• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Title Page
 The history of Joseph and...
 The life of Moses
 Ruth and Naomi; or, the affectionate...
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: Dean's scripture library for the young
Title: Scriptural tales
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004966/00001
 Material Information
Title: Scriptural tales Joseph and his brethern, The life of Moses, The affectionate daughter-in-law
Series Title: Dean's scripture library for the young
Alternate Title: Joseph and his brethern
Life of Moses
Affectionate daughter-in-law
Physical Description: 23, 23, 27, <12> p. : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Corner ( Julia ), 1798-1875 ( Editor )
Dean & Son ( Publisher )
Publisher: Dean & Son
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1865
Copyright Date: 1865
 Subjects
Subject: Patriarchs (Bible) -- Biography -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Bible stories, English -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Biographies -- 1865   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1865   ( local )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) -- 1865   ( local )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1865   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1865
Genre: collective biography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Biography   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Biographies   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding)   ( local )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: edited by Miss Corner.
General Note: Date of publication from ms. inscription.
General Note: Plates are hand-colored.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text and on endpapers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004966
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6081
notis - ALG5604
oclc - 19807158
alephbibnum - 002225332

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
    Title Page
        A-1
        A-2
    The history of Joseph and his brethren
        A-3
        A-4
        A-5
        A-6
        A-7
        A-8
        A-9
        A-10
        A-11
        A-12
        A-13
        A-14
        A-15
        A-16
        A-17
        A-18
        A-19
        A-20
        A-21
        A-22
        A-23
        A-24
    The life of Moses
        B-1
        B-2
        B-3
        B-4
        B-5
        B-6
        B-7
        B-8
        B-9
        B-10
        B-11
        B-12
        B-13
        B-14
        B-15
        B-16
        B-17
        B-18
        B-19
        B-20
        B-21
        B-22
        B-23
        B-24
        B-25
    Ruth and Naomi; or, the affectionate daughter-in-law
        C-2
        C-3
        C-4
        C-5
        C-6
        C-7
        C-8
        C-9
        C-10
        C-11
        C-12
        C-13
        C-14
        C-15
        C-16
        C-17
        C-18
        C-19
        C-20
        C-21
        C-22
        C-23
        C-24
        C-25
        C-26
        C-27
        C-28
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
        Advertising 3
        Advertising 4
        Advertising 5
        Advertising 6
        Advertising 7
        Advertising 8
        Advertising 9
        Advertising 10
        Advertising 11
        Advertising 12
        Advertising 13
        Advertising 14
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text



























-rNA
9316M- a
c 0 1











PAPA & MAIMA'is EASY LESSONS in ARITHMETIC,
BT T. T. MORELL. Illustrated with thirty appropriate engravings,
Is. 6d. in cloth boards; or, Is. sewed,, stiff covers.
An excellent method of teaching Childrex `the elementary principles of this
essential branch of knowledge.-Printed in the same size and style as, and
intended as a Companion to, Miss Corner's litay Grammar," and Miss A. M.
Sargeant's Papa and Mamma's Easy Lessons Jt. Geography."'




1 Basket. 2 Bee Hives. 3 Lutes.


Elementary Atlas and Geography,

FOR SCHOOLS AND FAMILIES.
This Elementary Work is intended to supply the greatest possible facilities
for laying a foundation for Geographical knowledge; the principles are there-
fore arranged in the shortest form consistent with clearness; while the peculiar
ioustructiou of the Maps willinsure its general introduction in Schools.


These Mapa partly in outline, and very plain and distinct, are intended to
exercise the Pupils, either by colouring the countries, and so fix the boundaries
on their Memories, or by writing in the names of the chief towns, rivers, jce. in the
proper places, render familiar the local features of each Country.
Size 8vo. super royal, illustrated with seven large Maps and other expla-
natory engravings, and typographical descriptions of the several parts
of the World. Is. in stiff covers; or, with the Maps coloured, 2s.


DEAN AND SON, LUDGATE.HILL.
i


The Baldwin Library
University
Fl ida


I


, .




I










.'^

1^
.i

,...:.

S::i


.:r

... !


,4











I W tl


7







, MISS CORNER's HISTORIES.

















The First History of England
that should be placed in the Hands of a Child:
This pleasing little Introduction to English History on a larger scale is
written in easy Language, adapted to the capacities of Children 1 it is
printed in large, clear type, and embellished with twenty-four pages of
appropriate engravings. Handsomely bound, with gilt edges, sa. 6d.-
Or, without the twenty-four pages of engravings, 2s. Od. cloth.
Not to fatigue the Infantile mind by too long a Lesson, this First History"
su divided into Eight Parts, or Divisions,-these are
1, The Ancient Britons, and their civilization by the Romans,-s, Con-
quest of the Britons and Romans by the Saxons.-3. England during the
Life and Time of Alfred the Great.-4, William the Conqueror, and the
Norman Conquest.--5, England and its People during the Feudal Ages.-
0, Manners and Customs of the English People in the Middle Ages.-
7, In the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries.-8 In the Eighteenth
and Nineteenth Centuries.
Clearly and attractively written; it may be safely recommended and safely
employed.-Atlas.
THE EIGHT PARTS OF THE ABOVE HISTORY OF ENGLAND,
May be had separately,-6d. each, in fancy covers, with tinted plates.



Every Child's.History of England,
FROM THE EARLIEST PERIODS TO THE PRESENT TIME,
Divided into Chapters, with the Questions on the leading events nar.
rated appended to each Chapter.-With a Map of England and Wales.
Is. Gd. strongly bound in Cloth; or Is. neatly sewed, stiff cover.
This little History, for Children, will be an invaluable assistant in the Nur-
sery, and in all Schools.-Evangel. Magazine.
As a School book, we can cordially recommend it to all who are anxious that
their Children should imbibe the purest mental food.-Peopler' Journal.

DEAN AND SON, LUDGATE-HIU <


































































Wholesale Bible, Prayer Book, and Church Service Warehouse.





L7 Fi i~i~c~ A-


t t r .kiI

LONDON: DEAN & SON, 31, LUDGATE HILL,
TUlltE DOORS WEST OF OLD BAILEY.


I. f'A'
to







THE HISTORY OF


JOSEPH
AND HIS BRETHREN.



HERE lived, in the land of
Canaan, which is that part
of Asia now called Syria, a
man named Jacob, who had twelve
sons. He was a good man, so God
loved him and made him prosper; and
he had lands, and flocks of sheep, and
herds of cattle. Of all his sons, Jacob
loved Joseph, his wife Rachel's child,
the best, because he was more dutiful,
and wiser than the rest, although he





JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.


was the youngest, except one, whose
name was Benjamin; and to show his
great love, the fond father gave him
a rich dress of many colours, such as
was worn by princes in those days,
which made his brothers jealous of him,
and they hated him in their hearts.
Now it happened thatJoseph dream-
ed this dream, and he told it to his
brothers: 'Behold, we were binding
sheaves in the field, and, lo, my sheaf
arose, and also stood upright; and, be-
hold, your sheaves stood round about,
and made obeisance to my sheaf.' Af-
ter this, he dreamed another dream,-
that the sun and the moon and the
eleven stars made obeisance unto him.
His brethren thought this meant that
he should one day be a great man, and
6





















...
























t pr
h.,P,











Joseph's brethren lowering him intu; a deepo pit.




JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.
rule over all his, fam i, which made
them more angry than before, and they
said to each other,-" Let us kill him,
and then he can never rule over us."
So one day, being far from home, they
put Joseph into a deep empty pit,
meaning to leave him there to perish;
but God did not suffer him to die so
cruel a death; for while his brothers
were sitting down to eat bread, there
came by a caravan of merchants, who
were going to Egypt with spices and
perfumes for sale. Now the great men
of that country were in the habit of
buying young men for slaves; and Ju-
dah, one of Joseph's brethren, said it
would be better to sell him, than to
leave him in a pit to die of hunger;
on which they spoke to the merchants,
8









tI


PIl


Joseph sold to th n .rc c iiI who were :i t'ieir way to Egy pt.


