• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Fox and the Geese
 Tom the Piper's Son
 Marriage of Cock Robin and Jenny...






Group Title: Fox and the geese
Title: The fox and geese
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004996/00001
 Material Information
Title: The fox and geese Marriage of Cock Robin
Series Title: Pleasure books
Uniform Title: Fox and the geese
Alternate Title: Marriage of Cock Robin
Courtship and marriage of Cock Robin and Jenny Wren
Story of Tom the piper's son
Bear and the children
Physical Description: 1 v. : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Cogger, Edward P ( Illustrator )
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin Brothers
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1867
Copyright Date: 1867
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1867   ( rbgenr )
Fables -- 1867   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1867   ( lcsh )
Printed boards (Binding) -- 1867   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1867   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1867   ( local )
Bldn -- 1867
Genre: Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Fables   ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Printed boards (Binding)   ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Title and imprint information from cover.
General Note: Illustrations by Harrison Weir and are hand-colored.
General Note: Date from inscription.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on back cover.
General Note: Cover illustration by Cogger.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004996
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6156
notis - ALH0269
oclc - 49422984
alephbibnum - 002229929

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover 1
        Front cover 2
        Front cover 3
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Fox and the Geese
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Tom the Piper's Son
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Marriage of Cock Robin and Jenny Wren
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
Full Text








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THE

FOX AND THE GEESE,

AN ANCIENT NURSERY TALE.



THE STORY OF TOM THE PIPER'S SON.




























































































































































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THE FO AND THE GEESE.




THERE was once a Goose at the point of death,
So she called her three daughters near,
And desired them all, with her latest breath,
Her last dying words to hear:


"There's a Mr. Fox," said she, that I know,
Who lives in a covert hard by,
To our race he has proved a deadly foe,
So beware of his treachery.


"Build houses, ere long, of stone or of bricks,
And get tiles for your roofs, I pray;
For I know, of old, Mr. Reynard's tricks,
And I fear he may come any day."






TIE FOX AND THE GEESE.


Thus saying, she died, and her daughters fair,-
Gobble, Goosey, and Ganderee,-
Agreed together, that they would beware
Of Mr. Fox, their enemy.


But Gobble, the youngest, I grieve to say,
Soon came to a very bad end,
Because she preferred her own silly way,
And would not to her mother attend.


For she made, with some boards, an open nest,
SFor a roof took the lid of a box;
Then quietly laid herself down to rest,
And thought she was safe from the Fox.


But Reynard, in taking an evening run,
Soon scented the goose. near the pond;
Thought he, Now I'll have some supper and fun,
For of both I am really fond."







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THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


Then oa to the box he sprang in a trice,
And roused Mrs. Gobble from bed;
She only had time to hiss once or twice
Ere he snapped off her lily-white head.


Her sisters at home felt anxious and low,
When poor Gobble did not appear,
And Goosey, determined her fate to know,
Went and sought all the field far and near.


At last -he dlescried poor Gobble's head,
And some feathers, not far apart,
So she told Ganderee she had found her dead,
And they both felt quite sad at heart.


Now Goosey was pretty, but liked her own way,
Like Gobble, and some other birds;
"'Tis no matter," said she, if I only obey
A part of my mother's last words."








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THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


So her house she soon built of nice red brick,
But she only thatched it with straw;
And she thought that, however the fox might kick,
He could not get in e'en a paw.


So she went to sleep, and at dead of night
She heard at the door a low scratch;
And presently Reynard, with all his might,
Attempted to jump on the thatch.


But he tumbled back, and against the wall
Grazed his nose in a fearful way,
Then, almost mad with the pain of his fall,
He barked, and ran slowly away.


So Goosey laughed, and felt quite o'erjoyed
To have thus escaped from all harm;
But had she known how the Fox was employed,
She would have felt dreadful alarm;





THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


For Gobble haLd been his last dainty meat,-
So hungry he really did feel,-
And resolved in his mind to accomplish this feat,
And have the young goose for a meal.


So he slyly lighted a bundle of straws,
And made no more noise than a mouse,
Then lifted himself up on his hind paws,
And quickly set fire to the house.


'Twas soon in a blaze, and Goosey awoke
With fright, almost ready to die,
And, nearly smothered with heat and with smoke,
Up the chimney was forced to fly


The Fox was rejoiced to witness her flight,
And, heedless of all her sad groans
He cased her until he saw her alight
Then eat her up, all but her bones.






THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


Poor Ganderee's heart was ready to break
When the sad news reached her ear:
"'Twas that villain, the Fox," said good Mr. Drake,
Who lived in a pond very near.


"Now listen to me, I pray you," he said,
SAnd roof your new house with some tiles,
Or you, like your sisters, will soon be dead,- -
A prey to your enemy's wiles."


So she took the advice of her mother and friend,
And made her house very secure:
Then she said,-" Now, whatever may be my end,
The Fox cannot catch me, I'm sure."


