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PREFACE


The 1963 Florida Legislature created the Legislative investi-
gation Committee, a continuation of similar interim committees
active on behalf of the state since 1955. Included in the Com-
mittee's mandate from the Legislature was the direction to inves-
tigate and report on "the extent of infiltration into agencies
supported by state funds by practicing homosexuals, the effect
thereof on said agencies and the public, and the policies of
various state agencies in dealing therewith."

To understand and effectively deal with the growing problem
of homosexuality, on understanding of its nature and manifesta-
tions is essential; and it is for that reason that the Committee
has sought in this report to preface its recommendations for
special studies leading to legislation with a review of the scope
and nature of homosexuality,

Although this report has been prepared, in keeping with the
Committee mandate, primarily for the benefit of state adminis-
trators and personnel officers, it can be of value to all citizens;
for every parent and every individual concerned with the moral
climate of the state, should be aware of the rise in homosexual
activity noted here, and be possessed of the basic knowledge set
forth.
























II
7jr





Fetish appeal is shown in this photograph taken from a homosexual's collection. The
use of the bindings is frequent in artwork of this nature, and an apparently strong
stimulant to the deviate. In many photos offered by "Art Studios" primarily for rho
homosexual trade the black posing strap will be drawn in with a material easily
removed after it has been mailed to the purchaser.









HOMOSEXUALITY AND CITIZENSHIP IN FLORIDA

Homosexuality is, and for too long has been, a skeleton in
the closet of society.
Upon this point, and this alone, can agreement be found
among the educators, psychiatrists, psychologists, researchers,
social workers, law enforcement and judicial officials, and prac-
ticing homosexuals themselves who have expressed interest in
the problem homosexuality poses for society.
To many Floridians, perhaps a majority, homosexuality is
a term without real meaning--the subject for a party joke, the
whispered accusation aimed at an effeminate neighbor or ac-
quaintance, and something to warn one's children about in vague
and general phrases.
This Committee claims no corner on understanding the
history or prognosis of homosexuality. It is, however, convinced
that many facets of homosexual practice as it exists in Florida
today pose a threat to the health and moral well-being of a
sizable portion of our population, particularly our youth.
Since 1959, legislative investigation committees have been
amassing information on homosexual activities within the state
-information drawn largely from the statements of practicing
homosexuals themselves. In 1961 and 1962 a special committee,
appointed by the Governor and directed by the Florida Children's
Commission and Sheriffs Bureau, explored the problem as it
exists within the state, and brought together in a series of
meetings leaders from all walks of life for serious consideration
of homosexuality and recommendations for broadening public
knowledge and understanding of it.
We have drawn on the files of our predecessor legislative
committees, and from the reports and recommendations of the
now inactive state study committee which were generously made
available to us by the Children's Commission, Sheriffs Bureau
and Governor's Office. We have held interviews and consultations
with officials of Florida's mental health program, law enforce-
ment agencies and courts, and made extensive study of the
many and divergent publications, both scientific and popular,
in the field. From this background we have sought to draw a
digest of information helpful to an understanding of homo-
sexuality, and to present recommendations for effective recog-
nition by the state of its present and potential bearing on the
quality of citizenship in Florida.

WHO AND HOW MANY ARE THE HOMOSEXUALS?
As in virtually all else relating to homosexuality, the defini.
tion and identification of homosexual individuals is obscured by
the presence of many conflicting opinions, contradictory statis-
tics, and a serious lack of responsible research.









A noted author in the field, who is himself a homosexual,
calls American homosexuals "an intensified minority" and speaks
of their sexual "inversion."
A law enforcement official who has made a study of homo-
sexuality suggests that its practice is the basis of "the most
insidious crime of all."
The Homosexual Voters Advisory Service, which claims to
represent 12 million homosexuals, describes a homosexual as "a
person who is capable of experiencing a real and noble love for
someone of his own sex."
Edmund Bergler, M. D., whose outspoken comments on
homosexuality and belief that is is a curable disease have made
him center of considerable controversy, says the "homosexual
is unconsciously a masochistic injustice collector who has shifted
the 'power to mistreat' from woman to man."
And Manfred Guttmacher, M. D., chief medical officer of
the Supreme Bench of Baltimore, summed up the many variables
around which discussions of homosexuality revolve when he
wrote that "individual sexual behavior is a complex pattern
dependent upon biologic endowments, parental behavior, religious
indoctrination, the basic relationship between the individual and
his parents in early childhood, group mores, the educational level
attained, accidental experiences during childhood and youth, and
police prohibitions."
For the purposes of this discussion, it seems safe to say that
a homosexual is a man or woman, married or single, young or
old. well-to-do or on-a-shoestring. possessed of an extensive or
limited education, who seeks and finds sexual stimulation and
gratification on a regular basis with one or more partners of the
same sex.
There is no single identifying characteristic of the homo-
sexual, nor can they be stereotvyed. although we shall later re-
view some common characteristics of active homsexungs. Tn
Florida, known homosexuals have "ranged from ill-paid field
hands to individuals at the highest levels of government, com-
merce and culture. Many active homosexuals are active members
of their communities, apparently happily married and rearing
families, taking part in church and civic affairs, and, to outward
appearances, the picture of normalcy,
There is no census of homosexual persons, and estimates
as to their numbers must at best be informed guesses.
The widely publicized Kinsey studies suggested that nearly
50 percent of the unmarried males under 35 in America have
engaged in homosexual practices, and that of the general popu-
lation, one out of six men had experienced at least as much
homosexual as normal, or heterosexual, experience for at least
three full years between the 16th and 55th birthdays. The
Kinsey reports estimated that one out of each 25 men is exclu-
sively homosexual after the onset of adolescence.
It was Kinsey's conclusion that homosexuality among








women is only one-half to one-third as prevalent as it is among
males. Other researchers, while agreeing with the Kinsey esti-
mates of three to five percent of the male population being ac-
tively homosexual, indicate the rate of female homosexuality
(lesbianism) to be double that of the male population. Far less
is known about female homosexuality than about male activities,
and relatively little research has been done on the subject.
From law enforcement records, medical and mental health
sources, the testimony of active homosexuals, and an application
of national projections to the state, the best and current estimate
of active homosexuals in Florida is 60,000 individuals. Several
of our consultants have suggested that this figure would be
more appropriate if limited to male homosexuals and ought to
be doubled if to accurately reflect the female homosexuals in our
population.
This figure, comparable to the population of Florida's capital
city, reflects an increase in the state's homosexual population
in recent years, and the expanding "open" activities of American
homosexuals, some 100,000 of whom dwell in New York City
alone and whose ghettos there recently prompted the staid New
York Times to delve into their deviations in a lengthy feature
article.
The origins of homosexuality are obscure, as is the question
of whether it is sin or sickness. It is depicted in ancient cave
drawings: was recognized in the culture of the Golden Age of
Greece; figures in the controversy over Shakespeare's sonnets;
is regularly debated in the scholarly seminars of forensic medi-
cine; and figures prominently in security considerations in the
highest echelons of today's world powers.
Rather than review the multitudinous theories, conclusions.
contentions and claims advanced through the years to "clarify"
consideration of homosexuality, we have contented ourselves
with presenting as an appendix to this report as complete and
responsible a bibliography on the subject as we believe can he
compiled, and leave to each individual the prerogative of selecting
the authority and theory that most nearly jibe with his own
views. We would, however, suggest that the Biblical description
of homosexuality as an "abomination" has stood well the test
of time.

THE SPECIAL WORLD OF HOMOSEXUALITY
For the active homosexual there exist two worlds in which
status, stature and security must be sought.
The first is the "straight" society, where conformance to
accepted social, moral and legal standards sets the pattern of
conduct familiar to most of us. This is the world of the coffee
break, the PTA, and the myriad other bits of Floridiana and
Americana, providing for most a comfortable and secure exist-
ence.








women is only one-half to one-third as prevalent as it is among
males. Other researchers, while agreeing with the Kinsey esti-
mates of three to five percent of the male population being ac-
tively homosexual, indicate the rate of female homosexuality
(lesbianism) to be double that of the male population. Far less
is known about female homosexuality than about male activities,
and relatively little research has been done on the subject.
From law enforcement records, medical and mental health
sources, the testimony of active homosexuals, and an application
of national projections to the state, the best and current estimate
of active homosexuals in Florida is 60,000 individuals. Several
of our consultants have suggested that this figure would be
more appropriate if limited to male homosexuals and ought to
be doubled if to accurately reflect the female homosexuals in our
population.
This figure, comparable to the population of Florida's capital
city, reflects an increase in the state's homosexual population
in recent years, and the expanding "open" activities of American
homosexuals, some 100,000 of whom dwell in New York City
alone and whose ghettos there recently prompted the staid New
York Times to delve into their deviations in a lengthy feature
article.
The origins of homosexuality are obscure, as is the question
of whether it is sin or sickness. It is depicted in ancient cave
drawings: was recognized in the culture of the Golden Age of
Greece; figures in the controversy over Shakespeare's sonnets;
is regularly debated in the scholarly seminars of forensic medi-
cine; and figures prominently in security considerations in the
highest echelons of today's world powers.
Rather than review the multitudinous theories, conclusions.
contentions and claims advanced through the years to "clarify"
consideration of homosexuality, we have contented ourselves
with presenting as an appendix to this report as complete and
responsible a bibliography on the subject as we believe can he
compiled, and leave to each individual the prerogative of selecting
the authority and theory that most nearly jibe with his own
views. We would, however, suggest that the Biblical description
of homosexuality as an "abomination" has stood well the test
of time.

THE SPECIAL WORLD OF HOMOSEXUALITY
For the active homosexual there exist two worlds in which
status, stature and security must be sought.
The first is the "straight" society, where conformance to
accepted social, moral and legal standards sets the pattern of
conduct familiar to most of us. This is the world of the coffee
break, the PTA, and the myriad other bits of Floridiana and
Americana, providing for most a comfortable and secure exist-
ence.








The second is the "gay" society, populated by homosexuals
and replete with its own language customs, and dangers. It is
a well organized society, extending from homosexual hangouts
in public rest rooms to the offices of several national organiza-
tions through which articulate homosexuals seek recognition of
their condition as a proper part of our culture and morals and
appreciation of their role in our history and heritage.
In homosexual circles the terms "queer" and "deviate" sel-
dom, if ever, are heard. Those individuals who have "come out,"
or committed themselves to a life of homosexual activity, are
"gay" and will be found at "gay" bars, eating places, organiza-
tions and shops. They may well be "cruising," driving or walking
through areas where they believe they might find "trade,"
individuals, not necessarily homosexual,.who will serve as passive
partners in the performance of homosexual acts.
Many homosexuals, and the majority of those apprehended
by law enforcement authorities, take their sex where they find
it, be it in a rest room of a park or other public place; a car, be
it moving or parked; a residence or a hotel room.
For the guidance of the uninitiated, we have appended to
this report a glossary of homosexual terms and a catalogue of
homosexual acts.
The two homosexuals most familiar to the general public
are the "Swish Queen" and the "Butch." The Swish Queen is the
ultra-effeminate male who will occasionally be seen fully dressed
in women's clothing. The Butch is the ultra-masculine female,
muscular in build, with mannish haircut and tailored clothing.
These are in the minority in homosexual society and cannot be
considered representative of homosexuals in general.
Homosexuals are given to freely discussing their status, even
when under arrest. From these commentaries and from perusal
of the two major homosexual publications, ONE MAGAZINE
and THE MATTACIINE REVIEW (both propaganda arms of
national homosexual organizations), some clarifying conclusions
can be drawn.
A key homosexual aim is recognition. A spokesman for a
major homosexual group put it this way:
'The time is coming when homosexual love will be accepted
in America as it is now in some other cultures of the world . .
"Homosexual love is just as beautiful and health-producing,
and as spiritually ennobling, as heterosexual love We homo-
sexiuals, too. know that sex without love is empty, incomplete.
and unsatis-fving But with love, homosexuality, too, can bring
ultimate fulfillment.
"That this fulfillment cannot biologically include the creation
of new life through children does not mean that homosexuality
should be condemned. Neither do heterosexual love relations,
when birth control by any means is used, result in procreation.
"The emotional, physical, intellectual, and spiritual oneness
experienced between two men or between two women in love is