V !..\


/\~ z~f t


BA~~I/


d




JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.


who gave them twenty pieces of silver
for Joseph, and took the youth into
Egypt, where he was sold to one of
the king's officers, and .thus became a
bond-servant in a strange land.
His brothers, being afraid their fa-
ther might suspect what they had done,
killed a kid of the goats, and dipping
Joseph's rich coat in the blood, took
it home to their father, saying "This
have we found, know now whether it
be thy son's coat or no." And Jacob
knew it, and said, It is my son's
coat." So Jacob thought Joseph had
been killed by some wild beast; and
long and deeply did he grieve for the
loss of his dear child.
Joseph met with many strange ad-
ventures in Egypt, and for some time
10





JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.
he was very happy; but being falsely
accused to his master of a crime which
he did not commit, was at length thrown
into prison.
While in this sad abode, he caused
much wonder among the prisoners by
telling some of them the meaning of
their dreams, which came to pass as he
had foretold; for God, no doubt, gave
him his knowledge, as a means of
bringing about the great events I am
going to relate.
It happened that Pharaoh, the king,
had a dream, the meaning of which
none of the wise men of that country
could explain; but being told there
was a Hebrew slave in prison who had
interpreted dreams, he sent for him;
and Joseph was brought before Pha-
11






































Lf
II ..-' ., ..- .Yl t l I I f | ~





...... .,.., .-,,-, .. ...
I.








/ -_
k------'i ----


Joseph explaining the meaning of King Pharaoh's dream.





JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.
raoh, who told him what he had seen
in his sleep; on which Joseph spoke
to this effect; "0 King, the meaning
of thy dream is this; There will be
seven years of plenty in the land of
Egypt, but these will be followed by
seven years of famine; therefore, be
wise, and store up half the corn in the
time of plenty, that the people may
have food to eat, and die not, during
those years when the famine comes."
The king so greatly admired the
wisdom of Joseph, that he bestowed
great honours upon him, and made him
his chief minister, giving him power
almost equal to his own. Thus Joseph
b-ecame a great Lord, and ruled over
the land of Egypt. His chief care,
however, was to provide against the
13





JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.
famine, by buying of the farmers half
their corn, for seven years, which he
kept in large store-houses, some of
which, it is believed, are standing at
the present day. At length, the crops
failed for seven years, as Joseph had
foretold; and then the people of all
countries were glad to buy corn at the
King's store-houses, instead of starv-
ing, as they must otherwise have done,
for want of bread.
Now the famine was in Canaan also,
where Jacob dwelt; and Joseph's bro-
thers, hearing there was corn to be
sold in Egypt, made a journey thither.
They were brought into the presence
of Joseph, and knelt down before him,
little thinking that the great ruler of
Egypt was the brother they had sold
14

















!11!



















Joseph's brethren brought into his presence.





JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.
into slavery; but Joseph knew them,
and asked them many questions, by
which he learned that his father was
still alive, and his youngest brother,
Benjamin, also, whom he had left a
child. Jacob had not sent this lad,
for fear any harm should happen to
Ijim; but Joseph told his brothers that,
if they came again, they must bring
Benjamin with them; and then he
gave them corn, and sent them away,
without making himself known.
SWhen this corn was eaten, they
went again into Egypt, having with
gieat trouble persuaded their father to
let Benjamin go with them. Joseph
feasted them all in his palace, but he
treated Benjamin better than the rest,
to try if his brothers were jealous of
16







! I I/


h0' 1' E ..


/


-
-


7L-


I 'I


Joseph causing his brethren's sacks to be filled with corn.


M


I -


r.l




JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.
him. When he had entertained them
for some days, he had their sacks filled
with corn, and sent them away; but
he had given private orders to his stew-
ard to hide a silver cup in Benjamin's
sack, and to follow his brothers and
accuse them of the theft. This was
done; the cup was found, and they
were all taken back in disgrace.
Joseph pretended to be very angry,
saying he must keep Benjamin for a
slave, and punish him for the crime he
had committed. Then his brothers
fell down at his feet, praying he would
punish them instead; for they said it
would break their aged father's heart,
and bring down his gray hairs with
sorrow to the grave, if any harm should
happen to the boy. And Judah, Ja-
Is 1





JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.


cob's eldest son said, I pray thee, let
thy servant abide instead of the lad a
bondman to my lord; and let the lad
go up with his brethren." This proof
of duty to his father, and their love for
Benjamin, so pleased Joseph, that he
told them who he was, saying, I am
Joseph, your brother, whom you sold
into Egypt."-" Doth my father yet
live?" And they trembled with fear;
but he forgave them for their former
conduct towards himself, and showed
them all manner of kindness. With
the king's consent, he bade them go
back to their own country, and bring
their father, and their wives and their
children, into Egypt, that they might
share his good fortune.
We may imagine the surprise and
19
































The happy meeting of Joseph and his father Jacob.
The happy meeting of Joseph and his father Jacob.





JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.
joy of Jacob at the news, and the hap-
py meeting that took place between
him and his long-lost son, when he
arrived in Egypt. Jacob was then one
hundred and thirty years old; and Jo-
seph presented his father to Pharaoh,
the king, who received him with much
honour and respect, on account of his
great age.
Pharaoh permitted Joseph to pro-
vide for his father and all his brethren
and their families, by giving to them
lands on which to feed their flocks and
herds, for they had been used to lead
the. life of shepherds, and desired not
to change. As long as the famine
lasted, Joseph supplied them with corn
from the king's granaries; and thus he
returned good for evil, as we are all
commanded to do. 21







ir'lI
I i : II
'''
i I I II''' i i jII ii iI i I I
'
' 'ii!i;I
i ; ''


I


The death of Jacob, after living seventeen years in Egypt.


I '





JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.
Jacob lived seventeen years in Egypt,
and Joseph was the comfort and de-
light of his old age. After his father's
death, he was as kind to his brothers
as before. He still continued to rule
over the country, for his wisdom and
justice had gained him the love of his
people, as well as the esteem of his
royal master; and, in short, there had
never been so good a governor in
Egypt.
So Joseph lived in peace and honour
to see his sons' great grandchildren;
and atlength he died, at the age of
one hundred and ten years, leaving
many to mourn for him.


23




















N


Jacob and his sons, and his sons' wives and children, with their flocks and herds,

journeying into Egypt.


- --


--
_--~-~

/
I


A .-




















; -~- ---
~ses~;;; -~~s,~P4C~
Ida~ -r
'3 -L, I -.~di~C~PP
- J ,...

~3~3 lr =
i
'"







rr,
in /f:;i:~ !'11'1:1 ~~-~-~4




~P :
c;:::








I, ;':J:3
;,I




i~c~;P\ '
I'I'


r
r;
\1b /iili I
I!li
I;iil~ ;!
:li!


~'~; ,,
r II!

-.-I


B'ii --i 1,;
- =-- --_-



r ~
.r
r



? : i
?


.IYltlIII~1~YIR I .,lls~llgisf8j~le~l ( :
r



\I I~Y I~nlllll.~L~~i~jlFOIi~'~JII
Z i
i I










i i'i' I
~~, ~ T~jp~ -+ ...

_ c~-1- qr s F _I~.
~?~=;;J


/.. =, t sdi
i,,
..,,.....

~l-~7L~ c I-~rCLPI "'"~`
-' r.









































WITH COLOURED ENGRAVINGS,


LONDON: DEAN & SON, 11, LUDGATE HILL.


i'flrri


bhifih htl ~tlia cFnmrr.


TH ,,Lt
6cCS~"i~B"~






THE


LIFE OF MOSES.



RIGHTLY the rays of the
morning sun fell on the great
river Nile, bathing in light the green
rushes that shaded its brinks, and shin-
ing softly on the face of an infant,
who was sleeping in a cradle of bul-
rushes, at the water's edge.
Now, hear why that little child was
left in that water all alone, instead of
being trusted to its mother's care, as
most babes are.
No doubt you have read in the Bible,
that Joseph and his brethren settled
in Egypt, and that the number of





TIE LIFE OF MOSES.


their descendants greatly multiplied;
so much so, as at length to create a
fear in the minds of the Egyptians
that they might prove too powerful
for them. To prevent this, their king,
who was called Pharaoh, made slaves
of them, that is, he forced them to work
for the Egyptians in building cities,
and as labourers in the fields; and set
hard-hearted task-masters over them.
Now the Israelites had been taught
to believe that a deliverer should arise,
who would rescue them from their
bondage. And this belief was told to
Pharaoh, who wickedly thought he
would prevent the accomplishment of
the prophecy; so he gave the cruel
order, that all their little boy children
should be thrown into the river Nile.
6














































v


The parents of Moses in grief because of the

decree of Pharaoh.


iI] )II
'"
''' i ;
" ''''
I:
,,

'' ~':
~ ''
''





THE LIFE OF MOSES.


