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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004770/00071
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Title: FAA bulletin
Physical Description: Book
Publication Date: June 1952
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
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Bibliographic ID: UF00004770
Volume ID: VID00071
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6023
ltuf - AME1161

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Full Text
t 1,-







The Florida Association of Architects
of the

American Institute of Architects
I .1


SANFORD GOIN
Doing a wondtrfil job on the fund rasi, camfrpagn


M > .








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of

THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


BULLETIN


Vol. 6 JUNE, 1952 No. 2


PR DANIEL HARI'., PRESIDENT
P. 0. KK 9f 3
PENSACOLA. FLORIDA

VICE PRtlEOINTS
0I|ST VIC PmSfInETT ,
JACK MCCANDLE55, W. PtTEPdAu*L J
SECOND VICE PaEIIDoF T
FRANCIS CRAIG, DrAYTO IA IA04
ThItB VICE P HESJOlNT
PRENTISS HUCDDLESTON, TAS.LASNASM
FOR-AT ViCE PRESIDEuJT
ICiOR B, POLEVITZKY. MIAWil
FrITN VIOC PRCPug0
RAYMOND H. PLOCKELMAN. PALIA ALACM
SINTH VCE PREEiOhNT
GEORGE CLINTON GAMBLE, 1. LAUO{2ALE
WAEVINTR iRADHAW M LZ.
WALTER URAD5HAW SCHULTZ. JACKowViLLEU


FMANCIS R. WALTON, 5ECRETARY-TREAASURER
1i.%M BAY STMT
DAYTONA BEACH, FLORIDA

lIaRCTORS
FLCNtibA CENTRAL CHATER
FRANCIS H. EMERSON
DAYTBNA EACH CAFTIR
JOEL SAYERS
aFLIDA MenIT CENTRAL C4APItI
ALUBRT WOODARV
aORCSA SCUTH OC4WT
ROBERT M. LITTLE
PALM KAM CM TI
JIOHN STETSON
BaOWA COUNTY CHAPTXA
WIILIAM T, VAUGHN
FLCRIDAM OAM CGIFT
WILLIAM T. ARNITT
AT MT ,
BENMONT TENCH, Jk, WAsvILLX


OBJECTS

The objects of the Association shall be to unite the architectural
profession within the State of Florida to promote and forward the
objects of The American Institute of Architects; to stimulate and
encourage continual improvement within the profession, cooperate
with other professions, promote and participate in the matters of
general public welfare, and represent and act for the architectural
profeision in the State, and to promote educational and public rela-
tion programs for the advancement of the profession.





EXECUTIVE SECRETARY FUND



Sanford Goin is doing a wonderful job on the fund raising
campaign. The money collected and pledged as we go to press
is $8,923.50. Records have been kept of every contributor and
the amounts.
All of you know that a large amount of correspondence has
been required to put this campaign across. The results seem to
justify the effort and we are in sight of our goal.
Of the funds raised, $475 has come from fifteen offices out-
side the state and scattered across the country.
Several of our non-member architects in the state have con-
tributed handsomely.





F.A.A. SPECIAL FUND FOR EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
AS OF MAY 1, 1952


Chapter Co:
Florida North Central --
Florida North
Florida Central
Daytona Beach
Palm Beach Chapter-
Broward County
Florida South _.......-
Out of State Architects .


Number Amount Number Amount


ntributors
3
38
53
12
21
21
71
15


Received
35.
2278.
1442.
357.
810.
490.
2325.
475.


Pledged
3
3


Pl
3


1


5 1


pledged Total
!00. 335.
85. 2363.
1442.
50. 407.
810.
490.
.50. 2475.
475.


12 585. 8847.


221 8212.





BUSINESS OF THE GAINESVILLE BOARD MEETING,
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS, APRIL 5, 1952


Two hundred and fifty dollars was
set aside for the Seminar Committee in
preparation for convention to be held
in Tallahasscc, November 13, 14, and
15. It was the sense of the meeting
that efforts should be made in tilhe fu-
ture to draw seminar material from our
own membership. Tilhe opinion was
expressed that we have many qualified
persons in our own organization who
have much experience and background
that could he brought to us.
Bob Little reported a regional meet-
ing will be held in Atlanta, September
18, 19, and 20, which will include a
seminar on schools. These regional
meetings of the institute have been
growing importance in recent years
and promise to take over much of the
thunder that has characterized institute
conventions in the past. Football game
tickets for a Georgia Tech game will
be made available for those attending
the regional meeting.
It was announced that preceding the
national convention on Monday, June
23, a meeting on a uniform schedule of
service rendered by architects will be
held with delegates from each Chapter
requested to attend.
A motion was put through to the ef-
fect that a committee of "3" be ap-
pointed to survey the available personnel
for the position of Executive Secretary,
make job studies, and make a report as
soon as possible to the Board. (Ap-
pointment of this committee reported
above.)
Sanford Goin called our attention to
the fact that Article 31 of the new Gen-
eral Conditions has been revised and
that in effect the last paragraph of that
article invalidates much of the bond


