as will permit it, at all times, to provide
adequate service for its important and rapidly growing territory."
The Florida Power and Light Co. has erected a
$7,500,000 power plant back of Fort Lauderdale and
Hollywood and in August 1927 purchased harbor front-
age and dockage of 40 acres on Bay Mabel.






rNif


Banking In Florida
Florida prides herself upon the soundness and con.
servatism of her banks, as well as upon their rapid
growth.
In 1926 Florida, the smallest in population of the
sixteen Southern States, ranked seventh in volume of
clearings. This growth has been carefully balanced by
an unusually high cash reserve, of which the state-
ment of the Hollywood Bank & Trust Co. at the close of
this article, is a typical example.
The National Banks of Florida
Condition as reported by the U. S. Treasury De-
partment in July, 1927:
Florida National Banks Deposits Resources
Dec. 31, 1924 --..._.......... ..... $177,233,000 $202,344,000
Dec. 31, 1925 ........-......... 373,402,000 404,172,000
Dec. 31, 1926 ............... .. 268,959,000 312,075,000
Mar. 23, 1927 (latest) -.......... ... 267,881,000 315,338,000
(1926 is 53.5% higher than 1924!)
National Bank Deposits 1920-1923
1920 1921 1922 1923
$99,387,000 $95,076,000 $115,497,000 $132,166,000
Note the increases from -920-1927.
Resources of State Banks
(1928 is 45.3% above the total for 1924)
,m. .k -... ---- -- -- --- - While Flor-
ida represents
. ..... ~ .dj " .. ..... -t but 3.4 per
Fora l 'te nks cent of the
Sold,. -tt.'i .. . link population of
t- .......- lggt.I the South, it
. has 7 per cent
n .of the total
BB!B i i_ _ banking re-
a Il I4 n P sibl 4iq gsmilq 0111 uj11azaw24 12r 12.k sources of that
active section.
The significant thing about both the State and Na-
tional Bank records is, that while 1926 is below the un-
usual year 1925, 1926 is approximately 50 per cent
higher than 1924! It is that continued upward advance
which tells the story of Florida.
In 1926 Florida's per capital bank deposits of $445
exceeded that of the United States which was $421 per
capital.
Bank Clearings
Jacksonville Miami Tampa
1920 ................ $ 625,6 5,098 ......... ...... $125,210,452
1921 ................ 580,947,110 * -.. ...... 114,148,072
1922 ....--.....--. 571,889,000 .......... ....... 118,825.807
1928 .......-.......- 652,880,128 ..........* 156,764,841
1924 ............-... 719,284,278 $ 212.858,789 195,979,545
1925 .............. 1,446,158,867 1,066,528,874 461,800,170
1926 .......... 1,505,427,662 682,867,019 414,418.178
*--Clearing House organized 1924.
Notice that 1926 is more than double 1924.






I sixteen

Bank Deposit Growth
S During the period from July 1, 1922 to January 1,
1927, bank deposits of this state increased $359,849,544
or 167.1 per cent. Here are the comparative state figures
showing percentage of deposit growth:
Florida ..__. .. 167.1% Ohio --......-............... 85.8%
New York .---..............-- . 117.5% Texas --....----....--..-- ...- . 85.0%
Massachusetts ...........-... 62.0% Louisiana -..-........... . 84.8%
Alabama ............. 58.8% Illinois --.............--- - 82.8%
Michigan _............. 1.2% Pennsylvania ~.-..... 82.8%
California -. . 50.4% Vermont .......---......... 82.4%
Connecticut ............. 48.6% Wisconsin .---...-..--- ... 81.8%
Mississippi ---......-----. 42.9% North Carolina .............. 28.%
Delaware 89.9% Tennessee ----..-. 24.8%
Arkansas . 87.7% Washington ........--- -- -. 24.8%
Rhode Island 86.8%
Florida Ranks Fourth
The report of the U. S. Comptroller of the Curren-
cy for 1926 shows Florida-sixteenth in population
among the Southern States-standing proudly fourth in
total bank resources-exceeded only by Missouri, Texas
and Maryland, which contain large production centers
within their borders.