Great was the sorrow and weeping,
when the command was put forth,
and Amram and Jochabed, the pa-
rents of Moses, could not find it in
their hearts to cast their little baby.
into the dark waters of the river; and
for three months they kept him hid-
den in their house, trembling at every
sound of feet, lest it should be some
one coming who might discover the
child. At the end of that time, they
heard that the king's officers were
going to search the houses; .so they
said, "We will trust our little one to
God;" and they laid him in a cradle
of rushes, coated with slime and pitch,
to keep out the water, and gave him
into the arms of his sister Miriam, to
take to the water's edge.
8





THE LIFE OF MOSES.
Reluctantly she placed him in his
tiny ark, amidst the reeds and rushes,
and then, sorrowing and weeping, re-
tired a little way off, to watch.
Morning past, and at the noontime,
attended by her maidens, came the
daughter of Pharaoh to bathe, for the
river flowed past her father's beauti-
ful gardens. Having bathed, and
just as she was about to return home,
she saw a dark spot on the water, and
sent one of her servants to see what
it was: the maiden obeying, quickly
returned, bearing the cradle. The
child stretched out his arms, and
opened his bright eyes on Pharaoh's
daughter; and when he cried with
cold and hunger, his voice awoke pity
in her heart, for she said, "It is one




THE LIFE OF MOSES.
of the Hebrews' children, but he shall
not die." Miriam heard this, and said,
" Shall I go and call a nurse of the
Hebrew women, to nurse the child for
thee?" and the princess said to her,
"Go." So Miriam hastened to tell
her parents, and the mother of the
child went to be his nurse.
Pharaoh's daughter adopted him for
her own son, and she called him
'Moses,' which meant, in her lan-
guage, 'saved from the waters.' And
Pharaoh treated him well, for his
daughter's sake, and had him taught
all the learning of the Egyptians, who
were then very clever, as. the ruins of
their immense pyramids, beautiful pil-
lars, and hieroglyphical writings, re-
main to shew.
10

































The child Moses brought to Pharaoh's daughter





THE LIFE OF MOSES.
After some time, Ph~aoh's wrath
was kindled against*'oses, because,
in his anger he drew his sword and
slew an Egyptian, who was ill-treat-
ing one of the oppressed Israelites;
so he was obliged to leave the country,
where he had lived for forty years,
and flee across the great sand Desert,
to the country of Midian, on the bor-
ders of the Red Sea. Oh! it was a
weary journey, amidst the oceans of
sand and tempests of hot winds.
At last, Moses arrived in the desired
country; and returning thanks to"the
God of the Hebrews, he sat by a well
to rest. No wonder that the traveller
sought repose at such a spot, for in
that hot, dry country, water was very
scarce, and a well was a very valua-
12

































Moses fleeing from the aand of his birth.





THE LIFE OF MOSES.
ble possession, and most pleasant to
sit by.
He watched the setting sun, while
sad thoughts of his own home and
his own people filled his heart. And
now voices rose on the air, and he
saw some girls in loose dresses and
veils, after the manner of the country,
bringing flocks of sheep and goats to
drink at the well. They were the
seven daughters of Jethro, a priest of
the country, and this was the usual
employment of young women in those
days, not excepting even the daugh-
ters of rich and great men. Presently
some shepherds came, and strove to
drive them away, for their flocks also
wanted water, and they feared that
the spring might cease to flow, as it
14



















1-II

Irr


M)ses assisting the daughters of Jethro.




THE LIFE OF MOSES.
was the hot season. Then Moses re-
sisted the shepherds, and helped the
maidens to give their flocks water.
When the young women went home
and told their father, he was pleased
at the stranger's kindness, and said to
his daughters, "Why is it that ye have
left this man ? call him, that he may
eat bread." So Moses was called, and
in the priest's house he found a home,
and became Jethro's shepherd.
Some years after, he married Zip-
porah, one of the priest's daughters,
and had a son, whom he called Ger-
shom, which meant the stranger,' for
he said "I truly have been a stranger
in a strange land."
^ One morning, when Moses watched
his sheep on Moult Horeb, he saw a
16





















































The Lord appearing to Moses on Mount Horeb


1;~t'l~p"r


!a C
I


~


'^ \




THE LIFE OF MOSES.


bright angel that seemed to rise from
a burning bush; and he heard the
voice of his God call to him, "Moses!
Moses!" and he said "Here am I!"
Then God, through his spirit, bade
him return to the land of Egypt, to
Pharaoh, to tell him 'to. et the chil-
dren of Israel depart from his country,
and be no more slaves, for the Lord of
Heaven willed it so; and that, if His
will should be disregarded, He would
send plagues on the land, until that
will was done.
When Moses returned from the
Mount, he took leave of his father-in-
law,, and set out, with his wife and
child, to Egypt; and told Pharaoh the
message of the Lord. But Pharaoh
heeded not the voice of Moses, and:
18





THE LIFE OF MOSES.


refused to let the Israelites depart; so
God, to exhibit his power, and show
that he would be obeyed, sent plague
after plague upon Pharaoh and his
people; yet still the king was obsti-
nate. The thick darkness, the hail,
and fire, bent not the stubborn will.
But when the last terrible plague was
sent,-when the angel of Death ho-
vered above, and smote the children
of the Egyptians, from 'the first-born
of Pharaoh that sat on his throne,
even unto the first-born of the captive
that was in the dungeon,'-when the
king bent over the form of his fair
dead child,-then did he tremble,
fearing that more terrible things might
come, and he let the children of Israel
go. They departed, praising the Lord;
I





THE LIFE OF MOSES.


and the Hebrews, or Jews, hold the
feast of the Passover to this day, in
remembrance of the angel of death
passing over the Israelites, without
hurting them.
Towards the wilderness of the Red
Sea did they flee, six hundred thou-
sand men, with women and children;-
And the Lord sent a pillar of cloud
by day, and a pillar of fire by night,
to guide them. Pharaoh, repenting
their release, followed with all his
warriors, and overtook them at the
Red Sea; then God divided the wa-
ters, and the children of Israel passed
through unhurt; the king and his
host tried to follow, but the sea closed
on them, and they all perished.
For forty years after this, the Is-
20



































Pharaoh and his host drowned in the Red Sea.


mom




THE LIFE OF MOSES.


raelites wandered in the Wilderness,
awaiting the time when the Lord, ac-
cording to his promise, would lead
them to the beautiful land of Canaan;
and many wonderous things happened
whilst they remained in the Wilder-
ness: there God gave to Moses the ten
commandments; the same that we have
now; and He rained manna, grains of
sweet gum, from heaven, to feed the
wanderers, when they were hungry;
and made pleasant the bitter waters of
Mara for their drink.
At times they murmured, and then
sickness was sent among them; but
through all their sorrows, one hope
led them on, and gladdened them,--
'the hope of the Promised Land.'
Brightly did that land burst at last
22




THE LIFE OF MOSES.
on the sight of Israel's children, and
joyfully did many enter it; but Moses
their leader, veiwed it only from a
distance,-from the mountain of Pish-
gah; he saw how fair a land it was,
and he died in peace, blessing God,
who permitted him to see it, after a
long life of a hundred and twenty
years;-and God caused him to be
buried in a calm valley, near Beth-
Peor.
So ends the life of Moses, who was
saved, when an infant, from the waters
of the Nile, to lead the armies of Is-
rael, and become 'the lawgiver from
the Lord.'


23
















fItuI nf
tbt lifr nf vXhlr3.








RUTH AND NAOMI;


OR, THE
AFFECTIONATE D UGHTER IN LAW.


OME years before the reign
of King David, who was
the father of the wise King
Solomon, there resided in the city of'
Bethlehem, a man named Elimelech,
who was possessed of a good estate,
and lived in affluence. He had a wife,
whose name was Naomi, and two sons,
named Mahlon and Chilion.
But there came a bad season; the
crops failed, and there was a famine
in the land, so that many people went
away to other places; and, among





RUTH AND NAOMI.


others, Elimelech removed with his
family to the country of Moab, situated
beyond the river Jordan, to the east of
the Dead Sea. He settled there, and
his affairs prospered so well, that he
chose wives for his sons from among
the Moabites; for the young people
in the east never choose wives or hus-
bands for themselves, but take those
selected for them by their parents, and
sometimes they do not see each other
until the day they are married. The
bride of the elder son, Mahlon, was
named Ruth, and the bride of Chilion,
Orpah; and they both came to live
with the parents of their husbands, as
young wives always did then, and still
often do, in those countries.
At length, however, the father and
4




















iL-


Elimelech, the husband of Naomi,


choosing Ruth as a bride for his eldest son, Mahlon.


rF5O ^


~eL
-Cg_~ ~
~
1~11
~LCI!
..i.,
T .Li~iCIP





RUTH AND NAOMI.
sons all died; and Naomi, being thus
left desolate in a foreign land, naturally
desired, in her old age, to return to her
native place. Her daughters-in-law
were both willing to go with her, but
she endeavoured to persuade them to
remain in their own country; saying,
it would be far better for them to stay
among their friends and relatives, than
to follow her into a strange land, where
she would now have to live in a very
poor and humble manner.
Orpah listened to this advice, and
bidding Naomi farewell, went home to
her friends; but Ruth could not bear
to see her aged and destitute mother-in-
law go forth alone in her sorrow; and,
in the beautiful language of the Bi-
ble, thus earnestly begged permission
6















-3 ,



F'


R, Puth entreating her rrother-in-law, Naomi,




to allow her to accompany her.


