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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004770/00070
 Material Information
Title: FAA bulletin
Physical Description: Book
Publication Date: March 1952
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004770
Volume ID: VID00070
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6023
ltuf - AME1161

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THE -CRIDA ASSJaIM3 IllB

T[IIf AMNERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS

MIA4RCH 1952


VICt PRESIDENTS


DIRECTORS


0 B J E C T S
The objects of the Association shall be to unite the architectural
profession within the State of Florida to promote and forward the
objects of The tAmeriLan Institute of Architects; to stimulate and
encourage continual improvement within the profession, cooperate
with other professions, promote and pUrticipate in the matters of
general public welfare, and represe t and act for the architectural
profession in the State, and to promote educational and public rela-
tion programs for the advancement of the profession,


A
v. 6
A 5/5j
v'





EXCERPT
FLORIDA
NOVEMBER


FROM ANNUAL
ASSOCIATION OF
2 AND 3, 1951,


CONVENTION
ARCHITECTS,
JACKSONVILLE,


President Goin called on Francis
Walton, Chairman of the Com-
mittee to Study the Need for an
Executive Secretary, for a re-
port, and Walton asked Russell
Pancoast to make some opening
remarks about the back round
that led to this committee's work
Pancoast mentioned that prac -
ticing architects are too busy
now to devote enough of their
time to do the work of the Asso-
ciation as is now needed to con-
tinue our accomplishments, that
this organization needs a politi-
cal organization on a State level
to get things done, and that any
amount invested is going to help,
The committee has come up
with a suggestion that it be put
upon a contribution level, and if
the Association is worth its salt
the members will invest in their
own future.

After a few words of explana -
tion as to what an executive sec-
retary is and does, Walton gave
his report, and moved the adop-
tion of the following resolution
formulated by his committee.

WHEREAS,the officers and mem-
bers of the Florida Association
of Architects have now brought
the Association to a high point
of achievement, it now becomes
apparent that to realize the full
potentiality of this organization
as an instrument of serviceto
the profession, it is impractical
and undesirable to further ex-
tend the duties of the practicing
architects who are officers and
directors, and,


WHEREAS, the present officers,
directors and a special commit-
tee of its members, feel that the
Association can accomplish much
greater service to the profession
only by engaging a qualified per-
son or persons to augment and
extend the accomplishments of
the elected officers and directors,

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RE -
SOLVED:

1. That by action of this conven-
tion of the Association on the 2nd
day of November,1951, the Presi-
dent is authorized to appoint a
committee whose duty it shall be
to:

(a) Conduct a campaign to raise
by contribution from members
or others, any sum up to $10,000
for the purpose of engaging an
Executive Secretary, or other
persons who canaugment and ex-
tend the accomplishments of the
Association, and

(b)Make recommendations to the
Board of Directors as to how the
sum raised may be best employ-
ed, and

(c) Make recommendations as to
suitable personnel available to
carry out the recommendations,
and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED,
that the Board of Directors shall
approve the means of solicita-
tion;that all funds collected shall
be kept by the Treasurer of the
Association as a separate ac -


MINUTES,
A. I. A.,
FLORIDA







BULLETIN


THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
OF
THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


VOLlUME 6 MARCH, 1952 NUMBER I


CAN'T SEE MUCH TO O0


WHiAT WAS ALL THE FUSS A&.OUT?


are asked by your local
Chamber of Commerce, your civic
club or any other organization to
which you might belong, to accept a
position with the following duties:
1. To serve as publicity chairman;
and
2. To serve as editor of the bulle-
tin; and
3. To spend two months out of
every two years attending Legislature
in Tallahassee; and
4. To make speec.hs before various
organizations in the interest of better
public relations for your organization;
and
5. To maintain continuous and ef-
fective liaison between your local
group, the state set-up and the national
organization
...and all for free!
Your answer would probably be:
"So I am asked to give up imy busi-
ness? Nuts!"
Of course, you couldn't do such a
thing. None of us can. And yet the
architectural profession in Florida is
sadly in need of someone to render
these services, and even more.


count;and that all funds collected
in said account shall be returned
to the donors if, in the opinion of
the Directors, the total collec-
tions are not sufficient to accom-
plish a worthwhile addition to, or
enlargement of, the activities of
the Association.