1927 Statement of Hollywood Bank and Trust
Company
Comptroller's Call of June 80, 1927
RESOURCES
Loans and Investments -----........---....... --. ------------- 812,876.06
State and Municipal Bonds .--.........-----$ 60,000.00
Cash Reserve .....------..... ------ ..----- 682,6635.82 692,585.82
TOTAL --....--...--....-- ...---.-.-- $1.0411.87
LIABILITIES
Capital Stock, Paid in ........------.-.----- ----------. 50,000.00
Surplus and Undivided Profits --.... --- .......... --...----- - 102,190.89
Deposits .--- ----- ...----------- 88,220.98
TOTAL -_$1.....-... --. .. .......... 1,005,411.87

Bank Failures in the U. S.
Florida, to her immortal credit, has just weathered
two great financial trials at a time when banking in the
United States has been strangely strained.
The 1926 report of the Federal Reserve Board shows
for the U. S. 56 per cent more bank suspensions than in
1925:
BANK SUSPENSIONS:
1924 1925 1926
777 612 956

In commenting upon these nation-wide conditions,
the report states:
"80 per cent of the 1926 suspensions were in 12 agricultural
states" * * * *
"nearly 2/3 were banks with a capital of $25,000 or less, sit.
uated in towns of less than 1,000 inhabitants" * * * *
"in many communities, especially in small communities,
there were more than could profitably engage in the local banking
business and many of these banks had insufficient capital."





Sevenseen


Our study of Bank Failures from the R. G. Dunn
Company's records from 1913 to 1926 inclusive shows
that the South-(16 states) with one-third of the nation's
population, has about one-third of the total failures of
that period-36 per cent to be exact.
However four of the sixteen states (Texas, Okla-
homa, Missouri and Georgia) have had more than half
of the South's total suspensions-56 per cent of them.
Florida had 17.1 per cent FEWER that her quota, in
terms of her share of Bank Resources.






00







BANK FAILURES BY STATES (1913-1926 INC.)
Of Florida's bank suspensions in the period studied
(1913-1926 inc.) more than one-half of hers came in
1926 and 60 per cent of those or twenty-five, belonged
to a weak chain of banks administered from a neighbor-
ing state.
The combined resources of these twenty-five "chain
banks" were one-fourth less than the present resources
S of the Hollywood Bank and Trust Company alonell!
Of the Florida Banks which closed between Janu-
ary 1, 1926 and June 3, 1927 ONE HALF HAVE SINCE
REOPENED, reports the Florida State Chamber of Com-
merce.
Florida is therefore to be congratulated on having
come through this trying experience in which agricultur-
al states have suffered so heavily.

Climate
Climate is an economic factor. It makes possible a
permanent tourist business. It determines heating and
clothing and building costs. Its effects show in health
or sickness conditions which are prime industrial fac-
tors. It is related to comfort which makes for per-
manence. It limits the range and value of agriculture.






Eighteen


Monthly Means of
Temperature in U. S.
(From U. S. Weather Bureau averages covering 20 to more than
50 years)