He called at her.door the very next day,
And loudly and long did he knock,
But she said to him,-" Leave my house, [ pray,
For the door I will not unlock;









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THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


"For you've killed my sisters I know full well,
And you wish that I too were dead;"
"Oh; dear," said the Fox, I can't really tell
Who put such a thought in your head:


"For I've always liked geese more than other birds,
And you of your race I've loved best;"
But the Goose ne'er heeded his flattering words,
So hungry he went to his rest.


Next week she beheld him again appear,
"Let me in very quick," he cried,
' For the news I've to tell you'll be charmed to hear,
And 'tis rude to keep me outside."


But the Goose only opened one window-pane,
And popped out her pretty red bill,
Said she, Your fair words aie all in vain,
But talk to me here if you will."





THE FOX AND THE GEE E.


"To-morrow," he cried, there will be a fair,
All the birds and the beasts will go;
, So allow me, I pray, to escort you there,
For you will be quite charmed, I know."


"Many thanks for your news," said Ganderee,
But I had rather not go with you;
I care not for any gay sight to see,"-
So the window she closed, and withdrew


In the morning, however, her mind she changed,
And she thought she would go to the fair;
So her numerous feathers she nicely arranged,
And cleaned her red bill with much care.


She went, I believe, before it was light,
For of Reynard she felt much fear;
So quickly she thought she would see each sight,
And return ere he should appear.





THE. FOX AND THE GEESE.


When the Goose arrived she began to laugh
At the wondrous creatures she saw;
There were dancing bears, and a tall giraffe,
And a beautiful red macaw.


A monkey was weighing out apples and roots;
An ostrich, too, sold by retail;
There were bees and butterflies tasting the fruits,
And a pig drinking out of a pail.


Ganderee went into an elephant's shop,
And quickly she bought a new churn;
For, as it grew late, she feared to stop,
As in safety she wished to return.


Ere, however, she got about half the way,
She saw approaching, her foe;
And now she hissed with fear and dismay,
For she knew not which way to go.











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'THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


But at last of a capital plan she bethought,
Of a place where she safely might hide;
She got into the churn that she just had bought,
And then fastened the lid inside.


The churn was placed on the brow of a hill,
And with Ganderee's weight down it rolled,
Passing the Fox, who stood perfectly still,
Quite alarmed, though he was very bold.


For the Goose's wings flapped strangely about,
And the noise was fearful to hear;
And so bruised she felt she was glad to get out,
When she thought that the coast was clear.


So safely she reached her own home at noon,
And the Fox ne'er saw her that day;
But after the fai. he came very soon,
And cried out in a terrible way,-







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THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


" Quick, quick, let me in! oh, for once be kind,
For the huntsman's horn I hear;
Oh, hide me in any snug place you can find,
For the hunters and hounds draw near."


So the Goose looked out in order to see
Whether Reynard was only in jest;
Then, knowing that he in her power would be,
She opened the door to her guest.


"I'll hide you," she said, L in my nice new churn:"
That will do very well," said he;
"And thank you for doig me this good turn,
Most friendly and kind Ganderee."


Then into the churn the Fox quickly got;
But, ere the Goose put on the top,
A kettle she brought of water quite hot,
And poured in every drop.















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THE FOX AND THE GEESE.


Then the Fox cried out, "Oh! I burn, I burn,
And I feel in a pitiful plight;"
But the Goose held fast the lid of the churn,
So Reynard he died that night.





MORAL.


Mankind have an enemy whom they well know,
Who tempts them in every way;
But they, too, at length shall overcome this foe.
If wisdom's right law they obey.











fHE STORY


OF


TOM THE PIPER'S SON,


WHO PLAYED HIS PIPE AND MADE

GREAT FUN.


TOM, he was a piper's son,
He learned to play when he was young;
But the only tune that he could play
Was Over the hills and far away."




TOM THE PIPER'S SON.


Tom with his pipe made such a noise,
He pleased both the girls and boys;
They'd dance and skip while he did play
' Over the hills and far away."


Then Tom he learned to play with such skill,
That those who heard him could never keep still;
As soon as he played they began for to dance,-
E'en pigs on their hind legs would after him prance.


And as Dolly was milking her cow one day,
Tom took out his pipe and began for to play;
Poor Doll and the cow they danced a lilt,
Till her pail it fell down, and the milk it was spilt.


He met with Dame Trot with a basket of eggs,
He used his pipe and she used her legs;
She danced about till her eggs were all broke,
And Tom he thought 'twas a very fine joke.




TOM THE PIPER'S SON.
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Tom saw a cross fellow beating his ass, -
Heavy laden with pots, pans, dishes, and glass;
He played them a jig, and they danced to the tune,
And the jackass's load was lightened soon.


Once a dog got a piggy fast hold by the ear,
The piggy squall'd murder, and To:,, being near,
He played them a tune, and they didn't dance bad,
Considering the little tuition they'd had.


Tom met with a Farmer in a sad, dirty place,
Where he made him to dance (he had so little grace)
He danced in the dirt till he danced in a ditch,
Where he left him in mud as thick as black pitch.