provisions carried by the contractor.
This article should be reviewed carefully
in this light.
It was decided that the summer meet-
ing of the board will be held in Miami.
At the January meeting the follow-
ing question was directed to our counsel:
"Where a member fails to pay an-
nual dues, and for this reason is ex-
pelled by the Chapter, may the Florlda
Association of Architects require the
Chapter to pay the dues of the expelled
member?"
The following is his reply:
"In my opinion the Association may
not require the Chapter to pay such
dues,
"Article VIII, Sec. 2, Const. F.A.A.,
provides that the Treasurer of each
Chapter shall collect annually form each
member the amount of his dues and re-
mit promptly to the Treasurer of the
Association. It appears from the word-
ing of this section that the responsi-
bility of the Chapter is discharged when
it forwards the dues collected from its
members.
"It should be noted that under the
provisions of the by-laws of the Insti-
tue, Ch. II, Art. I, Sec. 4, 'State organ-
izations may fix and collect annual dues
from the Chapters within the State or
from its members.' Apparently no
Chapter dues have ever been levied by
the Association upon the individual
Chapters.
"It should be noted further that under
the by-laws of the Institute, Ch. I, Art.
II, Sec. 4 (B-2), that upon written re-
quest by the Governing Board of the
Chapter the Institute will suspend a
member for failure to pay Chapter
and/or State dues." B. M. TENCH.




Joint Action With Engineers
The Legislative Committee and one
on Relations with engineers have been
collaborating in an attempt at meetings
with the engineers. Harry M. Griffin
of Daytona Beach and W. R. Gomon
(office partners), and members of Legis-
lative and Relations Committees and in
contact with Committee Chairmen
Frank Bunch and Elliott Hadley, were
able to take advantage of the general
prevelance of engineers in the Daytona
Beach area during their F. E. S. con-
vention. No formal meeting of com-
mittees came off, but some architects
attended the cocktail party as guests of
the Engineers Convention, and Harry
and Lona Griffin had dinner with
F. E. S. retiring President Dr. Walter
H. Beisler and Mrs. Beisler.
May 14, Harry Griffin had a meeting
with David Lee, of the Engineers Com-
mittee on Legislation. The following
are excepts from a report by Harry of
the matters discussed:
1. Resist consolidation of State
Boards.
2. Oppose establishment of profes-
sional offices in connection with govern-
mental agencies.
3. Get active contact with favorable
candidates for office.
4. Keep careful watch on State bud-
get and appropriation committee,
5. Take joint action through joint
meetings of our Boards with concerned
committees in attendance.

Florida North Central Chapter
The Florida North Central Chapter
has selected James A. Stripling to serve
as General Chairman of the F. A. A.
Convention to be held in Tallahassec
this year. If you will refer back to the
Map showing the distribution of mem-
bers, you will see why it will be necessary
to organize and promote the Conven-


tion attendance in the Chapters. There
are few members in the immediate vi-
cinity of Tallahassee. This Convention
is going to be an important one, and
some very heavy decisions may follow
it. Every Chapter should be repre-
sented there with the mostest of the
bestest.

Executive Secretary Committee
The Committee for the selection of
men to represent the Florida Association
of Architects in the capacity of Execu-
tive Secretary has been selected, and it
consists of President Hart, Russell T.
Pancoast and Franklin S. Bunch. These
men will meet some time between the
10th and 15th of June in Jacksonville
to begin their study of this problem.

Gainesville Meeting
Preceding the Gainesville F. A. A.
Board Meeting, members of the Board
received a conducted walking tour of
the University of Florida. Students and
faculty accompanied us on the tour and
explained much of what we saw. We
were presented with a small mimeo-
graphed handbook of the University
College of Architecture and facilities,
much of which handbook is reproduced
herewith.