Seattle .......... 4.1 44. 4 9.063.1 1.4 .
Portland (Ore.) ........ ' 42. 46. 1.8 6.9 62.4 .7 7 1.7 4.2 4 4 1
San Prnco ............ . .25.0 15.8 88.1 8. .1 0.9 0.6
Frano . . .............. 7. 76.8 82.1 0.7 78.4 4.0 4. 4 2 .
Los Angele. .. ........ 54. 55. 7.!. 2.2 6.4 70.2 71.1 9.0 65.9 8.& s8.4
Helena .. .. 20 324...... .. . .445 1.6 69. 8 0 68.44. 4
Salt Lake City ...... 41.7 7.4 67.4 75.7 74.64.4 a .1 41.3 15 1.8
Denver ............. . 7 7.1 2 86 72.2 70.7 62.9 1.2 3 5 0.0
Phoenix ....... 51.2 55.1 67 7.0 71.0 4.5 89.8 88.5 82770.� 1.7 S.6 16.7
Sante Fe �- . . 2 .1 .7 48. 55.7 64.8 69. 67.4 0.9 5.0.4 38. 0. 4.8
Bismark 4724.1 54.3 68.7 39.8 U.78SO 21.6 14.7 di.E
St. Paul - I 8 6 .1 72.1 9.4 1. 48. 32. *. 4.2
eVs Moines ...---- 0.1 X3.7 13 0.1 61.3 70.6 7L.4 7F.1 51.8 85.4 6 3.4 25.0 49.5
St. Louis ...... 4.53 43.55.8 66.9 74.8 78.6 77.8 70.1 58.4 45.1 34. 55.9
Oklahoema City ......- 34 390. 50.0 59.8 7.776.080.679.7172.8 1.5 4.8 3. 69.4
Galveston ....... 3.8 . 2.468.7 74.8 80.783.4 83.0 80.1 72.7 6.3 689.
Detroit ............. 2 . 8. 67. 2 63s.5 .
Chicago ...... 25.1 27.4 3.3 47.7 68.6 88.2 73.9 72.8 66.8 55.1 1. 30.0 80.2
Ind pol ....... 4002. 2.9 1. .7 7.7 66.9 .7 43.52.
Columbus ............. 30.739.1 1.2 62. 70.9 74.9 73.0 6 5.2 4 324 52.2
Louisville ...... 34.4 37.2 45.4 5.4 88.6 74.7 78. 77.0 70.6 69. 47 7. 87.0
Nashville ......... .6 41.4989.0 68.2 76.6 79.1 7.8 71.8 81.0 49 41 59.8
Vicksburg ...... ... 4.2 1.8s8.565.6 2.9 79.0 81.3 80.8 76.3 6.7 58.6 0.0 65.6
Montgomery ........... 251.57.865.3 73.4 79.6 81.7 80.8 7.3 . .8.4 65.6
New Orleans ............. 7.3 2.8 16.8 75.4 80.8 82.2 7 1.0 1.8.6 89.3
Portland (Me.) .... 22.4|23.8 31- 43.. 511.:62. 88.1 .4 . 4 6
Boston .............27.. 28.8I35.6 46 7.1 6.61.789.93.28.842.02. 49.6
New York . 3 .............. 3.31.337.7 49.4 60.668. 73.8 73.1 66. .3 44.2 35.0 2.
Pittsburgh ............... 30.7132.3 39.8 51.2 62.4 70.7 74.6 72.9 68.4 55.7 43.2 3.2 652.
Atlantic City ........... 32.533. 38. 47.8 58. 66.6 72.1 72. 6.8 56.9 48.6 364 52
Washington ...........33.43.32.8 33 63.7 72.2 7.8 76.0 68.1 7.4 45.2 36. 85.0
Lynehburg (Va.) .....37.540.47.357.3 67.374.677.5 75.669.0 58. 47.2.5 7.
Asheville .... ............ 438.4 7.6 542 62.5 69.2 72.0171.3 66.4 6.0 4 3 55.1
Charleston ................ 4.9 52. .4 64.5 72.7 78.9 81.4 81.0 78.6 67.8 SI 51.7 66.0
Atlanta ...................... 42.6.3 2.0 61.0 69.9 7.0 78.177.0 72.4 63.0 21 44.7 61.2
Jacksonville ......... .48 2.6 87 75.0 79.9 82.181.7 78.3 71.1 82.2 63 694
Tampa ............ 80.6161.817.2 70.9 76.5 80.2 81.3 81 800 4.3 7.1 .4 71.9
Miami-Hollywood ........ 6.167.1170.272. 76.4 80.0 81.0 81.480.1 7.0 71. 88. 74.4