Bunch seconded the motion for


the adoption of the above resolu-
tion,

President Goin asked for an ex-
pression from Benmont Tench,
Jr., FAA Counsel, and Tench
stressed the considerable need
for an executive secretary.After
further discussion, the motion
carried.





The only way the profession can
get someone to do all the things
we need done is for each of its
members to give somL of their
time and some of their money.

We know that you have probably
been asked to contribute and work
for your Chamber of Commerce;
the polio drive has just been corn-
pleted; the Boy Scouts drive is
just starting; and you can rarely
open your morning's mail with -
out a request for a contribution
of time and money for something.
The only difference between this
drive and any other is that in
this particular instance the con-
tribution is asked in the interest
of the profession by which you
earn your livelihood and it is
doubted that anyone can deny that
what helps architecture helps the
individual architect. And if you
think our profession doesn't need
some publicity, just start count-
ing the number of people who do
not even know what an architect
is or who think an architect is
the person who makes blueprints
(and theywant cheap ones), There
are literally thousands of people
who can see no value whatever
for your services. There are
people elected to the Legislature
every year who would be perfect-
ly willing to vote out of existence
all laws relating to your profes-
sion simply because they do not
know how important your skill
and training are in the interest
of public safety. Hence the need


for all of us to do everything
within our power to promote our
profession, and, in the judgment
of the members attending the last
convention of the FAA and the
members 4of your Executive
Board, the best way to promote
it in Florida is through the em-
ployment of an executive secre-
tary by the Association to do all
of the legwork that none of us
as individuals can possibly do
and still carry on our business.

The goal is $10,000 to be collec-
ted by March 15. It is fully rea-
lized that this sounds like a lot
of money but if we are to do a
real job we must hire a real man
with the necessary capabilities
to put the job across without the
necessity of future contributions.
It is the considered opinion of
your Executive Board that the
right man can do this with the
guidance and assistance of the
Board.


LOOK WE'RE PULLING!


CHECKS SHOULD BE JUST AS BIG AS YOU CAN AFFORD AND
SHOULD BE MADE OUT TO THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF
ARCHITECTS, MARKED "SPECIAL FUND," AND FORWARDED
DIRECT TO SANFORD W. GOIN, 518 N.E. 4TH AVE., GAINES-
VILLE,FOR TABULATION AFTER WHICH THEY WILL BE SENT
TO THE SECRETARY FOR DEPOSITING INA SPECIAL ACOOXNT





SA.rFORo W. GoIN
"FOnw GO-..A ARBCC rTECT

WE C ^AF PHMONC 7411
February 18, 1952.

Mr: Franois R. Valton, Secretary-Treasurer
Florida Association of Architects A.I.A.
Daytona Beach, Florida

Dear Francias

Following the Executive Board meeting in Tampa and my appointment by Dan Hart to
serve as general chairman of the Association Camittee to raise funds for the
employment of an executive secretary, I have done little other than work on the
campaign program.

I particularly appreciate the opportunity which you have given me to make a state-
ment in the interest of this program since its success will be dependent upon the
interest shown by the entire profession, and the bulletin is the only medium
wherein all of the architects of Florida can be reached.

It is a big program and has required a lot of thought and work to get it even to
this stage. The subject was first broached at the 1950 Convention and has been
thoroughly studied by the committee of which you were chairman, and upon presenta-
tion of your committee's recommendations upon the floor of the Convention last
November vas voted almost unanimously as providing the only means of enlarging
the work of the Association and meeting an urgent need of the profession.

There was no possible way that we could call upon any one eamber of the Associa-
tion to do all of the work incidental to setting up the program and providing for
its perpetuation in the future by studying vays and means and making contacts
which would eventually lead to its self-support. The goal is $10,000 to be s-
cured on a contribution basis from the members by March 15. This $10,000 is to
be used at the discretion of the Executive Board to pay for the job for one year
by providing a competent person with a salary and expense account who, with the
assistance of the Executive Board, *an spend sufficient time to work out the detail
of putting bia job on a self-paying baia,. Tiere have been many ideas advanced
from time to time but they all require a certain amount of detailed work and study
before they can be put on a self-paying basis that would assure safety and dignity

I an confident that the Executive Board, made up as it is of elected representa-
tives from the various chapters, will always be able to guide its employed person,
and ao direct his activities as to insure success, providing the profession will
furnieh sufficient funds to start the program.

