• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Illustrated songs and hymns for the little ones
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005043/00001
 Material Information
Title: Illustrated songs and hymns for the little ones
Physical Description: 202 p., <8> leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Watson, George ( Printer )
Anelay, Henry, 1817-1883 ( Illustrator )
Johnston, J ( Engraver )
Mason, Walter George, 1820-1866 ( Engraver )
Dalziel, Edward, 1817-1905 ( Engraver )
Dickes, William, 1815-1892 ( Illustrator )
Gilbert, John, 1817-1897 ( Illustrator )
John ( Compiler )
Partridge & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Messrs. Partridge & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: G. Watson
Publication Date: 1865
Copyright Date: 1865
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1865   ( local )
Children's poetry -- 1865   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1865   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1865
Genre: poetry   ( marcgt )
Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: compiled by Uncle John.
General Note: Added title page, engraved.
General Note: Plates engraved and variously signed by J. Johnston, W.G. Mason, E. Dalziel, after W. Dickes, H. Anelay, and J. Gilbert.
General Note: Date from inscription.
General Note: Without music.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00005043
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6334
notis - ALG4198
oclc - 48915126
alephbibnum - 002223942

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Fron Matter 2
    Frontispiece
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Dedication
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
    Preface
        Page viii
    Table of Contents
        Page ix
        Page x
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 48a
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 72a
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 92a
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 112a
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 136a
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 172a
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
    Back Cover
        Page 203
        Page 204
    Spine
        Page 205
Full Text




w7s


















~gAPL~'~p4e-.4,1 '7 '








;IL













IV,,





























1A-























COPILDR




f41





























t"' i
'iA


C,

1. ~



/ :




742 X I




76k d


--


The Baldwin Library
University

Fl rida
















































01" (Ai 1 )(V -
(~JA


MESSRS. PARTIPITE; & Co., PATERlNOSTER ROW,













ILLUSTRATED




SONGS AND HYMNS

S FOR

THE LITTLE ONES.


COMPILED BY


UNCLE


LSonton


MI ESSRS.


PART


34, PATERNOST


JOHN.






Z' M












JIDGE & Co.,
ER ROW.


[ The right f translations reserved,





















































LONDON:

PRINTED BY G. WATSON, 5, KIRBY STREET, HATTON GARDEN.



[ENTERED AT STATIONERS' HALL.]




























I,


" FEED MY LAMUS."















V-
p77zy-


THE hope that this collection of ILLUSTRATED


yo'


7










SONGS and HYMNS will, by the Divine blessing,

aid-you in the pleasing, yet deeply responsible

duty of training up your "LITTLE ONES"

for both worlds, has led to its publication.

That this volume may be the means, under

God's blessing, of promoting the welfare of

the rising race-the lambs whom Christ charged

His disciples to feed," is the earnest prayer of

their sincere friend,
UNCLE JOHN.












*,* Most of the pieces in this collection are copyright
reprinted without permission.


A LITTLE CHILD'S PRAYER

KINDNESS TO GOD'S CREATURE

NEATNESS . .

THE BIRD'S NEST .

LOVE THE BIBLE ..

THE SHEEP AND THE LAMBS

DEEDS OF KINDNESS .

OBEDIENCE TO PARENTS

THE SLEEPING INFANT

THE CHICKENS

WHAT I WAS MADE FOR .

CHILD WITH FLOWERS

NOAH'S DOVE .. ..

THE ROSE ..

LITTLE ALICE'S BIRTH-DAY

HYMN . .

MY BABY BROTHER

THE MOUNTAIN RILL .

MY LITTLE BROTHER -

THE "TRY COMPANY" -

PRAYER FOR A LITTLE CHILD

WHO STOLE THE BIRD'S NEST?


t, and cannot be


PAGE PAGE
. 1 ON PRAYER 46

S 2 FEEDING THE POULTRY 48

4 ALL AMONG THE BUTTERCUPS 49

S6 SUNDAY-SCHOOL HYMN 51

8 THANKFULNESS 53

9 THE RAIN CONCERT 55

11 LITTLE TODDLES 57

13 THE PRETTY TALE 59

15 THE CHURCHYARD 61

17 EARLY RISING 63

19 SONG OF THE LABOURER 65

21 THE SEA-SHORE .67

23 ROBIN REDBREAST 69

25 ON A SUNDAY MORNING 72

WHAT DOES THE WATCH SAY? 73

27 THE SABBATH DAY 74

29 OLD JACK THE DONKEY 76

31 SPARE THE NEST 79

33 PLEASANT SOUNDS 81

34 GENEROSITY 83

36 HOW PLEASANT IT IS 85

37 THE WINDMILL 88


__


I-


|













CONTENTS.