The advertisements appearing in
this issue were paid for at fifty
dollars net per page per issue.
All copy furnished ready to go
by advertiser.
Some have paid in advance for
other issues. Members are urged
to call attention to this medium by
showing your copy to sales repre-
sentatives and keeping it on top of
the hay pile in your office.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE
AND ALLIED ARTS-1925.1952


It is the purpose of the College of
Architecture and Allied Arts to im-
prove man's physical environment and
enrich his life through education in
architecture and the arts.
To that end the College provides pro-
fcssional programs of study for students
in the College of Architecture and Al-
lied Arts, courses in architecture and the
arts for students in other colleges of
the University, and appropriate services
to the citizens of Florida in general.
Professional programs leading to ap-
propriate bachelor's degrees are offered
in Architecture, Building Construction,
Commercial Art, Costume Design,
Crafts, Interior Design, Landscape
Architecture, and Painting and Draw-
ing.
When the college was first established
27 years ago, the old attic in Peabody
Hall, where the first classes were held,
served the 34 students reasonably well.
But the size of the student body has
grown through the years, and there are
now more than 600 students enrolled
for work in the College of Architecture
and Allied Arts.
The original attic has been outgrown,
and the College now occupies all or parts
of five different buildings on the campus.
Following will be a brief description
of the things seen on the tour.
Temporary Building "E" houses the
college and departmental offices, the
Bureau of Architectural and Commu-
nity Research, the office of the Center
of the Arts, the college library, and
design studios for upper division stu-
dents in Architecture, Building Con-
struction, Landscape Architecture, and
Interior Design.
Administrative Ofices. Along the


north corridor of Temporary "E" are
the administrative offices of the dean
and the two department heads.
Bureau of Architectural and Com-
munity Research. This Bureau, located
in Temporary "E", has been established
to conduct and coordinate research in
these fields which concern the design
of shelter and environment for all kinds
of human activity.
Center of the Arts. A beginning has
been made of a great teaching, research,
and public service center known as the
Center of the Arts in which students,
faculty, and die general public can
study examples of outstanding contem-
porary work in painting, industrial de-
sign, furniture, crafts, community
planning, architecture, and the other
arts.
The current exhibition in the Foyer
in Temporary "E", the 1950 American
Institute of Decorators Awards, is
brought to the campus by the Center of
the Arts. The Foyer is too small for
exhibitions much larger than the present
one,
Upper Division Architecture. Tem-
porary "E" houses the six design studios
used by upper division students in Archi-
tecture. For lack of space, graduate
students are assigned space in the same
rooms with undergraduates.
Upper Division Building Construc
tion. Upper division students in Build-
ing Construction occupy four rooms in
Temporary "E", two on the east corri-
dor and two on the center corridor.
Upper Division Landscape Architec-
ture. Along the west corridor is the
design studio used by upper division stu-
dents in Landscape Architecture.
Upper Division Interior Design. Up-





per division students in Interior Design
have their studio along the center cor-
ridor.
Model Making Studio. Along the
west corridor is a room equipped with
the small tools necessary for the con-
struction of models of various sorts.
Store Room. Here are the drawing
files and the equipment storage for the
College. There is one small store room
in the east wing also. The Rudolph
Weaver collection of Japanese prints is
in st.,rage for lack of space to show the
collection.
Heliodon Room. This room contains
an advanced model heliodon, an instru-
ment for determining the direction of
the rays of the sun any place on earth.
With this instrument, it is possible to
compress a day into 12 minutes.
Building Materitds Room. Until re-
cently, this roor was in use as a draft-
ing room. Now it contains building
material samples and assemblies used in
teaching.
College Library. At the south end
:f the west corridor is the library of the
College of Architecture and Allied
Arts. The room is relatively convenient
for students in Temporary "E", but
for students in Temporary "C", Tem-
porary "U", and Walker Hall, its re-
moteness is a serious handicap in their
daily work.
Desks and Lockers. The temporary
wooden desks throughout this building
and others were built to provide emer-
gency facilities immediately after World
War IT. Some 250 permanent desks
are now needed by the College.
Temporary wooden foot lockers pro-
vide a few students with storage space
for books, instruments, and supplies the
provision of permanent desks would give
necessary space for storage in each desk.
Temporary Building "U" provides
design studios for lower division students


in Architecture, and houses The Gal-
lery of the Center of the Arts.
Lower Division Arehitecture. The
studios in Temporary "U" provide
limited space for the freshmen and
sophomores enrolled in the lower di-
vision courses in Architecture. It is
necessary to assign three students to
every desk, and to operate classes in
shifts beginning at 7:30 in the morning,
Monday through Friday.
Lecture Rooms. The lecture room
and the projection room in Temporary
"U" are typical of the makeshifts
which our temporary facilities provide.
The only additional lecture room as-
signed to the College is Room 176,
Tempory "E", likewise a converted
space in which posts interfere with sight
lines.
The Gallery. This combination
corridor-gallery is the largest space for
teaching exhibitions available on the
the campus. The current exhibition,
the Investigation of Space, is a presen-
tation of the Center of the Arts. It
consists of student work from the Col-
lege of Architecture and Allied Arts.
Student Service Center. This build-
ing provides space for a temporary Art
Gallery which was opened this year.
Art Gallery. The space at the north
end of the balcony in the Student Book
Store provides space for a limited num-
her of paintings or drawings. The cur-
rent show, a one-man exhibition by
Gryorgy Kepes, was brought to the
campus by the Department of Art in
connection with a recent visit and series
of talks by Mr. Kepes, who is professor
of visual design at M. I. T. and author
of the book, The Language of Vidson.
Temporary Building "C" houses
lower division students in Art and pro-
vides studios for upper division students
in Painting and Drawing, and Com-
mercial Art.





F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS. 'ssCENT
JCNN F. IALLUI&, JA... EKa- iCS-A




"vIThcrTA PACRS



A-Ffft iE TcL
PRIAI-HI-L *N-.E
MM-b PfctAno rLU-EMrLvtC
;nR- QKH/nD HUIIE T0 TOM


AANK D. WILLIAMS. V
SJACK A WERA. Y:CMACS.
KCH A. COLE


CST40LIFJI E 12,1

F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS CO.

'Btaitifr areid terrIfanmit df cA1Srer t T?(

ATLANTA,
EL1 ..:T fGA. FPICE ..ARh A..
LOL'K4 cSaTAAMRM= i*,SL BIJLLYAR0D. N. K.


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GREETTfKS TO FtORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARJCHETETS!

All of you are cordially invited to be with us as our guests for the
Twenty-Ninth Annual Golf Tournament of Architects and Arc itectural
Draftsmen of the Southeast, which will b. hbld at the Capital City
Club Friday, June 13.

Golf Tournament 18-hole medal play with handicaps, starts at 1i00 P.'.
Social Hour 600 P. M.
Dinner 7030 P. M.



In the meantime we shall be very glad to have you write or telephone us
collect (D-4@70 or Elgin-lQOS) for information, samples and prices on any
of the many beautiful and permanent materials we handle.

For your eonveniencej we have several local dealers and representatives in
Florida and shall be glad to have the one responsible for serving you call
on you, or send a man from here, at any time you wish. .


F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS COMPANY, INC.
1414 BOULEVARD, -I. E. ATLANTA, GA.
&w-yAhring in 'Bmur,'iu anrd 'Pefrmornt 'Buildirig Mairoials


MARK P. J, WILLAMS. vit-mn.
JAMES H. BARRON. JR.. ;ECY.--,A.



L LAZED Rnu
*ALT nO:rC1 TILTILE
ALLOw TM
ALUJMIMUM wIn 4WF

O ALU.U .
LOHIIiTLhiAAL TUIA CanTT
pHlE TOULHIL flAPS
KACKIQ PJAN.At flnwon



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MAP OF FLORIDA

Showing Distribution of Architects Within Chapter Boundaries
and Indicating Institute Membership

Solid dots represent Institute Members.
Open dots represent other registered architects in resident practice.
Non-resident registered architects have been ignored.
Chapter desigrntions on map:
FN Florida North Chapter
FC Florida Central
FS Florida South
DB Daytona Beach
PB Palm Beach
B Broward County
FNC Florida North Central

Fl'urda North Chapter is broken into four parts, indicated by numbers,
the formation of other chapters within its original boundaries.
Thfe ip was drawn by University of Florida students, under the direc-
tion of Dean Arnett, from data and map prepared by Hatton and Walton
the original Executive Secretary Study Comrnittee, an(I points up some
of the problems confronting an executive secretary and some of the need for
stud)' on the matter of chapter boundaries.





































(Kt











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V ? -TODAY!
Stock szes, specificaion changes


types f onsruct
USE GATE CITY FREE ENGINEERING SERVICE

GATE CITY SASH & DOOR CO.
"Wood Window Craftsmr S;Bco 1910r
P- O. BOX 901 FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA





Lower Division Art. The studios in
Temporary "C" provide space for
freshmen and sophomores enrolled in
lower division courses in design, draw-
ing, and color in the Department of Art.
Upper Division Painting and Draw-
ing. Studios for upper division students
in Painting and Drawing arc located in
Temporary "C".
Up-per Div'wun Commercial Art.
Students in upper division Commercial
Art occupy studios in this building.
Among the facilities provided are the
necessary presses for work in graphic
arts.
Walker Hall Attic. The top floor o f
Walker Hall provides space fir upper
di: vision students and graduate students
in art.
Upper Division Crafts. Students in
the upper division work in Craftsoccupy
studios in Walker Hall. Here are the
looms, the wheels, the kiins, and the
benches where crafts products de-
signed and produced.
Upper DIvsion Photography. In
Walker Hall are the work room and
dark room for student work in Pho-
tography.
Upper Division Costume Design.
Students in Costume Design have their
studio in this building. Beginning in
September, 1952, a 4-yhar program in
Costume Design will be inaugurated.
Graduate Painting. Graduate stu-
dents in Painting have their studio at
the south end of the attic. The M.F.A.
is the most recent graduate work in-
augurated by the College.
Organization of the College
The College of Architecture and Al-
lied Arts is comprised of the Depart-
ment of Architecture, the Department
of Art, the Center of the Arts, and the
Bureau of Architectural and Community
Research.
The faculty consists of 40 people, 35


of whom are on full-time status, 2 on
part-time, and 3 on leave. The staff is
as follows:
College. William T. Arnett, Dean.
Martha B. Barton, Curator.
Department of Architecture. John L.
R. Grand, Head. Professors: Thomas
Larrick, P. M. Torraca. Associate
Professors: Herman H. Block, M. IH.
Johnson (on leave), James D. McVoy,
William' N. Womel-dorf. Ass:,iant
Professors: Daniel Bau, Nicholas E.
Chatas, William 1. Eaton, Edward M.
Fearney, Norman 1. Flagg, Sadi S.
Koruturk, Harry Lee Lindsey, George
C. Millican, Harold C. Rose, Charles
W Strieby. Instructors: Robert E.
Crosiand, Robert M. Dillon, Martin
Nosenchuk, T. W. Patterson, F. Blair
Reeves, Arthur A. Smith, Martin H.
Smith, Jr., Wiley J. Tillman.
Department of Art. Stuart R. Pur-
ser, Ht'ad. Professors: IHollis H. Hol-
brook (on leave), Fletcher Martin. As-
sociate Professors: Agnes P. Borgia, P.
R. McIntosh, G. Weimer Pursell, A.
D. Graeffe (part-time). Assistant Pro-
fessor: Barbara W Ebersole. Instruc-
tors: Edward A. Anderson, Harrison
W. Covington, Kenneth E. Peabody,
Roy N. Green (part-time).


On to the AIA Convention!
It always seems sad that the Florida
men attending the AIA conventions
travel apart for such a long ride. This
would be a swell chance to join in cara-
vans by train and car to get some
needed contact with each other while
we can't possibly make any client con-
tacts anyhow.
The Silver Meteor leaving St. Pete
at 9:45 A. M. and Miami at 9 A. M.
joins in Jax at 3:52 P. M. East Coast-
ers would have to take this at Jax and
Miami. Orlando men can catch it, thi,





FLORIDA STATE BOARD
OF ARCHITECTS
In our last bulletin Mellen C. Gree-
Icy furnished a good piece on the work
of the State Board of Architects. Mr.
Greeley has now furnished us with a
series of questions and answers calcu-
lated to bring all of us up to date on
the work of the Board and the nature
of the law under which we practice.
These questions have been grouped in
three installments, the first of which
follows Mr. Greelcy's letter below.

To members of The Florida Association of
Ar-dLitecet. fF the A. 1. A. especially, and, to
all architects in Florida-Gretings:
Having had the privilege of serving for a
number of years as secretary of your State
Board of Architecture, it has been my pleas-
ure as well to have been the recipient of
many inquiries regarding the laws govenling
the practice of architecture in Florida. As a
result of trying to give reasonable answers to
these questions I have been exposed to legal
opinions by the board's attorneys, to opinions
of various members of die board and to ex-
pressions of opinion on the subject as well
as results of legal actions emanating from
other states, therefore it seems a good idea
to put in writing some of the information
which has come to my attention for reference
and perhaps education of members of the
profession.
This information is given for what it is
worth: the opinions expressed are generally
those of the writer and may not have been>
tested in the courts. Where direct quotations
are made from Laws of Florida they will be
shown indented and in italics if printed. Re-
arrangement of text of laws has been done
only in the attempt to make the meaning
more clear. Please let me repeat, this report
should be considered as a laya.n's document
and not a legal brief.
Please imagine that Mr. Archie Teck is
asking the questions and that your secretary
is trying manfully to answer them.
Sincerely,
MI.LEEN C. GREELEY.