A prominent insurance man in y own cOmunity, who is a great believer in organi-
sation activity, once made the statement to me that he would much prefer to have
the volume of all of the insurance that is not written in his town to that which
is written and shared by all of the local W rties. Have you ever considered the
volume of work which is done in your own community without benefit of architect
and what a very small amount of this work it would take to re the amount of
your contribution to this $10,000 fund?
Sinc y ,

Sanford V. in, Chaira
SU/aeg FAA Committee to Raise Funds
for Executive Secretary








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THE SECRETARY'S PAGE


At the F.A.A. Board Meeting in
Tampa January 26, 1952, a bud-
get was adopted in line with pre-
vious practice for non-legislative
years. Counsel Tench was re-
employed and spoke of the need
for legislative committee work
in this year prior to election.
He urged contact with men who
are running for office and re -
minded us that a promise before
election is a promise but after
election it is a brush-off. In
line with his urging that we get
the story of the State Board of
Architecture before the members
we have in this issue a very gpod
piece from Mel Greeley.

Committee appointments were
made. These appear in fill else-
where in the Bulletin with the
exception of Sanford Goin's fund
raising committee which is quite
elaborate and which is being in-
dependently circularized by San-
ford.

A special committee of Shultz,
McCandless and Craig was ap-
pointed to determine "if and
what" in regard to a seminar at


YEL OW PAGES OF T E


TELEPHONE BOOK


Tallahassee and to coordinate
with Bill Arnett.

Sbme reports presented are con-
tained herein in full. Other ma-
terial will appear later.

We had much discussion of the
forthcoming regional meeting in
Atlanta in the Fall. We will have
more on this later. r

Our next Board Meeting will be
in Gainesville possibly to help
Sanford count the money.

The Secretary went to Sarasota
and looked over some work by
Twitchell and Rudolph. HOT
DAWG!" Promptly on return
home some of these methods
were discussed with our local
building official and we find that
considerable flexibility exis ts
within our code (Southern Stand-
ards basically). I like to see a
fellow ata dance who seems to be
having a ball at no one else's
discomfort. I get the same re-
action looking at the work by
Rudolph and Twitchell.
&hi*ak.t- t


LOCALL MEMBERS"
Atkinson Carl N Taylor arc. .7-5731
Dykemra C Dale 16901 Gulf blvd GBchs. .9-3321
Gay John B Sr 7217 Gulf blvd GBchs. 2-4284
Hadley Elliott B 860 Snell Isle blvd- .51-2651
Harvard Wilriarn 8 2714 9th St. -7-6735
Lott Winfied Plaza bi .7-8934
Messiner Joseph H liall bi ............ 7-1Q54
Parish Archie G Rutland bl 7-5545
Smith Bruce Plaza bl .7-8934


AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS-
THIS IS WHAT THE FELLOWS FLORIDA DENTAL CHAPTER
The Members of the Florida
IN THE ST. PETE AREA DO Central Chapter A. I. A. Have
for Their Purpose the Main-
ABOUT THEIR LISTING IN THE tenance of High Professional
Standards of Practice and
conduct.





EDUCATION AND REGISTRATION


FLORIDA RANKS IN TOP SIX
SCHOOLS

The Association of Collegiate
Schools of Architecture reports
that of 57 member schools the
University of Florida is the larg-
est in the South and sixth largest
in the country. Current enroll-
ment in architecture at Florida
is 337. Leading the processbn
is Illinois with 881, followed by
California with 595, Southern
California with 426, Cincinnati
with 345, and Michigan also with
345.


NEW FACULTY MEMBERS
ADDED

Recent additions to the faculty
in architecture at the University
of Florida include William Nor-
vell Wornelsdorf, Associate Pro-
fessor,. Charles W. Strieby, As -
sistant Professor, and Theodore
W. Patterson and Wiley James
Tillman, Jr., Instructors.