PAGE PAGE
THE TOWN PUMP 90 THE WEAKEST ARE OF USE 147

BE KIND TO THE POOR .. 92 THE ORPHAN .. ..150

THE FALL .. .. 93 THE VILLAGE CHURCH 153

BE DOVE-LIKE. ... 95 WIDOW GRAY . 155

CONTENTMENT . 97 EARLY MORNING 157

WATER, BRIGHT WATER! . 99 WAR ..... 158

THE TABLET ON THE WALL 101 PEACE .. .... 160

THE COBWEB . . 103 EVENING . 162

ON SEEING THE BIBLE SOCIETY MAMMA . . 165

NEW COLLECTING-BOX 105 HAYMAKING . .167

A CRADLE HYMN . 106 "OH, THIS HARD LUMP !" 169

HOLY BIBLE . 109 THE COW . 172

A STROLL ON THE BEACH 111 LINES TO A CHILD . 173

INTEMPERANCE . 113 THE FISHERMAN'S DONKEY 176

AN INFANT'S HYMN 117 ABRAHAM AND ISAAC 178

TO MY GRANDCHILD .119 LITTLE SINS. . 180

EVENING PRAYER .. .121 THE BEE AND THE BUTTERFLY 181

SUFFER THE LITTLE CHILDREN NOT ASHAMED OF JESUS 183

TO COME UNTO ME 122 CHILDREN GATHERING THE

GOD MADE ALL THINGS 125 FLOWERS. .. 185

THE PLAYFUL KITTEN . 129 THE COMPLAINT 187

THE HARVEST .. .131 SABBATH MORNING HYMN 189

SPRING PRAISES . 183 SUNDAY-SCHOOL HYMN . 191

HAVING A RIDE . 136 THE POOR GIRL AND THE EARL 193

PAPA'S VISIT TO LONDON. 137 THE COTTAGE DOOR 196

THE HOLIDAY 140 THE VOICE OF THE FOUNTAIN 198

THE FLY . . .142 WHILE HE WAS YET AMONG US 200

JACK AND THE BIRDS 145 OUR END .... 201


















II












i
I













































I
I


A LITTLE CHILD'S PRAYER.


JESUS, tender Saviour,



Hast Thou died for me ?



Make me very thankful,



In my heart, to Thee.


When the sad, sad story



Of Thy griefs I read,



Make me very sorry



For my sins indeed.






B


i--- "-

~~. ~-~-~- --
-
~iz
-,-:---
4
--,


r--- --,,



~
----
.---
----
.:.-
z
-;`-~i. -------
"---

c_

" "'
"~ !~2,1.*; i?\-
,, -~-~~:-- :=~
,i
:~;u;
;Ii~iiII s ,
'4
C

I;
,'

ii


I










1








1









2 KINDNESS TO GOD'S CREATURES.


Now I know Thou livest,
And dost plead for me;
Make me very thoughtful,
In my prayers to Thee.


Soon I hope, in glory,
At Thy side to stand;
Make me fit to meet Thee,
In that happy land.






KINDNESS TO GOD'S CREATURES.

MY Father made the happy flies
That fill the summer sky ;
He gave the many-coloured wings
To the gay butterfly.


The birds that hover in the air,
The fishes in the stream,
The creeping things upon the ground,-
All these were made by Him.












KINDNESS TO GOD'S CREATURES.


K ~


f


And shall I hurt the meanest thing

My Father deigned to make,

Who takes such tender care of me

For Christ, my Saviour's sake?




It does not look like loving Him

To cause His creatures pain,

Or thoughtlessly to take a life

I cannot give again.


H













A'


n


r ;
/
I
"
t""'










4 NEATNESS.


Dear Lord, give me a tender heart,
From cruel thoughts set free;
Then, if they come into my head,
I will look up to Thee. v. P.





NEATNESS.


OW neatly all the seeds are laid
S, Within the ripening pod;
How carefully the cells are made ?-
This is the work of God.


The lining is not harsh or rough,
But soft, or polished well;
Each little seed has room enough,
Within its tiny cell.

How carefully the sides are closed
Against the winds and rain;
For if the seeds were left exposed,
They would not grow again.


_~ __, __ 1__


__ __ _____~___ __ _ __ ____ ___










1


Be, therefore, neat, my little friend,

In everything you do;

And it shall to your comfort tend,

And to your profit too.


F. P.


5


NEATNESS.



There's no disorder anywhere

In what my Father does;

He condescends to make with care

The smallest flower that grows.


- ~E

:,y,, u
Y
'ih;
~.'~


.'









6G


THE BIRD'S NEST.


WILL you take the nest away,
From beneath the hawthorn spray,
And the poor bird's labour spoil,
After all her pains and toil?


She has only flown for food,
For her young and tender brood;
Think, oh think, how she will moan,
When she finds her darlings gone.









THE BIRD'S NEST.


Patiently for many a day,
When the sunshine looked so gay,
On the little eggs she sat,-
Will-you not remember that?


And her faithful mate would sit
Near her with his joyous twit?
Singing, all the livelong day,
Pretty songs of shining May.


Little birds, shall all your care
Now be changed to sad despair ?
Who would take the nest away
From the twinkling hawthorn spray ? F. P.



,'. ., ,,". ,''* *. I i! '_, \ "


















,.,~ ~ __ .:--








LOVE THE BIBLE.

OH, love the blessed Book,
To wandering sinners given,
To teach them all about the road
That leads from earth to heaven.

It tells of Him who died,
Our peace with God to make;
It shows how God is satisfied
With sinners for His sake.

It shows us what to do,
If we with Christ would dwell,
So plainly, that a child may know,
Who only reads it well.


F. P.














THE SHEEP AND THE LAMBS.