-----~~ `--"--- -
_~-F-- ----__


--


r4T~-~" c
r Iv~i

I,,


'' I
r'f 5
"`' r
.1

;i; IrF:Jc~~-l ;-z 1)1
ii
~h. ., ,g
--
'rl .ZI I
i f
' $
rr~l \

~lr




RUTH AND NAOMI.
to share her destiny, whatever it might
be:-" Intreat me not to leave thee, or
to return from following after thee; for
whither thou goest, I will go; and
where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy
people shall be my people, and thy
God my God. Where thou diest, will
I die, and there will I be buried: the
Lord do so to me, and more also, if
ought but death part thee and me."
Naomi objected no longer; so they
set out together on the road to Beth-
lehem. We are not told how they
travelled, but it is most likely they
rode on asses, as that was the usual
mode of performing journeys in Syria.
It was harvest time when they ar-
rived, and the reapers were busy cut-
ting down the corn, while the poor
8





RUTH AND NAOMI.
people flocked to the fields to glean
up the scattered ears, which were left
on purpose for them. The rich land-
owners of the Hebrew nation were
usually thoughtful of the poor, at this
season of the year; for it was com-
manded by the laws of Moses, that
they should not reap their fields very
close, nor gather all the grapes of their
vineyards, but leave some for those
who were in need, and especially for
widows and fatherless children; which
was a very good law.
Now among the wealthy land-own-
ers who lived at Bethlehem, there was
one named Boaz, who was a near rela-
tive of Naomi's late husband; but she
was fearful to go to his house, because
she was very poor, and did not know
9




RUTH AND NAOMI.
whether he would receive her kindly.
She was indeed so poor that she had
no money to buy food; and Ruth said
to her, Let me go out and glean in
the fields, that we may have barley to
make bread." Barley was much used
for bread, at that time, by the rich as
well as the poor, and the loaves were
made of a flat shape, like cakes. Nao-
mi consented that Ruth should go, and
she went out, humble and patient, to
join the lowly gleaners; nor did she
repine at her altered condition, but
wisely made up her mind to endeavour
to improve it by honest industry.
Providence directed her steps to-
wards a field belonging to Boaz, where
many of his reapers were at work, both
men and women, and a number of poor
10















I -j




'K! V> A


Ruth, with the lowly gleaners, gleaning in



the fields of Boaz.


C r'
,.'' "VI i
'1
'e I

\\\ e 4ii r


YII~-- --- -- -I ~ L- --
-C-- ---




RUTH AND NAOMI.
women and children were gleaning
after them. There was also an over-
seer, whose business was to superintend
the labourers: so Ruth went up to this
person, and humbly begged his permis-
sion to glean with the rest; on which
he asked her name, and from whence
she had come; and when he learned
that she was the daughter-in-law of
Naomi, he gave her leave to glean; and
making further enquiries concerning
her, he was told how she had left her
own country, to be a help and a com-
fort to her aged mother-in-law: and he
resolved to tell all this to his master.
Towards evening, Boaz came to see
how his reapers were going on. The
modest looks and gentle demeanour of
Ruth attracted his attention, and he
12






























C--. ----__


SBcaz having heard of Ruth's affectionate

conduct, desiring her to glean in his field.




RUTH AND NAOMI.
asked the overseer whose damsel she
was; when, to his great surprise, he
found she was the young widow of
Mahlon, his near kinsman. He list-
ened with pleasure to the history of
her affectionate conduct; and, calling
her to him, told her that he had heard
of all that she had done for ht r mother-
in-law, since the death of her husband;
and how she had left her father and her
mother, and the land of her birth, and
come unto a people which she knew
not heretofore, to be her comfort and
consolation;-for that good deed, said
Boaz, come thou into my field every
day during the harvest, and glean after
my reapers. And, he also added,
"At meal time come thou hither, and
eat of the bread, and dip thy morsel in
14





RUTH AND NAOMI.
the vinegar: And she sat beside the
reapers: and he reached her parched
corn, and she did eat, and was sufficed,
and left."
Vinegar mixed with a little oil, was
frequently eaten with bread, and is
very refreshing in that warm climate;
and the parched corn was, and is still,
an usual kind of food in Palestine and
other parts of the east, where it is
customary for people to roast ears of
corn, and eat the roasted grain at their
meals.
And when Ruth had risen up to
glean, Boaz commanded his young
men, saying, "Let her glean even
among the sheaves, and reproach her
not: And let fall also some of the
handfuls of purpose for her, and leave,
15





RUTH AND NAOMI.
them, that she may glean them, and
rebuke her not."
So Ruth remained in the field 'till
evening, and beat out the grain from
the ears she had gleaned, which yielded
as much as an ephah of barley; being
about a bushel of our measure. This
she carried home to Naomi, her mo-
ther, who was surprised at the quan-
tity, and asked her where she had been
gleaning. Then Ruth told her where
she had been, and how kindly Boaz,
the master of the field, had spoken to
her; at which Naomi was greatly re-
joiced, and exclaimed,-" Blessed be he
of the Lord, who hath not left off his
kindness to the living and to the dead.
And Naomi said to her, The man is
next of kin unto us, one of our next
kinsmen." 16















I


' 1


Naomi surprised on seeing-the'quantity

of corn that Ruth had gleaned.


I I
!lI:


c----.-
--





RUTH AND NAOMI.
Ruth went every day to glean, "and
kept fast by the maidens of Boaz," 'till
the barley harvest and the wheat har-
vest was gathered in, and "dwelt with
her mother-in-law."-And as Boaz still
continued to take the same notice of
Ruth as at first, Naomi thought they
might venture to claim his protection
as their kinsman.
So when the harvest was all gathered
in, Naomi knew that Boaz would go
down to the field, in the evening, to
winnow the corn. In those countries,
it was the custom to make a raised
thrashing-floor of earth, in the field;
which was thrown on and flattened
down, till it was quite hard and smooth;
and the master usually slept there him-
self, with some of his servants, to pro-
s18









"1


The eastern method of winnowing the corn,
which is, separating it from the chaff.


= --


c-~ ~





RUTH AND NAOMI.


tect the corn from robbers, until it
should be stored up in the granaries.
The usual mode of winnowing corn in
Syria and Palestine is to tnrow it up in
the air, when the wind is sufficiently
brisk to blow away the husks, and then
the grains fall on the floor; and this was
the reason why Boaz went to winnow
his corn at night, as a breeze was sure to
spring up from the sea in the evening.
Naomi, being aware that Boaz would
pass the night on the threshing-floor,
desired Ruth carefully to notice the
place whereon he rested, and to place
herself at his feet whilst he was asleep,
and draw the skirt of his cloak over
her; by which he would understand
that she claimed him as her relative
and sought his protection.
20




RUTH AND NAOMI.
To those who are unacquainted with
the manners and customs of eastern
nations, this might seem an act of in-
delicacy on the part of Ruth; and her
mother-in-law would be blamed for ad-
vising her to do so; but it was a form
that was usual among the Jews in such
cases; besides which, the mode of
sleeping at night in those countries
was, and still is, very different from
what it is here; the people merely
lying down, without undressing, on a
mattress, or carpet, or mat, with a
cushion under their head, and their
cloak, or large outer garment, thrown
over them, for a coverlet; and during
summer and harvest time, even fami-
lies not engaged in agriculture, still
sleep in this manner, in the open air,
on the flat tops of their houses.





















~.~l;-.~p~-Bo~e~--rlC~T;-.~j~.r ~Erl-3~1~?lll
,r_-; ----------' 7


.~%
I~_~;---- 1~C~::~%e~3f"~,~uL_
rT-
s
----- --
- ---


.
6


S Ruth claiming the protection of Boaz,




her husband's kinsman.


i\





RUTH AND NAOMI.