~_~I Xi_ III..XIXX _.~









in every way comparable to the same beautiful emotion experi-
enced between persons of the opposite sex."
One flaw in this thesis is that the sort of love relationships
lyrically described are notoriously few and far between among
male homosexuals. Fleeting relationships are the order of the
day in a great many cases, and multiple sex acts with a procession
of partners who are often strangers known only by a first name
or nickname frequently occur within the space of one evening.
It is true that many male homosexuals do enter into "Gay
Marriages," often begun with a solemn ceremony in which they
agree to live together under conditions approximating a straight,
or heterosexual, marriage situation. It is rare for such a union to
last over a prolonged period, even though into the bonds of some
such marriages is placed a formal agreement for a "Trick Day"
one or more days a week when either or both of the partners
are free to seek union with another for the night.
In the case of female homosexuals, many "marriages" have
been known to remain stable over long periods of time. There is
speculation that this is due both to the inborn desire of women
for a more settled existence and because two women living
together are less apt to cause comment within a community than
would two men.
Some insight into the nature of a lesbian "marriage" is to
be found in a letter written by a Tampa woman in response to
publicity on the state's concern with homosexuality. She wrote:
"This letter is not written with lascivious intent. Neither is
it intended to glorify the homosexual and fling obscenities at
the law enforcement organization while hiding behind a shield
of animosity. I am writing only to set forth certain facts which
you may not have the opportunity to review. In other words, I
am giving you my side of the story.
"First of all, let me say that I do not feel shame for what
I am. I have made a good adjustment to my way of life. I am
happy as I am. I do nut want to change. Many well adjusted
homosexuals feel as I do, and there is truly nothing a psychiatrist
can do for a person who does not recognize a need and express
a desire to change.
"Like many others, I lead a quiet, and apparently normal
life. I have a well paying, responsible job, I own my own home,
I am active in church and community affairs and I command the
respect of those who know me. I love the woman I live with and
I honor this love more than a great number of people honor the
marital vows they speak, I regard my personal relationship as
having all the sanctity of marriage.
"My life is not a merry-go-round of bars, wild parties, and
changing partners as is often the case with homosexuals. Per-
haps I am an exception, but I do not believe so. I have numerous
friends, couples who have lived together for many years, who
do not 'make the rounds' of the bars. Although we cannot attend
formal dances and other forms of recreation which require









mixed couples, we find many clean and wholesome activities
such as bowling, tennis, card parties, record parties, etc.
"I will grant you a point. Homosexuality is, as a total pic-
ture, a dread disease. It must be stopped from spreading rapidly.
But I must protest the manner in which it is treated. iomo-
sexuals are not all alike. Yet all are treated alike as criminals
and when 'investigated' are submitted to vulgar questioning,
abuse and undignified treatment. This handling is not restricted
to those who have committed a criminal act, but to be very frank,
it is common treatment of anyone suspected or vaguely connected
with homosexuality.
"Must I be stripped of my privacy and all the pride and
dignity that I enjoy as an American, simply because some
element in my environment, some incident in my childhood, or
some faulty parental relationship has produced an individual
who chooses to love one of the same sex ?
Very truly yours,
Just a Girl of 24"
It is with similar arguments that homosexuals have mounted
a national drive to legalize sexual relationships between mutually
consenting adult partners of the same sex. Such a proposal was
advanced in a massive British study presented to the Parliament
in 1957, but which was not enacted into law. In this country,
only the Illinois Legislature has acted favorably on the proposal,
which has failed of passage in several other states in which it
has been introduced.
This movement by homosexuals has received some support
from liberally-oriented authors and legislators. Notable among
these is Harry Golden, who devoted a column in his Carolina
Israelite to the suggestion that the world has seen several homo-
sexual ages:
"Ancient Greece was a homosexual culture. The scenes that
take place between two men in a Greek tragedy are nothing more
or less than love scenes. It was not considered an anti-social act
in Greece . Elizabethan England was also a homosexual age.
Shakespeare dedicated one of his sonnets to a lover . The
last of these three homosexual ages has been our own. Homo.
sexuality took on the characteristics of an endemic affliction
after World War I which destroyed all of the old values. Pioneer
America may have known isolated cases of homosexuality, but
it is the industrial age and the 'atomic' generation which have
given it a new popularity.
"Society would feel better if there were no homosexuals,
but our laws have to face the truth that every society in one
way or another produces certain aberrancies. In a religious
society you have heresies, in a wilderness society, renegades,
and in this society, homosexuality. Society must change itself
to lose homosexuality. It can't be stamped out. Until we make









some of our laws humane, we will be unable to understand the
problem, let alone deal with it."
On the strength of such reasoning, aggressive homosexuals
are assembling a considerable array of supporters from the
"straight" world, whose sympathies and lack of knowledge of
the other side of the homosexual coin prompt their support of
a drive for "rational" legislation at both the federal and state
levels.
WHY BE CONCERNED?
If the torrent of propaganda from homosexual organizations
is to be believed, those afflicted with homosexuality constitute
a maladjusted, misunderstood and mistreated minority, com-
posed of productive people seeking their proper place in the sun.
It is difficult, however, to find the ennobling element in
scenes such as these which are drawn from official records of
this state.
In late evening a well dressed teacher enters the men's
room of a large Central Florida shopping center. He enters a
stall toilet, noting that the adjacent booth is occupied. There is
a hole about the size of a fifty cent piece carved through the
partition separating the stalls. The teacher places a finger
through the hole, then withdraws it. The finger of the unknown
occupant of the next stall appears. The teacher then inserts his
sex organ through the hole to perform, in less than five minutes,
a homosexual act with a partner he never sees and to whom he
need not speak.
Or this:
The athletically-built little league coach in West Florida
lived at home with his mother, but he was in his mid-twenties
and only recently returned from college so no one thought it
strange. He was looked up to by the parents of the youngsters
he tutored in sports, for the 10-to-15 year olds obviously idolized
him. So it was that it came as a special shock to the community
when it was revealed that he had systematically seduced the
members of the baseball team into the performance of homo-
sexual acts, and that he was using the services of a willing 13
year old girl for the normal sexual stimulation of the boys, and
for his own gratification.
And this:
In South Florida it was possible for visiting homosexuals to
obtain the services of a male partner, ranging in age from the
early teens through adulthood, for a single act or the duration
of his stay, with about the same ease at comparable cost as other
tourists-on-the-town obtain the services of a "high class" pros-
titute. When the boys in this ring were not on call, they passed
the time posing for nude photos to be made part of the tremen-
dous traffic in homosexual pornography.
These are not isolated instances, nor do they touch the
extremes of deviate behavior which enforcement officers have









some of our laws humane, we will be unable to understand the
problem, let alone deal with it."
On the strength of such reasoning, aggressive homosexuals
are assembling a considerable array of supporters from the
"straight" world, whose sympathies and lack of knowledge of
the other side of the homosexual coin prompt their support of
a drive for "rational" legislation at both the federal and state
levels.
WHY BE CONCERNED?
If the torrent of propaganda from homosexual organizations
is to be believed, those afflicted with homosexuality constitute
a maladjusted, misunderstood and mistreated minority, com-
posed of productive people seeking their proper place in the sun.
It is difficult, however, to find the ennobling element in
scenes such as these which are drawn from official records of
this state.
In late evening a well dressed teacher enters the men's
room of a large Central Florida shopping center. He enters a
stall toilet, noting that the adjacent booth is occupied. There is
a hole about the size of a fifty cent piece carved through the
partition separating the stalls. The teacher places a finger
through the hole, then withdraws it. The finger of the unknown
occupant of the next stall appears. The teacher then inserts his
sex organ through the hole to perform, in less than five minutes,
a homosexual act with a partner he never sees and to whom he
need not speak.
Or this:
The athletically-built little league coach in West Florida
lived at home with his mother, but he was in his mid-twenties
and only recently returned from college so no one thought it
strange. He was looked up to by the parents of the youngsters
he tutored in sports, for the 10-to-15 year olds obviously idolized
him. So it was that it came as a special shock to the community
when it was revealed that he had systematically seduced the
members of the baseball team into the performance of homo-
sexual acts, and that he was using the services of a willing 13
year old girl for the normal sexual stimulation of the boys, and
for his own gratification.
And this:
In South Florida it was possible for visiting homosexuals to
obtain the services of a male partner, ranging in age from the
early teens through adulthood, for a single act or the duration
of his stay, with about the same ease at comparable cost as other
tourists-on-the-town obtain the services of a "high class" pros-
titute. When the boys in this ring were not on call, they passed
the time posing for nude photos to be made part of the tremen-
dous traffic in homosexual pornography.
These are not isolated instances, nor do they touch the
extremes of deviate behavior which enforcement officers have


























































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THE FLORIDA LEGISLATIVE INVESTIGATION COMMITTEE


803 South Adams Street


Post Office Box 1044


Tallahassee, Florida





REPRESENTATIVE RICHARD O. MITCHELL, CHAIRMAN

SENATOR ROBERT WILLIAMS, VICE CHAIRMAN


MEMBERS FROM THE HOUSE


LEO C. JONES
Panama City


RICHARD 0. MITCHELL
Tallahassee

WILLIAM E. OWENS
Stuart

GEORGE B. STALLINGS, JR.
Jacksonville


John E. Evams
Stafl Director

Leo L. Fostw
Counsel


Lamar Bleds e
Secretary


MEMBERS FROM THE SENATE

CHARLEY E. JOHNS
Starke


ROBERT WILLIAMS
Gracevillo


CQ W. (BILL) YOUNG
St. Petersburg


C. Lawrence Rice
Chief Investigaror









become accustomed to encountering in the world of homo-
sexuality.
The plain fact of the matter is that a great many homo-
sexuals have an insatiable appetite for sexual activities and find
special gratification in the recruitment to their ranks of youth.
This addiction to youth has been reflected by homosexuals
themselves in the pages of their publications. In the letters to
the editor column of ONE MAGAZINE, there have appeared
sentiments such as those in the January 1960, issue of "Mr. T. W.
of Brooklyn" who wrote that "the urge for a younger companion
is almost basic to the gay life . If the desire for youth makes
me sick, then forget about calling the doctor for I never want to
be cured of my illness."
There is a tendency to lump together the homosexuals who
seek out youth and the child molesters. To most people the child
molester seems to pose the greatest threat to society.
The child molester attacks, but seldom kills or physically
cripples his victim. The outlook for the victim of molestation
is generally good for recovery from the mental and physical
shocks involved and for the enjoyment of a normal life.
The homosexual, on the other hand, prefers to reach out for
the child at the time of normal sexual awakening and to conduct
a psychological preliminary to the physical contact. The homo-
sexual's goal and part of his satisfaction is to "bring over" the
young person, to hook him for homosexuality.
Whether it be with youth or with older individuals, homo-
sexuality is unique among the sexual assaults considered by
our laws in that the person affected by the practicing homosexual
is first a victim, then an accomplice, and finally himself a per-
petrator of homosexual acts.
Homosexuals are generally outwardly gregarious people,
free with gifts and money for those they like or are currently
enmeshed with. Many find association with extreme youth a
solace for their anxiety over aging, just as some aging "straights"
seek out the companionship of youthful members of the opposite
sex.
The appeals to youth by homosexuals are manifold. They are
masters of flattery, playing up to the teenager's desire for recog-
nition and equal status in an adult world. They will provide the
youth with opportunity to attain goals made attractive by adult
practitioners-a car to drive, cigarettes to smoke, liquor to drink.
Frequently, pornographic materials of a heterosexual nature are
used. One strip of photos we have seen starts off depicting in
detail and clarity a male-female sexual relationship; and as the
ensuing photos unfold, the man leaves the woman and joins
another man in a series of poses leading up to vivid homosexual
erotica.
In this connection, it is worthy of note that while much
public hue and cry has been raised about the "girlie" magazines
draped across newsstands the length and breadth of the state,


II~X I~XXII








little has been done to reveal the role of the male muscle and
physique magazines, the pin-up books of homosexuality.
The principal purchasers of these books are not the puny
"before" examples of skin and bone seeking a formula by which
to pour themselves into the muscular mold of the male models,
but are the homosexuals who find more stimulation from viewing
the rippling muscles and tanned figures portrayed there, than
the man who likes women derives from the center fold of Playboy.
These magazines are the showcases for photographers who
deal in homosexual pornography and who, in most cases, supply
the publishers with photographs free of charge. In return for
this, there appears at the back of the magazine a credit page
listing the names and addresses of the photographers who con-
tributed the photos used on various pages of the publication.
Along with this is the suggestion that the reader who sees some-
thing he likes correspond directly with the photographer.
Such correspondence will lead first to circumspect figure
studies; then to more suggestive photos, dualss" showing two
men in close proximity; and finally to the hard core and costly
homosexual pornography consisting of totally nude males in
lascivious, suggestive poses, or actual homosexual acts. Similar
photos of lesbian relationships are more rare, but available from
major producers of these materials.
In addition to the multi-million dollar traffic in profession-
ally produced homosexual pornography, local homosexuals trade
photos like some youngsters trade bubble gum baseball cards.
The Polaroid camera has been a great boon to homosexuals and
a blow to those required to investigate their activities_ The
avoidance of a film processor has freed the homosexual to vpro-
duce photos in abundance of his friends at play, and inexpensive
copying machines have made possible rapid reproduction for
exchange or sale.
Once entangled in the web of homosexuality, there are sev-
eral courses common to young people.
The first is that they quickly "come out" by becoming full-
fledged homosexuals, taking an aggressive role in sexual acts.
It is this type of youth who "goes out for chickens" by becoming
an active recruiter of extremely vouni boys. It is this individual
who is found to be the leader (although usually with adult advice)
of homosexually oriented high school "secret societies" whose
initiation rites run the gamut of homosexual appeals.
Another course is that pursued by the young person who
recognizes that his willingness to be a passive partner in homo-
sexual acts can be the key to an ever-available flow of money
and gifts. A good looking youth finds little difficulty in making
contact with "cruising" homosexuals willing to pay for his ser-
vices. In Miami, one bov of 17 claimed convincingly that he had
"earned" more than $20,000 since he was 14, and that he was
paying his family's expenses, had bought an automobile and a
complete and tasteful wardrobe with the wages of homosexuality.








Such young people as this, known as hustlers, will frequently
become "fairies," interested only in sex with any man, or "dirt,"
willing to be passive in a homosexual act but given to robbing
the homosexual of all money and clothing at its conclusion.
Homosexuals, especially those with good jobs or close family
ties, are vulnerable to blackmail, and there are those who serve
as "trade" merely to amass the information on which a black-
mail threat can be based. Those homosexuals who steal seldom
do so for personal use, but to satisfy a greedy lover or black-
mailer.
In addition to the moral and legal problems engendered by
the spread of homosexuality, its practitioners face a very real
medical hazard. Venereal disease can be, and is, transmitted by
certain of the more common homosexual acts. The incidence of
the several forms of this disease has increased in recent years
to a new high of 1748 cases in 1963, ranking Florida third in the
nation in number of cases, due, according to health authorities,
in large measure to homosexual transmission. Particularly has
this been found to be the case in university communities and
similar areas with a large youth population,
We have not touched upon homosexuality as a factor in
other forms of sex deviation or in major crime occurrences and
security matters, for to do so would deserve more space than is
available here. Suffice it to say that such links do exist and that
the homosexual, subject to abnormal external and internal pres-
sures, tends to neuroticism and mental imbalance, a predilection
opening pathways to crime and conduct far beyond the veil of
rationality.
We would not deny the existence of some lasting homosexual
relationships which pose no threat to society and in which the
participants are constructive and contributing members of their
communities. We do, however, believe that the glimpse of the
homosexual world we have here presented underlines our convic-
tion that homosexuals pose a problem..demanding of serious at-
tention by all concerned with sound citizenship.

WHAT TO DO ABOUT HOMOSEXUALITY
In Florida, homosexuality is not treated as an entity by
existing laws, but rather individual acts are specified as illegal
in those sections of the Statutes dealing with sex offenses. We
include a summary of those laws in the appendix to this report.
Many homosexuals are picked up and prosecuted on vagrancy
or similar non-specific charges, fined a moderate amount, and
then released to pick up their practices virtually where they left
them on arrest.
Most law enforcement, prosecutive and judicial officials are
in an honest quandary as to how best to handle such cases. They
are concerned that in sexual matters Florida follow the admoni-
tion of Britain's Wolfenden Report to continue "to preserve








Such young people as this, known as hustlers, will frequently
become "fairies," interested only in sex with any man, or "dirt,"
willing to be passive in a homosexual act but given to robbing
the homosexual of all money and clothing at its conclusion.
Homosexuals, especially those with good jobs or close family
ties, are vulnerable to blackmail, and there are those who serve
as "trade" merely to amass the information on which a black-
mail threat can be based. Those homosexuals who steal seldom
do so for personal use, but to satisfy a greedy lover or black-
mailer.
In addition to the moral and legal problems engendered by
the spread of homosexuality, its practitioners face a very real
medical hazard. Venereal disease can be, and is, transmitted by
certain of the more common homosexual acts. The incidence of
the several forms of this disease has increased in recent years
to a new high of 1748 cases in 1963, ranking Florida third in the
nation in number of cases, due, according to health authorities,
in large measure to homosexual transmission. Particularly has
this been found to be the case in university communities and
similar areas with a large youth population,
We have not touched upon homosexuality as a factor in
other forms of sex deviation or in major crime occurrences and
security matters, for to do so would deserve more space than is
available here. Suffice it to say that such links do exist and that
the homosexual, subject to abnormal external and internal pres-
sures, tends to neuroticism and mental imbalance, a predilection
opening pathways to crime and conduct far beyond the veil of
rationality.
We would not deny the existence of some lasting homosexual
relationships which pose no threat to society and in which the
participants are constructive and contributing members of their
communities. We do, however, believe that the glimpse of the
homosexual world we have here presented underlines our convic-
tion that homosexuals pose a problem..demanding of serious at-
tention by all concerned with sound citizenship.

WHAT TO DO ABOUT HOMOSEXUALITY
In Florida, homosexuality is not treated as an entity by
existing laws, but rather individual acts are specified as illegal
in those sections of the Statutes dealing with sex offenses. We
include a summary of those laws in the appendix to this report.
Many homosexuals are picked up and prosecuted on vagrancy
or similar non-specific charges, fined a moderate amount, and
then released to pick up their practices virtually where they left
them on arrest.
Most law enforcement, prosecutive and judicial officials are
in an honest quandary as to how best to handle such cases. They
are concerned that in sexual matters Florida follow the admoni-
tion of Britain's Wolfenden Report to continue "to preserve








public order and decency, to protect the citizen from what is
offensive and/or injurious, and to provide sufficient safeguards
against exploitation and corruption of others."
Incarceration is not a satisfactory answer in many cases,
for indeed prison life produces its own specialized brand of devi-
ates, known as "institutional homosexuals," who would not, in
freedom, consider homosexual activity, but in prison turn to it in
search of escape from sexual tensions.
The Florida Legislature in 196:1 recognized this problem and
enacted legislation directing the Division of Mental Health and
Division of Corrections of the State to plan for the construction
of facilities at the prison system's new receiving and treatment
center "for the care of child molesters and criminal sexual
psychopaths."
The same legislative session revised the Statutes relating
to the revocation of teaching certificates to make more certain
the withdrawal of teaching privileges from those against whom
homosexual charges have been verified. From 1959 through
January 1, 1964, a total of 64 Florida teachers have had certifi-
cates revoked by the State Board of Education; and, of these,
54 were on morals charges. An additional 83 cases are now pend-
ing before the Board. While this is a relatively low number in
the light of Florida's more than 40,000 certified teachers, it is
ample to warrant concern by educators and parents.
A veteran investigator of homosexual activities summed up
the feelings of many who have studied the problem of homo-
sexuality in Florida when, in consultation with us, he said:
"There are those who feel that this particular type of inves-
tigation-against homosexuals-is just too touchy to fool with,
But it must he done. It must be done.
"The homosexual groups, Homosexuals Anonymous, the
Homophile Institute, the Mattachine Society and others, are now
coming out in the open in our larger cities like New York and
Washington, trying to gain social acceptance in publications.
Late last fall they actually sought a permit to solicit on the
streets of Washington.
"Since the homosexual has seen fit to come out into the
open and try to get himself accepted by society, I think it is
about time the thinking members of society, the persons in posi-
tions of responsibility, get up off their duffs and realize that if
we don't stand up and start fighting, we are going to lose
these battles in a very real war of morality.
"The homosexuals are organized. The persons whose respon-
sibility it is to protect the public, and especially our kids, are
not organized in the direction of combating homosexual recruit-
ing of youth.
"The problem is so little understood by lay people that the
homosexuals will win every battle that is fought unless we band
together to educate ourselves. There is only one thing that the
homosexual fears as far as straight persons are concerned, and








"that is a straight person who knows him and the gay crowd for
what they are. lie is not afraid of the average housewife and
the average citizen, and he is not afraid of the judges who have
never taken the time and the trouble to look into this problem
and see to what it really amounts. He is afraid of the police
officer, because he feels the police officer can see through him
a lot easier than anyone else can.
"He will depend upon a jury, invariably, to adjudicate his
guiltiness in a court of law, rather than a judge, because he
feels the judge may be able to see through him.
"We must do everything in our power to create one thing
in the mind of every homosexual, and that is 'Keep your hands
off our children! IThe consequences will be terrible if you do not.'
"The homosexuals' motto is: Today's Trade is Tomorrow's
Competition. This motto is spoken in every language in the civil-
ized world. We must teach the homosexual, make him understand
that ~re will not tolerate his recruitment of youth.
"I don't think that this is asking too much of us-too much
of every parent, for if we don't act soon we will wake up some
morning and find they are too big to fight. They may be already.
I hope not."
The Committee is reluctant to concede that homosexuality
in Florida and America today has reached either the proportions
or power suggested by that investigator.
It concurs fully, however, that the closet door must be
thrown open and the light of public understanding cast upon
homosexuality in its relationship to the responsibilities of sound
citizenship.
We hope that many citizen organizations in Florida will use
this report as a inmping off point for a serious and meaningful
consideration of the problem of homosexuality and as a source
of information with which to prepare their children to meet the
temptations of homosexuality lurking today in the vicinity of
nearly every institution of learning.
We recommend to the Florida State Board of Education
retention at the earliest practicable time of qualified personnel
to be assigned to the Teacher Certification Diviqion of the State
Department of Education for the purpose of refuting or affirm-
ing allegations of homosexuality involving teachers in the lbhlic
schools of the state and preparing information thus obtained for
the prompt consideration and action of the Department and
Board. In the past, the Department of Education has called uon
this Committee and its predecessors to perform investigative
activities for it. but this is not a proper function of a lerrislative
body and should be placed on a permanent basis within the
Department, as contemplated in the Statutes.
We recommend. and have initiated, the formulation of legis-
lation providing A Homosexual Practices Control Act for Florida.
We feel such legislation warranted, for while we encourage
and call for increased research efforts to expose the underlying


- -









causes of homosexuality and its possible cures, we recognize that
the problem today is one of control and that established pro-
cedures and stern penalties will serve both as encouragement to
law enforcement officials and as a deterrent to the homosexual
hungry for youth.
We have asked a committee of distinguished Floridians to
consult with us in the formulation of effective legislation in this
field and will invite their consideration of such steps as:
1. Mandatory psychiatric examination prior to sentencing
of every person convicted of a homosexual act with a minor and
discretionary pre-sentence examination of others.
2. Provision for outpatient psychiatric treatment centers
to which offenders on probation or parole may be assigned.
3. Providing for the confidentiality of information relating
to the first arrest of a homosexual similar to that now in effect
in juvenile cases, with the provision that the confidentiality of
the information may be waived by the judge upon conviction or
a plea of guilty.
4. Creation of a central records repository for information
on homosexuals arrested and convicted in Florida and provision
that such records shall be open to public employing agencies.
5. Placing sole jurisdiction of a second homosexual offense
in a felony court and providing appropriate penalties upon con-
viction.
We believe that a law embodying elements such as these
would serve to radically reduce the number of homosexuals prey-
ing upon the youth of Florida, would stiffen the state's hand in
dealing with those homosexuals apprehended and would provide
an element of protection for those homosexuals whose first public
venture is relatively mild and whose ability to earn a living or
provide for a family would be destroyed by exposure.
It behooves us all to come to know the nature of the homo-
sexual, for he is with us in every area of the state. It behooves
us, too, to define for him, and for ourselves, the conditions which
govern his presence.

















Suspended a,"t ili;A Teacher

,Resigns; Hearing Canceled
AAilr t' If prr.ll-Tarl) arrr ti f al & Ini" Csw ( r ml .r j f f i t U 4' ,
.-.",( r; pkri k, .hoter .SFln ~,e.ru~e v lba.s I e w t a ri ,i ., .ni, 11 ,, LJit
f ed ID ds spar an o Ihli. athtec P 41* d a.,r n, i .c1rd. 1' g ,' 1,,
romwi d yard wlr Bd lakm'I Pu.tk **i ~ pr- r .-rt Ai W..
.oiltawld Am -- acilomm L ae L ptial cttl uJft it4 a WI. 1I ..ra1-l hy tNl TI-
lr t l c,- CMr $4 La rLcin ui i shm ..fl i** F, r i*,.
wblephmnsotiwjgh Ni r. inc re ,r i Yr w.kn he
u I.' Pr tl. T e a&, l. cw me a tr rr jar *, Lhe s
W.^ d'h. i b r 1h 'as.r I u Elrmd a a vl 'r I. y C "
3 tC. E.r.-to e unaul-,.1 he hMJ Isr Ib-t wer mn. -rt I 'i
aw~u g M wb smwrimedd' r-., A-rilirrdi .. .
w Ui amk & ith t)a s *'rCr .An -.. n ii.. .. I.
...w iihm.a ar I t* l. fr 1 .in c .t. D "A Ir
i r ifn uila l wam Jsimis of 2 tistoel" had brim qinrfe *-*lail I .
l d uI tp m. hl i irw 3 b rri rd Fri r rf
lil i haI P h lt iv -' .had ike rr 1 03
*.thu g d lls d ,is-- w f Isl Ct llt-i" *C *
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aMotinE J ;L. c fiy Ln *r

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w" Dr !ati s 1 r : C- r
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On the infrequent occasions whn debate behavior s xpoed, epecialy on the part
of those who work with youI, t*he school systn ad dedicated ser ice





of Ihe young are mada Iuspect.
b~ e~~LcL~~ y4L
:ds"Ir pI C16 A4hrLB i `b

On te ifreuen ocasins han&Wae bhavir I exoxe, epecall anthepar
of hoe kowok ithyoth te chol yseman ai ediaWtoth siric
ofth yun ae ad sqmt









FLORIDA LAWS ON SEX OFFENSES

ILLEGAL FORMS OF NATURAL INTERCOURSE:


1. FORNICATION:
(798.03)


Unlawful heterosexual intercourse be-
tween two unmarried persons.


PUNISHMENT: 3 months or fine not to exceed $30.00.

2. LEWD AND LASCIVIOUS BEHAVIOR:
(798.02)
(a) If any man and woman, not being
married to each other, lewdly and lasci-
viously associate and cohabit together

(b) If any man or woman, married or
unmarried, is guilty of open and gross
lewdness and lascivious behavior .
(The offense of lewdly and lasciviously
associating and cohabiting together in-
cludes both lewd and lascivious inter-
course and/or living or dwelling together
as if the conjugal relation existed be-
tween the parties. Both elements must be
proven to sustain o conviction.)


PUNISHMENT:



3. ADULTERY:
(798.01)


PUNISHMENT:



4. INCEST:
(741.22)




PUNISHMENT:


Not more than one year in prison, or one
year in the county jail, or fine not to
exceed $300.00,

Voluntary heterosexual intercourse of a
married person with o person other than
his spouse. (If either party is married,
both shall be deemed guilty.)
Not to exceed 2 years in prison, or one
year in the county jail, or fine not to ex-.
ceed $500.00.

Persons within the degrees of consan-
guinity within which marriages are pro-
hibited or declared by low to be inces-
tuous and void, who intermarry or com-
mit adultery or fornication with each
other . ,
Not to exceed 20 years in prison, or one
year in the county jail.


-n .









5. PROSTITUTION:
(796,07)

PUN ISHMENT:


6. RAPE:
(794.01)




PUNISHMENT:


A woman who permits any man who will
pay her price to have (natural) sexual
intercourse with her ..
Fine not exceeding $500.00, or imprison-
ment not to exceed six months, or both.

Whoever ravishes and carnally knows a
female of the age of 10 years or more,
by force and against her will, or unlaw-
fully or carnally knows and abuses a fe-
male child under the age of ten years

DEATH, unless a majority of the jury
recommends mercy.


7. CARNAL INTERCOURSE WITH UNMARRIED PERSON
UNDER EIGHTEEN:
(794.05)


PUNISHMENT:


Any person who has unlawful carnal in-
tercourse with any unmarried person, of
previous chaste character, who at the
time of such intercourse is under the age
of eighteen .
Not more than 10 years in prison, or fine
not to exceed $2,000.00.


8. CARNAL INTERCOURSE WITH AN UNMARRIED
FEMALE IDIOT:
(794.06)
Any male person who has cornal inter-
course with an unmarried female, with
or without her consent, who is at the time
an idiot, lunatic or imbecile . .


PUNISHMENT: Not to exceed 10 years in prison.









PSYCHOPATHIC SEX CRIMES:

PSYCHOPATHY: (As defined in Black's Law Dictionary)

Mental disorder in general. More commonly, mental disorder
not amounting to insanity or taking the specific form of a
psychoneurosis, but characterized by a defect of character
or personality, eccentricity, emotional instability, inadequacy
or perversity of conduct, under conceit and suspiciousness,
or lack of common sense, social feeling, self-control, truth-
fulness, energy, or persistence.


1. SADISM:

2. MASOCHISM:

3. FLAGELLATION:


4. PIQUERISM:





5. ANTHROPOPHAGY:


6. NECROPHILIA:

7. PYROMANIA:


Sexual gratification resulting from in-
flicting pain on another person.
Sexual gratification resulting from in-
flicting pain upon himself,
A masochist with a passion to be
whipped resulting in sexual grati-
fication.

Sexual criminals (most frequently sad-
ists) who stab their victims, usually
girls or women, with sharp instruments
. deriving sexual gratification from
the sight of blood and the suffering of
the victim.
(An thro poph' a gy) A sadistic sexual
perversion leading to rape, mutilation,
and cannibalism.
(Ne croph' il ioa A sexual perversion
in which dead bodies are violated.
Sexual gratification resulting from
lighting fires and watching them burn.









SEXUAL NUISANCES:


1. VOYEURISM:



2. EXHIBITIONISM:


3. FETISHISM:



4. MASTURBATION:


5. TRANSVESTISM:


6. FROTTEURS:



7. KLEPTOMANIA:

8. KOPROLAGNIA:


9. UROLAGNIA:


(Vwoh yur') A peeping tor. One who
obtains sexual gratification from wit-
nessing the sexual acts of others or
from viewing persons in the nude.
One who obtains sexual gratification
from exhibiting himself in the nude or
exhibiting his private ports.
Sexual gratification obtained through
handling of certain objects, e.g. wo-
men's panties, or part of a human
body.
Causation of sexual excitement
through manual manipulation of the
genitalia.
A form of sexual deviation in which
the person tries to play the role of the
opposite sex by crossed dressing.
A form of masturbation accomplished
by rubbing the genitalia against per-
sons (of either sex) . occurs fre-
quently in crowds,
Sexual gratification resulting from
stealing.
Sexual excitement resulting from the
smell or taste of filth, e.g., urine or
feces.
Sexual excitement resulting from the
sight of urine or a person urinating.


SEXUAL OBSCENITIES:
(847-.01-.06)
1. Obscene telephone calls . letters .. .language.
2, Pornographic literature . photographs drawings.


k I



























i"



















X


















































































































L




































































































a





















iin

i












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Additional! copies of this report are available at
since copy cost of twenty-five cents, indudimrg
mailing. Special prices on purchases Of 100 or
more ccples. Wrile Report, P. O,. Bx 1044,
Tallahassee, for copies or information.









CHILD MOLESTER CRIMES ..
AND UNNATURAL SEX CRIMES:


LAW:
An offense shall include: Attempted
rape, sodomy, attempted sodomy, crimes
against nature, attempted crimes against
nature, lewd and lascivious behavior, in-
cest and attempted incest, assault (when
a sexual act is completed or attempted)
and assault and battery (when a sexual
act is completed or attempted), when the
acts are committed against, to, or with
a person fourteen years of age or under.
(1) It shall be within the power and
jurisdiction of the trial judge to:


1. CHILD MOLESTER
(801.02)








PUNISHMENT:


(a) Impose a term of years not to
exceed 25.
(b) Commit for treatment and re-
habilitation to the Florida State
Hospital or
Commit to Florida Research
and Treatment Center
Imposition of sentence may be
deferred pending discharge.








CRIMES AGAINST NATURE LAW:
(800.01)

1. CRIMES COMMITTED PER OS: (Oral copulation)


c. FELLATIO:




b. CUNNILINGUS:





c. ANNILINGUS:


(Feh lay'sheeo) A sexual deviation where
gratification is obtained by sucking the
penis. It may be practiced by males in
homosexuality, or by the female where
she introduces the penis into her mouth.
(Cun ni lin'gus) A form of sexual devia-
tion where a person derives sexual ex-
citation by licking the clitoris (KIy' to-
ris) or vulva, or the vagina. It is prac-
ticed by female homosexuals (Lesbian-
ism), or by a male with a female.
(An ni lin'gus) A form of sexual devi-
ation where a person of either sex derives
sexual excitement by licking the anus of
another


2. CRIMES COMMITTED PER ANUS: (Anal copulation)


a. PEDERASTY:
PEDOPH ILIA:


(Ped'er as ty) A form of sexual inter-
course through the anus. Carnal copula-
tion of male with male (particularly man
with boy) by penetrating the onus with
the penis also when the same act is
with the female.


This is also referred to as SODOMY ..

3. CRIMES COMMITTED WITH ANIMALS:


a. BESTIALITY



PUNISHMENT:


Sexual relations between human beings
and an animal . commonly between
human male and female animal ..
ALSO referred to as SODOMY.
(ALL CRIMES AGAINST NATURE)
(800.01)
Not to exceed 20 years in prison,














I"






I












'if
























ii




I i'































































This photograph was taken by a Florida law enforcement agency of a homosexual
act being performed in a public rest room. Such occurrences take placid every day in
virtually every city in every state. It is significant that tke removal of the toilet stall
doors to facilitate photography did not deter these and numerous other practicing
homosexuals




UVf.lSltY OF l-LO AO
3i 1 l fl 1 112 1 I2 II I4
3 1262 07122 4066










































iLI
al




;I




























LL




Homosexuality and citizenship in Florida
CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004805/00001
 Material Information
Title: Homosexuality and citizenship in Florida a report of the Florida Legislative Investigation Committee
Physical Description: 48 p. : illus. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Legislature. -- Legislative Investigation Committee
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahasee
Publication Date: 1964
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Homosexuality -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Bibliographical footnotes.
General Note: Featured in the links to additional resources for the Humanizing Conversations: Roundtable "Behind Closed Doors: The Dark Legacy of the Johns Committee" at UF 11 March 2013, 5:30 pm film, 6:00-7:30 pm panel, Smathers Library (East) 1A This documentary film screening, and following panel and audience discussion, will examine the legacy of the Florida Legislative Investigation Committee, known as the Johns Committee (1956-1965), in current social and political debates concerning public higher education in Florida nearly half a century later. Under the direction of Florida Senator Charley Johns, the Johns Committee was designed by the Florida State Senate to weed out communism and homosexual activity across Florida. The Committee chose the University of Florida in 1958 as its first academic target. Building on the January and February panel discussions about academic freedom and diversity, this event will link to ongoing conversations about political influence in higher education, support for gay and lesbian students, staff, and faculty at UF, and decisions about how to record our collective memory of individuals and events at UF (including the J. Wayne Reitz Union). Following the film screening and four ten-minute presentations, there will be time for a question and answer period and more broad discussion of these issues. Moderator: Churchill Roberts, College of Journalism and Communications (University of Florida) Panelists: Allyson Beutke DeVito, Author of the film "Behind Closed Doors" Stacy Braukman, Writer and Editor Kim Emery, Department of English (University of Florida) Jim Schnur, Special Collections (USF-St. Petersburg); Department of History (Eckerd College) Links of Interest "Homosexuality and Citizenship in Florida," Florida Legislative Investigation Committee Official Report of the Johns Committee. Tallahassee, 1964. "Cold Warriors in the Hot Sunshine : The Johns Committee's Assault on Civil Liberties in Florida, 1956-1965," by James Schnur. Master's thesis, University of South Florida, 1995. "Closet Crusaders: The Johns Committee and Homophobia," by James Schnur. In Carryin' On in the Lesbian and Gay South, ed. by John Howard. New York: New York University Press,1997. "Closet Crusaders, 'Perverts' under the Palms, and Sunshine State Subversion," by James Schnur. Paper presented at the annual meeting of History of Education Society, St. Petersburg, FL, November 2008. "Behind Closed Doors: The Dark Legacy of the Johns Committee," by Allyson A. Beutke and Scott Litvak. Student project for the College of Journalism and Communications, University of Florida, 1999. See also And They Were Wonderful Teachers: Florida's Purge of Gay and Lesbian Teachers, by Karen L. Graves. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009.
General Note: Also called the purple pamphlet.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6140
notis - ADW2813
alephbibnum - 000769402
oclc - 01891176
System ID: UF00004805:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Prelude
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Main
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Appendix
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Back Cover
        Page 51
        Page 52
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THE FLORIDA LEGISLATIVE INVESTIGATION COMMITTEE


803 South Adams Street


Post Office Box 1044


Tallahassee, Florida





REPRESENTATIVE RICHARD O. MITCHELL, CHAIRMAN

SENATOR ROBERT WILLIAMS, VICE CHAIRMAN


MEMBERS FROM THE HOUSE


LEO C. JONES
Panama City


RICHARD 0. MITCHELL
Tallahassee

WILLIAM E. OWENS
Stuart

GEORGE B. STALLINGS, JR.
Jacksonville


John E. Evans
Staff Director

Leo L. Foster
Counsel


Lamar Bledsoe
Secretary


MEMBERS FROM THE SENATE


CHARLEY E. JOHNS
Starke


ROBERT WILLIAMS
Graceville
I-


C. W. (BILL) YOUNG
St. Petersburg


C. Lawrence Rice
Chief Investigator


















PREFACE


The 1963 Florida Legislature created the Legislative Investi-
gation Committee, a continuation of similar interim committees
active on behalf of the state since 1955. Included in the Com-
mittee's mandate from the Legislature was the direction to inves-
tigate and report on "the extent of infiltration into agencies
supported by state funds by practicing homosexuals, the effect
thereof on said agencies and the public, and the policies of
various state agencies in dealing therewith."

To understand and effectively deal with the growing problem
of homosexuality, an understanding of its nature and manifesta-
tions is essential; and it is for that reason that the Committee
has sought in this report to preface its recommendations for
S special studies leading to legislation with a review of the scope
and nature of homosexuality.

" Although this report has been prepared, in keeping with the
Committee mandate, primarily for the benefit of state adminis-
trators and personnel officers, it can be of value to all citizens;
for every parent and every individual concerned with the moral
climate of the state, should be aware of the rise in homosexual
activity noted here, and be possessed of the basic knowledge set
forth.











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Fetish appeal is shown in this photograph taken from a homosexual's collection. The
use of the bindings is frequent in artwork of this nature, and an apparently strong
stimulant to the deviate. In many photos offered by "Art Studios" primarily for the
homosexual trade the black posing strap will be drawn in with a material easily
removed after it has been mailed to the purchaser.









HOMOSEXUALITY AND CITIZENSHIP IN FLORIDA

Homosexuality is, and for too long has been, a skeleton in
the closet of society.
Upon this point, and this alone, can agreement be found
among the educators, psychiatrists, psychologists, researchers,
social workers, law enforcement and judicial officials, and prac-
ticing homosexuals themselves who have expressed interest in
the problem homosexuality poses for society.
To many Floridians, perhaps a majority, homosexuality is
a term without real meaning-the subject for a party joke, the
whispered accusation aimed at an effeminate neighbor or ac-
quaintance, and something to warn one's children about in vague
and general phrases.
This Committee claims no corner on understanding the
history or prognosis of homosexuality. It is, however, convinced
that many facets of homosexual practice as it exists in Florida
today pose a threat to the health and moral well-being of a
sizable portion of our population, particularly our youth.
Since 1959, legislative investigation committees have been
amassing information on homosexual activities within the state
-information drawn largely from the statements of practicing
homosexuals themselves. In 1961 and 1962 a special committee,
appointed by the Governor and directed by the Florida Children's
Commission and Sheriffs Bureau, explored the problem as it
exists within the state, and brought together in a series of
meetings leaders from all walks of life for serious consideration
of homosexuality and recommendations for broadening public
knowledge and understanding of it.
We have drawn on the files of our predecessor legislative
committees, and from the reports and recommendations of the
now inactive state study committee which were generously made
available to us by the Children's Commission, Sheriffs Bureau
and Governor's Office. We have held interviews and consultations
with officials of Florida's mental health program, law enforce-
ment agencies and courts, and made extensive study of the
many and divergent publications, both scientific and popular,
in the field. From this background we have sought to draw a.
digest of information helpful to an understanding of homo-
sexuality, and to present recommendations for effective recog-
nition by the state of its present and potential bearing on the
quality of citizenship in Florida.

WHO AND HOW MANY ARE THE HOMOSEXUALS?
As in virtually all else relating to homosexuality, the defini.
tion and identification of homosexual individuals is obscured by
the presence of many conflicting opinions, contradictory statis-
tics, and a serious lack of responsible research.









A noted author in the field, who is himself a homosexual,
calls American homosexuals "an intensified minority" and speaks
of their sexual "inversion."
A law enforcement official who has made a study of homo-
sexuality suggests that its practice is the basis of "the most
insidious crime of all."
The Homosexual Voters Advisory Service, which claims to
represent 12 million homosexuals, describes a homosexual as "a
person who is capable of experiencing a real and noble love for
someone of his own sex."
Edmund Bergler, M. D., whose outspoken comments on
homosexuality and belief that is is a curable disease have made
him center of considerable controversy, says the "homosexual
is unconsciously a masochistic injustice collector who has shifted
the 'power to mistreat' from woman to man."
And Manfred Guttmacher, M. D., chief medical officer of
the Supreme Bench of Baltimore, summed up the many variables
around which discussions of homosexuality revolve when he
wrote that "individual sexual behavior is a complex pattern
dependent upon biologic endowments, parental behavior, religious
indoctrination, the basic relationship between the individual and
his parents in early childhood, group mores, the educational level
attained, accidental experiences during childhood and youth, and
police prohibitions."
For the purposes of this discussion, it seems safe to say that
a homosexual is a man or woman, married or single, young or
old, well-to-do or on-a-shoestring, possessed of an extensive or
limited education, who seeks and finds sexual stimulation and
gratification on a regular basis with one or more partners of the
same sex.
There is no single identifying characteristic of the homo-
sexual, nor can they be stereotyped, although we shall later re-
view some common characteristics of active homosexuals. In
Florida, known homosexuals have^ranged from ill-paid field
hands to individuals at the highest levels of government, com-
merce and culture. Many active homosexuals are active members
of their communities, apparently happily married and rearing
families, taking part in church and civic affairs, and, to outward
appearances, the picture of normalcy.
There is no census of homosexual persons, and estimates
as to their numbers must at best be informed guesses.
The widely publicized Kinsev studies suggested that nearly
50 percent of the unmarried males under 35 in America have
engaged in homosexual practices, and that of the general popu-
lation, one out of six men had experienced at least as much
homosexual as normal, or heterosexual, experience for at least
three full years between the 16th and 55th birthdays. The
Kinsey reports estimated that one out of each 25 men is exclu-
sively homosexual after the onset of adolescence.
It was Kinsey's conclusion that homosexuality among








women is only one-half to one-third as prevalent as it is among
males. Other researchers, while agreeing with the Kinsey esti-
mates of three to five percent of the male population being ac-
tively homosexual, indicate the rate of female homosexuality
(lesbianism) to be double that of the male population. Far less
is known about female homosexuality than about male activities,
and relatively little research has been done on the subject.
From law enforcement records, medical and mental health
sources, the testimony of active homosexuals, and an application
of national projections to the state, the best and current estimate
of active homosexuals in Florida is 60,000 individuals. Several
of our consultants have suggested that this figure would be
more appropriate if limited to male homosexuals and ought to
be doubled if to accurately reflect the female homosexuals in our
population.
This figure, comparable to the population of Florida's capital
city, reflects an increase in the state's homosexual population
in recent years, and the expanding "open" activities of American
homosexuals, some 100,000 of whom dwell in New York City
alone and whose ghettos there recently prompted the staid New
York Times to delve into their deviations in a lengthy feature
article.
The origins of homosexuality are obscure, as is the question
of whether it is sin or sickness. It is depicted in ancient cave
drawings; was recognized in the culture of the Golden Age of
Greece; figures in the controversy over Shakespeare's sonnets;
is regularly debated in the scholarly seminars of forensic medi-
cine; and figures prominently in security considerations in the
highest echelons of today's world powers.
Rather than review the multitudinous theories, conclusions,
contentions and claims advanced through the years to "clarify"
consideration of homosexuality, we have contented ourselves
with presenting as an appendix to this report as complete and
responsible a bibliography on the subject as we believe can be
compiled, and leave to each individual the prerogative of selecting
the authority and theory that most nearly jibe with his own
views. We would, however, suggest that the Biblical description
of homosexuality as an "abomination" has stood well the test
of time.

THE SPECIAL WORLD OF HOMOSEXUALITY

For the active homosexual there exist two worlds in which
status, stature and security must be sought.
The first is the "straight" society, where conformance to
accepted social, moral and legal standards sets the pattern of
conduct familiar to most of us. This is the world of the coffee
break, the PTA, and the myriad other bits of Floridiana and
Americana, providing for most a comfortable and secure exist-
ence.








The second is the "gay" society, populated by homosexuals
and replete with its own language, customs, and dangers. It is
a well organized society, extending from homosexual hangouts
in public rest rooms to the offices of several national organiza-
tions through which articulate homosexuals seek recognition of
their condition as a proper part of our culture and morals and
appreciation of their role in our history and heritage.
In homosexual circles the terms "queer" and "deviate" sel-
dom, if ever, are heard. Those individuals who have "come out,"
or committed themselves to a life of homosexual activity, are
"gay" and will be found at "gay" bars, eating places, organiza-
tions and shops. They may well be "cruising," driving or walking
through areas where they believe they might find "trade,"
individuals, not necessarily homosexual, who will serve as passive
partners in the performance of homosexual acts.
Many homosexuals, and the majority of those apprehended
byF law enforcement authorities, take their sex where they find
it, be it in a rest room of a park or other public place; a car, be
it moving or parked; a residence or a hotel room.
For the guidance of the uninitiated, we have appended to
this report a glossary of homosexual terms and a catalogue of
homosexual acts.
The two homosexuals most familiar to the general public
are the "Swish Queen" and the "Butch." The Swish Queen is the
ultra-effeminate male who will occasionally be seen fully dressed
in women's clothing. The Butch is the ultra-masculine female,
muscular in build, with mannish haircut and tailored clothing.
These are in the minority in homosexual society and cannot be
considered representative of homosexuals in general.
Homosexuals ate given to freely discussing their status, even
when under arrest. From these commentaries and from perusal
of the two major homosexual publications, ONE MAGAZINE
and THE MATTACHINE REVIEW (both propaganda arms of
national homosexual organizations), some clarifying conclusions
can be drawn.
A key homosexual aim is recognition. A spokesman for a
major homosexual group put it this way:
"The time is coming when homosexual love will be accepted
in America as it is now in some other cultures of the world . .
"Homosexual love is just as beautiful and health-producing,
and as spiritually ennobling, as heterosexual love . .We homo-
sexuals, too. know that sex without love is empty, incomplete,
and unsatisfying. But with love, homosexuality, too, can bring
ultimate fulfillment.
"That this fulfillment cannot biologically include the creation
of new life through children does not mean that homosexuality
should be condemned. Neither do heterosexual love relations,
when birth control by any means is used, result in procreation.
"The emotional, physical, intellectual, and spiritual oneness
experienced between two men or between two women in love is









in every way comparable to the same beautiful emotion experi-
enced between persons of the opposite sex."
One flaw in this thesis is that the sort of love relationships
lyrically described are notoriously few and far between among
male homosexuals. Fleeting relationships are the order of the
day in a great many cases, and multiple sex acts with a procession
of partners who are often strangers known only by a first name
or nickname frequently occur within the space of one evening.
It is true that many male homosexuals do enter into "Gay
Marriages," often begun with a solemn ceremony in which they
agree to live together under conditions approximating a straight,
or heterosexual, marriage situation. It is rare for such a union to
last over a prolonged period, even though into the bonds of some
such marriages is placed a formal agreement for a "Trick Day"
one or more days a week when either or both of the partners
are free to seek union with another for the night.
In the case of female homosexuals, many "marriages" have
been known to remain stable over long periods of time. There is
speculation that this is due both to the inborn desire of women
for a more settled existence and because two women living
together are less apt to cause comment within a community than
would two men.
Some insight into the nature of a lesbian "marriage" is to
be found in a letter written by a Tampa woman in response to
publicity on the state's concern with homosexuality. She wrote:
"This letter is not written with lascivious intent. Neither is
it intended to glorify the homosexual and fling obscenities at
the law enforcement organization while hiding behind a shield
of animosity. I am writing only to set forth certain facts which
you may not have the opportunity to review. In other words, I
am giving you my side of the story.
"First of all, let me say that I do not feel shame for what
I am. I have made a good adjustment to my way of life. I am
happy as I am. I do not want to change. Many well adjusted
homosexuals feel as I do, and there is truly nothing a psychiatrist
can do for a person who does not recognize a need and express
a desire to change.
"Like many others, I lead a quiet, and apparently normal
life. I have a well paying, responsible job, I own my own home,
I am active in church and community affairs and I command the
respect of those who know me. I love the woman I live with and
I honor this love more than a great number of people honor the
marital vows they speak. I regard my personal relationship as
having all the sanctity of marriage.
"My life is not a merry-go-round of bars, wild parties, and
changing partners as is often the case with homosexuals. Per-
haps I am an exception, but I do not believe so. I have numerous
friends, couples who have lived together for many years, who
do not 'make the rounds' of the bars. Although we cannot attend
formal dances and other forms of recreation which require










mixed couples, we find many clean and wholesome activities
such as bowling, tennis, card parties, record parties, etc.
"I will grant you a point. Homosexuality is, as a total pic-
ture, a dread disease. It must be stopped from spreading rapidly.
But I must protest the manner in which it is treated. Homo-
sexuals are not all alike. Yet all are treated alike as criminals
and when 'investigated' are submitted to vulgar questioning,
abuse and undignified treatment. This handling is not restricted
to those who have committed a criminal act, but to be very frank,
it is common treatment of anyone suspected or vaguely connected
with homosexuality.
"Must I be stripped of my privacy and all the pride and
dignity that I enjoy as an American, simply because some
element in my environment, some incident in my childhood, or
some faulty parental relationship has produced an individual
who chooses to love one of the same sex?
Very truly yours,
Just a Girl of 24"
It is with similar arguments that homosexuals have mounted
a national drive to legalize sexual relationships between mutually
consenting adult partners of the same sex. Such a proposal was
advanced in a massive British study presented to the Parliament
in 1957, but which was not enacted into law. In this country,
only the Illinois Legislature has acted favorably on the proposal,
which has failed of passage in several other states in which it
has been introduced.
This movement by homosexuals has received some support
from liberally-oriented authors and legislators. Notable among
these is Harry Golden, who devoted a column in his Carolina
Israelite to the suggestion that the world has seen several homo-
sexual ages:
"Ancient Greece was a ,'onis.exuiiIl culture. The scenes that
take place between two men in a Greek tragedy are nothing more
or less than love scenes. It was not considered an anti-social act
in Greece . Elizabethan England was also a homosexual age.
Shakespeare dedicated one of his sonnets to a lover . The
last of these three homosexual ages has been our own. Homo-
sexuality took on the characteristics of an endemic affliction
after World War I which destroyed all of the old values. Pioneer
America may have known isolated cases of homosexuality, but
it is the industrial age and the 'atomic' generation which have
given it a new popularity.
"Society would feel better if there were no homosexuals,
but our laws have to face the truth that every society in one
way or another produces certain aberrancies. In a religious
society you have heresies, in a wilderness society, renegades,
and in this society, homosexuality. Society must change itself
to lose homosexuality. It can't be stamped out. Until we make









some of our laws humane, we will be unable to understand the
problem, let alone deal with it."
On the strength of such reasoning, aggressive homosexuals
are assembling a considerable array of supporters from the
"straight" world, whose sympathies and lack of knowledge of
the other side of the homosexual coin prompt their support of
a drive for "rational" legislation at both the federal and state
levels.
WHY BE CONCERNED?
If the torrent of propaganda from homosexual organizations
is to be believed, those afflicted with homosexuality constitute
a maladjusted, misunderstood and mistreated minority, com-
posed of productive people seeking their proper place in the sun.
It is difficult, however, to find the ennobling element in
scenes such as these which are drawn from official records of
this state.
In late evening a well dressed teacher enters the men's
room of a large Central Florida shopping center. He enters a
stall toilet, noting that the adjacent booth is occupied. There is
a hole about the size of a fifty cent piece carved through the
partition separating the stalls. The teacher places a finger
through the hole, then withdraws it. The finger of the unknown
occupant of the next stall appears. The teacher then inserts his
sex organ through the hole to perform, in less than five minutes,
a homosexual act with a partner he never sees and to whom he
need not speak.
Or this:
The athletically-built little league coach in West Florida
lived at home with his mother, but he was in his mid-twenties
and only recently returned from college so no one thought it
strange. He was looked up to by the parents of the youngsters
he tutored in sports, for the 10-to-15 year olds obviously idolized
him. So it was that it came as a special shock to the community
when it was revealed that he had systematically seduced the
members of the baseball team into the performance of homo-
sexual acts, and that he was using the services of a willing 13
year old girl for the normal sexual stimulation of the boys, and
for his own gratification.
And this:
In South Florida it was possible for visiting homosexuals to
obtain the services of a male partner, ranging in age from the
early teens through adulthood, for a single act or the duration
of his stay, with about the same ease at comparable cost as other
tourists-on-the-town obtain the services of a "high class" pros-
titute. When the boys in this ring were not on call, they passed
the time posing for nude photos to be made part of the tremen-
dous traffic in homosexual pornography.
These are not isolated instances, nor do they touch the
extremes of deviate behavior which enforcement officers have









become accustomed to encountering in the world of homo-
sexuality.
The plain fact of the matter is that a great many homo-
sexuals have an insatiable appetite for sexual activities and find
special gratification in the recruitment to their ranks of youth.
This addiction to youth has been reflected by homosexuals
themselves in the pages of their publications. In the letters to
the editor column of ONE MAGAZINE, there have appeared
sentiments such as those in the January 1960, issue of "Mr. T. W.
of Brooklyn" who wrote that "the urge for a younger companion
.is almost basic to the gay life . If the desire for youth makes
me sick, then forget about calling the doctor for I never want to
be cured of my illness."
There is a tendency to lump together the homosexuals who
seek out youth and the child molesters. To most people the child
molester seems to pose the greatest threat to society.
The child molester attacks, but seldom kills or physically
cripples his victim. The outlook for the victim of molestation
is generally good for recovery from -the mental and physical
shocks involved and for the enjoyment of a normal life.
The homosexual, on the other hand, prefers to reach out for
the child at the time of normal sexual awakening and to conduct
a psychological preliminary to the physical contact. The homo-
sexual's goal and part of his satisfaction is to "bring over" the
young person, to hook him for homosexuality.
Whether it be with youth or with older individuals, homo-
sexuality is unique among the sexual assaults considered by
our laws in that the person affected by the practicing homosexual
is first a victim, then an accomplice, and finally himself a per-
petrator of homosexual acts.
Homosexuals are generally outwardly gregarious people,
free with gifts and money for those they like or are currently
enmeshed with. Many find association with extreme youth a
solace for their anxiety over aging, just as some aging "straights"
seek out the companionship of youthful members of the opposite
sex.
The appeals to youth by homosexuals are manifold. They are
masters of flattery, playing up to the teenager's desire for recog-
nition and equal status in an adult world. They will provide the
youth with opportunity to attain goals made attractive by adult
practitioners-a car to drive, cigarettes to smoke, liquor to drink.
Frequently, pornographic materials of a heterosexual nature are
used. One strip of photos we have seen starts off depicting in
detail and clarity a male-female sexual relationship; and as the
ensuing photos unfold, the man leaves the woman and joins
another man in a series of poses leading up to vivid homosexual
erotica.
In this connection, it is worthy of note that while much
public hue and cry has been raised about the "girlie" magazines
draped across newsstands the length and breadth of the state,









little has been done to reveal the role of the male muscle and
physique magazines, the pin-up books of homosexuality.
The principal purchasers of these books are not the puny
"before" examples of skin and bone seeking a formula by which
to pour themselves into the muscular mold of the male models,
but are the homosexuals who find more stimulation from viewing
the rippling muscles and tanned figures portrayed there, than
the man who likes women derives from the center fold of Playboy.
These magazines are the showcases for photographers who
deal in homosexual pornography and who, in most cases, supply
the publishers with photographs free of charge. In return for
this, there appears at the back of the magazine a credit page
listing the names and addresses of the photographers who con-
tributed the photos used on various pages of the publication.
Along with this is the suggestion that the reader who sees some-
thing he likes correspond directly with the photographer.
Such correspondence will lead first to circumspect figure
studies; then to more suggestive photos, dualss" showing two
men in close proximity; and finally to the hard core and costly
homosexual pornography consisting of totally nude males in
lascivious, suggestive poses, or actual homosexual acts. Similar
photos of lesbian relationships are more rare, but available from
major producers of these materials.
In addition to the multi-million dollar traffic in profession-
ally produced homosexual pornography, local homosexuals trade
photos like some youngsters trade bubble gum baseball cards.
The Polaroid camera has been a great boon to homosexuals and
a blow to those required to investigate their activities. The
avoidance of a film processor has freed the homosexual to pro-
duce photos in abundance of his friends at play, and inexpensive
copying machines have made possible rapid reproduction for
exchange or sale.
Once entangled in the web of homosexuality, there are sev-
eral courses common to young people.
The first is that they quickly "come out" by becoming full-
fledged homosexuals, taking an aggressive role in sexual acts.
It is this type of youth who "goes out for chickens" by becoming
an active recruiter of extremely young boys. It is this individual
who is found to be the leader (although usually with adult advice)
of homosexually oriented high school "secret societies" whose
initiation rites run the gamut of homosexual appeals.
Another course is that pursued by the young person who
recognizes that his willingness to be a passive partner in homo-
sexual acts can be the key to an ever-available flow of money
and gifts. A good looking youth finds little difficulty in making
contact with "cruising" homosexuals willing to pay for his ser-
vices. In Miami, one boy of 17 claimed convincingly that he had
"earned" more than $20,000 since he was 14, and that he was
paying his family's expenses, had bought an automobile and a
complete and tasteful wardrobe with the wages of homosexuality.









Such young people as this, known as hustlers, will frequently
become "fairies," interested only in sex with any man, or "dirt,"
willing to be passive in a homosexual act but given to robbing
the homosexual of all money and clothing at its conclusion.
Homosexuals, especially those with good jobs or close family
ties, are vulnerable to blackmail, and there are those who serve
as "trade" merely to amass the information on which a black-
mail threat can be based. Those homosexuals who steal seldom
do so for personal use, but to satisfy a greedy lover or black-
mailer.
In addition to the moral and legal problems engendered by
the spread of homosexuality, its practitioners face a very real
medical hazard. Venereal disease can be, and is, transmitted by
certain of the more common homosexual acts. The incidence of
the several forms of this disease has increased in recent years
to a new high of 1748 cases in 1963, ranking Florida third in the
nation in number of cases, due, according to health authorities,
in large measure to homosexual transmission. Particularly has
this been found to be the case in university communities and
similar areas with a large youth population.
We have not touched upon homosexuality as a factor in
other forms of sex deviation or in major crime occurrences and
security matters, for to do so would deserve more space than is
available here. Suffice it to say that such links do exist and that
the homosexual, subject to abnormal external and internal pres-
sures, tends to neuroticism and mental imbalance, a predilection
opening pathways to crime and conduct far beyond the veil of
rationality.
We would not deny the existence of some lasting homosexual
relationships which pose no threat to society and in which the
participants are constructive and contributing members of their
communities. We do, however, believe that the glimpse of the
homosexual world we have here presented underlines our convic-
tion that homosexuals pose a problemidemanding of serious at-
tention by all concerned with sound citizenship.

WHAT TO DO ABOUT HOMOSEXUALITY
In Florida, homosexuality is not treated as an entity by
existing laws, but rather individual acts are specified as illegal
in those sections of the Statutes dealing with sex offenses. We
include a summary of those laws in the appendix to this report.
Many homosexuals are picked up and prosecuted on vagrancy
or similar non-specific charges, fined a moderate amount, and
then released to pick up their practices virtually where they left
them on arrest.
Most law enforcement, prosecutive and judicial officials are
in an honest quandary as to how best to handle such cases. They
are concerned that in sexual matters Florida follow the admoni-
tion of Britain's Wolfenden Report to continue "to preserve








public order and decency, to protect the citizen from what is
offensive and/or injurious, and to provide sufficient safeguards
against exploitation and corruption of others."
Incarceration is not a satisfactory answer in many cases,
for indeed prison life produces its own specialized brand of devi-
ates, known as "institutional homosexuals," who would not, in
freedom, consider homosexual activity, but in prison turn to it in
search of escape from sexual tensions.
The Florida Legislature in 1963 recognized this problem and
enacted legislation directing the Division of Mental Health and
Division of Corrections of the State to plan for the construction
of facilities at the prison system's new receiving and treatment
center "for the care of child molesters and criminal sexual
psychopaths."
The same legislative session revised the Statutes relating
to the revocation of teaching certificates to make more certain
the withdrawal of teaching privileges from those against whom
homosexual charges have been verified. From 1959 through
January 1, 1964, a total of 64 Florida teachers have had certifi-
cates revoked by the State Board of Education; and, of these,
54 were on morals charges. An additional 83 cases are now pend-
ing before the Board. While this is a relatively low number in
the light of Florida's more than 40,000 certified teachers, it is
ample to warrant concern by educators and parents.
A veteran investigator of homosexual activities summed up
the feelings of many who have studied the problem of homo-
sexuality in Florida when, in consultation with us, he said:
"There are those who feel that this particular type of inves-
tigation-against homosexuals-is just too touchy to fool with.
But it must be done. It must be done.
"The homosexual groups, Homosexuals Anonymous, the
Homophile Institute, the Mattachine Society and others, are now
coming out in the open in our larger cities like New York and
Washington, trying to gain social acceptance in publications.
Late last fall they actually sought a permit to solicit on the
streets of Washington.
"Since the homosexual has seen fit to come out into the
open and try to get himself accepted by society, I think it is
about time the thinking members of society, the persons in posi-
tions of responsibility, get up off their duffs and realize that if
we don't stand up and start fighting, we are going to lose
these battles in a very real war of morality.
"The homosexuals are organized. The persons whose respon-
sibility it is to protect the public, and especially our kids, are
not organized in the direction of combating homosexual recruit-
ing of youth.
"The problem is so little understood by lay people that the
homosexuals will win every battle that is fought unless we band
together to educate ourselves. There is only one thing that the
homosexual fears as far as straight persons are concerned, and