,. -: ... -NIT





































The shepherd atchiful


Lambs wouldd be desolate
,.. _- . indeed
SIf they forsaken were.
-- ( j
.- ___ -- -

.... .;:-- ]--
























I ,--:-~--: _1~~~-_ _~_


_.__ _______ _










10


THE SHEEP AND THE LAMBS.


They know not where to go
Unless he leads them on :
Know not where sweetest herbs do grow,
Or clearest waters run.

None but the shepherd's arm
His little lambs could keep
From every danger and alarm
That might dismay the sheep.

When in his arms they lie,
Then only they are strong;
Or when they feed beneath his eye,
Amid the fleecy throng.

Thou art the Shepherd, Lord,
And I, thy little lamb;
I'm safe if Thou thy help afford,
However weak I am. F. P.


i' I




.1-
.^ / \.!:;., I ^ -



































DEEDS


OF KINDNESS.


SUPPOSE the little Cowslip
Should hang its golden cup,
And say, I'm such a tiny flower
I'd better not grow up;"
How many a weary traveller
Would miss its fragrant smell,
How many a little child would grieve
To lose it from the dell.


11









DEEDS OF KINDNESS.


Suppose the glistening Dew-drop
Upon the grass should say,
" What can a little dew-drop do ?
I'd better roll away."
The blade on which it rested,
Before the day was done,
Without a drop to moisten it,
Would wither in the sun.



Suppose the little Breezes,
Upon a summer's day,
Should think themselves too small to cool
The traveller on his way;
Who would not miss the smallest
And softest ones that blow,
And think they made a great mistake
That heard them talking so.



How many deeds of kindness
A little child may do;
Although it has so little strength,
And little wisdom too.


___ j


12









OBEDIENCE TO PARENTS. 13


It wants a loving spirit
Much more than strength, to prove
How many things a child may do
For others by its love. F. P.


OBEDIENCE TO PARENTS.

WHEN I my parents disobey
In spite of all their love,
How can I kneel at night to pray
To Him who reigns above?


D









OBEDIENCE TO PARENTS.


I dearly love them both, and yet
When evil tempers rise,
Too often I their love forget,
And God's commands despise.


Am I my Heavenly Father's child
When His commands I break,
And can I sleep unreconciled,
And happily awake?


I bless His name, this need not be,
For Jesus Christ has died-
His blood can plead for sinful me;
His blood my sins can hide.


And He, if I am really His,
Will help me every day,
And make me feel how sweet it is
His precepts to obey. F. P.


_ ___


14









15


"' ''.:"




















Baby dear lies sleeping :
Now we all must quiet be,
On soft tiptoe creeping.


We may kiss its hand, and peep
At each pretty feature,
But must not disturb its sleep-
Lovely little creature!


/









16 THE SLEEPING INFANT.


See its dimpled arms, so fair,
Smooth, and round, and waxen;-
And, beneath the cap, its hair
All so soft and flaxen.

By and bye, when he has grown,
He will laugh and prattle,
Walk about the room alone,
With his horse and rattle.

In the garden he shall play
'Mong the pretty flowers,
And, with loving sisters gay,
Spend the pleasant hours.

Then we'll set him in the swing,
(But not to turn him over,)
Dance hand in hand, in merry ring,
And roll him in the clover.

God protect our cherub dear,
Our lovely baby brother,
And many a long and happy year
Preserve us for each other. s. W. P.








17


THE CHICKENS.

You pretty little chickens,
So soft and round and small;
What makes you run so quickly?
I want to count you all.


Stop here, you little tiny,
And answer me, I beg;
Come tell me how you managed
To creep out of the egg?









18


I


THE CHICKENS.



Do let me stoop to touch you;
You need not be afraid!
I would not dare to hurt you,
Whom God, my Father, made.

But hark! the hen is calling,
She trembles for her brood,
Perhaps she wants to give them
Some little grains for food.

Just one stroke more-quite gently
Upon their downy wings,
And then you must not keep them,
Poor little f-rightened things !


F. P.















19
































WHAT WAS I MADE FOR.



GOD made the little Bird to sing


Up in the tree so tall;


He made the castled Snail to cling


Close to the garden wall.


E-~ii
(Ir
,t
., ...: "E~/~: r r
I
'I~
c
I~ / ~
II
.- It i-
-9
; -1..\
t I n
.
: ''~ 2I~
;I' I .' :~' 5',
1. I ~e~lC~aap~g~i~~~C1~ .. rII4
;5
*7'
.





1



20 WHAT I WAS MADE FOR.


He made the Flower to charm the eye,
And scent the air around;
He made the Tree so broad and high,
To shadow all the ground.


He made the Stars to cheer the night,
And yon dark sky adorn;
He made the Sun, so warm and bright,
To ripen well the corn.


I cannot twinkle like a Star,
Or blossom like the Flowers;
But God hath made me greater far,
And given me nobler powers.


Affection, reason, knowledge, will,
Lord, Thou hast given to me;
Then shall not each Thy law fulfil,
And all be used for Thee ? s. w. P.













CHILD WITH FLOWERS.


How can a young sinful heart
Bring forth flowers of love,
If the Lord do not impart
Sunshine from above ?

Love, and gentleness, and peace,
Are the Saviour's flowers ;
He himself brought forth all these,
In this world of ours.

Oh, how patient and how kind
Jesus used to be!
lie will put His gentle mind,
If I ask-in me. F. Pi


22









23











ji










NOAH'S DOVE.