(1) Question: Are there any provisions
under the laws of the State of Florida which
require that drawings and specifications for


buildings must be prepared by an architect
registered in the State?
(1) Answer: Generally, NO, but there are
cases where the answer in Yes, for example:
1-Plan. and specifications for certain
types of buildings, which come under the
jurisdiction of the State Hotel and Restau-
rant Commission, must he signed and
scaled by an architect currently registered
in Florida, before a building permit for
erection of the building may be issued by
one of the Supervising Architects of the
Commission.
2-Also, in a number of cities it is re-
quired by local ordinances that drawings
and specifications for certain types build-
ings must be signed and sealed by a regis-
tered architect or by a registered profes-
sional engineer or by both a registered
architect and a registered engineer, before
permits inmay be issued allowing for con-
struction of the buildings.
(2) Question: Is there any provision un-
der laws of Florida which would allow any-
one, not a registered architect, to prepare
plans and specifications for buildings and to
supervise the erection of sa te?
(2) Answer: I assume that you have read
Chapter 647, Florida Statutes, 195 1. This is
the Chapter which governs the practice of
architecture. Section 467.09 reads, in part,
thus:
"No person sha{ be required ... to quali-
fy at an architect in order to makte plans
anl specifications for or supervise the trec-
tion, enlargezent or alteration of. .."
(a) "A4ny building upon any farm for
the use of asry farmer irrespective of the
cost of such building" ... or of
(b) "any one- or two-faimily residence
building costing less tMan ten thousand dol-
lars" ,,.. or of
(c) ... any domestic outbuilding ap-
furtenant to any such one- or two-family
residence regardless of cost... ", or
(d) "of any other type building costing
les stman five thousand dollars (except
schools, auditoriums, or other buildings in-
tended for thet mas assemblage of peo-
ple) -... "
Chapter 467 also contains this language.:
"Nor shall anyt/xng in this or any other
state law be held to present registered pro-
fessional engineers, or their employees or
subordinates eader their responsible super-
'ising control from performing architec-





tural service which are puredy incidental
to their engineering practice ...".
(3) Question; I have read Chapter 467,
but I still do not understand what It means,
especially the parts you have just quoted. Is
an unregistered person prohibited from per-
forming architectural service?
(3) Answer: While the Statute as a whole
has not been subjected to interpretation by
the Courts it appears to this writer that an
unregistered person may not legally:
(a) Engage .., m the planning or de-
sign for t/e erection, enlargmenatn or alte-
ration of buitdings fpr others or furnishing
architectural supervision of t/he construction
t/ereof ... ", or,
(b) Use the title "Architect" or any
word or title derived therefrom, or,
(c) Advertise or in any way hold him-
self out as being an architect or as prac-
ticing or as being qualified to practice
architecture.
Note that: "...no professional engineer
shall practice architecture or use the desig-
nation 'architect' or any terms derived
themrefrom ... 2"
(4) Question: There is an apparent con-
flict between that part of the Statute which
reads: "No person shal be required... to
qualify as an architect in order to make p4lts
and specifications for or supervise the erection,
enlargement or alteration of any building...
for the use of any farmer... or any one- or
two. family residence... or of any other
type building... ", etc., and that part of the
Statute just quoted which appears to prohibit
an unregistered person from performing any
architectural service whatever. Please explain
the apparent inconsistency.
(4) Answer: The apparent conflict in
different parts of the Statute really does not
exist. By reference to the statutory lan-
guage an endeavor will be made to show
that the various provisions are consistent and
carry out the intention of the legislature.
At the outset, the statute merely states that
no person shall be required to qualify as an
architect in order to make plans and specifi-
cations for or supervise the erection, enlarge-
ment or alteration of certain types of build-
ings, such types being farm buildings, family
residence buildings, costing less than $10,000,
or other type of building costing less than
$5,000, except schools, auditoriums or build-
ings intended for the mass assembly of people.
You will note this does not indicate the per-
son may hold himself out as an architect or