This table of mean temperatures must be compared
with the table of extremes for the same cities. Bismark,
N. D., has a mean winter temperature of 21.3", yet it has
temperatures 45" below zero; its summers average 59.9�,
yet it gets as hot as 108�!
Extremes of Temperature
Record Record Highest Lowest
Cities on on Cities on on
Highest Lowest Record Record
Seattle ........._.......... 96 8 Bismark .................. 108 -45
Portland .--.......... 102 -2 St. Paul --..........-....... 104 -41
San Francisco ......... 101 29 Des Moines .......... 110 -80
Fresno -.............. 115 17 St. Louis ................. 107 -22
Los Angeles -.....- . 109 28 Okla. City ............ 108 -17
Helena ............ 103 -42 Galveston . ........._ 99 8
Salt Lake City ...... 102 -20
Denver ....... . 105 -29 Portland ....-....... 108 -21
Phoenix ..... .... 117 16 Boston ......-............. 104 -14
Santa Fe -----.....- 97 -18 New York ............-_ 102 -18
Detroit ._-........... 104 -24 Pittsburgh ............. 108 -20
Chicago .. .....- 103 -28 Atlantic City ....-..... 104 -7
Indianapolis .. --. 106 -25 Washington ...........- 106 -15
Columbus ............- 104 -20 Asheville ............ 95 -6
Louisville ............... 107 -20 Charleston ..........- 104 7
Nashville -.............. 104 -18 Atlanta ..- ... . 100 -8
Vicksburg ...... . 101 -1 Jacksonville .....- 104 10
Montgomery ... 107 -5 Tampa ....- ... 98 19
New Orleans ..... 102 7 Miami-Hollywood - 96 27
Extremes of temperature must be considered as ex-
tremes and should be compared with the monthly av-
erages above. It will be noted that the Hol-
lywood-Miami zone records the highest low temperatures
and shares with Asheville and Seattle the lowest high
temperatures of record.






Nineteen


Comfort
Climatic comfort is a resultant of several factors in-
cluding sun, temperature, humidity and air movement.
While Florida's sunshine has unusual ultra-violet ray
activity, sunstrokes are unknown. It has the highest low
temperatures in winter and the lowest high temperatures
in summer. Its relative humidity is highest in the de-
lightful winter months, thus adding comfort.
The annual air movement averages 8.4 miles per
hour. The breeze is nearly continuous.
Hours of Breezeless Calm
1924 1925 1926 1927
January .-..----- --.----..---....................... ........ 0 2 2 0
February ......-------------------.............. ----- .. .2 0 0 5
March ----............................... ....-..... .....-....-- 0 2 2 0
April ... .............................. ....................... 0 1 1 0
May ...--------....----...-. --.... ................-..-- ... 1 0 7 2
June ........--.................. .....----- -..---.... ..--- --- 4 2 7 0
July ..----..... --....................-- ..- .... .... . 3 0 17 0
August .......................-......---. 2 11 5 0
September .------ ...-....--- ....--...-....-. 2 6 7 -
October ------...~. --.... .-.............. 1 1 2 -
November ................................---------.. 1 1 0
December .-.-....-.....................-..--.. . 0 2 1 .
Total ............-............-..---.. ....--------- 16 28 51
The industrial value of such climate is well nigh in-
estimable.

Miami-Hollywood Temperature
Hollywood is located in the Miami observation zone.
The annual mean temperature since 1895 is 75.1*; Chi-
cago (based on figures since 1830) averages 49.2�; Los.
Angeles (1877-1925), 62.5�; New York, 1871-1925),
52.0%.
The average winter temperature at Hollywood (Nov.
to April inclusive), based on 1895-1925 figures for this
zone, is 70.3�.
The average summer temperature (May to October
inclusive), is 79.9�.

In the year 1925, there were only 25 days in the year
in which temperature in the 70s was not recorded some
time during the day.
There were 2 days above 90--one day, July 28 was
92�; one day, Aug. 14 was 91�. (None in 1927.)

Hollywood temperature, while it varies within a nar-
row range, is not a dull monotony. Practically every
7-10 days during the year there is a drop in temperature.
This is true also in the period of greatest heat-
nights are very regularly 10� cooler than the days-
the nights in the seventies, the days in the eighties.
In the summer of 1925, Chicago had 15 days above 90, .
New York had 8 days above 900, Atlantic City had 5, while it Holyi-
wood only 2 days were above the 900 mark.
In addition theieto Chicago had 111 days or 80.4% of tle
year at or below freezing