WHEN Noah had been long shut in,
And thought the earth was dry;
He sent a dove, to fly for himi
Into the open sky.

The raven he had sent. before,
Returned not to the ark;
The gentle dove no safety saw,
iFor all was drear and dark.










24 NOAH'S DOVE.

If like the dove I wander forth
Into the stormy sky,
Out of the ark there 's only wrath
For sinners such as I.


Christ, like the ark, the refuge is,
For sinners lost like me;
Without are floods and stormy skies,
In HI~ I safe shall be.


Dear Lord, look forth and take me in,
As Noah took the dove:
Let me not perish in my sin,
But save me in Thy love.
E E. P.









25


THE ROSE.


How fair is the rose I what a beautiful flower!
The glory of April and May !
But the leaves are beginning to fade in an hour,
And they wither and die in a day.










26 THE ROSE.

Yet the rose has one powerful virtue to boast,
Above all the flowers of the field; [lost,
When its leaves are all dead, and fine colours are
Still how sweet a perfume it will yield!

So frail is the youth and the beauty of men,
Though they bloom and look gay like the rose:
But all our fond care to preserve them is vain;
Time kills them as fast as he goes.

Then I'll not be proud of my youth or my beauty,
Since both of them wither and fade;
But gain a good name by well doing my duty;-
This will scent like a rose when I 'm dead.
DR. WATTS.















27


LITTLE ALICE'S BIRTH-DAY HYMN.


ANOTHER birth-day, Lord, I see;

How very thankful I should be!

I thank Thee for each mercy shown

Throughout the year that now has flown.


i,
:. : ; ,
''' 2: .I
I /


~.t-5 ~C~ -~ r~ 1P ~
.
-3
J
= cc~ rb
" C7
U:











LITTLE ALICE'S BIRTH-DAY HYMN.


A birth-day gift I humbly claim
(I ask it in the Saviour's name)-
Thy Holy Spirit let it be,
Oh, may it now descend on me!


Fill my young heart with light and love,
Fixing my hopes on things above;
And on this birth-day visit me,
That I may give myself to Thee!
S. Y.


II
'I I


28














29


k, .'s


MY BABY BROTHER.



LET me come and kiss the baby,

On his little lips, like this;

I am sure I shall not wake him

By one soft and gentle kiss.




How I love to see him smiling,

Pretty little baby boy!

When his merry eyes are glancing,

And he clasps his hands for joy.


I .


I


I' ? I ~
'
:I
.y \2~$ r
,f
Y' ~
I %P
I.r --iti!
;-e ,
.Uc
~t-~i;s~i

t ;i .r
,..i ..-. r
r C r:










30 MY BABY BROTHER.


When he grows a little older,
And can run about with me,
I will play with him so gently,
And will watch him carefully.

Lord, look down with grace and pity,
Little children are Thy care;
Through this world of fear and danger,
Both of us to glory bear.
F'.


i\










31


I "\ -. "' -" I,




















STHE MOUNTAIN RILL.

SHow pleasant, on a sunny day,
To rest beside the brook,
And watch the ripples, as they play,
Down in some shady nook.

To drink the clear cool water, as
It busily flows by;
Or, stretched upon the pleasant grass,
To gaze into the sky.
And watch the ripples, as they play,
Down in some shady nook.

To drink the clear cool water, as



To gaze into the sky.










32 THE MOUNTAIN RILL.

To watch the rushes bend and rise
In the hot summer air;
The fishes leap-the water-flies -
The banks reflected there.


And, better than the best of these,
To those that love the Lord,
To think of the great promises
He gives us in His word.












33


MY LITTLE BROTHER.


I MUST not tease my brother:

He's not so old as I,

And if I cross and vex him,

'Twill make him fret and cry.

No, I will try to please him,

And join in all his play,

Will soothe him in his sorrows,

And wipe his tears away.


Whatever others give me,

An apple, cake, or pear,

I won't eat all, so greedy,

But he shall have a share.


~_


I _


-Nilc r

ot~ ; :SP~-~P-~


ZTbF










34 THE "TRY COMPANY."


And when at eve he's sleeping,
So quietly I' 11 creep,
And stooping o'er his cradle,
Will kiss him while asleep.
SS. Vw. I .





THE "TRY COMPANY.

JOHN loves, above all things, to ride
In a railway train by his parents' side;
And one fine morning thus rode he,
With a tiny parcel on his knee.

The parcel with a cord was bound,
That tied it close, all round and round,
And with so tight a knot was tied
That all his efforts it defied.

A traveller sat smiling by,
And watched the child with curious eye:
"You can't," said he, "my little man ;
Here, cut it: that's the better plan."






ij










35






I-L




















"Thank you," said John, "no knife I want,
Papa won't let me say, I can't;'
I shall succeed, Sir, by-and-bye,
I'm one of the 'TRY Company.' "


And John set hard to work again,
Nor were his efforts long in vain ;
The cord began to loosen fast,

And so try" gained the day at last.

s. w. P.









36




PRAYER FOR A LITTLE CHILD.

JESUs, love me, make me good,
Take my naughty heart away;
Jesus, teach me, for I would
Love Thee better every day.

Thine, dear Saviour, I would be;
Always gentle; always kind;
Make me, Jesus, just like Thee,
In my heart, and in my mind.