that he may act as an architect. The lan-
guage means no more than that a person shall
not be required to register in order to qualify
for the preparation of this type of plan or
the doing of that type of plan or the doing
of that type of work. While it ii true the
person in doing this type of work is in reality
practicing architecture, he has not been re-
quired to qualify as such in order to do so.
Now this is not an inconsistency because in
the statute which penalizes a person for prac-
ticing architecture, it is expresdsy stated that
the penal provisions do not apply to thlse
persons exempted in the perform-ance of the
duties within the exempted classes above re-
ferred to, namely farm buildings, dwelling,
less than $10,000, etc. And so the statute
only makes it a misdemeanor punishable as
provided hy law, for a person to practice
architecture in this state:
exceptt as exempted ; Section 467.09."
This exception relates to the type of archi-
tectural work that has been referred to. Thus,
you see a person may not even hold out to
the public his capacity to be an architect, or
advertise that he will practice architecture
even though he limits his field to the ex-
empted type of architectural work. It should
be emphasized that the exemption which is
referred to in this penal provision of the
Statute, relates only to the practice of archi-
tecture and it does not permit any person in
doing this to use the title architect or to use
a display, any title, sign, word, card, adver-
tisement or other device or method to indi-
cate that such person practice or offers to
practice architecture or is an architect.

Florida State A. G. C. Council
The Florida State A. G. C. Council
met in Pensacola on April 17, 18 and
19. The Afternoon of Saturday they
had a forum session covering several
topics. Relations between Architects
and Contractors was discussed by our
President, R. Daniel Hart. Mr. Hart's
comments were well received.

EXCUSES
Your Secretary, who lost his wife in Janu-
ary after a five-month siege with acute
lukIemia, has been in the process of remarry-
ing while this bulletin was being put to-
gether, and declares no responsibility.





Book Review
'"tn Approach To Design", by Nor-
man T. Newton of the Graduate School
of Design of Harvard University, pub-
lished by Addison-Wesley Phess, Inc.,
Cambridge 42, Mass., which sells for
$3.65, is recommended.
The book is a brief and somewhat
introductory session in the implications
of the relatively new science of semantics
on the field of design. Those who have
been picking at the science of semantics
have found much of significance to the
architect. This is as far as we know
the first publication by one in the archi-
tectural field directed toward the appli-
cation of these ideas to our work. This
work by the author is actually a compila-
tion of ideas which have been thrashed
in -ontact with students in attempting
to get around the subject and in attempt-
ing to define for the students usable
words and ideas for their future prac-
tice,. It can serve the general prac-
titioner by helping him to clean house,
sort out and sharpen his tools of thinking.
Since the book is so compact, it cannot
really be reviewed, but it is already being
quoted widely in the architectural press.
It contains no pictures, and is for those
who can read without seeing what the
picture says.

Architectural Awards
Given at University
GAINESVILLE, May 13-Six scholarships
and three medals were presented to students
tonight at the annual architectural awards
dinner held in the Student Service Center.
The six architecture seniors receiving the
$250 scholarships were Henry Raymond
Woodward of Jacksonville, Alan Charles
Borg of Peckskill, N. V., William John Rupp
of Lake Worth, Joan Roberta Shumaker of
St. Petersburg, George Booth Owen of Vero
Beach, and Kalvin J. Platt of Miami.
University President J. Hillis Miller pre-
s'nted the scholarships in behalf of the Stew-
ard Melon Companies of Jacksonville, Or-


land and Tampa. Each of the tile contract-
ing firms donated two of the scholarships.
The awards were made on the basis of
professional promise and financial need and
the recipients will be asked in the years after
graduation to make available a like amount
of money to some deserving student in need
of financial assistance to complete his college
work.
The American Institute of Architects silver
school medal went to James Richard, Barnes
of St. Petersburg, a graduate student in arch-
itecture, for "scholarly standing and charac-
ter." Runner-up for the award was Earl
Maxwell Starnes of Winter Haven.
John L. R, Grand of Gainesville president
of the Florida North Chapter of the AIA,
made the presentation.
Charles Ernest Daffin of Tallahassee re-
ceived the Florida Association of Architects
medal from William T. Arnett of Gaines-
ville, director of the Florida association-
This medal is awarded each year to the
student in architecture at the University of
Florida who has made the most meritorious
contribution in leadership and service among
his fellows.
The guest of honor and principal speaker
at the dinner was Paul M. Rudolph, interna-
tionally known architect from Sarasota, who
visited classes and held discussions with upper
division architecture students during the day.
-Jacksonville Times Union.