Boaz was thus sleeping on his thrasn-
ing-floor, when Ruth approached him,
according to the instructions of her
mother-in-law, and placing herself at
his feet, drew part of his mantle over
her. When he awoke, and saw she
was there, he knew why she had come,
and told her to be of good cheer, and
fear not, for that he was pleased with
her conduct, and was willing to do
much for her sake; but, he said, there
was a man in the city who was still
more nearly related to her late hus-
band than himself, and who had taken
possession of his inheritance; and
therefore was bound, by the law, to
marry his widow.
Now Boaz wished to marry Ruth
himself, but he could not do so, unless
23































Boaz asserting the claim of Ruth

to her husband's inheritance.





RUTH AND NAOMI.


the man he spoke of would give up
his right; so he thought he would try
him, and this is the way he proceeded.
As soon as morning dawned,, he said,
"Bring the veil thou hast upon thee,
and hold it." And when she held it,
he poured into it as much barley as
Ruth could carry, and sent her home
to her mother. He then went to the
gate of the city, where the .elders or
magistrates assembled, and sitting
down there, soon saw his kinsman
passing by; so he called to him, and
spoke to him about the estate, asking
whether he wished to retain it. The
man said it was his by right, as the
sons of Elimelech were both dead, and
he was the next heir.
"That is true," replied Boaz, "but
24





RUTH AND NAOMI.
the Jewish law says, he who takes the
land, must marry the widow, also; and
the widow of Mahlon is come to Beth-
lehem, and must be provided for."
Then the man said, he could not mar-
ry her, for that would injure his own
inheritance; so he was willing to make
over his right to Boaz, who immedi-
ately went with him before the elders
for that purpose, and the land was
given up to him, who was happy to
take the widow also.
Thus, in consequence of her amia-
ble disposition and kind behaviour,
the affectionate Ruth became the wife
of one of the best and richest men of
the country; and the good Naomi
lived happily with them all the rest of
her days; and assisted in bringing up
26





RUTH AND NAOMI.


their son, who was named Obed, a
word which, in the Hebrew language,
means one who is to be dutiful; and
thence comes the word obedient. Obed
was the grandfather of the great King
David; so that from Ruth descended
a long line of sovereigns, who ruled
over the Jews for twenty-one genera-
tions.
It is not to be expected that all good
children, whose parents are poor, will
become rich and great: but this we
may all be sure of, THAT DUTIFUL
BEHAVIOUR TO PARENTS IS
SO PLEASING IN THE SIGHT
OF GOD, that HE will never suffer
it to go unrewarded, either in this life,
or in that which is to come.


27




















I~ -,

I'
Iii I


uru Df tbt ltnnq Df Al#B ant Vannml"*









1854.





Dnau 6at :ni's Eist af

ctartinnal aih ratonl 3nnaks.










To be had of



all %nnkdaell, otatinuri, At


35, Threadneedle Street, London.


.. ""I~'-~ ..








IN A LARGE CLEAR TYPE, IN FOOLSCAP OCTAVO.

SCRIPTURAL HISTORY SIMPLIFIED:
BY MISS CORNER.
REVISED BY J. KITTO, LL.D.
For the use of Schools and Families.

IN QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS. PRICE 3s. 6d.
ALL parents and teachers must be conscious of the importance of making
Sacred History a part of the daily studies of their children and pupils. It is a
duty they owe both to God and man, to implant the seeds of Scriptural Know-
ledge in the minds of those committed to their charge, without which all other
learning is vain and profitless, conducing little to the future happiness of
the young student; so certain is it that nothing can tend to do good that is not
based upon the principles of true religion. The best and surest foundation for
a Christian education is, an early acquaintance with the Scriptures, which, as
regards children, is not to be gained by reading the Sacred Volume alone;
therefore, a good summary of Bible History cannot fail to be useful as a prepar-
ation for such reading; and with that view the present volume was designed
by the Authoress, whose ability as a historian for the school-room has long
been felt and acknowledged.
Biblical literature has reached a high standard in these enlightened times
and it is desirable that our school books should keep pace with the increasing
knowledge of the age. Miss CORNER'S SCRIPTURE HISTORY contains, in a
series of Questions and Answers, a condensed narrative of the events recorded
in the Bible; elucidated by much useful information on various subjects con-
nected with the history of God's chosen people: their peculiar customs and
industrial pursuits; descriptive notices of the chief places mentioned in Holy
Writ; natural productions, arts, commerce, sources of wealth, and many
other interesting particulars tending to make the reading of the Bible a delight-
ful instead of a laborious task to young people.
As some evidence of the merit of the work, and its fitness for the purpose
ofinstruction, the Publishers subjoin an extract of a letterfrom DR. JOHN KITTO,
who, at their request, undertook the revision of the M. S.
"The Authoress has shewn great skill and judgment in the condensation
of large statements, and in seizing the really salient points of the subject
before her. This is arare and difficult art, but not always appreciated, because
its indications are given not more by the details that are selected, than by
those that are passed over. This, however, will be better understood in the
present case than in most others, the full History thus condensed being so
familiar to the public mind."

THE

CHURCH OF ENGLAND CATECHISM
EXPLAINED.
BY THE REV. R. MONTGOMERY.
With SCRIPTURE PROOFS, for Schools and Families. Price Sd. demy S1mo.
A LARGER EDITION, with Supplement on the Articles, Prayers, &c., Is.

REV. R. MONTGOMERY'S CHRISTIAN POETRY,
FoR SCHOOL AND FAMILY USE.
being a Selection of the RKv. BOBaRT MONTGOMERY'S POEMS, suitable for
Sunday Reading and Recitation. By EDWARD FARR, Esq., Author of Select
Poetry," Collected and Edited for the PARKER SOCIETY. Ready, March








Price 3s. 6d., profusely Illustrated, Imperial Square 16mo., cloth, lettered,
TRUUVY A BOOK WORTH BUYING.

MISS CORNER's FABLES OR THEYOUNG,
ILLUSTRATED BY ALFRED GROW.UILL AND JAMES NORTHCOTE, ESQS.


CORNER'S

HISTORIfAL LIBRARY,
FOR YOUTH, SCHOOLS, AND FAMILIES;
PUBLISHED BY DEAN & SON, 35, THREADNEEDLE-STREET, LONDON;
COMPRISING
A COMPLETE HISTORY OF EVERY NATION IN EUROPE,
Uniformly printed, with Illustrations from Historical Subjects, elegantly e-
graven on Steel, from designs by Franklin, Jones, and Gilbert; and an
Accurate Map to each VQlume; well bound in cloth, lettered;
COMMENCING WITr THE EARLIEST PERIOD op AUTHENTIC RECORD
AND BROUGHT DOWN TO THE PRESENT TIME:
ACCURATELY PORTRAYING THE
NATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS, AND DOMESTIC HABITS Of THE PEOPLE

BY MISS CORNER,
Author of Questions on the History of Europe," a Sequel to
Mangnal's Historical Questions, Sc. 6yc.
THE object of these Works,-peculiarly suited to Schools and
Families,-is to furnish the reader with a faithful History of each
Nation, interspersing it with an accurate account of the religion,
laws, customs, national characteristics, and domestic habits, of the
people, in the various periods of their History.
In writing these elementary treatises, one especial object has
been kept in view-that of adapting them to the capacities of
young people and occasional readers: by this means, while they
embrace information and entertainment for all, they attract the
rising generation, by simplicity of language, and clearness of
detail, and render comparatively easy the attaingmet of a know-
ledge of the leading events of History.
The many high encomiums awarded to these works by the
Public Press, and the very considerable acceptance they have met
with in Schools and Families, are proofs that the efforts of the
Author to render historical knowledge pleasing, and easy of attain-
ment, are not unappreciated by those to whom the care of the
rising generation is intrusted.









Historical Works, published by


THE HISTORICAL LIBRARY,
BY MISS CORNER, COMPRISE THE FOLLOWING

THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND;
A New Edition ; with Chronological Table; Twenty-ninth
Thousand; 3s. 6d. cloth, lettered; or bound up with
Questions on the History, 4s.
Illustrated with a Map, and five Historical Engravings,-1.
Rowena presenting wine to Vortigern. 2. King John signing
Magna Charta. 3. Henry VII. proclaimed at the Battle of Bos-
worth Field. 4. Oliver Cromwell dissolving the long Parliament.
5. Coronation of Queen Victoria-the Peers rendering Homage.
"It is important that history meant for young Englishmen should be free
from political poison, and this book will be found unexceptionable on this
score."-British Banner.
We have much pleasure in stating that this book is in another new edition,
and its merits deserve it; it is well written, and admirably adapted for a school
or reward book."-Academic and Collegiate Circular.
Miss Corner's England and Wales, we perceive, has just reached another
new edition, in which the addition of the chronological table will be a great
desideratum; the work is well written, and is equally adapted for a school, or,
indeed, a gift book."-Bent's Literary Advertiser.
We know no histories more likely to prove useful and agreeable in the
instruction of children."--Britannia.
The style of the book throughout renders it worthy of the support it has
secured."-Gospel Magazine.
"Miss Corner has chosen her epochs skilfully, and sketched them in a man-
ner to make an adequate impression."-Literary Gazette.