Womelsdorf graduated at Auburn
and has done advanced work at
Auburn and at Illinois Tech. He
has been a member of the staff
at Auburn and a practicing archi-
tect in Alabama. Strieby holds
degrees from Kansas and Colum-
bia as well as a diploma from
Fontainbleau. His architectural
work has been in Kansas, Okla -
homa and Texas.

Patterson graduated at Florida
and returns after establishing
an outstanding record at Harvard
where he earned his M.C.P. He
has worked in Florida and has


done planning work in Massachu-
setts. Tillman is a graduate of
Illinois and has been employed in
that state.

ARCHITECTS SHORTAGE SEEN
BY 1960

Turpin Bannister, head of the
Department of Architecture at
Illinois, predicts a shortage of
architects by 1960. For the last
60 years, the number of archi-
tects reported by the U.S.Bureau
of the Census has varied little
from 33 per 100,000 urban popu-
lation. With urban population
increasing rapidly, and with the
increased use of architects for
all types of projects, Bannister
believes that the demand for ar-
chitects can be met only by main-
taining architectural enrollmerts
at the present high level. Total
enrollment in 57 schools of ar-
chitecture is now 10,700, about a
thousand less than a year ago.


VISITING LECTURERS AT
GAINESVILLE

Recent visitors to the College of
Architecture and Allied Arts in-
cluded George Nelson, Arthur
Osver, and Edwin Bateman Mor-
ris. Nelson, well known for his
contemporary furniture, served
as visiting lecturer during part
of January, Osver brought an ex-
citing show of his paintings of
New York City, and Morris pre-
sented a stimulating talk on col-
or in architecture.

Visiting lecturers for the second
semester will include Gyorgy




Kepes and William Lescaze .
Kepes,professor of visualdesign
at M.I.T., will give a lecture on
March 20 and an exhibition of his
work will be shown until April 7.
Lescase will be on the campus
from March 31 through April 2
and will lecture on April 1. Both
lectures are open to the public
and there will be no charge for
admission.


SCHOLARSHIP
PLANNED


PROGRAM


Representatives of the Steward-
Mellon Companies of Jackson -
ville, of Orlando, and of Tampa
met recently with officials of the
University of Florida and a com-
mittee from the Florida Nor th
Chapter to plan a program of
scholarships for senior students
in architecture and in building g
construction.

Six scholarships of $Z50 each are
contemplated. These scholarships
will make it possible for a mruber
of worthy students to complete
their college work who might
otherwise have to drop out of
school. A similar scholarship
fund is being undertaken by the
George Doro Fixture Companyof
Jacksonville.


CENTER OF THE ARTS EXHIBI-
TIONS

The University of Florida Center
of the Arts will exhibit the Tim-
ber Engineering Company's "Prize
Winning Designs of Garden Type
Apartments,, from February 11
through February 26. From Mlarch
1 through March 22, the A.I.A.'s
"Honor Awards, 1951" will beon
exhibition. Painting shows fo r


the second semester include
Fletcher Martin, visiting profes-
sor at Florida, Contemporar y
Arts, and Twenty Americ an
Paintings from the I.B.M. col -
lections.



TO ADVERTISERS
0
... The Bulletin offers the op-
portunity for virtual direct mail
contact to all registered archi-
tects with offices in the State of
Florida at least four times a
year.
... Under our new policy the
Bulletin may carry adds and the
Secretary will send a schedule
of charges and designate loca-
tions available upon request.
...It is our intention to issue
four Bulletins each year with
the possibility that a fifth issue
would appear following the con.
vention and covering its active.
ties. This would picture, if
possible, the manufacturer's dis-
plays at the convention and the
social activities.
... Closing dates for these will
be May 1, August 1, October 1,
and if a post convention Bulletin
is issued, it will be December 1.
... Most of the materials in this
issue is merely the natural com-
pilation of writings of associa-
tion affairs. The Secretary hopes
to develop more for the follow-
ing issues and will welcome ad-
vertiser's use of good photos of
contemporary work, using their
materials in their ads.