Some little time after Tom slept on some hay;
The very same Farmer was passing that way-
He took poor Tom's pipe, and bade him prepare
To answer his crimes before the Lord Mayor.





TOM THE PIPER'S SON.


To the Lord Mayor he took him, and told all Tom's
art,
How he made people dance with a sorrowful heart;
Begg'd he'd send him abroad, and there teach to
dance
All the men and the women and children of France.


Says Tom, I am willing to go into France;
Only give ine my pipe, and I'll give them a dance:"
They gave him his pipe,-he began for to play,
And the Farmer and Mayor they went dancing away.
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THE

COURTSHIP AND WEDDING

OF

COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


I'HE BEAR AND THE CHILDREN.



































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THE MARRIAGE OF


COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN




IT was on a merry time,

When Jenny Wren was young,

So neatly as she danced,

And so sweetly as she sung,-



Robin Redbreast lost his heart-

He was a gallant bird;

He doff'd his hat to Jenny,

And thus to her he said:-

































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COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


"My dearest Jenny Wren,

If you will but be mine,

You shall dine on cherry-pie,

And drink nice currant-wine



SI'll dress you like a Goldfinch,

Or like a Peacock gay;

So if you'll have me, Jenny,

Let us appoint the day."



Jenny blush'd behind her fan,

And thus declared her mind,-

"Then let it be to-morrow, Bob;

I take your offer kind..






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


"Cherry-pie is very good!

So is currant-wine!

But I will wear my brown gown,

And never dress too fine."



Robin rose up early,

At the break of day;

He flew to Jenny Wren's house,

To sing a roundelay.



He met the Cock and Hen,

And bade the Cock declare,

This was his wedding-day

With Jenny Wren the fair.





COCK ROBLN AND JENNY WREN.


The Cock then blew his horn,

To let the neighbors know

This was Robin's wedding-day,

And they might see the show.



And first came Parson Rook,

With his spectacles and band;

And one of Mother Hubbard's books

He held within his hand.



Then followed him the Lark.

For he could sweetly sing;

And he was to be clerk

At Cock Robin's wedding.





COCK ROBIN AND ,TENNY WREN.


He sung of Robin's love

For little Jenny Wren;

And when he came unto the end,

Then he began again.



The Bullfinch walked by Robin,

And thus to him did say,-

"Pray, mark, friend Robin Redbreast,

That Goldfinch, dressed so gay;--



"What though her gay apparel

Becomes her very well;

Yet Jenny's modest dress and look

Must bear away the bell."































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COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


Then came 4the Bride and Bridegroom;

Quite plainly was she dressed,

And blush'd so much, her cheeks were

As red as Robin's breast.



But Robin cheer'd her up;

"My pretty Jen," said he,

"We're going to be married,

And happy we shall be."



The Goldfinch came on next,

To give away the Bride;

The Linnet, being bride's-maid,

Walk'd by Jenny's side.





COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


And as she was a-walking,

Said, "Upon my word,

I think that your Cock Robin

Is a very pretty bird!"



"And will you have her, Robin,

To be your wedded wife ?"

"Yes, I will," says Robin,

"And love her all my life."



'And you will have him, Jenny,

Your husband now to be?'

"Yes, I will," says Jenny,

"And love him heartily."





















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COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


The 'lackbird and the Thrush,

Ana charming Nightingale,

Whose sweet jug sweetly echoes

Through every grove and dale;--



The Sparrow, and Tom Tit,

And many more, were there:

All canie to see the wedding'

Of Jenny Wren the fair.



" Oh, then," says Parson Rook,
"Who gives this maid away ?"

"I do," says the Goldfinch,

"And he: fortune I will pay;-





























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COCK RUBIN AND JENNY WREN.


"Here's a bag of grain of many sorts,

And other things beside;
Now happy be the ,Bridegroom,
And py be the Bride!"



Then on her finger fair
Cock Robin put the ring;
"You're married now," says Parson Rook;
While the Lark aloud did sing,-



"Happy be the Bridegroom,

And happy be the Bride!

And may not man, nor bird, nor beast,
This happy pair divide."






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


The birds were ask'd to dine;

Not Jenny's friends alone,

But every pretty songster

That had Cock Robin known.



They had a cherry-pie,

Besides some currant-wine,

And every guest brought something,

That sumptuous they might dine.



Now they all sat or stood,

To eat and to drink;

And every one said what

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COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.


They each took a bumper,

.And drank to the pair,-

Cock Robin the Bridegroom,

r And Jenny the fair.



The dinner-things removed,

They all began to sing;

And. soon they made the place

Near a mile round to ring.



The concert it was fine;

And every bird tried

Who best should sing for Robin,

And Jenny Wren. the Bride.






COCK ROBIN AND JENNY WREN.



When, in came the Cuckoo,

And made a great rout;

He caught hold of Jenny,

And pulled her about.



Cock Robin was angry,

And so was the Sparrow,

Who fetch'd in a hurry

His bow and his arrow.



His aim then he took,

But he took it not right,

His skill was not good,

Or he shot in a fright;--




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