THE HISTORY OF IRELAND;
New Edition; with Chronological Table; Seventh Thousand;
2s. 6d. cloth, lettered; or bound up with Questions on the
History, 3s.
Illustrated with a Map, and three Historical Engravings.-1. St.
Patrick preaching Christianity to the King and Nobles. 2. Lord
Thomas Fitzgerald renouncing his allegiance to Henry VIII. 3.
Entry of James II. into Dublin.
The history before us is well executed."-Literary Gazette.
Miss Corner's style of writing will produce habits of thinking."-Morning
Advertiser.
"The Historical facts, always correct, are detailed in plain and concise
language. This is one of the best class books on Ireland, for young people."-
Limerick Standard.
The beauty of composition throughout the writings of Miss Corner is singular
and fascinating.-Sun.
Miss Corner has acquired a deserved celebrity for the singularly-attractive
and intelligible manner she has in narrating history.--Critic.
S7








DEAN AND SON, Threadneedle-street.

THE HISTORY OF SCOTLAND;
New Edition ; with Chronological Table: Tenth Thousand;
2s. 6d. cloth, lettered; or bound up with Questions on the
History, 31.
Illustrated with a Map, and three Historical Engravings.-1.
Coronation of the Infant King David H. and his Queen, at Scone.
2. James V. taking refuge at Sterling Castle. 3, Queen Mary's
Escape to Eng]ap4.
We sincerely recommend this history as peculiarly suited to the meridian
of schools."--Ayr Oserper.
This meritorious work is written in a very easy and agreeeble style, per-
fectly adapted to the capacities of the youngpersons foYrwhom it is intended."-
Times.
We have perused this history with much interest, delighted with the ease
and perspicuity of style, and with the clearness and force of the narrative."-
Edinburgh Chronicle.
"Peculiarly adapted for instructive family reading."-Caledonian Mefrcury.

THE HISTORY OF ROME;
From accepted English and Foreign authorities, as Macpher-
son's Annals of Commerce, Keightley's Roman History,
Smith's and Adam's Greek agd Roman Antiquities; Dr
Arnold, Niebuhr, &c. With Questions to each Chapter, a
Chronological Table, and a Map of the Roman Empire;
3s. 6d. bound in cloth, lettered. 7th thousand.
Miss Corner's History of Rome wall assuredly ere long supersede all the
Roman histories at present used in schools: it is well written, andthe historical
facts elicited by the learned labours of Niebuhr, Arnold, &c are made to take
the place of the fabulous accounts which have hitherto passed current as au-
thentic history; at the same time the popular early legends are not omitted, but
their doubtful nature pointed out."--Westminster Review.
"An excellent feature in this history is the continual effort to open out to the
young reader the household life and social customs of the Romans, for without
this, ancient history can have no reality for Children."-Educational Times.
"Its contents form a correct history of the Roman empire, from its begin-
nipg."-Church of Egeland Journal.

THE HISTORIES or SPAIN AND PORTUGAL;
New Edition, Fifth Thousand; 2s. 6d. cloth, lettered; or
bound up with Questions on the Histories, 3s.
Illustrated with a Map, and three Historical E~gravings,-1.
Inez De Castro entreating the King to save her life. 2. Interview
of Columbus with Queen Isabella. 3. The tortez taking the Oath
of Allegiance.
Miss Corner gives a clear and striking account of the different kingdoms
that at various times were founded in Spain."-Edinburgh Review.
So concise anid plain as to be at once adapted to the capacities and volatility
of young people, while they are useful compendium for adults."-Times.









Historical Works, published by


THE HISTORY OF FRANCE;
Eleventh Thousand, New Edition, with continuation of events
to the Presidency of Louis Napoleon Bonaparte. With
Chronological Table.
2s. 6d. cloth, lettered; or bound up with Questions on the
History, 3s.
Illustrated with a Map, and three Historical Engravings,-
1. The Coronation of Charles VII. 2. A French Tilt, or Tourna-'
ment. 3. Bonaparte's Expedition across the Alps.
"The Writer has borne in mind throughout, that simplicity of style was
essential to her purpose, and has selected those facts which are best adapted
to give an idea of the events and the customs of the successive ages."--Baptist
Magazine
Miss Corner appears to be an excellent historian for the school room. She
narrates with fluency and clearness, and in a concise and lively manner, the
leading facts, so as to convey the spirit of history, and indicate the character-
istics of the people and the country, as well as the rulers and famous cha-
racters."-Spectator.
"We look upon Miss Corner's work with great interest, as being peculiarly
adapted to the minds of young people, and being free from that inversion of
facts by which history is so often made subservient to party purposes."-
Nonconformist.

THE HISTORY OF DENMARK, SWEDEN,
AND NORWAY;
2s. 6d. cloth, lettered; with a Map, and two elegant Histo-
rical Engravings.
1. A Norwegian Family listening to the Songs of their Scalds.
2. Submission of the Order of Nobles to Frederick III.
The two chief qualities of a good book are usefulness of subject and clever-
ness of handling, and these requisites Miss Corner's histories exhibit in an
eminent degree. The frequent intermixtures of government between the three
countries have indeed tended materially to embarrass this portion of European
history, but Miss Corner, by an accurate arrangement of dates, and a judicious
connection of events, has set every thing in a clear light."-Post Magazine.

THE HISTORY OF POLAND AND RUSSIA;
3'. 6d. cloth, lettered; with a Map, and three elegant Histo-
rical Engravings.
1. Assassination of Demetrius. 2. John Cassimer, worn out by
misfortune, resigning his crown to the Diet. 3. Flight of the
Inhabitants of Moscow at the approach of the French army.
This volume forms one of a series of histories for the use of young persons;
the present volume is, however, more descriptive than historical, which we
consider an advantage, the living manners of the Poles and Russians being
much more instructive and entertaining to young English readers."-Tait's
Magazine.
'" Miss Corner has succeeded in compressing into a small compass all the
leading events of history, without the slightest obscurity, or without sinking
her book into a dry chronicle of facts."-Britannia.









DEAN AND Sow, Threadneedle-street.

THE HISTORY OF TURKEY AND THE
OTTOMAN EMPIRE; INCLUDING GREECE,
SYRIA, AND THE HOLY LAND;
38. 6d. cloth, lettered; with a Map, and three elegant En-
gravings.
1. Selim II., receiving the Ambassadors of Maximilian, Empe-
ror of Germany. 2. Mahomet expounding the Koran at Medina.
5. Reschid Pacha reading the Hatti Scheriff of 1839 to the Am-
bassadors and Great Officers of State.
"The narrative is so well arranged and so agreeably diversified by occa-
sional remarks on individual and national character, as to render history
attractive even to the very young; and the information is conveyed in a style
remarkable for its unaffected simplicity and clearness."-Morning Post.
The leading features of Turkish manners, laws, and policy, are accurately
and forcibly portrayed, while the narrative is distinguished for simplicity
perspicuity, and completeness."-Conservative Journal.


THE HISTORY or ITALY AND SWITZERLAND;
3s. 6d. cloth, lettered; with a Map, and three elegant Histo-
rical Engravings.
1. Pope Martin V. riding through the streets of Rome, the Em-
peror and Elector leading his Horse. 2. Massaniello haranguing
the Populace. 3. William Tell and the other Swiss Patriots hold-
ing their nightly meetings.
Brief, clear, and correct; well adapted for young persons."-Leamington
Spa Chronicle.
"Written with great care and ability."-John Bull.
"A very useful educational book."- Literary Gazette.