THIS ITEM IS FROM THE STUDIES ON THE EXECUTIVE
SECRETARY JOB AND WAS NOT INCLUDED IN THE REPORT

WHY PEOPLE JOIN THE A.IA.

I. They believe in the institute and its objectives.
2. They use the services of the organization.
3. They like to attend meetings.
4. They appreciate contacts and companionship.
5. They want to join because their friends belong.
6. They seek personal preference and recognition.
7. They want to keep informed on professional matters.
8. They are ,good fellows.,1
9. They obtain educational advantages.
10. They want to improve the profession.
11. They want to improve the professional methods and effici-
ency of their plants.
1Z. They want to fight unfair legislation and taxation.
13. They like the social and recreational features.
14. They want to work with competitors on mutual problems.


WHY PEOPLE DECLINE TO JOIN THE A.I.A.

1. They do not believe organized effort can accomplish any -
thing.
2. They do not want to spend money for dues.
3. They think they can get the benefits anyway (the "free
riders"i).
4. They like to be individual "big shots."
5. They are just naturally "mean."
6. They haven't got the money.
7. They have had some unfortunate past experience.
8. They are non-mixers; and do not like to meet people.
9. They have an exaggerated opinion of their own cleverness.
10. They think they have all they can get out of the organization.
(These are ,in-and-outers.")
11. They can't dominate institute policies.


THINGS THAT PEOPLE WILL DO:

1. They will follow a habit until it hurts.
2. They accept beliefs ready-made, and stick to them tenaci-
ously.
3. They follow leaders blindly, and will believe their friends
even though they know they are wrong.
4. They will yield to suggestion when flattered.
5. They will work hard to establish superiority in the eyes of
other people.





6. They find the greatest interest in their own emotional "kicks.,,
7. They glorify the past an-: discount the future.

THINGS THAT PEOPLE WILL NOT DO:

1. They will not look far beyond their own interests.
2. They resent change and dislike newness.
3. They forget the past and rrnemember inaccurately.
4. They will not fight for things when they canfind something
to fight against.
5. They do not dare be different from the crowd unless those
differences are recognized as being virtues.
6. They will not exert themselves beyond the line of least re-
sistance except under high emotion.
7. They will not act even in important matters unless they are
followed up.


The above item is an abridge-
ment of material lifted from
"Trade Association Management"


NEW HOME
FINANCE


CIRCULAR ON


GULLEY AND MILLKEY

If you were unable to attend the
Third Architectural Field Day
of the Student A.I.A. Chapter in
Gainesville in September, you
will want to read Ralph Gulley's
address, 'The Architect and
20/20 Vision," in the February
JOURNAL of the A.I.A. together
with the quotations in the column
"They Say," in the same issue.

Also in the February JOURNAL
is an enlightening account of the
Georgia registration controversy
by Hervert Millkey, presidentof
the Georgia Chapter. Millkey
predicts closer mutual under -
standing among all elements of
the profession as a result of the
hiatus.


"Financing the Home" is the
title of a new circular issued by
the Small Homes Council of the
University of Illinois. This
twelve-page circular, one of a
series on small homes, contains
much of value to a prospective
home owner. It was compiled
as the result of a two-day sym-
posium on home financing at
Urbana in which top officials in
banking, research, government,
insurance, and the like partici-
pated.

Among the topics discussed are
"What Can You Pay for Housing"
"Necessary Outlay for Home Own-
ership," "How Expensive a Home
Can You Afford," "Typesc Mlr-
tgage Loans," "Where to Go for a
Loan," and ,Closing the Loan.

Copies of the circular may be
obtained for ten cents by writing
the Small Homes Council,Mum-
ford House, University of Illi -
nois, Urbana.





A SOLICITED BUT UNAUTHORIZED REPORT BY
THE SECRETARY OF THE STATE BOARD OF
ARCHITECTURE FOR THE BULLETIN


February 1952

Dear fellow members
of the F.A.A.:

"The mills of the Gods grind slow-
ly ------" Etc. it has been said,
and while it seems inappropriate
to set the State Board of Archi-
tecture up on such a high plane
as was occupied by the Pagan
Gods, there is to be noted some
comparison at least in the speed
with which legal matters of the
board get done: I hope also that
results may be comparative.