But a little child I am,
Yet, sweet Jesus, I do know,
I may be a little lamb
In Thy sheepfold here below.


Keep me, Jesus, while I live;
Take me, Jesus, when I die;
And my little spirit give
A happy home with Thee on high.
ERNEST LEE.










37





















WHO STOLE THE BIRD'S NEST?

TO-WHIT! To-whit! To-whee!
Will you listen to me ?
Who stole five eggs I laid,
And the nice nest I made?




, ,-

--).._,
St/
_. ~` '










WHO STOLE TIE BIRD'S NEST?


Not I, said the Cow, Moo-oo!
Such a thing I'd never do,
I gave you a wisp of hay,
But did n't take your nest away;
Not I, said the cow, Moo-oo!
Such a thing I'd never do.


To-whit, To-whit, To-whee!
Will you listen to me?
Who stole five eggs I laid,
And the nice nest I made ?


1 38













WHO STOLE TIE BIRD'S NEST ?


Bob-a-link! Bob-a-link !

Now what do you think?

Who stole a nest away

From the plum-tree to-day ?


Not I, said the DOG, Bow-wow!

I would n't be so mean, I vow,

I gave hairs the nest to make,

But the nest I did not take.

Not I, said the dog, Bow-wow!

I would n't be so mean I vow.


L


:iD / /
_I I


a
I,



1
I




I


~------"-I~
l-L-I_-~--_-_L- __1--- -_I~ -111
-- --~-x~~--. _.~.. LI.I-."-LI-~L~. _~-~_L.--- --.-II1I~_~-~ ___-~__~_.___-~._- r


1











WHO STOLE THE BIRD'S NEST?


To-whit! To-whit! To-whee!

Will you listen to me?

Who stole five eggs I laid,
And the nice nest I made ?


Bob-a-link! Bob-a-link!

Now what do you think?

Who stole a nest away
From the plum-tree to-day?


Coo, said the DovE! Coo-coo!

Let me speak a word, too:

Who stole that pretty nest

From little yellow-breast?


_ _IX ~I


_j I


40














WHO STOLE THE BIRD'S NEST?


I~L r
rr ~= ~rs c
LI
-Sia-5
''
r ~'
r--- %---
--~- -=- -
r
I;
'
, ii 3 r,
rrlJrr
.1J
r
!Ir
tr. ~ ~I '' 1
:B'

~-~ J -Gt ~
,
1 4 c~~
-~---- r\
~L.- !s
~---- -'


Not I, said the SHEEP; oh no!

I would n't treat a poor bird so;


I gave wool the nest to line,


But the nest was none of mine.

Baa! Baa! said the sheep, oh no!


I would n't treat a poor bird so.





To-whit! To-whit! To-whee!


Will you listen to me ?


Who stole five eggs I laid,

And the nice nest I made?


- -" ~w I --


41











WHO STOLE THE BIRD'S NEST?



Caw! Caw! cried the CROW,
I should like to know

What thief took away
A bird's nest to-day ?


Cluck! Cluck! said the HEN,
Don't ask me again.

Why, I have n't a chick

Would do such a trick!



We each gave her afeather,

And she wove them together.

I'd scorn to intrude
On her and her brood.

Cluck! Cluck! said the hen,

Don't ask me again.



Chirr-a-whirr! Chirr-a-whirr!

We will make a great stir!

Let us find out his name

And all cry "For shame!"


42


--I- --~~- ~------ ~~-
- `----------~I-~II IXIII-l_-_l


-------~-_-~_













43










44


'Tis very cruel, too,
Said little Alice Neal;
I wonder if he knew
How sad the bird would feel?


A little boy hung down his head,
And went and hid behind the bed;


I -


WHO STOLE THE BIRD'S NEST?



I would not rob a bird,
Said little Mary Green;
I think I never heard
Of any thing so mean.











WHO STOLE THE BIRD'S NEST? 45





I


rr _l -













For he stole that pretty nest,

From poor little yellow-breast; I

And he felt so full of shame, \
He did n't like to tell his name.
MARIA L. CHILD.










46


ON PRAYER.

PRAYER is the soul's sincere desire,
Utter'd or unexprest;
The motion of a hidden fire,
That trembles in the breast.

Prayer is the burden of a sigh,
The falling of a tear;
The upward glancing of an eye,
When none but God is near.

Prayer is the simplest form of speech
That infant lips can try,
Prayer-the sublimest strains that reach
The Majesty on high.

Prayer is the Christian's vital breath,
The Christian's native air;
His watch-word at the gate of death,-
He enters heaven with prayer.

Prayer is the contrite sinner's voice
Returning from his ways,
While angels in their songs rejoice,
And say, Behold he prays!"











ON PRAYER.


0 Thou by whom we come to God,
The life, the truth, the way;
The path of prayer Thyself hast trod-
Lord, teach us how to pray!
JAMES MONTGOMERY.


47




I





48


FEEDING THE POULTRY.

EVERY morning gentle Kate,
With barley-basket on her arm,
Seeks, with John, the garden gate,
To feed the poultry of the farm.

For faithful Susan, true and kind,
Has long ago impressed with care
Her lessons on their youthful mind,
Of love to all things everywhere.

And well the poultry know the hour,
And round the door impatient throng,
Till Kate's kind hands the barley shower
The little chickens all among.

See how they scramble for the grains,
The hens at leisure standing by ;
While the bold cock aloof remains-
Grave father of the family.

Well may they love you, gentle Kate;
Good deeds are never thrown away:
We show no kindnesses but straight
They back return another day.
S. W. P.










49


S ALL AMONG


THE BUTTERCUPS.

ALL among the buttercups,
All among the hay--
Oh, that spring would come again
With its merry May!


K













Hasten summer's pleasant days,
Summer's pleasant hours;
Send us back the butterflies,
And the pretty flowers.

Yes, bright days will come again;
Winter soon will go:
And the smiling sun shall melt
All this dreary snow.
Then, beside the flowing stream,
Merrily we '11 play,
All among the buttercups,
All among the hay.


___









51


SUNDAY-SCHOOL HYMN.

WHILE many a child in heathen lands
Of Jesus never heard,
In happy Britain we are taught
To know and fear the Lord.










52 SUNDAY-SCHOOL HYMN.


While there the little children bow
To gods of stone and wood,
The Bible here to us reveals
The true and only God.

How glad and grateful should we be
That we are taught so plain;
And oh, how deeply should we fear
Lest we be taught in vain!

The light and knowledge we possess,
To us so freely given,
Will but increase our sin and shame
Unless it lead to heaven.

Lord, may we love the truth we learn,
The Saviour's laws obey;
And, as we 're taught in wisdom's school,
Be found in wisdom's way.
s. w. P.










53



!. ..... -I"
. .: : ..





















I LOVE my pleasant cottage home,
Beneath the spreading trees;
I love about the lanes to roam,
SAnd wander in the breeze.


How sweet the roses on the wall,
The beds of flowers so gay;
The shadows from the trees that fall
On the bright summer day.










54


What blessings hath my Father given
To such a child as I!
And, better still, bright hopes of heaven,
My soul to satisfy.


Glory to Thee, my God, my King,
For all Thy love to me;
Teach me, while yet a child, to bring
My grateful heart to Thee. F. P.


THANKFULNESS.


I see the playful lambs in spring,
That frisk about so free;
I hear the little birds that sing
Up in the old oak tree.


'*^ .l^ --^\
.---.-... . I -j. 1.:: i.: ;.,.
. ,.


I











55








mm .




























THE RAIN CONCERT.


MILLIONS of tiny rain-drops

Are falling all around ;

They're dancing on the house-tops,

They 're hiding in the ground.


_ __1_1~ __










56


It seems as if the warbling
Of the birds in all the bowers
Had been gathered into rain-drops,
And was coming down in showers.
ANON.
..... .. .. .... . . ... .. . .... .. .... -- - -- -


THE RAIN CONCERT.


They are fairy-like musicians,
With anything for keys,
Beating tunes upon the windows,
Keeping time upon the trees.


A light and airy treble
They play upon the stream;
And the melody enchants us,
Like the music of a dream.


A deeper bass is sounding
When they're dropping into caves;
With a tenor from the zephyrs,
And an alto from the waves.


Oh, 'tis a stream of music,
And Robin "don't intrude,"
If, when the rain is weary,
He drops an interlude.










67


LITTLE TODDLES."

EVERY morning, over the green,
Bob and his dear little Jane are seen,
Wending their way to the cottage there,
Where grandpa sits in his old arm-chair.


L











" LITTLE TODDLES."


0.8


-P ~ ~

_c-


r


------------------


Punctual as morn they go together,

Though wet the day, or cold the weather:
Nothing shall harm Bob's sister dear
While her kind brother's hand is near.


And the old man throws his stick aside,

And fondles his darling with love and pride

And seems as pleased as a man can be,
With his little Toddles on his knee.


And the child-she crows, and runs to meet

Her grandpa dear in his ancient seat;

And which is the happier of the two

I'm sure I cannot tell-can you ?
S. W. P.










59.













Li-
.^ t!.. ;.


























THE- PRETTY TALE .

A KIND old man is Walter Gill;

And oft, on summer evening still,
Beneath his favourite tree,
He round him calls a youthful crowd,
And reads them pretty tales aloud,

As long as he can see.
,, T ,. ----:i .. ._ : :: ...








---- 2~ ,. _. ;___ . r,.,. ,, .
--_- -" -'i .... ..





And~ read thmpet tlsaod
As lon a h cn ee










60 THE PRETTY TALE.


And Harry leaves his trap and ball;
And Robert stays to hear it all,
Devouring every word:
Jane hears the village clock no more;
And Mary's aunt, at yonder door,
Shouts to the girl unheard.

What read you, Walter; let me know
What chains your little audience so ?
And pretty pictures, too!
Oh yes, I see: 't were strange indeed
Were they not pleased to hear you read
The Band of Hope Review."










61


THE CHURCHYARD.

" LOOK, mother, what a tiny grave
Beneath that spreading tree:
'Tis scarcely half so long as those
That scattered round we see."


" It is a little grave, 'tis true,
And teaches us, my dear,
That children die as young as you,
For babes lie buried here.


r
r


Alm"











THE CHURCHYARD.


62


4


" The little grave may well remind

How soon we pass away:
The old, we know, must shortly die,
And e'en the youngest may.