THE HISTORY oF HOLLAND AND BELGIUM;
2s. 6d. cloth, lettered; with a Map, and two elegant Histori-
cal Engravings.
1. Assassination of William of Orange. 2. Admiral Van Tromp
shot whilst animating his sailors.
"The present, like the proceeding histories from the pen of this intelligent
lady, is distinguished for its conciseness, elegance of expression, and clearness
of detail."-Manchester Times.
"A condensed mass of knowledge, well put together, and prettily illus-
trated.,'-Church and State Gazette.
To a pleasing, fluent, narrative style, Miss Corner unites a nice discrim.
nation, and never suffers matters Which sully the mind to appear in her
pages."--Surplice.
We cannot too strongly recommend these admirable Histories, and we feel
satisfied that no parent or preceptor can place better works in the hands of a
youth."-Academic and Collegiate Circular.









Historical Works, published by


THE HISTORY OF GERMANY AND THE
GERMAN EMPIRE;
New Edition, with additions, and Chronological Table and Index.
3s. 6d. cloth, lettered. With a Map and three historical plates,
1. The forced abdication of Henry IV.-2. The murder of
Albert I. Emperor of Germany.-3. Maria Theresa present-
ing her infant son to the assembled States.
Altogether we do not know of a more agreeable or instructive present for
youth; and each history is illustrated with a map and engravings, which con-
sidering the price of the work, are of a superior description."'-Times.
The authoress shows much discrimination in conveying in language suited
to her readers the results of the laborious investigations of other scholars."-
Educational Times.


AN ACCURATE HISTORY OF GREECE.
From accepted Authorities, English and Foreign; as Grote's
and Chambers's Histories of Greece, Smith's Greek and
Roman Antiquities, Thirlwall and Wordsworth's Greece,
Smith's Mythology and Biography, Annals of Commerce,
Library of Useful Knowledge, &c. With Questions to
each Chapter, a Chronological Table, Index, and a coloured
Map of the Greek States. Price 3s. in cloth, lettered.
We have not met with any History of Greece that contains, within the same
compass, so large an amount of interesting and valuable information. Miss
Corner writes concisely, perspicuously, and sensibly.-Wesleyan Banner.
A concise History of Greece, well adapted for Schools.- Cambridge Inde-
pendent Press.
This is a very excellent compendium of Grecian History, and such are the
merits of the Work that we shall not be surprised at its becoming a popular
educational book.-The British Mother's Magazine.
Remarkably clear in its arrangement, while the simple and easy style in
which it is written, peculiarly fits it for popular use: it displays much careful
research on the part of its Author.-Englishwoman's Magazine.
Miss Corner has the art of writing so as to be understood by youthful
readers.-London Literary Journal.
By far the best introductory School History of Greece we have ever seen.-
The British Banner.
A combination of simplicity of narrative, with comprehensiveness of detail,
admirably adapted for the use of the School-room -Douglas Jerrold's Weekly
News.
With feminine delicacy, Miss Corner omits what should be omitted, giving
meanwhile a narrative of the broad character and features that mark the pro-
gress of a nation.-Express, Evening Paper.
The results of the best modern scholarship are here given.-Leader.
Miss Corner's Histories require no recommendation of ours to bring them
into notice. This Volume, her History of Greece, is written with great clear-
ness and fluency, the fabulous tales which disfigure so many professedly
authentic histories of the Greeks are discarded. We cordially recommend
this work for the School-room, or family circle.-Gospel Herald.









DEAN AND SON, Threadneedle-street.

DEAN'S SCHOOL AND FAMILY ELEMENTARY
ATLAS AND GEOGRAPHY.
Containing Seven distinctly engraved Maps, with engravings, and Geo.
graphical information about the Five Continents.
Is, plain, or 2s. coloured.

THE FIRST HISTORY OF ENGLAND THAT
SHOULD BE PLACED IN THE HANDS OF A CHILD. Second
Edition. BY Miss CORNER : Author of the Play Grammar, Every
Child's History of England, &c. Containing,
An interesting description of the Ancient Britons, and their Civiliz-
ation by the Romans; the Conquest of the Romans and Britons by
the Saxons; the Life and Times of Alfred the Great; the Norman
Conquest; the Feudal Times; the Manners and Condition of the
People of England in the Middle Ages; in the Sixteenth, Seventeenth,
Eighteenth, and Nineteenth Centuries, to the present time.
Printed in large type; with twenty-five pages of illustrations.
3s. 6d. bound, suitable for a present, inblue cloth, gilt edges;
Or, in Eight Parts, 6d. each, stitched in fancy wrappers.

EVERY CHILD'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND:
WITH A MAP, AND QUESTIONS TO EACH CHAPTER.
Particularly suited for Children, and for Home, or Infant School
Reading. By Miss CORNER: Author of the Play Grammar, &c.
Is. sewed; or with the map coloured, Is. 6d. in cloth.
f This little History for Children will be an invaluable assistant in the
nursery, and in all schools."-Evangelical Magazine.
Very clearly and attractively written: it may be safely recommended,
and safely employed."-Atlas.
As a school-book we can cordially recommend it to all who are anxious
that their children should imbibe the purest mental food."-People's, Journal.
GUIDE TO USEFUL KNOWLEDGE:
BY CHARLES BUTLER.
Containing, in the popular form of an easy and familiar Catechism,
the newest and most useful information connected with the Arts,
Sciences, and the various Phenomena of Nature. For the use of
Schools and Families.
Fifth edition, corrected. Is. 6d. bound in cloth.

AN EASY GUIDE TO GEOGRAPHY: FOR THE USE OF
SCHOOLS AND PRIVATE INSTRUCTORS. BY CHARLES BUTLER.
A new, pleasing, and concise description of the Five great divisions of
the Globe: the empires, kingdoms, and states, into which they are
divided; and the natural, mineral, and vegetable productions of the
several countries; with the number, and the manners and customs o.
their inhabitants.
New edition, (7th thousand) Is. 6d. bound in cloth;-or, with
Seven Glyphographic Maps, and the Use of the Globes, 2s. bound.
"This is truly what it professes to be An Easy Guide.' We recommend it
without hesitation,- A thenceum.
"We know of none superior to it, as an elementary book, for the use of
schools, and private families."--North British Review.
We recommend this Geography as an important addition to our stock of
sterling school books."-Surplice.
6 Evidently most carefully compiled."-Edinboro' Weekly Post.










Educational Works, published by


PAPA AND MAMMA'S EASY LESSONS IN GEOGRA-
PHY; OR, ELEMENTS OF GEOGRAPHY, IN A NEW AND AT.
TRACTIVE FORM.
By ANNA MARIA SARGEANT, Author of Bible Geography, Tales of
the Reformation, &c. Embellished with many Illustrations: and
a companion to Miss Corner's Play Grammar. 3rd Edition.
Price Is. stitched, or Is. 6d. bound in cloth.
"Full of information, conveyed in the simplest language." Literary Gazette
Geography amusingly imparted."-Church of England Quarterly Review
For young people, this is one of the best elementary geographical works
we have ever met with."-Church and State Gazette.
Admirably adapted for the purpose."- Wesleyan Penny Magazine.

PAPA AND MAMMA'S EASY LESSONS IN ARITH-
METIC. By T. T Morell. With 30 illustrations. Same size and style
as MISS CORNER's PLAY GRAMMAR, and MISS SERGEANT'S
PAPA and MAMMA'S EASY LESSONS IN GEOGRAPHY.
Price Is. stiff cover, or Is. 6d. cloth.

THE PLAY GRAMMAR; or, THE ELEMENTS OF GRAMMAR
EXPLAINED IN SHORT AND EASY GAMES.
By Miss CORNER. Is. 6d. cloth lettered, with richly coloured
frontispiece, and numerous engravings on wood; or, Is.
sewed in fancy covers, with plain frontispiece. 7th Edition.
,1 Miss Corner's Play Grammar is, beyond all comparison, the best contrivance
we have seen for teaching this difficult science to young Children."-Critic.
One of the prettiest and cheapest of children's books, and at the same
time one of the most successful attempts to simplify the rudiments of gram-
mar that we have seen."-Watchman.


EASY AND INTERESTING HISTORIES,-FOR LITTLE FOLKS,
BY MISS CORNER, Author of the Historical Library, &c.
Price six-pence each; printed in large type, and embellished with four pages
of descriptive tinted plates, and sewed in fancy wrappers.
THE ANCIENT BRITONS.
Describing their Manners and Customs; and how they were con-
quered, and Britain was governed, by the Romans.
6d. With four pages of plates.
THE CONQUEST OF THE ROMANS AND BRITONS BY
THE SAXONS; and an interesting Account of the Saxon Heptarchy,
or the Seven Saxon Kingdoms in England.
6d. With four pages of illustrations.
THE LIFE AND TIMES OF ALFRED THE GREAT:
an interesting Narrative. 6d. Four pages of illustrations.
THE NORMAN CONQUEST;
And the manner in which the People of England lived during the
Reign of William the Conqueror. An interesting Narrative.
6d. Four pages of illustrations.
ENGLAND, AND ITS PEOPLE, IN THE FEUDAL TIMES.
6d. Four pages of Illustrations.