Your Board, having been the re-
cipient of many complaints and
informations regarding practice,
(or alleged practice) of archi-
tecture by persons not register-
ed to perform such services ,
has made quite a number of at-
tempts to estop (I must quit lis-
tening to lawyers) such practices
through legal processes, and by
other methods, and it is a pleas-
ure to report that the Board has
had a fair measure of success.

During the past three or four
years there have been reported
to, or have been observed by,
the Board. perhaps two dozen
cases in which it appeared that
some person or persons were
practicing or were offering to
practice, architecture although
not being registered or licensed
to do so. As a routine custom
the secretary of theboard has in
almost every case written a let-
ter to the alleged violator in
which letter attention has been


called to the provisions of the
Registration Law and he has
been requested to explain his
past actions and to outline his
intentions for the future. The
Board has in every case inform-
ed the violator of the powers of
the board to prosecute under
Chapter 467, Florida Statutes of
1941, revised 1951, but has in-
formed him that as a matter of
policy,no legal proceedings would
be instigated until he had had an
opportunity to explain his actions
and, if he had the necessary
qualifications, to apply for regis-
tration.


In many cases the warning letter
has resulted in the accused per-
son making application and, in a
number of cases, obtaining regis-
tration. In some cases the ac-
cused has claimed ignorance and
has promised to abide by the law,
in which event the information
has been filed and the Board and
its attorneys have tried to keep
informed on the actions of the
accused. It is in such cases that
the registered architects of
Florida are invited to lendtheir
assistance.

In a very few cases the accused
person has not only refused to
agree to abide by the law, but
has in effect or in fact defied
the board to prosecute him.When
this occurs, there is usually
nothing for the board to do but
attempt to gather information
and evidence of sufficient value
and importance to enable our at-





torneys to persuade a State's At-
torney or a County Solicitor to
bring the matter to a Circuit
Court for trial. At this point I
would like to bring out the fact
that the Board has authority to
conducthearings based on alleged
offenses under the law, perform-
ed by registered architects, and
to suspend or revoke their regis-
tration certificates; however the
board has no jurisdiction over
unregistered persons and can
only attempt to get action in the
Courts by proper authorities, in
which case the board can and
does offer help in securing evi-
dence. Usually the board finds
it necessary to exercise persua-
sion in order to get the court of-
ficers to proceed even when the
evidence appears sufficient in
the eyes of the members of the
board and other architects to
warrant action.

In a comparatively recent case
a different method of approach
was attempted and I am glad to
announce that the attempt was
successful. This attempt was
to restrain by injunction a cer-
tain person from trading under
the name "General Drafting Ser-
vice," and from performing ar-
chitecturalservices and offering
to perform such services under
the trade name. In the Circuit
Court in Pinellas County a per-
manent injunction was entered


against this Drafting Service.
The board hopes that this is a
milestone on the highway of en-
forcement of Chapter 467.

There are in the files of the
board quite a number of uncom-
pleted records of alleged prac -
tice of architecture by unregis -
tered persons. These matters
have been and are being investi-
gated by Mr. Benmont Tench,
one of the attorneys for the
board, and by the board mem-
bers,just as rapidly as possible.
Unless one has had experience
in these matters he is justly
privileged to question the speed
(or latk of same) with which the
board acts. I can only say that
the power which activates the
previously mentioned mills is,
in our case, inadequate to over-
come the friction caused by the
technicalities of law and at the
same time deliver grist at the
speed and of the fineness desired
by the Profession.

After reading (if you have done
so)this unofficial report, please,
fellow F.A.A. members, with-
hold criticismof the board with-
out thorough investigation, and
please assist the board in fol-
lowing up information necessary
before a court action can be
commenced.


MELLEN C. GREELEY





Mr. R. Daniel Hart,
President, Florida
Association of Architects
P. 0. Box 928
Pensacola, Florida

Dear Dan:

As you well know, the problem
of building in the Gulf Southeast
differs from the problem of build-
ing elsewhere, not only because
we have conditions of heavy rain-
fall, high humidity, prolonged
heat, and numerous insects, but
also because our climate is such
that people can live and work in
buildings which are almost com-
pletely open for the greater part
of the year. This letter is writ-
ten with the hope that a way can
be found to study building prob-
lems in this area in an orderly
way, and to find valid answers to
many presently unanswered ques-
tions concerning our climate,our
people, and our buildings.