"Then let us early turn to God,
And early love His word;
That so our souls may rise to heaven,
Through Jesus Christ our Lord."
S. W. P.


m


=L3L--P-i~-~nlr~ZPi~l~P-~- U---------


I


__._.__._.~~L~









63


EARLY RISING.

" UP, up," cries the watchful COCK,
" Did you not hear the village clock?
I have been up for an hour or more,
Crowing aloud at the stable door.
Dobbin has gone with the boy to plough,
Betty has started to milk the cow;
Sure there is plenty for all to do,
And all are up, young friend, but you."


" Up, up," cries the soaring LARK,
" Only sleep, my young friend, in the dark.
Oh, let it never, never be said,
You wasted the morning hours in bed.









64 EARLY RISING.


Ouit of the window glance your eye,
And see how blue is the morning sky;
Open the casement, your slumber spare,
And smell how fresh is the morning air."


"Up, up," cries the busy SUN,
Is there no work, little friend, to be done ?
Are there no lessons to learn, I pray,
That you lie dozing the hours away ?
Who would give light to the world below,
If I were idly to slumber so ?
What would become of the hay and corn,
Did I thus waste the precious morn? "


Up, up," cries the buzzing BEE,
"There's work for you, as well as for me.
Oh, how I prize the morning hour,
Gathering sweets from the dewy flower!
Quick comes on the scorching noon,
And darksome night will follow soon;
Say, shall it chide for idle hours,
Time unimproved, and wasted powers ? "


[Extracted, by prill mssion, from Rhymes worth Retemitbering."'
















'I l"1
J i















4,'








,







A ,



SONG OF THE LABOURE


GIVE me the clear, fresh water

That sparkles in the sun;

There's nothing like it to refresh,

When work has to be done.
if"


R.


M





7




66 SONG OF THE LABOURER.


I'll take my basket in my hand,
And sit beside the brook,
And while I eat my humble meal
My heart to God shall look.


I'll bless Him that He keeps my soul,
And for my whnts provides;
And gives me, with His many gifts,
A sober mind besides.
F. P.






.. '














- - i I
I I I '











-7






---- -.-.







SI
: _--- : .








SS

















THE SEA SHORE.

WHAT music there is in the sea's wild roar

The threatening. waves, how grand,

As they break into foam on the rocky shore,

Or dash on the yielding sand.
",:,. _._. ::.] -. oa e ..: - .. ,.









68


THE SEA SHORE.


How lonely it looks, and how far away,
The place where it meets the sky;
I think I could stand a whole summer's day
As the beautiful waves roll by.

On the sands, and the rocks, and the pebbly beach,
What delicate shells I see;
As far as the tide can come they reach,
Washed up by the waves for me.

All these, though so small and so finely made,
Are the work of GOD'S mighty hand,
Who the depths of the sea in order laid,
And stretched out the pathless sand.

There's nothing too small for His gracious care,
And nothing beyond His might;
His wonderful works with one voice declare
How great is the Lord of light.

And this is the Lord who so gently calls
Poor children to love His name;
Dear Lord! I would low at Thy footstool fall,
And Thy power and grace proclaim. F. p.









69


ROBIN REDBREAST.


PRETTY Robin Redbreas
Hopping in the snow,
Why are you so early he:
I should like to know
Did Mrs. Redbreast send
To get a dainty crumb
And bid you bring your
A tiny morsel home ?


t,


re,
?

I you, pray,


little ones








70


Faithful Robin Redbreast!
With returning spring
Soon the birds will come again
To glitter or to sing.


ROBIN REDBREAST.


No, poor Robin Redbreast;
While 'tis winter stern,
No fond mate nor little ones
Wait for your return:-
Not till leafy summer comes
Will they glad your nest,
Leaving you, these dreary months,
Friendless and unblest.


I


I


I __









ROBIN REDBREAST. 71


But, though some have gayer coats,
Some a sweeter song,
You, friend Robin, stay with us
All the winter long.


Come, then, Robin Redbreast,
Prythee do not fear;
No rude boy is standing by,
No sly pussy near.
Come nearer to the window, friend,
For safely you may come:
There, eat your fill, and take, beside,
A tiny morsel home.
S. W. P.
1









72 I





ON A SUNDAY MORNING.

ON a Sunday morning
How pleasant 'tis to hear
The church bells chiming merrily,
So musical and clear.
As I, musing, listen,
Thus they seem to say-
Little Mary, come to church,
Come to church to-day."

Down the daisied meadow,
Up the leafy lane,
From each homestead gathered,
Comes a swelling train.
Mary, too, is coming,
With the rest to pray,
W here the bells still tinkle
"Come to church to-day."
W ).,










73










And sit upon my knee,









And sit upon my knee,










And tell me what this pretty watch
Is whispering unto thee?"


_Oh yes, grandpa, I hear it-

How very soft and quick!
But-let me listen once again-
It only says 'Tick, tick!


- -









74 WHAT DOES THE WATCH SAY?
i --


Ah, child, I'm not so youthful,
And to my mind it says-
How very fast the minutes fly,
How fleeting are our days!

The hours so swiftly flying-
Let's use them as we may;
Those who to-morrow hope for heaven,
Should think of heaven to-day."
S. W. P.






THE SABBATH DAY.

IT is Sunday evening now,
Soon its hours will be no more;
Have I sought this day to grow
More like Jesus than before?