'that is a straight person who knows him and the gay crowd for
what they are. He is not afraid of the average housewife and
the average citizen, and he is not afraid of the judges who have
never taken the time and the trouble to look into this problem
and see to what it really amounts. He is afraid of the police
officer, because he feels the police officer can see through him
a lot easier than anyone else can.
"He will depend upon a jury, invariably, to adjudicate his
guiltiness in a court of law, rather than a judge, because he
feels the judge may be able to see through him.
"We must do everything in our power to create one thing
in the mind of every homosexual, and that is 'Keep your hands
off our children! The consequences will be terrible if you do not.'
"The homosexuals' motto is: Today's Trade is Tomorrow's
Competition. This motto is spoken in every language in the civil-
ized world. We must teach the homosexual, make him understand
that wve will not tolerate his recruitment of youth.
"I don't think that this is asking too much of us-too much
of every parent, for if we don't act soon we will wake up some
morning and find they are too big to fight. They may be already.
I hope not."
The Committee is reluctant to concede that homosexuality
in Florida and America today has reached either the proportions
-or power suggested by that investigator.
It concurs fully, however, that the closet door must be
thrown open and the light of public understanding cast upon
homosexuality in its relationship to the responsibilities of sound
citizenship.
We hope that many citizen organizations in Florida will use
this report as a jumping off point for a serious and meaningful
consideration of the problem of homosexuality and as a source
of information with which to prepare their children to meet the
temptations of homosexuality lurking today in the vicinity of
nearly every institution of learning.
We recommend to the Florida State Board of Education
retention at the earliest practicable time of qualified personnel
to be assigned to the Teacher Certification Division of the State
Department of Education for the purpose of refuting or affirm-
ing allegations of homosexuality involving teachers in the public
schools of the state and preparing information thus obtained for
the prompt consideration and action of the Department and
Board. In the past, the Department of Education has called union
this Committee and its predecessors to perform investigative
activities for it. but this is not a proper function of a legislative
body and should be placed on a permanent basis within the
Department, as contemplated in the Statutes.
We recommend. and have initiated, the formulation of legis-
lation providing A Homosexual Practices Control Act for Florida.
We feel such legislation warranted, for while we encourage
and call for increased research efforts to expose the underlying









causes of homosexuality and its possible cures, we recognize that
the problem today is one of control and that established pro-
cedures and stern penalties will serve both as encouragement to
law enforcement officials and as a deterrent to the homosexual
hungry for youth.
We have asked a committee of distinguished Floridians to
consult with us in the formulation of effective legislation in this
field and will invite their consideration of such steps as:
1. Mandatory psychiatric examination prior to sentencing
of every person convicted of a homosexual act with a minor and
discretionary pre-sentence examination of others.
2. Provision for outpatient psychiatric treatment centers
to which offenders on probation or parole may be assigned.
3. Providing for the confidentiality of information relating
to the first arrest of a homosexual similar to that now in effect
in juvenile cases, with the provision that the confidentiality of
the information may be waived by the judge upon conviction or
a plea of guilty.
4. Creation of a central records repository for information
on homosexuals arrested and convicted in Florida and provision
that such records shall be open to public employing agencies.
5. Placing sole jurisdiction of a second homosexual offense
in a felony court and providing appropriate penalties upon con-
viction.
We believe that a law embodying elements such as these
would serve to radically reduce the number of homosexuals prey-
ing upon the youth of Florida, would stiffen the state's hand in
dealing with those homosexuals apprehended and would provide
an element of protection for those homosexuals whose first public
venture is relatively mild and whose ability to earn a living or
provide for a family would be destroyed by exposure.
It behooves us all to come to know the nature of the homo-
sexual, for he is with us in every area of the state. It behooves
us, too, to define for him, and for ourselves, the conditions which
govern his presence.

















Suspended i7H":iih Teacher

Resigns; Hearing Canceled
iD,* i : -ietal--The March 30 at which time Coaeh 'rlta i f .5'I. :lli 't r d.
I .cher from,Thr,,. j E V ,b, tendered his WIhn .i vti.il f *: .e
SP. who as resignation effective at the end asked if tt wa ti-e .. rius
,..rpe. .fl .. . ( ago on of this school ycar and tle of 'he board, te oithi .-e
-. 1 m u r- indicated he will re-

.!... W .I r I*
.. . t.i .D ITi'. C. ..' +* .*I *" didi to te.r
.ei p p i *,* .Ie .Ate
r aC I. a.b A .ia. r
o. ncg pl iril a p I
h wit dM*IT i s+i resig i ef. ie to. ( I f rs
Fi a "-.+: r f ..... .1 4j. r.
rtih tall -am nea .er ..
-Icen d"rpeh w
i.e ,,a-amtst a n

ins igaton b y the n,I had gien h i a !.
chargedd wth dis- relignation efftive k
tigar crd to a Do toolh d the hoard
a \ ege d:y kissing the catll ame near the
C" e *the meeting
r "I certain think w
^1d P boar essr: -pJ
11 P~e Professor'/ /


On the infrequent occasions when deviate behavior is exposed, especially on the part
of those who work with youth, the school system and all dedicated to the service
of the young are made suspect.





















APPENDIX


I. Florida Laws on Sex Offenses

II. Glossary of Homosexual Terms and Deviate Acts

III. Bibliography on Sexual Deviations









FLORIDA LAWS ON SEX OFFENSES

ILLEGAL FORMS OF NATURAL INTERCOURSE:


1. FORNICATION:
(798.03)


Unlawful heterosexual intercourse be-
tween two unmarried persons.


PUNISHMENT: 3 months or fine not to exceed $30.00.

2. LEWD AND LASCIVIOUS BEHAVIOR:
(798.02)
(a) If any man and woman, not being
married to each other, lewdly and lasci-
viously associate and cohabit together

(b) If any man or woman, married or
unmarried, is guilty of open and gross
lewdness and lascivious behavior . .
(The offense of lewdly and lasciviously
associating and cohabiting together in-
cludes both lewd and lascivious inter-
course and/or living or dwelling together
as if the conjugal relation existed be-
tween the parties. Both elements must be
proven to sustain a conviction.)


PUNISHMENT:



3. ADULTERY:
(798.01)


PUNISHMENT:



4. INCEST:
(741.22)




PUNISHMENT:


Not more than one year in prison, or one
year in the county jail, or fine not to
exceed $300.00.

Voluntary heterosexual, intercourse of a
married person with a person other than
his spouse. (If either party is married,
both shall be deemed guilty.)
Not to exceed 2 years in prison, or one
year in the county jail, or fine not to ex-
ceed $500.00.

Persons within the degrees of consan-
guinity within which marriages are pro-
hibited or declared by law to be inces-
tuous and void, who intermarry or com-
mit adultery or fornication with each
other . .
Not to exceed 20 years in prison, or one
year in the county jail.









5. PROSTITUTION:
(796.07)

PUNISHMENT:


6. RAPE:
(794.01)




PUNISHMENT:


A woman who permits any man who will
pay her price to have (natural) sexual
intercourse with her . .
Fine not exceeding $500.00, or imprison-
ment not to exceed six months, or both.

Whoever ravishes and carnally knows a
female of the age of 10 years or more,
by force and against her will, or unlaw-
fully or carnally knows and abuses a fe-
male child under the age of ten years

DEATH, unless a majority of the jury
recommends mercy.


7. CARNAL INTERCOURSE WITH UNMARRIED PERSON
UNDER EIGHTEEN:
(794.05)
Any person who has unlawful carnal in-
tercourse with any unmarried person, of
previous chaste character, who at the
time of such intercourse is under the age
of eighteen . .
PUNISHMENT: Not more than 10 years in prison, or fine
not to exceed $2,000.00.

8. CARNAL INTERCOURSE WITH AN UNMARRIED
FEMALE IDIOT:
(794.06)
Any male person who has carnal inter-
course with an unmarried female, with
or without her consent, who is at the time
an idiot, lunatic or imbecile ..
PUNISHMENT: Not to exceed 10 years in prison.










GLOSSARY of HOMOSEXUAL TERMS
and DEVIATE ACTS

GAY: Homosexual.
QUEER: A homosexual, usually of low class and
habits.
FAIRY: Interested only in sex with any man.
DEGENERATE: Extremely sexual with any person,
male or female. Mentally unbalanced
when sex is involved. Some have been
known to use animals. Dangerous to
gay and normal people.
TRADE: People who like to be passive partners
in sexual relations with homosexuals;
one-sided affairs.
DIRT: Rough trade-normal people the same
as trade except they rob homosexuals
after the affair, of both money and
clothing.
CHI-CHI: (Pronounced she-she). Usually a room
or apartment very effeminately decor-
ated. Lace works, drapes, etc.
SWISHY: A homosexual with very effeminate
ways, especially in walking and ges-
tures.
BUTCH: (a) A homosexual who appears to be
very masculine.
(b) Term used by homosexuals to de-
scribe a normal person.
(c) The aggressive or masculine part-
ner in a homosexual relationship
between two females.
BITCH: A homosexual who is swishy and talks
in an effeminate manner. Frequently
uses "mushy" language.
JAM: Normal person.
Sometimes used to designate a normal
person who is understanding in the
ways of homosexuality but who is un-
touchable for trade or anything else.









DOG'S LUNCH:


PUPPY'S LUNCH:


LET YOUR HAIR DOWN:


"HAIR PINS" or just
"PINS":


COME-OUT:


CRUISE:



FLUFF (or FEMME):


BUTCH:


CREEP:



CUTE:


BI-SEXUAL:


LESBIAN:

DIKE or DYKE:


Either a normal person or a gay person
whose looks and actions are unattrac-
tive to the point of non-association.

Not as bad as a dog's lunch, but still
unattractive.

Meaning to admit being a homosexual
by verbal means.

To drop hints to a person whose ways
are unknown, to determine if he is a
homosexual or not.

The time one admits he is a homo-
sexual and adjusts himself to that life.

A method of picking up other homo-
sexuals by a gay person-looking a
person over as possible trade.

A female homosexual who is effemin-
ate in her ways.

In referring to a female, is one who is
gay and acts and dresses in a mascu-
line manner.

A homosexual or normal person who
is disgusting to the average normal or
gay person in all ways.

An attractive person in the eyes of a
homosexual, either male or female,
depending on the homosexual sex.

A person who is neither exclusively
homosexual nor heterosexual.

Female homosexual.

Female homosexual.


Same as dike.


A male homosexual.


KING:

QUEEN:









QUEEN:


TYPES OF QUEENS:







GAY CROWD:

GAY BAR:

GAY MARRIAGE:



TRICK DAY:





GAY DIRT:



G-WARNING-G
(General) RED

G-WARNING-G
(General) BLUE
G-WARNING LOCAL:




RED LIGHT:


Leader of a group of female homo-
sexua s.
69 queen.
Browning queen
Reaming queen
Belly-wh queen
Hand queen
Golden-shower queen
(All of the above are fairly well self-
explanatory.)
A group of homosexuals who run
around together.
Popular meeting place for homo-
sexuals.
Mutual agreements between homo-
sexuals of either sex to live together
and observe the normal code of ethics
concerning marital fidelity.
A day that two married homosexuals
are free to go with someone else for
the one night. The frequency of these
depends entirely on the agreement
reached by the two married homo-
sexuals.
A gay person who is considered tough
and who expects money or clothing,
by force if necessary, after a mutual
sexual affair with another gay person.
Tip-off of an oncoming raid which will
happen soon. Warning for all gay peo-
ple to leave the bars and head home.
Same as above, only more time to
leave.
Tip-off that the club in which it is
given is going to be raided. Also, used
to inform another gay person that
you're being watched and to be cau-
tious.
A raid which is starting without enough
time to leave safely. Only time enough
to change places with the other homo-
sexuals to make couples of the oppo-
site sex and to destroy all incriminat-
ing material. This warning is given by
rapid repetition throughout the club
or bar.









SHE:
69:


PARTIAL 69:


BLOW JOB:

71:
MARRIED:


HUSBAND:

WIFE:

MY MAN:
MY WOMAN:
MY GIRL:
MY LOVER:
DINGE QUEEN:
SEA FOOD:
"DO YOU":

CRUSHED FRUIT:


GAY CROWD:
SCREAMING BITCH:
or FLAMING BITCH:

SISTER:
GOING IN DRAG:


PISS ELEGANT:


CHICKEN:


Male homosexual.
Sex act wherein two persons commit
oral intercourse on each other simul-
taneously.
Sex act wherein a homosexual is the
recipient of an act of fellatio but does
not return the act.
An act of fellatio either given (active)
or received (passive).
Intercourse by anus.
When two homosexuals go together
exclusively. Not considered married
unless they provide for each other.
The aggressive (active) partner of two
"Married" homosexuals.
The recipient (passive) partner of two
"Married" homosexuals.
Terms of endearment between homo-
sexuals.


A negro homosexual.
Homosexuals in the Navy.
Give a "blow job," said as: "I'd like
to do you."
A term used to characterize a homo-
sexual who tries to deny he is a homo-
sexual.
Any gathering of homosexuals.
An exhibitionist who outwardly pro-
claims his homosexuality and his hom-
osexual intentions.
A homosexual.
Wearing a costume, usually complete
with female wig,makeup,and women's
clothes.
A homosexual who brags or is out-
wardly conceited.
An extremely young-looking homo-
sexual or a homosexual under 21 years









DREAM BOAT:

THIS YEAR'S TRADE IS
NEXT YEAR'S
COMPETITION

ADAMISM:

ANILINGUS:

AUTO-EROTICISM:
CAIN COMPLEX:


COMPLEX:





CUNNILINGUS:

ECSTASY
INTOXICATION:


ELECTRA COMPLEX:


ENURITICS:

EXHIBITIONISM:






FELLATIO:

FETISH:


A term used to characterize an un-
usually attractive homosexual.
A phrase used by homosexuals to indi-
cate that a person who participates in
the passive role will eventually go over
to the active state.
A form of exhibitionism in which the
subject exhibits himself in the nude.
Sexual pleasure obtained through the
use of the mouth on the anus.
Sexual love or fixation on one's self.
Rivalry between brothers and sisters
over the family possessions or the af-
fection of one or both of the parents.
The pattern of man's mental processes,
his reaction to his environment; in
each there is represented elements of
our foreknowing (primary instincts)
together with instinctive elements of
a lower order.
Apposition of the tongue or mouth to
the vulva; oral copulation.
That moment when the sadist has
reached the zenith of affectivity; the
sensation of pain is suppressed by the
stronger urge and sensation of desire.
Sexual desire of the daughter towards
her father, with hostility towards her
mother.
Psychopaths who are interested in
urine.
(Spectacular complex). The exposure
of the genitalia for the purpose of
sexual gratification; the genitalia are
usually in a condition of excitement,
and the act is more prevalent among
males; Pathological display of the ego
in general.
Oral copulation; use of the mouth on
the male sex organs.
A symbol arousing sexual excitation;
the substituting of a part of the body
or an article for the sexual object.









FETISHISM:



FIRE-WATER COMPLEX:





FLAGELLATION:



FROTTEURS:






GERONTOPHILIA:

HETEROSEXUAL:
HOMOSEXUALITY:


INCEST COMPLEX:

KLEPTOMANIA:





KOPROLAGNIA:


LIBIDO:


Sexual abnormailty in which sexual
stimulation or gratification is derived
through some article or part of the
sexual object.

This condition is often found as a part
of the symptom complex occurring in
sexually psychopathic incendiarists.
After lighting a fire there is a period
of exhibitionism followed by a desire
to urinate.
A psycho-sexual perversion character-
ized by a passion for whipping; en-
countered among sado-masochists;
may be either active or passive.
Addicts of a form of masturbation,
closely associated with buttock fetish-
ism; the male subject usually rubs or
presses against the buttocks of a fe-
male, and sometimes a male, while in
a crowd. In this condition there is us-
ually a homosexual element.
The choice of older persons of the op-
posite sex as sexual objects or partners.
Pertaining to the opposite sex.
A condition in which there is a sexual
fixation or erotic sexual attachment
to persons of the same sex.
Desire for sexual relations with a near
relative, usually a parent.
The desire to steal or appropriate arti-
cles. In many cases psychopathic per-
sonalities manifesting the impulsive
desire to steal come under the heading
of fetish-thieves and during the act of
stealing receive sexual gratification.
A condition usually found in maso-
chism, wherein the subject is sexually
excited through the senses of taste
and smell by articles of filth, such as
excrement (urine and feces).
The energy of the sexual instincts,
which is normally directed to an out-
side object.









LUST MURDER



MASOCHISM:



MASTURBATION:



NECROPHILIA:

NYMPHOMANIA:

OEDIPUS COMPLEX:

ORALISM:


PEDERASTY:




PEDOPHILIA:


PERVERSION:

PERVERT:

PYGMALIONISM:

SADISM:




SAPPHISM:


Murder committed in sadistic brutal
fashion; the victim's body usually
shows evidence of being mutilated,
particularly the genitalia.

The correlative complex of sadism,
which like its correlative, may be he-
terosexual or homosexual; the desire
to experience pain and suffering.

Causation of sexual excitement through
manual manipulation of the genitalia;
auto-eroticism through friction or rub-
bing.

Sexual intercourse with the dead.

A morbid sexual desire in the female.

Sexual desire of the son for his mother,
with hostility to the father.

Sexual pleasure obtained through the
use of the mouth on the sexual organs.

(Sodomy). Insertion of the penis in
the anus for the purpose of sexual gra-
tification. This term has been used for
the practice of the act of sodomy upon
children by adults.

The condition in which a child or ado-
lescent is chosen as the sexual object.

The deviation of the sexual impulse
from its normal goal.
One who indulges in unnatural sexual
acts or fantasies.
The sexual desire for a statue or sta-
tues; a statue fetish.
(Algolagnia). A perversion in which
the libido becomes misdirected or per-
verted, so that the act of inflicting
pain becomes in itself an object of
sexual gratification.
Titillation of the clitoris through mu-
tual masturbation or cunnilingus prac-
ticed by females.









SODOMY:


TRANSVESTISM:


TRIBADY:


TRIOI.ISM:


UROLAGNIA:



VOYEURISM:-

ZOOPHILIA:


Taking into the mouth or anus the
sexual organ of any other person or
animal or placing one's sexual organ
in the mouth or anus of any other per-
son or animal.
Sexual perversion characterized by the
wearing of the clothes of the opposite
sex, and the desire to assume the name
and role of the opposite sex.
Intimate homosexual relationship be-
tween females (lesbians). The active
individual assumes the male character
towards the female partner in the sex-
ual acts.
A form of exhibitionism in which the
subject desires to perform the sexual
act with several partners or in the
presence of several persons.
A condition found in sado-masochism
and fetishism in which the person is
sexually aroused through the sight and
odor of urine.
The desire to see or to be a witness to
sexual practices.
A passion for animals, often fetishistic
in nature; erotic sexual relationship
with animals.









PSYCHOPATHIC SEX CRIMES:

PSYCHOPATHY: (As defined in Black's Law Dictionary)

Mental disorder in general. More commonly, mental disorder
not amounting to insanity or taking the specific form of a
psychoneurosis, but characterized by a defect of character
or personality, eccentricity, emotional instability, inadequacy
or perversity of conduct, under conceit and suspiciousness,
or lack of common sense, social feeling, self-control, truth-
fulness, energy, or persistence.


1. SADISM:

2. MASOCHISM:

3. FLAGELLATION:


4. PIQUERISM:





5. ANTHROPOPHAGY:


6. NECROPHILIA:

7. PYROMANIA:


Sexual gratification resulting from in-
flicting pain on another person.
Sexual gratification resulting from in-
flicting pain upon himself.
A masochist with a passion to be
whipped . resulting in sexual grati-
fication.

Sexual criminals (most frequently sad-
ists) who stab their victims, usually
girls or women, with sharp instruments
. deriving sexual gratification from
the sight of blood and the suffering of
the victim.
(An thro poph' a gy) A sadistic sexual
perversion leading to rape, mutilation,
and cannibalism.
(Ne croph' il ia) A sexual perversion
in which dead bodies are violated.
Sexual gratification resulting from
lighting fires and watching them burn.









SEXUAL NUISANCES:


1. VOYEURISM:



2. EXHIBITIONISM:


3. FETISHISM:



4. MASTURBATION:


5. TRANSVESTISM:


6. FROTTEURS:



7. KLEPTOMANIA:

8. KOPROLAGNIA:


9. UROLAGNIA:


(Vwah yur') A peeping tom. One who
obtains sexual gratification from wit-
nessing the sexual acts of others or
from viewing persons in the nude.
One who obtains sexual gratification
from exhibiting himself in the nude or
exhibiting his private parts.
Sexual gratification obtained through
handling of certain objects, e.g. wo-
men's panties, or part of a human
body.
Causation of sexual excitement
through manual manipulation of the
genitalia.
A form of sexual deviation in which
the person tries to play the role of the
opposite sex by crossed dressing.
A form of masturbation accomplished
by rubbing the genitalia against per-
sons (of either sex) . occurs fre-
quently in crowds.
Sexual gratification resulting from
stealing.
Sexual excitement resulting from the
smell or taste of filth, e.g., urine or
feces.
Sexual excitement resulting from the
sight of urine or a person urinating.


SEXUAL OBSCENITIES:
(847-.01-.06)
1. Obscene telephone calls . letters . language.
2. Pornographic literature . photographs . drawings.











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These photographs are from the catalogue of a supplier
of homosexual erotica. Five by seven inch prints of each
pose were offered at a dollar each. The youth of the model
is indicative of the frequent homosexual fixation on youth.


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Reifert, D. Protection of children involved in sexual offenses: a new method of investigation
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Additional copies of this report are available at
single copy cost of twenty-five cents, including
mailing. Special prices on purchases of 100 or
more copies. Write Report, P. O. Box 1044,
Tallahassee, for copies or information.









CHILD MOLESTER CRIMES . .
AND UNNATURAL SEX CRIMES:


1. CHILD MOLESTER LAW:
(801.02) An offense shall include: Attempted
rape, sodomy, attempted sodomy, crimes
against nature, attempted crimes against
nature, lewd and lascivious behavior, in-
cest and attempted incest, assault (when
a sexual act is completed or attempted)
and assault and battery (when a sexual
act is completed or attempted), when the
acts are committed against, to, or with
a person fourteen years of age or under.
PUNISHMENT: (1) It shall be within the power and
jurisdiction of the trial judge to:
(a) Impose a term of years not to
exceed 25.
(b) Commit for treatment and re-
habilitation to the Florida State
Hospital . or
Commit to Florida Research
and Treatment Center .
Imposition of sentence may be
deferred pending discharge.








CRIMES AGAINST NATURE LAW:
(800.01)

1. CRIMES COMMITTED PER OS: (Oral copulation)


a. FELLATIO:




b. CUNNILINGUS:





c. ANNILINGUS:


(Feh lay'sheeo) A sexual deviation where
gratification is obtained by sucking the
penis. It may be practiced by males in
homosexuality, or by the female where
she introduces the penis into her mouth.
(Cun ni lin'gus) A form of sexual devia-
tion where a person derives sexual ex-
citation by licking the clitoris (Kly' to-
ris) or vulva, or the vagina. It is prac-
ticed by female homosexuals (Lesbian-
ism), or by a male with a female.
(An ni lin'gus) A form of sexual devi-
ation where a person of either sex derives
sexual excitement by licking the anus of
another . .


2. CRIMES COMMITTED PER ANUS: (Anal copulation)


a. PEDERASTY:
PEDOPHILIA:


(Ped'er as ty) A form of sexual inter-
course through the anus. Carnal copula-
tion of male with male (particularly man
with boy) by penetrating the anus with
the penis . also when the same act is
with the female.


This is also referred to as SODOMY . .

3. CRIMES COMMITTED WITH ANIMALS:


a. BESTIALITY


Sexual relations between human beings
and an animal . commonly between
human male and female animal .
ALSO referred to as SODOMY.


PUNISHMENT: (ALL CRIMES AGAINST NATURE)
(800.01)
Not to exceed 20 years in prison.



















al




















1
























This photograph was taken by a Florida law enforcement agency of a homosexual
act being performed in a public rest room. Such occurrences take place every day in
virtually every city in every state. It is significant that the removal of the toilet stall
doors to facilitate photography did not deter these and numerous other practicing
homosexuals.