DEAN AND SON Threadneedle-street.


THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND; WITH THE MANNERS
AND CONDITION. F THE PEdUtXE, IN THE MIDDLE AGES.
id. With'four pages of illustrations.
AN INTERESTING DESCRIPTION OF ENGLAND IN THE
SIXTEENTH AND SEVENTEENTH CENTURIES.
And how the People lived and dressed, during the Reign of Henry
the Seventh, to the death of William the Third. 'd. With four pages
of illustrations .
ENGLAND IN THE EIGHTEENTH AND NINETEENTH
CENTURIES.
Exhibiting the Condition of the People, and their modes of life; from
the Reign of James 'the Second, to that of Queen Victoria. Od.
With Four pages of illustrations.
These Eight Histories may be had, bound in One Volume, "i fancy eloth, gilt
sides and edges, suitable for a present, price 3s. 6d.


AINSWORTH's :ENGLISH-AND-LATIN AND LATIN
AND ENGLISH DICTIONARY:
Designed for the use of Schools and Families, by Thomas Morell, D.D.
Stereotype edition -carefuly revised and corrected from the best
authorities, by JAMES ROfS, LL. D 15s. bound.

ENTICK'S NEW SPELLING DICTIONARY OF THE
ENGLISH LANGUAGE:
In which the Parts of Speech are asiitately -distiag'ished,-aild to
which is prefixed, a Comprehensive English Grammar. The who l
revised, corrected, and improved, by John Robihson.
New edition, 2s. 6d. bound in green sheep, lettered.

SHERIDAN's PRONOUNCING DICTIONARY OF THE
ENGLISH LANGUAGE.
Revised and improved throughout, by SY'PHI FrN JOlss. A new edition,
further corrected and improved, with the addition of several hundred
words frequently occurring in the Arts and Sciences, and in the works
of modern Authors; by WIL'i Bhitniksra .
3s. 6d. strongly bound in sheep, and lettered.

HOWARD'S SPELLING AND READING BOOK.
Third edition, Is. bound in leather.

RHOWARD'S READING :LSSbONS pon HOME AND
DAY SCHOOLS. With frontispiece and neat engravings.
Third editi-n, 6d. Isteed :in set utcovers.

HOWARD'S POETRY LESSONS FoR HOME AND
DAY SCHOOLS. From various Authors, adapted to different Ages.
6d. sewed, in stout covers, with neat frontispiece.

PRETTY PRIMER, A FnST 'BooK FOR CHILDREN,
many engravings. 3d. sewed.








Published by DEAN AND SON, Threadn'eedle street.

ELEMENTARY & PROGRESSIVE DRAWING-BOOK:
Comprising examples of Still Life, Figures, Animals, and Landscape,
Shipping, &c. BY C. ROBINSON.
In thirteen Numbers, 6d. each; or the set in one vol. 7s.

ELEMENTS OF PERSPECTIVE DRAWING,
An easy mode of acquiring the knowledge of Drawing in Perspective,
by progressive lessons. BY SYMNS AND CROUCH.
3s. neatly bound.

ELEMENTS OF PERSPECTIVE DRAWING;
Suitable for the practice of beginners. With 8 pages of illustretionsl
By AUGUSTUS DEACON.
Price 2s.
WORSLEY's NEW DRAWING-BOOK,
On:PROGRESSIVE PRINCIPLES. Commencing with' designs in out-
line, to half and full shade, and on to perfect finished specimens.
Five sorts, Is. each; or 5s. 6d. bound.

DRAWING-BOOK OF TREES; with Pictorial Illustra-
tions of THEIR USES TO MAN placed round each Tree. Four large
plates in each book. In Four Parts, 8d. each.

NEW DRAWING BOOK OF ANIMALS.
BY J. BARFOOT. In Seven Parts. 3d. each.


SUITABLE FOR INFANT SCHOOLS.
Royal Nursery Picture Instructors: price Is. each, coloured.
Royal Nursery Clock,-on stout cardboard, with moveable
hour and minute hands.
Royal Nursery Alphabet.
Royal Nursery Musical Alphabet.
Royal Nursery Mariner's Compass.
Royal Nursery Calendar.
Royal Nursery Peep into the Royal Road to Learning.
Royal Nursery Peep into Geography.
Royal Nursery Astronomy.
Royal Nursery Peep at the Flags of all Nations.
Royal Nursery Peep at Natural History.
Royal Nursery Kings and Queens of England; or a Peep
into History.
.Amusement and Instruction are here blended, and Learning made a
pleasure in lieu of a task.






EDUCATIONAL WORKS.












Funny. Funnier. Fuain i,

Miss Corner's Play Grammar,".

Or, Elements of Grammar explained in easy Games.
The aim of the authoress has been to make the study of Grammar an amus.
ing pastime, instead of a dry and difficult task, and thus instil useful instrue.
tion under the guise of entertainment; and it is not too much to say that the
attempt has been eminently successful.
Illustrated with numerous engravings, and coloured frontispiece and
title. Is. bd. bound in cloth, lettered; or, Is. sewed, fancy covers.
Miss Corner's Play Grammar is, beyond all comparison, the best contrivance
we have seen for teaching this difficult science to young people.-Critie.
One of the prettiest and cheapest of Children's books, and at the same time
one of the most successful attempts to explain and simplify the rudiments of
Grammar that we have seen.-Watchman.


Papa's Easy Lessons in Geography;
Or, ELEMENTS OF GEOGRAPHY IN A NEW, ATTRACTIVE FORM.
A Companion to Miss Corner's Play Grammar. By A. M. SARaesR T,
author of Bible Geography, &e.
The plan and intention of these Lessons" is to render the acquirement of
the first principles of Geography easy to Children. AChild is supposed to be
in sad trouble, because she cannot understand her Geographical lesson, and in
her grief appeals to her papa, who at once removes the difficulty, and explains
the rules of the Science, by directing her attention to surrounding objects, in
so clear and simple a manner as to make the subsquent lessons a pleasure in.
stead of a task.
Illustrated with many explanatory engravings, Is.d. bound la cloth,
lettered; or, Is. sewed, in fancy covers.
For young people, this is one of the best elementary Geographical works
S we have met with.--CAhrc and State Gaette.
Fall of information conveyed in the simplest language.-Liferary Gasete.

7 DEAN AND SON LUDGATZ-IILL

























(,
iI

























ii
Si
C)

)


ip~


ENTICK's SPELLING DICTIONARY of the ENGLISH
LANGUAGE, FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS.
New edition, revised and corrected by John Robinson. 28. Od. sheep.
SHERIDAN's PRONOUNCING DICTIONARY
OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE,
Revised by STEPHEN JONES, and further improved by the addition of
several hundred words, by WM. BIRKIN. New edition, 3s. 6d. bound.

Illustrated Elementary School Books,
THREE PROGRESSIVE SORTS.-FOURPENCE EACH.
This really excellent Series of Elementary School Books are designed equally
for the Nursery and School: they are printed in good clear Type, and illus-
trated with numerous appropriate engravings. The Three of this Series are-
FIRST BOOK OF SPELLING AND READING.
With twenty-seven appropriate illustrations. In stiff showy cover, 4d.
SECOND BOOK OF SPELLING AND READING.
With forty-one appropriate illustrations. In stiff showy cover, 4d.
THIRD BOOK,-EASY GRADUATED GRAMMAR.
With twelve appropriate illustrations. In stiff showy covers, 4d.
* An inspection of these Books will prove that they have been written
with considerable care, and that many new features of, and improvements in
Elementary Education, have been introduced therein.

HOWARD's NEW SPELLING and READING BOOK.
Containing instructive Reading, and the Spelling and meaning of above
1,000 Words. With Multiplication and other useful Tables. is. bound.
READING LESSONS, for Home and Day Schools,
An easy method of proceeding, step by step, in teaching the Infant mind
to Read and Spell. By Mrs. Howard. New edition, 6d. half-bound.
POETRY LESSONS, for Home and Day Schools,
Pretty Poetical Pieces, from various Authors, suited to the capacity es o<
Children, fit to commit to memory. By Mrs. Howard. 6d. half-bo sni
9 DEAN AND SON, LUDGATE-HILL.


EDUCATIONAL


IFORKS.-


ra


- ----~- -


ii


'- '






p
)

a









t)




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs