• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 The poet's dream
 The exile's dream
 The conqueror's dream
 Dream of the criminal
 Age's dream of the past
 Youth's dream of ambition
 The merchant's dream
 The miser's dream
 The murderer's dream
 The dream of the brave knight
 A dream of happiness
 A dream of plenty
 A dream of peace
 Advertising
 Back Cover














Title: Dreamland /
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005017/00001
 Material Information
Title: Dreamland /
Physical Description: 15 p., 13 leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Macleod, Jessie
Mary Elizabeth ( Author )
Warren, Albert Henry ( Binding designer )
Brandard, John, 1812-1863 ( Lithographer )
M.&N. Hanhart Chromo Lith ( Lithographer )
Leighton Son & Hodge ( Binder )
W. Kent and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: W. Kent & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1859
Copyright Date: 1859
 Subjects
Subject: Dreams -- Poetry   ( lcsh )
Delusions -- Poetry   ( lcsh )
Anti-war poetry   ( lcsh )
Gold stamped cloth binding -- 1859   ( local )
Warren -- Signed bindings (Binding) -- 1859   ( rbbin )
Leighton Son & Hodge -- Binders' tickets (Binding) -- 1859   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1859
Genre: Gold stamped cloth binding   ( local )
Signed bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Binders' tickets (Binding)   ( rbbin )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Jessie Macleod ; with illustrative lines by Mary Elizabeth.
General Note: Illustrated t.p.
General Note: Binding designed by Albert Henry Warren.
General Note: Bookbinder's ticket: Leighton Son and Hodge.
General Note: "J. Brandard, Lith. ... M. & N. Hanhart, Imp."--T.p.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00005017
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6280
notis - ALG4408
oclc - 27212609
alephbibnum - 002224147

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece 1
        Frontispiece 2
    Half Title
        Half Title 1
        Half Title 2
        Half Title 3
        Half Title 4
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
        Title Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
        Table of Contents 3
        Table of Contents 4
        Table of Contents 5
    The poet's dream
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    The exile's dream
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The conqueror's dream
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Dream of the criminal
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Age's dream of the past
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Youth's dream of ambition
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The merchant's dream
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    The miser's dream
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The murderer's dream
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The dream of the brave knight
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    A dream of happiness
        Page 31
        Page 32
    A dream of plenty
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    A dream of peace
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Advertising
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Back Cover
        Page 41
        Page 42
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CONTENTS.


PAGE
THE POET'S DREAM . . . . . .. . 3

THE EXILE'S DREAM . . . .. . ... . 4

THE CONQUEROR'S DREAM . . . ... ... 5

DREAM OF THE CRIMINAL . . . . .. 6

AGE'S DREAM OF THE PAST. .. . . . 7

YOUTH'S DREAM OF AMBITION . . . . 8

THE MERCHANT'S DREAM .. . . . 9

THE MISER'S DREAM ... . .. . o. . 0

THE MURDERER'S DREAM . . ... . . .

THE DREAM OF THE BRAVE KNIGHT .. . .12

A DREAM OF HAPPINESS . . . . . 13

A DREAM OF P.I-NTV . ..... . . 14

A DREAM OF PEACE . . .. . . . r1



















































































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THE POET'S DREAM.


ESCAPING from the noisy city's roar,
On slumber's wings the Poet's fancies soar,
In fairy-land they stray:
Dear are the Poet's dreams, though brief yet bright,
Delusive as the marsh's meteor light,
That shines to lead astray.


He hears the voice of Fame proclaim his praise,
While Honour bears the wreath of sacred bays,
And wealth attends his lay:
Alas! poor youth, hast thou so soon forgot
That fame too rarely is the Poet's lot,
Till life hath passed away.




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THE EXILE'S DREAM.



No MORE she wanders through the sunny grove,
Where sang the nightingale her lay of love;
Wide spreads the sea and far the billows foam,
Between the Exile and her distant home.
Rude were the hands that tore her from the land,
And left her lover bleeding on the strand;
She saw him fight and fall beside the flood,
Whose ebbing wave was crimson'd with his blood.
Of him she dreams when fades the light of day,
For him she weeps when all around are gay;
She looks with anguish on the laughing wave,-
All things seem free, and she alone a slave;
She sighs 'mid splendour over hopes decayed,
(For flowers transplanted reck not where they fade.)
And liberty is dearer far than all,
Though jewelled fetters bind and gilded chains
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THE CONQUEROR'S DREAM.



ON couch of down the Conqueror is laid,
While mocking slumbers o'er his eyelids close;
But shall his soul, by guilty dreams dismayed,
Feel e'er again the blessings of repose ?


Where is the city where proud commerce dwelt.
And where the fields by Autumn's riches graced ?
Oh! hath not he to all destruction dealt ?-
The firebrand and the sword have laid them waste.


But though his hand a mighty sceptre bears,
And though to him a monarch's crown is given.
A fearful record stamped in blood and tears,
Bears witness againstt the Conqueror in heaven!







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DREAM OF THE CRIMINAL.


THE cell is dark and deep,
And the sunbeams come not nigh,
Where the Prisoner in sleep
Doth 'mid his slumbers weep,
IThough closed his sunken eye.

Fond dreams his thoughts beguile,
And again he kneels, a boy,
Beneath the sacred pile,
In the dim Cathedral aisle,
His mother's pride and joy.

Ah! then his heart was gay
As the bird upon the bough,
Then passed the summer day
In guiltless mirth away;
But all is vanished now.

Now he hears the deep-toned bell,
And blessed strains arise,
With the organ's solemn swell,
And the sacred accents tell
Of mercy in the skies.

















































































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AGE'S DREAM OF THE PAST.


I SIT at eve by the lonely hearth,
Where the dying embers glow,
There rises now no voice of mirth,
It was silenced long ago;

And I dream, alas! of the golden day
Of my youth's glad summer time,
Though its joys have long since passed away,
Even as the summer's prime.

In the battle fell my gallant son,
None died that day more brave;
My dearest kindred, one by one,
I have laid them in the grave.

In death my husband's eyes to close
Was to my prayers denied:
The sharer of my joys and woes
On the black gibbet died.

The woods are green, the fields are gay,
And I hear the voice of spring;
But the blossoms, long since snatched away,
To me it cannot bring.


























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YOUTH'S DREAM OF AMBITION.


FAIR was the maiden's cool retreat,
Impervious to the noontide beam,
The wild-bird's song was soft and sweet,
As though it feared to mar her dream;

But far her senses soar'd beyond
The sheltered glade and winding rill.
She dreamed of noble Sigismond,
Whose castle crowned the neighboring hill;

She dreamed that she with him had flown,
Fast riding through the' tangled wood;
She deemed that castle all her own,
Whose battlements looked o'er the flood.

But he is proud, and as his right
Will claim a bride of high degree:
The eagle builds upon the height,
The linnet in the greenwood tree.

And dangerous is Ambition's dream,
Whose fancied splendours charm the breast,
Far dearer than a throne will seem
The roof by fond contentment blest.





























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THE MERCHANT'S DREAM.


THE light winds blow, the vessel scuds before,
Laden with treasures from a foreign shore;
The sailors idly watch the flying foam,
And smile as each day brings them nearer home.


The Merchant's brow is with forebodings grave,
For all his wealth is on the distant wave;
He longs to see again the welcome sail,
He fears the dangerous surge, the treacherous gale.


Thoughts of his absent ships disturb his sleep;
He dreams of all the terrors of the deep,
He sees his vessels sink, he hears the cry
Of brave men gasping in their agony.


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THE MISER'S DREAM.


DOWN to his hoard the Miser creeps,
To count once more his gold,
Until beside the glittering heaps,
Exhausted with fatigue, he sleeps,
For he is weak and old;

And there the broad red ducats shine,
And there the diamond gleams;
Scarce can he trust them from his sight,
His thoughts are full of fears by night,
And robbers haunt his dreams.

By many a bolt and iron band
His doors are closed by day;
But Death beside the gate shall stand,
And when he knocks with icy hand,
Will they his entrance stay ?

No kindly bosom shall bewail
The Miser in his grave;
Nor 'gem, nor gold, will then avail,
Nor wealth at Heaven's bar prevail,
A guilty soul to save.





















































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THE MURDERER'S DREAM.


WITH a secret blow he struck him down,
And he fell there stiff and stark,
With his bloody hand he wiped his brow,
And it left a crimson mark.


Now in the silence of the night,
When all is hushed around,
The murdered man beside him stands,
And shows the gaping wound.


Then the Murderer tosses to and fro,
And mutters in his sleep,
" The corpse-the corpse will never rest,
Though I dug the grave so deep."



















THE DREAM OF THE BRAVE KNIGHT.


ALL day the foe had kept the field,
All day they fought and bled,
Until the ground was strewn with slain,
And the burning sand was red;
Each bent in death alone to yield,
Till forced by night to quit the field,

Amid the silence of his tent
There sleeps a gallant Knight,
His plume had waved throughout the day,
The foremost in the fight;
But now his thoughts far distant roam,
The soldier dreams of love and home.

There mourns the wife her absent lord,
'T is long since last he came,
His youngest child amid his play
Lisps forth his Father's name;
The memory of a home so dear
May justify a soldier's tear.




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A DREAM OF HAPPINESS.


THE daughter of a mighty king,
Of ancient line is she;
And he is but a simple knight,
A knight of low degree.

Though monarchs oft have sought her hand,
She hath ever said them nay;
" I cannot wed," sighs the young Princess,
When my heart is far away."

She dreanis within her secret bower,
At the witching eventide,
That she has with her lover flown,
And is sitting by his side.

She has cast away her diadem,
And flowers crown her brow,
Her throne it is the mossy bank,
A crook her sceptre now.

She has turned from gilded palaces,
To the green sheltered dale,
For Peace, that shuns the glare of courts,
Finds shelter in the vale.





















A DREAM OF PLENTY.


THE farmer's wife is dreaming
Of the happy harvest home,
With the golden spoils of autumn
She sees the reapers come.

They are singing, they are dancing,
Garlands gay the maidens twine,
And she hears their loud rejoicings
That the harvest is so fine.

Thus slumber reproduces
Full many a waking dream,
And makes the misty future
Like the joyful present seem.

The miser dreams of treasure
That in golden shower drops,
While the duchess dreams of diamonds,
And the frnier-'s wife of crops!!!




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A DREAM OF PEACE.


NIGHT comes again, and like a pall descending
Darkness o'er the beleaguered city falls;
From many a shrine the prayer of faith ascending
In mute appeal for speedy succour calls.

The weary soldier sleeps, and, in his dreaming,
Peace like a visitor celestial strays,
With quiet eyes above his slumbers beaming,
The silent harbinger of happier days.

Now on a brilliant train in sleep he gazes,
The mitred priest is there, and warrior stern;
While many a voice the loud Te Deum raises
Of Peace, to celebrate the glad return.

Rest, soldier, rest; even while thou art sleeping
A gallant band through wood and morass ride;
Aid to the brave and solace to the weeping,
E'en now are hast'ning o'er yon mountain's side.

Brightly the soldier's name shall shine in story,
Who fights for the defenceless and oppressed;
Their blessings, like an aureol of glory,
Shall gild his fame, and on his ashes rest.





















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THE MERRIE DAYS OF ENGLAND.
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Price One Guinea.

THE MILLER'S DAUGHTER.
BY ALFRED TENNYSON.
Illustrated with SEVENTEEN STEEL ENGRAVINGS, drawn by A. L. BOND, and
engraved by MOTE. With a PORTRAIT of the AUTHOR; small 4to. Handsome
cloth binding, I6s. ; morocco, 24s.

HEROINES OF SHAKESPEARE.
Comprising all the principal Female Characters in the Plays of the Great Poet;
engraved on Steel under the direction of MR. CH \RLES HEATH. Imperial 8vo.
splendidly bound in morocco, 42s. ; or with coloured plates, 3/. 13s. 6d.

CHRISTMAS WITH THE POETS.
A Collection of English Poetry relating to the Festival of Christmas, with Intro-
ductory Observations explanatory of obsol te Rites and Customs, and upwards of
FIFTY ENGRAVINGS, from Drawings by BIRKET FOSTER, and numerous Initial
Letters and Borders printed in gold. Super-royal 8vo. richly bound, s2s.
morocco, 35. .

LONGFELLOW'S POETICAL WORKS.
Illustrated with ONE HUNDRED and SEVENTY ENGRAVINGS ON WOOD, from designs
by BIRKET FOSTER, JANE E. BENHAM, and JOHN GILBERT. New and enlarged
edition, including "EVANGELINE," "VOICES OF THE NIGHT," "SEASIDE AND
FIRESIDE," "THE GOLDEN LEGEND," and other Poems. Crown 8vo. 2is. cloth
gilt; 3os. morocco gilt or antique.

MILTON'S L'ALLEGRO AND IL PENSEROSO.
With upwards of THIRTY ILLUSTRATIONS, drawn and etched by BIRKET FOSTER.
The text printed in red. Super-royal 8vo. neatly bound, 2is. ; morocco, 31s. 6d.
Altogether one of the handsomest and most beautiful books which has come under our notice;
it deserves a place on every drawing-room table."--Morning Post.


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