Florida

Total Area, 58,666 Square Miles;
Water 3, 805 Square Miles.
1900 1910
Population 528,542 752,619
Wealth:
Property, true value $355,743,000 $g936,885,000
Assessed value property $- 96,686,954 $165,000,000
Manufactures:
Capital $ 25,682,171 $65,290,643
Products, value $34,183,509 $72,889,659
Mines and Quarries:
Capital $20,794,901
Products, value - 2,943,000 $8,846,665
Mineral Products, value _ $3,326,517 $9,284,705
Phosphate mined, tons 706,243 $2,067,507
Lumber cut, feet 788,905,000 992,091,000
Farms:
All land in farms, acres __ 4,363,891 5,253,538
Improved land, acres _ - 1,511,653 1805,408
Number of farms 40,814 50,016
Value of all farm property $_ 53,929,064 $143,183,183
Value of farm land - 30,823,016 $93,738,065
Farm products, value $18,309,000 $43,689,000
Farm crop, value $13,498,000 $33,217,000
Farm crops, acres 1,020,000 1,221,000
Citrus Crop:
Oranges, boxes 273,000 4,888,000
Value _ __
Grapefruit, boxes 12,000 1,062,000
Value ___
Cotton Crop:
Acreage ---- 222,000 527,000
Bales, number .... 54,000 59.000
Value ____ - -- $2,592,000 $5,500,000
Tobacco Crop, pounds .. -- 1,125,600 3,505,801
Value $254,211 $1,025,476
Acreage 2,056 3,987
Grain Crop:
Corn, bushels 4,156,000 8,190,000
Value $2,494,000 $6,962,000
Acreage 519,000 630,000
Oats, bushels ..-- ..378,000 680,000
Value $189,000 442,000
Acreage 33,000 42,000
Livestock: Cattle, number -... 751,000 845,000
Sheep, number 125,000 114,000
Swine, number - . . . 464,000 810,000
Horses, number -.... 43,000 46,000
Mules, number 14,000 23,000
Banking: Aggregate resources .. . __- $73,573,258
Paidin capital $9,575,135
Individual deposits $-... $10,150,000 46,942,593
Railroad mileage 3,299 4,432
Motor vehicles, number -.. .. xl,749
Highway expenditures t$437,184 tt$2,280255
Public schools, expenditures - . $766,000 $1,773,000
*Census 1920; 1912; x 1922; ** 1923; t 1904; tt 1914; � 1924;
*1926; "Estimated..





Twenty-one


Florida
Land 54,861 Square Miles;
(35,111,040 Acres)
1925
Population -- _1,264,000
Wealth:
Property, true value -....x$2,440,491,000
Assessed value property -_ $620,913,000
Manufactures:
Capital *$206,294,000
Products, value_ 1$267,009,000
Mines and Quarries:
Capital *58,067,662
Products, value *-8,976,413
Mineral Products, value _ $16,661,00
Phosphate mined, tons 2,672,65
Lumber cut, feet 1,06I,876,000
Farms:
All land in farms, ac re
Improved land, acres
Number of farms
Value of all farm property
Value farm land
Farm products, value
Farm crops, value
Farm crops, acre
Citrus Crop:
Oranges, value
Value
Grapefruit, boxes ____ ...
Value $14600,0
Cotton Crop:
Acreage 101,000
Bales, number ____ 3000
Value $3,59,000
Tobacco crop, pounds 5,824,000
Value $1805,000
Acreage 7,000
Grain Crop:
Corn, bushels ,700,000
Value $8,700,000
Acreage 580,000
Oats, bushels .. 182,000
Value .-_._ .-. $164,000
Acreage ----__..... . 13,000
Livestock: Cattle, number ..... 630,000
Sheep, number .. 59,000
Swine, number . .... 458,000
Horses _ 28,000
Mules, number 43,000
Banking: Aggregate resources - $658,335,000
Paid-in capital $25,997,000
Individual deposits ---.. $514,207,000
Railroad mileage ..- 5,500
Motor Vehicles, number ..... 286,388
Highway expenditures $ 31,608,214
Public schools, expenditures -- 14,946,542


1926
1,317,000

$4,000,000,000
$786,643,000

$265,000,000
$300,000,000


SAM
5,0714,000


$7,097A0
1762,000
234,00

714,000
7,097,000
551,000
24,000
152,000
7154,000
34592,000
555,493,000
45,000
27,000
43,000
$713,354,000
$34,082,000
$555,493,000
5,783
401,562
$32,000,000
$31,054,264


* Census 1920; $1912; x 1922; ** 1923; 1 1904; tt 1914; � 1924;
* 1925; "Estimated.
-Based partially on Blue Book of Southern Progress, 1926.