LOST

Resigned
December 27, 1951: E. L. Robertson,
Florida South.
Terminated Membership
Howard Douglas Fiedler, Florida Central.
William Jackson Green, Florida South.
John J. Mattern, Jr., Fla. North Central.
Francis J. Tarlowski, Florida South.
Charles LeRoy Kinports, Florida South.
Suspended
Leslie M. Barrett, Florida South.
Robert Elsmere Collins, Florida South.
Donovan Dean, Florida Central.
Albert Moore Saxe, Florida Central-
Russell Seymour, Florida North.

FOUND
Eliot Chapin Fletcher, Tampa-Florida
Central.





The home D). Beach Chapter members arc think
The shots are no al efforts, but .Inaps. Lat's hear from other cha.
















Harry Grfflin's Spanish colonial haa an open hearth in its walled ga


William Garrett Taylor, Vero B-ach-Palmn
Be- b Chapter.
Fr.ed C Van4 Duct Jacksonville-Florida
Norti,
H irry Edwardi Burns, Atlantic Beach, Fior- -
ida North,
jcLmr Le Lawrence Uiing, Miami Shores, ,; -----
T'I rida South.
Paqjualre Mario inctville, Flor-
id,t N.-th. Frank Craig'a bick-to-the-stret effe
John Whi <.,k, VeroBcach, Palm
Beach.
IWilliam Edward Vero ,Beach,
Pain Beach.
Charhl- E Duni. V ,m Be.ac]i, Palnt
Btach.
Fdw-ard NM. Farni CGainc- Florida ''
M -rcth-- rLstiret. r riiibcrshil.


DEATHS
I ar.,r L ,nd-Dicd at At-


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Opens up in the center toward thE* south





















Wslter amih's pftdcb cm a duns looks
04 atb am


Ni'tur( !olka Elwtn anld HE1eie Suead h~id tht-ir
UouaeB 9D~ in the woods tb]s Im all we could O't


icuan v"e and breme


atml Mn the making. 1it lived Irk


while Bill Gaman% Dpen Planl is stritHiY
for the birds In p1acea-h~a anwiir
between lffi sud BR


- - whlge p~emi"Ihfl garden to flow
through 43Y room i3,91ow





Architects Specify


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the necessity of locating the furnace
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2 The architect knows the exact in-
stalled cost ofa Van-Packer complete
chimney without "guesatimating"
He can save up to 50% compared to
brick construction and pass these
economies on to the buyer.
3 Van-Packer is easily installed in 3
man-hours or less.
4 Van-Packer develops sufficient draft
for heating plants designed to serve
homes of ten rooms or less. Under-
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6 Valuable floor space is saved as a
Van-Packer chimney can be hung
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7 The Van-Packer Chimney is nation-
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assure you that Van-Packer will be
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Write for New Architect Sheet!


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AIA CHAPTERS & CHAPTER OFFICERS IN STATE


DAYTONA BEACH CHAPTER
President Ralph Spicer, 550 N.
Oleander Avenue, (P.O.Box 1671)
Daytona Beach, Florida
Secretary Joel Sayers, 216
Brookline Avenue,Daytona Beach,
Florida

FLORIDA CENTRAL CHAPTER
President George H. Spohn, Zl0
Park Avenue No., Winter Park,
Florida
Secretary W. Kenneth Miller,
209 S. Orange Avenue, Orlando,
Florida

FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL
CHAPTER
President Charles W.Saunders,
212 North Adams Street, Talla -
hassee, Florida
Secretary Chester L. Craft,
Assistant State School Architect,
Department of Education, Talla-
hassee, Florida


PALM BEACH CHAPTER
President- Raymond H. Plockel-
man, 325 Worth Avenue, Palm
Beach, Florida
Secretary Gordon Elliott, 3700
Eastview, West Palm Beach,
Florida

BROWARD COUNTY CHAPTER
President Walter E. Pauley,
2800 E. Las Olas Boulevard,
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Secretary Morton T. Iron -
monger, 1229 E. Las Olas Boule-
vard, Fort Lauderdale, Florida

FLORIDA NORTH CHAPTER
President -' John L. R. Grand ,
University of Florida, College
of Architecture & Allied Arts,
Gainesville, Florida
Secretary Jack Moore. 518
N. E. 4th Avenue, Gainesville ,
Florida


FLORIDA SOUTH CHAPTER
President Robert Fitch Smith,
Shoreland Arcade, Miami 32,
Florida
Secretary- H. George Fink, Sr.,
204 Aragon Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida


THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
Francis R. Walton, Secretary
1421/ Bay Street, Daytona Beach4 Florida


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