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Title: Butterfly chase
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004971/00001
 Material Information
Title: Butterfly chase
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Stahl, P.-J.
Publication Date: 1869
Copyright Date: 1869
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004971
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6141
ltuf - ALJ5192

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
        Front Matter 3
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Back Cover
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Spine
        Page 52
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BUTTERFLY CHASE.



TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCI OF


P. J. STAHL.




WITH "I'TWVNTY-FOUR ILLUSTRATIONS B


LORENZ FROLICH.


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SEEILEY, JACKSON & HALLIDAY, 54 FLEET STREET.

LON)DON. MCCCLXIX.


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A BUTTERFLY CIAISE.


I.


YES, little Minnie and her cousin Bertie have quite made
up their minds to have a splendid collection of butterflies.
They have been reading all about it in a book which their


_1__11______ I_ _I









., BUTTERFLY CHdSE.


uncle, who is a professor at the Museum, has sent them.
In this beautiful book they have learnt all about it-how
to chase the butterflies, and how to catch them, and how
to arrange them in glass cases when they are caught. Every-
thing they want is ready for them. Their uncle has sent
with the book two butterfly-nets; a pretty case filled with
crooked scissors, tweezers, pincers, and all sorts of sharp
steel instruments; a pretty box, at the bottom of which are
little round pieces of cork, glued in rows, with long large-
headed pins to run through the butterflies; and another little
box, with a lot of small squares of glass, which are to be
put over their wings to keep them open, and prevent them
froni fluttering and beating about.
In the beautiful book there are pretty coloured pictures
of the fine butterflies that they may meet with in their chases,
with the names of each kind printed underneath, so that
they will know them all when they catch them.
How very interesting butterflies are!


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- - --













A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


II.


Minnie's mamma, who is almost like a mamma to Bertie


too, though she is only his aunt, would be very glad to


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i BUTTER FL2 CHASE.


see her little ones fond of natural history, but still she does
not seem quite pleased witl theiCr uncle's idea in sending
them, not only the pretty book, but the nets and the sharp,
dreadful-looking steel things which they are to use in making
their collection. She shook her head rather sadly when she
saw the pretty nets which were to stop the butterflies from
flying about so happily, and the pins and tweezers which
were to turn them into lifeless specimens in a glass box.
But she did not wish to vex their kind uncle, who was
a very learned man, and was always thinking of collections
and museums, and 'science and experiments; a:nd she did not
like to tell him that she would rather her little ones should
learn about butteirflies fIrom the book with its beautiful pic-
tures, and from watching them flying about, and settling
on the flowers in the fields; and that she did not think it
could be a nice play for children to catch and kill the pretty
harmhl'l' cql.re.-' s.


~111~~ __ _I_~













A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


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III.


It is a beautiful day. Minnie and Bertie are all ready

to start, with their light gauze nets in their hands. Bertie's


s









A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


is green, and Minnie's is blue.' Bertie has slung the butterfly-
box, with the corks and great pins, over his shoulder. He
looks quite like a sportsman.
They are going to the daisy field for their first chase;
it is a beautiful meadow, full of flowers, which the butterflies
are very fond of.
They say good-bye to mamma. She goes with them to
the bottom of the steps. The daisy field is not far off.
From the drawing-room window dear mnamma will be able
to see the ch;sc. They have promised not to make them-
selves too hot.


- --- -- -- -` -- ---











A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


Now they are off, armed with their nets. They are sure

to have a splendid chase. Bertie intends to catch a dozen


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peacock butterflies, and Minnie a doeni emperors. That
will make twenty-four butlrflies. Peacocks and eipcrors are
the finest of all-the only buLtlrflies the" mncani to catch.
As soon as they reach the field the two hunters hold a con-
sultation and arrange the plan of proceeding. Bertic will
take the right side of the field, and M;inni,: tIh leit. They
must not come in each other's way, only if one should want
help, then the other is to fly to the rescue.


__ __ I __I~I


__ ___ ___








A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


They' walk gently along, each on the proper side, just
as they agreed; for, in the first place, the grass is very high,


V.


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A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


and that makes it difficult to run fast; and then, of course,
they must not frighten the butterflies. They must go very
cautiously, so as to take them by surprise.
There is a donkey in the field. He looks very much
astonished at something. I think he is asking himself if the
butterfly hunters are not come to hunt him. What an absurd
donkey to think of any one hunting donkeys with a butterfly-
net










A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


VI.


Everything is blooming in the meadow, the air is full of

soft murmurs, and the insects make a musical hum.


- -- --"1--~-----~-`'


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A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


At the hunters' approach the grasshoppers hop, the bees
fly off, and thousands of pale-blue or white butterflies seem
to come out of the flowers. But they are too small, and there
are so many of them that they do not know which to catch.
Peacocks are what they want, or emperors.
Minnie finds that there are holes in the ground, hidden
under the grass, which make her trip, and there are disagree-
able plants growing among the daisies, which sting her legs,
and even some that tear little slits in her frock --but when
one goes a-hunting one must not be particular; another time
she will ask for a pair of gaiters, like Bertie's, andi a very
thick frock. Mr DonkeI is very inquisitive.


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A BUTTERFLY CHASE.









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VII.

Hush!-Bertie stops all on a sudden, and makes signs to

Minnie not to stir. He must have spied a peacock. How

cleverly and quietly he steals up-nearer, nearer, without the









A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


slightest noise; he scarcely seems to breathe. Minnie would
like to run across to see the beautiful peacock. Bertie holds
up his net, all ready to catch the butterfly; the wind puffs
the green gauze a little, and Minnie's heart beats with im-
patience.
The Donkey cannot conceive what the children are doing.
They seem to pay no attention to him.


---










A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


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All on a sudden Bertie b rings down the 'net, and then
throws himself on his hands and knees, to make sure of his
success. :--He must have caught the butterfly. ..
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VII
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A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


No! there is no butterfly-nothing at all in the net but
a bit of clover. Bertie seems rather unhappy about it; but
I know who is happy enough-the beautiful butterfly that
has had such a fortunate escape. How he soars away! How-
ever, Bertie calls out to his cousin that it was not a real
peacock after all, which is some comfort.
The Donkey, seeing Bertie on all-fours, wonders whether
he is mocking him, and making fun of him.











A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


IX.


Butterflies are very silly. I think the peacock cannot

have noticed Minnie, for he flies very imprudently close to

her. Minnie will manage much better than Bertie; yes,


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A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


indeed, she is not going to let such a beautiful butterfly get
away, for he is very beautiful though he may not be a
peacock.
Pat! she has got him, and very tight too, so that he
cannot possibly get away under the rim.














A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


X.


'Have you got him?' cries Bertie.

'Yes, yes,' answers Minnie. 'Oh, come quick !'

Bertie runs up; but, oh, dear, the ill-natured butterfly


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A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


has made his escape through a hole in the net, which had
been torn by a hedge.
He laughs at Miss Minnie, the good-for-nothing butterfly!
He flies up so high, so high, that the little hunters, gazing
up at him, almost tumble over on their backs.
But the Donkey is not going to waste his time in staring
up into the sky, and very wisely goes back to his browsing.


I I --- - -- ~









A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


,- W ;.-


XI.


'Let us lie down on the grass,' says Bertie, C and be
on the watch to take the peacock by surprise. When he
cannot see any more of us, he will come down. Butterflies


---------------- ~ "` -- - --- "







A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


are too greedy to stay up in the air very long; they want
to come down to suck the honey out of the flowers.'
The two hunters hide themselves carefully, and wait for
their revenge, with their nets all ready in their hands. It
is a long time to wait; but if one goes a-hunting, one must
have patience.
The Donkey is out of all patience, and says to himself,
( What are they going to do ?' Really he is a most inquisitive
donkey. He wants to know everything.









A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


,-


XII.


The butterfly, seeing nothing more of them, comes down
by degrees. First he flies to the right, then he flies to the
left, then he flies round and round.


I--







A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


SHe can't make up his mind about anything,' says Bertie.
'And he doesn't know a bit where he is going,' says
Minnie. 'He looks every minute as if he were going to
stop. He seems as if he wanted a daisy, and then he goes
right off to another flower.'
Oh !!! this is cool. The impudent butterfly has popped
right down on Minnie's nose.' At first Bertie could scarcely
believe his eyes.








A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


XIII.

Bertie never laughed so much in his life. Minnie, who
certainly was not expecting anything of the kind, is so taken


-------"








4A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


by surprise that she jumps up on her feet; and the butterfly,
quite as much astonished at what he has done, flies off again
as quickly as before. Minnie cannot leave off rubbing her
nose; the butterfly's little feet did tickle her so.
'He is a very rude butterfly,' said Minnie.
Oh! he must have mistaken your little nose for a flower,'
said Bertie. He did not mean to offend you. He meant
to be very polite.'













A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


XIV.


But there is no time for laughing; the butterfly has


settled on a great tuft of meadow-sweet all in flower. The


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A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


two hunters, seeing this, forget all their plans, and run both
together after him with all their might. But the butterfly
is not so silly as to wait for them; every time he sees his
two enemies come near, off he starts again. A dozen times
Minnie thought she had him, and a dozen times Bertie said
he had got him; but a dozen times he got away.
'What troublesome things to catch butterflies are!' said
the two hunters. c What is to be done ? We have tried
every possible way.'


- --












2 BUTTERFLY CASE.








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xx>

Minnie has been running so much that she is quite out
of breath, and her hair has fallen all over her shoulders.
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A BUTTERFLTJ CHASE.


Bertie, too, is in a most uncomfortable state, and as red as
a turkey-cock. Oh! how hot it is. But they cannot lose
their time in standing still. They just stop for a few seconds
to take breath, and then set off again. But the butterfly
has got a good start, arid is a long way off already.
All this time the Donkey is lying quite coolly on the
grass; but he just takes a look now and then at the hunters.












A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


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The Donkey, seeing them come quite close to him, is


taken by surprise. He is quite sure now that they are


_ I~I______II _sl_ _____






A BUTTERFLY' CHASE.


running after him. He must be a most conceited ass to
suppose that two such hunters as Minnie and Bertie have
nothing better to do than to hunt donkeys. He thinks
so much of himself, this Donkey, that he is perfectly silly.
So Bertie thinks. As for Minnie, she does not trouble
herself about him at all. She can think of nothing but her
butterfly.






A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


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XVII,

Heigh-ho! what has happened? Bertie and Minnie, who
seemed only just now to be flying over the ground, have
disappeared, as if by magic.







A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


This is how it was. Bertie and Minnie, rushing along
so eagerly, did not notice that they had got to the bottom
of the field; and at the bottom of the field was a ditch;
and into the ditch they went head over heels, rolling one
over the other.
And at the bottom of the ditch there was some water
left by the rain-nasty yellow water.

















A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


XVIII.


Poor Minnie is quite frightened. Bertie has tumbled



right upon her; and Bertie is so heavy. Besides, she has



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A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


got very wet, and her pretty white frock is all dirtied with
the mud. It is not nice at all. Bertie helps her up, but
she is half inclined to cry.
'Oh,' says Bertie, 'when we go a-hunting we must not
mind such little things; we shall be sure to have plenty
more of the same sort.'
Minnie begins to thjnk she has had enough already.








.4 BUTTERFLY CHASE.









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XIX.
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A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


that one would have thought him asleep or dreaming on the
tuft of beautiful blue-bells, where Bertie has just found
him.
He turns his back scornfully on the hunters; just as
if he had seen or heard nothing, and as if all that has
happened did not concern him in the least.
Bertie hopes to have his revenge now. He pops his"
net down so neatly on the careless butterfly, that this time
Mr. Peacock is safely caught, for there are no holes in
Bertie's net.
'How he beats about!' says Bertie.
Oh! he will spoil all his wings!' says Minnie.








A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


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XX.

Minnie, however, remembering the directions- in her

uncle's book, has opened the box, while Bertie holds his

net tightly down on the ground. The butterfly cannot


__II ___


~








A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


escape. Minnie has given her cousin a great long pin, with
a sharp point.
The Donkey, who had run off to some distance, comes
back when he sees the hunters stop. He says to himself that
something extraordinary must have happened, and he is
not wrong this time.


___~ _








A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


XXI.

Bertie holds the big pin close to the quivering body of
the poor butterfly. He must find the exact spot in the










A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


middle of his back, so that the operation may not fail.
He has told Minnie to put her hands flat down on the net,
one on each side of the poor prisoner. The butterfly, tnus
pressed, can scarcely stir; a few convulsive struggles are
the only signs of his agony and his helplessness; his head,
with its large eyes, can still move a little. How dreadful
his eyes look; they are full of terror.
Bertie was so proud of his victory; why does he hesitate
now ?













A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


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XXII.

Why Because just when he was going to put his poor

prisoner to death, the child's heart and hand trembled--because










A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


he looked at his cousin and saw her turn pale-because
Minnie turned away her head that she might not see her
cousin do this cruel deed. She felt that death was dreadful,
whether it were a man's death or a butterfly's. This pin
was just the same to the poor insect as a sword would be to a
man. 'Oh, Bertie, Bertie!' she cried, bursting into tears;
'no, no! don't let us kill him! Only think, Bertie, it said
in uncle's book that butterflies live for several days with pins
run through them. Oh, how dreadful it must be! I could
not bear to see it, and you could not, Bertie. It is" not nice
play to kill things; I don't like chasing butterflies.'
Bertie has lifted up his net.
Oh, the happy, beautiful butterfly! He thought himself
just dead, and he has come back to life. One moment to
shake his wings, and away he soars again in his joyous flight
towards the blue sky,
Minnie throws her arms round Bertle's neck, and says,
SOh, thank you, Bertie !' They are very happy too-good
little Bertie and dear little Minnie. They know they have
done right.
They will never go chasing butterflies again, never, never.






A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


XXIII.


But from the balcony, where she was sitting, Minnie's
mamma had seen them fall into the ditch, and was hastening


,'aP3










A BUTTERFLY CHASE.


to them. The little hunters were so absorbed that they did
not see her coming. But dear mamma understands it all, and
she is very much pleased with her little children. 'When they
are older she will explain to them that though it is not wrong
for learned men to make painful experiments, in order to
gain useful knowledge, no one else should wantonly destroy
even the least of God's creatures.
As for the Donkey, I don't know what has become of
him. I think he has given up trying to understand anything
about the matter, and gone home to his stable.


Strasburgh, printed G. Silbermann.









































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