Twenty-two


Permanent Investments In Florida
During the Past 3 Years
Railroads .. ..- ...$------------------- 125,000,000
Telephone Companies ... .---.---------. 22,000,000
Power and Light ..........------....---.-- 100,000,000
Port Development --..--............. .. . 42,000,000
Home Building .......... . --...----...-. 300,000,000
Business Building -..-.. -...-- ---------. 200,000,000
Hotels ........ .....---------------- 125,000,000
City Development .-......-__...... . 200,000,000
Highway Construction _........-....-.....- 100,000,000
$1,214,000,000
(Municipal improvements not listed.)
A billion dollars of capital outlay in permanent in-
vestments in Florida in 3 years. That is 1-6 of all the
money in circulation in the United States.

Since 1922 Hollywood has built $30,000,000 of
buildings--12 hotels, 263 apartment buildings, 601 busi-
ness buildings, nearly 3,000 dwellings, a bathing casino,
golf and country club, 7 churches, 2 railroad stations, etc.
The above capital outlay figures are based on actual reports
except the figures for building which we believe to be too small.
They are based upon the S. W. Straus Company's report from New
York City.

Florida's Annual Balance Sheet
New Income Produced 1926
Tourist Business $.................-- . $250,000,000
Manufactures __. ..-..-----...--. 300,000,000
From the Soil ..- .......1-. . 190,000,000
From the Water _....---... . ... .... . 17,000,000
$757,000,000
Florida's Trade Balance
Consumed Produced Imported
By In Into
Florida Florida Florida
Beef and Veal . $ 20,427,650 $ 6,623,544 $13,797,106
Pork and Bacon ... 25,579,400 6,176,179 19,403,221
Lard 4,266,230 1,066,562 3,199,668
Lamb and Mutton _- - 1,740,000 40,000 1,700,000
Dairy Products _ 31,125,000 7,089,819 24,035,181
Poultry 11,250,000 3,750,000 7,500,000
Eggs _ . 9,000,000 4,500,000 4,500,000
$103,388,280 $29,246,104 $74,135,176
Imports of Feeds, Flour, Canned Goods, etc ___ 50,000,000
Total Food Imports . -..---. .... . $125,000,000
--State Market Commissioner.
Reveals Opportunity
The trade balance of a half billion dollars is signi-
ficant, but in Florida's importations of foodstuffs is a
business opportunity. Florida producers of live stock,
poultry, feeds, and foods have the challenge of a HOME
market, the financial advantage of little or low freight
haul and the advantages of year-round production under
conditions of minimal cost, with: population increase
guaranteeing yet increased demand.




Twensmy-Aree


Florida Has-
Climate -340 days in seventies.
Sunshine -But one sunless day in 1926.
Health -Death rate 46% below U. S. registration area.
Fruits -20 fruits grown commercially.
Vegetables -Fifty commercial field and truck crops.
Agriculture -Quarter of a billion yearly.
More Land-20,000,000 acres awaiting plow.
Crops-All year growing season (south).
Beauty-.Perpetual flowers and shrubs and trees.
Population -Growing twice as fast as the U. S. ,-
Transportation -Adequate rail, otmor,. ! :
Location -48 hours to 100,000,000
Tourists -A million guests a year. r;
Manufactures -Three hundred uBali j
Highways--Investing $3.p0,00W more jya .
Bank Deposits-Leads U. S. in increase.
Building-Ranks twelfth, first half of 1927.
Motors -Leads U. S. in registration growth.
Income-Leads U. S. in per capital Federal income
taxes.
Cash-On Feb. 11th-$12,177,525.05 in treasury.
No Tax -On income, inheritance, franchise, severance,
stock transfer,or on intangibles.
Encouragement -For all legitimate business.
Industrial Advantages-
1.-Cheap factory construction in mild climate.
2.-Saving of fuel and all-year-production.
3.-Saving of heavy sickness losses due to cold.
4.-More sunshine hence light factories.
5.-Cooler factories in summer-trade winds.
6.-More permanence due to worker's living con-
ditions.
7.-Workers' all year gardens and reduced clothing
bills.















































Joseph W. Young Properties, Inc.
Hollywood By-the-Sea,
In Florida


New York Office
535 Fifth Avenue


Chicago Office
180 N. Michigan Avenue


All rights reserved, H. W. Hurt


10120127




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