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Group Title: Our favorite fairy tales
Title: Little Red Riding Hood
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004968/00001
 Material Information
Title: Little Red Riding Hood
Series Title: Our favorite fairy tales
Physical Description: 15 p. : col. ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Sheldon & Company (New York, N.Y.) ( Publisher )
Publisher: Sheldon & Company
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1869
Copyright Date: 1869
 Subjects
Subject: Obedience -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Grandmothers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Wolves -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1869   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1869   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1869
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Date from inscription.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements: p. 4 of wrapper.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004968
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6144
notis - ALK2560
oclc - 50034670
alephbibnum - 002250807

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Back Cover
        Page 16
Full Text

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LITTLE

RED RIDING HOOD.



ONCE upon a time, in a pretty village, stood a neat
little cottage, covered with roses and honeysuckles, and
shaded by large trees.
In this cottage lived a good woman, who had a very
pretty daughter-a sweet, dear little girl, with bright
eyes and long hair, falling in golden curls all over her
neck and shoulders. Her cheeks were as rosy as two
ripe peaches, and her laugh was the inerriest you would
hear on a summer's day. She was a kind, good child,
with a gentle heart and obliging manners.
So it is no wonder she became a great favorite with
all the villagers. Every one who knew her liked her;
and when she called to see any poor or sick neighbors,
her presence was like a ray of sunshine to them, they
were so pleased to see ler.
Now, although she was so greatly liked by everybody,
far and near, none loved her so dearly as her mother
and her grandmother. So her grandmother made her a
beautiful riding-hood of scarlet cloth, such as ladies wore
in those days when they went out riding ; and when she

The Baldwin Librry
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LITTLE RED IiII)1NG HOOD.


was seel corning along the village, the neighbors would
say, "Here comes LITTLE RED ERIDING HOOD," till at last
she was known by that .amne, and no other.
The good old grandmother had been very sick for a
long time, so the mother, who had been making some
cheese-cakes and churning so:te butter that morning,
said to her daughter, You may go, my child, to your
grandmother's, and take her some of these nice cakes,
and a pot of fresh butter for her breakfast." So Little
Red Riding Hood brought a little basket for the cakes
and butter, and put on the little scarlet hood, that be-
canme her so well.
It was not very far from Red Riding Hood's home to
her grandmother's cottage, so her mother was not afraid
to send her alone. Still, on parting with her, she told
Ilcr not to stop too long on the way. She also charged
her with many kind messages for the good old lady.
Little Red Riding Hood promised not to forget, and
giving her two kisses, and saying ''Good-bye," started
off as gay and light-hearted as any of the little birds that
were singing on the boughs of tlhe trees.
Now there were some woodmen at work in the forest,
cutting down trees for firewood, and singing as they dealt
their strokes, with willing hands and heavy axes. There
was also something in the forest that threatened danger
to the little girl, and that was a great hungry woLF.
The wolf knew Little Red Riding Hood very well, and






































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LITTLE RED RIDINCt HOOD.


lhad often watched and plotted to carry her off, that he
might devour her. He would like to have made one
spring at Red Riding Hood, and have eaten her up at
once; but he was too cunning for that, for the wooden
were near, and he was afraid they would see him, which
would never do. So he resolved to make her acquaint-
nice, and pretend to be her friiend.
One of the woodmen saw both the wolf and Red Ridilg
Hood, and kept a watch on them, without seeing to do
so. Master Wolf walked dai.ntily up to Little Red Riding
Hood, wagging. his tail, and tried his best to appear as
amiable as possible, and said, Good morning, Little
Red Riding Hood."
Good morning, Master Wolf," replied she.
"And pray where are you going so early, my darling,"
continued the wolf.
t I am going to my grandmother's," answered the
child. She has been very sick, and is not yt well I
am taking her some cakes and a pot of nice fresh butter."
"Dear me I am sorry to hear she is ill. I will call
upon ler ; she will be glad to see me, I have no doubt.
Allow me to carry your basket, my dear ; I fear you are
tired.' At the same time giving a sly, hungry sniff, and
almost thrusting his nose into the basket.
Red Riding Hood thought this was rather rude of him,
but only said, Oh, no, thank yot ; I am not a bit tirdc1."
Well," said the wolf, remember me to your grand-







0 LITTLE I1ED HIDING HOOD.

mother, and say I will call and see her. Now, suppose
I take this path to the right, and you follow that one,
and we'll see which of us gets there first."
Sow this cunnig old wolf klew very well lie would
get to the old dzmne's cottage first. He had chosen the
shortest way, you may be sure ; and not only that, but
;is soon as the child wis out of sight he set off galloping,
as hard as lie could go.
Little Red Riding Hood had no cause to hurry, it being
yet e~rrly ; she loitered along the pleasant forest path, to
gather the pretty wild flowers that grew by the wayside,
to make a nosegay. Grandmama likes flowers," she
said to herself; and she will be pleased if I bring her fa
handsome noseg:ly ; and a few wood strawberries to cat
with her cakes will, perhaps, please her, too "
The pace at which the wolf ran soon brought him to
the grandmother's cottage.
Then he knocked at the door, giving two little taps, as
Bed Riding Hood might have done.
"Who's there ?" cried the old dame.
"'Tis I," said the wolf, imitating Red Riding Hood's
VOICO.
voice.,
The grandmother, as she sat up in bed kni-tting,
thought her grandchild must have a bad cold to speak in
such a gruff way. Never suspecting for a moment any one
else was there, she said, Pull the bobbin and the latch
will fly up, and come in."












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So the wolf took the bobbin in his teeth, gave it a jerk,
then, putting his shoulder to the door, pushed it open
and went in.
Good morning, madam," said the wolf, trying to be
agreeable, but looking as if he meant to eat her up.
"Good morning to you, Sir," replied the dame, as she
moved to the other side of the bed.
"Your grandchild told me this morning you had been
unwell, so I thought I would call to see how you were."
The grandame saw the wolf looked fierce and hungry,
so instantly got off the bed away from the wolf, and
moved toward the door of a closet or small room, saying,
" Pray excuse me a minute, Sir; I am not dressed to
receive company."
Don't mind me, I beg," said the wolf with a horrid
grin, looking savagely hungry, and made a spring across
the bed, and seized the wrapper she had on with his teeth.
But fright made the old dame active, and, as quick as
thought, she slipped off her loose wrapper which the wolf
had hold of, and darted into the closet anid.bolted the door
before he could recover himself; then fell down in a
fainting tit, through fright..
The wolf grinIed horribly with rage and disappoint-
ment, saying to himself, "'Well, never mind ; she is safe
enough. Little Red Riding Hood will soon be here ; Ill
have her for breakfast, and finish the old woman for
dinner."







LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.


With these savage thoughts, the wolf put on the dame's
wrapper and night-cap, and got into bed, pulling the
clothes well up, to hide Iis hairy face. Presently he
heard Little Red Riding Hood coming to the door; then
came tap tapp! tap!
Who's there?" cried the wolf, this time trying to
imitate the grandmother's voice. Red Riding Hood
thought, What a bad cold grandmother has got to make
her speak so hoarse;" but suspecting nothing wrong, re-
plied, Your grandchild, with some nice cakes, and a pot
of fresh butter." Pull the bobbin, my dear, and the
latch will fly up." Little Red Riding Hood did as she
was told, and walked itto the room, all fresh and rosy
with her walk, her basket on her arm, and the wild
(lowers on the other.
She was not a little surprised when she saw how
strange the old lady looked as she lay tucked up in bed.
Whatever can have made grandmother's eyes so
green ?" thought she, as she employed herself in arrantg-
ing on the mantel piece the flowers she had brought with
her; and as she was a tasty little thing, she soon made
the place look quite fresh and neat. When she had
finished, she turned her bright face to granny with a look
of triumph, and bade her see how pretty she had made
her room.
Now, the pretended grandmother appeared to be very
ill indeed, and said in a feeble voice, Oh, my deo:r











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grandchild, will you not come into bed with your poor
old granny ? I am too ill to get up and talk to you."
Little Red Riding Hood obeyed; and so tired was she
with her long walk, that in a moment she had fallen
asleep.
Now, the wolf was so sure of his prey, that he felt
quite pleased with himself at the success of his plans.
He could not help admiring the beautiful little girl as she
l:y there sleeping, and thought what a nice breakfast he
would have presently.
But, like many wicked people, he deceived himself, as
we shall presently see.
You remember the wood-cutters, who saw the wolf
with Rod Riding Hood when they met in the forest.
Well, they thought the wolf had some evil design that
made him so extra civil. So they hastened to the cot-
tage, to see that all was right. But what was their sur-
prise, on looking through the window, to see Red Riding
Hood in bed, and the wolf standing over her. Red
Riding Hood soon awoke, and begati to tell her gra id-
mother (as she supposed) how she had met the wolf in
the forest.
"And, ohl grandmama, he was so polite, and offered
to carry my basket for me."
id lhe, indeed, my dear !" said the wolf, and laughed.
Yes; and lie asked me where I was going. I told
him you were sick, and I was coming to see you and


11







LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.


bring you the cakes and butter. He was sorry to hear
you were sick, and s;iid he would call and see you. Do
you think I shall see him before I leave, grandma ?"
I should not wonder if you did," replied the wolf,
and gave her a loving hug.
Grandmima," cried the child, in the greatest sur-
prise, what great strong arms you have got!"
"The better to embrace you with, my dear child,"
said the wolf.
"But, grandma, what long, stiff ears you have got!"
"The better to hear what you say, my darling ;" and
his eyes glared greener than ever.
What large green eyes you have got, grandmaap"
said Red Riding Hood, so frightened she knew not what
to say.
"t The better to see you with, my child," chuckled the
wolf, showing his ugly teeth. Little Red Riding Hood
now sat up in bed in the greatest terror.
Grandinama, what a large mouth, and, oh! what big
teeth you have got !"
Ah ah! ah The better to tear you to pieces and
cat you with !" said the wolf, throwing off his disguise,
giving a hungry growl, and opening his mouth to bite
her-when, whack! came a spear on his head, then two
or three stabs, which knocked him off the bed, howling
frightfully.
The woodmen, who had seen and heard what the wolf


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14 LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.
was at, had rushed in just in time to save the life of dear
Little Red Riding Hood.
The wolf howled for mercy ; but they soon killed him.
They asked where her grandmother was; but Red Riding
Hood could not say, because she supposed the wolf was
her grandmother. She was like one in a dream.
They feared, at first, that the wolf must have carried
her off, or else eaten her up.
But one of the woodmen, hearing the dame in the
closet, burst open the door, and found her quite safe.
Little Red Riding Hood fell upon her neck, kissing her
and weeping for joy.
One of the woodmen said to Little Red Riding Hood,
in a kind, friendly manner, Don't you think it would
have been better to have come straight to your grand-
mother, without stopping to gossip with the wolf? You
would then have escaped this danger. Let this be a
warning to you through life."
Little Red Riding Hood kissed the woodman, and tears
flowed down her cheeks freely, and she promised to do
better in future.
The grandmother recovered from her fright, and pro-
duced what good things she had, of which the woodmen
ate heartily, making a breakfast and dinner in one.
Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother ate but
little ; but they did their utmost to make their deliverers







LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD. 15

welcome. The woodmen greatly complimented the
grandmother at her outwitting the cunning old wolf.
After the woodmen had feasted well, they.escorted
Little Red Riding Hood home, and took the grand.
mother along with them.
When they got home, and told the end of the wicked
wolf, all the villagers rejoiced to hear their enemy had
been destroyed.
A great deal of good advice was given to Red Riding
Hood by her friends, which is to be hoped was a benefit
to her.
In the village that evening all the neighbors assembled,
and they had a great deal of rejoicing.
But I must leave you to imagine all that, and con-
clude with the advice the woodmen gave to Little Red
Riding Hood, and which I give my readers by way of
moral-

If in ihis world secure you be
From danger, strife and care,.
Take heed with whom you keep company,
And h iv-and when-and where,











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