Have I loved the Lord's own day
As His pardoned children do,
When I knelt with them to pray,
Was my heart among them too ?










THE SABBATH DAY.


,,, I
~ I
-. i -?
-... 1*4-,.~ ~/:;Z`h


What so sweet as prayer and praise?

When from children's hearts they come,

What so pleasant as the ways

Leading to my Father's home ?


Happy Sunday-if we love
Him whose holy day it is;

Peace descending from above

Fills the heart that would be His.
F. P.


75









76

OLD JACK, THE DONKEY.

OLD JACK was as sleek and well-looking an ass
As ever on common munched thistle or grass;
S And-though 'twas not gaudy, that jacket ot
brown,
Was the pet of the young and the pride of the
town.

And indeed he might well look so comely and
trim,
When his young master, Joe, was so gentle to
him;
For never did child more affection beget
Than was felt by young Joe for his four-footed pet.

Joe groomed him and fed him, and, each market-
day,
Would talk to his darling the whole of the way;
And Jack before dawn would be pushing the door,
As though he would say, Up, Joe; slumber no
more.

One day Jack was wandering along the road-side,
When an urchin the donkey maliciously eyed;
And aiming too surely at Jack a sharp stone,
It struck the poor beast just below the shin bone.


- --











OLD JACK, THE DONKEY.


..- -.
2 I ,.
1 .4 : -

.., 1... .-; .-
..-- .:- . - ..
':..~ ~~~ ... ..:."\,'""
MtI ,_ ,A a


Joe soothed

until


and caressed him and coaxed him


They came to a stream by the side of the hill;

And with the cool water he washed the swoll'n

limb,

And after this fashion kept talking to him:


77


i



I


I








78


OLD JACK, THE DONKEY.


" Poor Jack, did they pelt him-the coward, so
sly!
I wish I'd been there, with my stick, standing by:
It doesn't bleed now-'twill be well in a trice;
There, let me just wash it-now isn't that nice?"

And Jack nestled down with his soft velvet nose,
As close as he could, under Joe's ragged clothes;
And he looked at his master, as though he would
say-
" I'm sure I can never your kindness repay."
S. w. P.


ii

II











79


letI
:t; J .





















SPARE THE NEST.


Go back, cruel Thomas, go back to the wood,

And don't take the bird's nest away;

Replace on the bough the young shivering brood,

SAnd pity and mercy obey.
;"'
~I~ .,..
_ j I -

SPARE THE NEST.

Go~ ~ ~ ~~~-1 back crue Thms gobak hewod
And dn't ake he brd'snestaway
Replace n the bugh theyoungsivein rod
Andpityand ercyobey









SPARE THE NEST.


80

|i


What pains the old birds must have taken to
weave
The wool, and the moss, and the hair!
You surely could never such innocence grieve,
Nor rob the industrious pair.

To seek for their young a nice morsel or two
They just round the corner have flown;
Oh, say, shall they find, thoughtless Thomas,
through you,
Their home and their little ones gone?

Suppose some strong giant should climb up, and
steal
Your mother's young Thomas, so dear,
What pangs you may guess her fond bosom would
feel
When her darling no longer was near.

Then go, cruel Thomas, go back to the wood,
And spare the poor parents their pain;
Replace on the bough the young shivering brood,
And never go nesting again. S. W. P.









81























PLEASANT SOUNDS.






And hear its soft, low tones.

I love to hear the evening breeze
The willow branches shake,
The buzz that underneath the trees
The busy insects make.


O









82 PLEASANT SOUNDS.


[ The birds that sing themselves to sleep,
The leaves that gently fall,
The distant bleating of the sheep,-
There's music in them all.

If earthly music sounds so sweet,
What must the heavenly be,
Where harpers harp, before Thy seat,
Glory and praise to Thee!

I never heard the angels' voice,
I never learned their song;
But if I make the Lord my choice,
It will be mine ere long. F. P.


1 11-- - -









83





















J.KIICH



GENEROSITY.


To give up to others
The things that I love,-
This grace, if I have it,
Must come from above.
'Tis easy to give
What we don't care about,
But true self-denial
Is harder, no doubt.


-- --











84 GENEROSITY.


Most children by nature
Love best to receive,
But we know who has said,
'Tis more blessed to give."
His blessing goes with it,
His smile of sweet peace:
Dear Lord, if I have it,
This spirit increase.


The things that I long for,
My own self to please,
I want to be willing
To give up all these.
Far sweeter and better
The peace Thou wilt give;
When earthly joys wither
My pleasures shall live.


F. P.


I I


- -- I
-


84


GENEROSITY.









































,,,: HOW PLEASANT i
XI;,











I IT IS.



How pleasant it is in the woods to lie,
While the scorching sun is in the sky,
And the leafy branches overhead
Arch over the streamlet's ebbly bed.




p
,~ r c. .9-~. r' -16~h '~'P










HOW PLEASANT IT IS.


And the dappling shadows, creeping slow,
O'er all the landscape come and go,
And the merry sunlight struggles down
Between the beechen foliage brown.


And up and down, in the gentle breeze,
The gnats are dancing beneath the trees,
And the laden bee booms by in haste,
And the butterflies go twinkling past.


86"


r;
S"-_ ^-




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs