• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Introduction
 Title Page
 The kitten cousins
 Mister Fox
 Chit chat
 Story of a robber kitten
 Back Cover














Title: Funny animals
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00005011/00001
 Material Information
Title: Funny animals a picture book for the nursery: comprising, 1. The kitten cousins, 2. Mister fox, 3. Chit chat by a motherly cat, 4 Story of a robber kitten
Alternate Title: Funny animals a coloured picture book for the nursery
Kitten cousins
Mister fox
Chit chat by a motherly cat
Story of a robber kitten
Physical Description: <38> leaves : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: Edinburgh
T. Nelson and Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
Publication Date: 1867
Copyright Date: 1867
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Pictorial works   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1867   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1867   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1867
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with thirty-two pages of illustrations printed in oil colours.
General Note: Each story has an independent half t.p., and all in verse.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00005011
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6276
notis - ALG3711
oclc - 49423755
alephbibnum - 002223462

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Introduction
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
    The kitten cousins
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Mister Fox
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Chit chat
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Story of a robber kitten
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Back Cover
        Page 30
Full Text





























FUNNYANIMALS
COLOUR PICTURE

rFORTHE NURSERY
E R U ,





The Baldwin Library
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Florida


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-- -- Si~-s, ----


0 ME, children, draw your chairs near,
M. And see what wonders I have here!
Come, listen to my witty rhymes,
Which ring like merry Christmas chimes:
What fun you may both hear and see!
How Puss was teazed by Kittens wild
With merry tricks and wanton glee,
Yet only purred, and purred, and smiled,
Until they stole the cream; and then,
Ah, I can tell you, she was vext:
But, think you now, what follows next?
Why, shrewd old Reynard in his den,
With his dear little foxes, eight, nine, ten,
Whom he feeds upon a plump young duck-
What shame that thieves should have such luck!
Still, sometimes, even his tricks will fail,
And if he escapes, 'tis minus a tail!
Oh yes! oh yes! Come, listen to me,
And I'll tell you stories one, two, three;
And all the chit-chat of a motherly Cat,
Who was vext, and, indeed, scarce knew what she was at;
So full was her young ones of mischief and play,
They teazed her by night, and perplexed her by day!
And the tale you shall hear of a thief of a Kit
Who lived on the spoils of his cunning and wit!
Come, children, draw your chairs annar,
And see what wonders I have here l


(FUNNY ANIMALS.)









FUNNY


ANIMAL


A PICTURE I9} POR TI3 NJRSFERv

COMPRISING

I. THE KITTEN COUSINS.
2. MISTER FOX.
3. CHIT CHAT BY A MOTHERLY CAT.
4. STORY OF A ROBBER KITTEN.


WITH


THIRTY-TWO PAGES OF

lrinttr in Oil


ILLUSTRATIONS,

(00lours.


LONDON:
T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
EDINBURGH; AND NEW YORK.


1867.


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I T T E N C 0 U S I N S

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THE DANCE.
dear, what a merry young kitten I am!
Just see how I dance with my black Cousin Sam.
__ All girls and all boys who would kittens' joy see,
Should first look at Sammy and then look at me.


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TIHE VISIT.
( aunt, Sammy's mother-a kind-hearted cat-
Came once to see us and to have a long chat.
She read through a CAT-alogue all by herself,
And mother then left the thick CAT on the shelf



































THE COMPLAINT.
]ISTER TAB," said mamma, "that Sam I should slap;
Do you know that he tore the strings of my cap ?"-
Never mind," said my aunt, it was but in play,
And 'kits will be kittens,' as old people say."











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THE ROBBERY.

) the pantry I went with sly Cousin Sam;
He went to the jelly-I went to the jam.
He caught on a cloth-and, oh dear! what a fall!
Down tumbled black Sammy, jam, jelly, and all!


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THE D ISGU ISE.
IAT to do Cousin Sam was not long in doubt;
He put on aunt's bonnet, and meant to go out.
But his mother peeped in, and thought he looked pale,
And something was wrong with the tip of his tail.










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THE DECEIT.

3E kissed him, and cuddled him, called him her dear,
Till Sammy himself tried to bring out a tear.
His mother, I think, would have been much more sad
Had she known what a thieving kitten she had.
















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THE DISCOVERY.
WAS not much hurt, so I thought I would try
To have a nice lick at the cream on the sly.
I was just about taking some cream from the pan,
When my mother I saw-and quickly I ran.


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THE PUNISHMENT.
UT mother can run quite as fast as poor I;-
Oh, didn't she whip me! and didn't I cry!
Kittens, pray take- advice: though odd it may seem,
Take jam, if you like it, but never steal cream.










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THE 3AR T.
FOX went out in a hungry plight,
And he begg'd of the moon to give him light,
For he'd many miles to trot that night
Before he could reach his den, 0!












































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THE FARM-YARR..



qD first he came to a farmer's yard,



Where the ducks and geese declared it hard



That their nerves should be shaken and their rest



By the visit of Mister Fox, 0! [be marr'd,


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THE FIRST PRIZE.
took the gray goose by the sleeve;
Says he, "Madam goose, and by your leave,
I'll take you away without reprieve,
And carry you home to my den, 0!"


































THIE SECOND PRIZE.
E seized the black duck by the neck,
And swung her all across his back;
The black duck cried out "Quack! quack! quack!"
With her legs hanging dangling down, 0!






































THE ALAR M.

HEN old Mrs. Slipper-slopper jump'd out of bed,

And out of the window she popp'd her head,-

"John, John, John, the gray goose is gone,

And the fox is off to his den, 0! "


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THE CHASE.

IEN John he went up to the hill,

And he blew a blast both loud and shrill;

Says the fox, This is very pretty music-still

I'd rather be at my den, 0!"


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THE FAMILY.

-BIT last the fox got home to his den,
To his dear little foxes, eight, nine, ten;
Says he, "You're in luck, here's a good fat duck,
With her legs hanging dangling down, 0!"


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THE FEAST.

then sat down with his hungry wife,

They did very well without fork or knife,

They never ate a better goose in all their life;

And the little ones picked the bones, 0!
























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OUR LOVE.

'M a motherly Cat, with two Kits, you see,
SAnd one on the table sits, you see.
AMy Blacky is good, because, you see,
He has gone to sleep in my paws, you see.


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OUR M IRTH.


AND my Kittens can dance, you see;


SWe skip, and jump, and prance, you see.


Blacky will fly at the nail, you see,


And Tab makes a boa of my tail, you see.


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Y troubles are sometimes great, you see;
,My Blacky has broken a plate, you see.
The cook will come with a cane, you see;
And beating causes us pain, you see.


























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OUR WOE.

T was only last Friday week, you see,

We all looked clean and sleek, you see.

Blacky was soft as silk, you see,

Till he tumbled into the milk, you see.


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U" TR REST.

ND if we all go to sleep, you see,
The mice are so very deep, you see;
SThey gambol and dance about, you see,
As though we had all gone out, you see.














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OUR FEAR.




HEN if we all keep awake, you see;



There are things to make us quake, you see.



Just look at the picture now, you see-



We're alarmed to hear Bow-wow," you see.






































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SUR FRIGHT.



J OG FIDO will bark so loud, you see;


Because he is petted, he's proud, you see.


S He barks at me and my Kits, you see;


And frightens us out of our wits, you see.


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OUR WAY.
UT I and my Kits can fight, you see;
SWe can fuff, and scratch, and bite, you see.
But when you stroke our fur, you see,
To "you" we gently purr, you see.














































































































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SO ARE YOU ANOTHER I
KITTEN only six months old
Was very bad and very bold;
He scorned his mother's good advice,
He left off looking out for mice,
And daily practised at the glass,
That he might for a robber pass;
With pistols and with broadsword stout,
And bandit hat, he then set out.




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