Several months ago the Building
Research Advisory Board of the
National Research Council, rea-
lizing the importance of special
study of the problems in the
southern part of the United States
established a Committee on Trop-
ical Housing and Building. Brief-
ly, the purpose of this committee
is to collect and correlate exist-
ing data, to secure new data by
laboratory research and building
applications, and to make its
findings available through con-
ferences and publications.

The members of the central com-
mittee of BRAB are Assistant
Executive Director, G. M. Rapp
of the Pierce Foundation; Archi-
tect Ralph Walker of Voorhees ,


Walker, Foley and Smith; and
Dean W. R. Woolrich of the Uni-
versity of Texas.

Under the guidance of this cen-
tral BRAB committee,three area
coknmittees have been appointed:
The Far Southwest Committee
centered at the University of
California, the Mid- Southwest
Committee centered at the Uni-
versity of Texas, and the Gulf
Southeast Committee centered at
the University of Florida with
Dean Joseph Weil as chairman.


The Gulf Southeast Committee on
Tropical Housing and Building
consists of fifteen members rep-
resenting Florida, Georgia, Ala-
bama,Mississippi and Louisiana.

As a member of the Gulf South-
east Committee, Dean Weil has
asked me if I would be willing to
undertake a preliminary survey
of the situation in Florida through
existing professional organi -
zations, including the Associaled
General Contractors, the Florida
Association of Architects, the
Florida Engineering Society, the
Florida Society of Professional
Engineers, and the Producers'
Council.

I am writing to ask if the Florida
Association of Architects would
be interested in working with the
Gulf Southeast Committee on
Tropical Housing and Building in
a research program,and if so,if
you would be willing to suggest
means by which this cooperation
could be most productive and
helpful. The enclosed list of
topics, prepared as a preliminary
check list by the central cormmit-





tee, may suggest general fields
of inquiry.

If 1 can give you any additional
information or answer any ques-
tions you may have, it will be a
privilege to do so.


Sincerely yours,

William T. Arnett
Member,Regional Committee
119 Building E
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida
January 10, 1952


Phase I. Collecting Existing
Data Relevant to Tropical Hous-
ing and Building

1. Area Data


(a) Foundations


Soil movements due to cli-
matic conditions
Soil mechanics of tropical
structures
Insulating properties of
soils
Mean soil temperatures
Control of moisture con-
tent in soils
Limitations of materials
as moisture seals.
Comparison of pier and
continuous footing founda-
tions
Flexible foundation under
rigid structures


(b) Walls and Roofs

U-value importance in area
Porosity desirability
Low cost aesthetic walls
Heat capacity
Heavy inside walls versus
heavy outside walls
Rating of materials for
usefulness,balancing ther-
mal, fire resistance and
aesthetic factors
Structural strength of walls


OUTLINE FOR OBJECTIVES

AND PROCEDURE

TROPICAL HOUSING RESEARCH



(c) Sdfnlight control

Natural shade and plantings
Opaque porous walls
Roof coolants and insulators
Overhang and roof projec-
tions
Adjustable walls
Double roof design

(d) Breeze control

Natural shade control and
shrub baffles
House orientation
House layout
Structural diversionbaffles
Mechanical movement of
air
Wind tunnels studies of air
movement about houses

(e) Humidity factors

Control by air movement
By confining to areas where
created
By wall material selection
By room design
By refrigeration





(f) Heating

Preferred listing of eco-
nomical heating methods
Relative cost data on over-
all heating costs of typical
houses and other buildings
including depreciation,
maintenance and operation
Calendar of sustained heat-
ing and intermittentheating
days per year balanced
against hours per year and
design temperatures

(g) Cooling economics

Natural cooling and limi-
tations
Evaporative cooling basic
data and limitations
Research data on room fan
cooling
Machine cooling
Radiant cooling

(h) Climatology and Physbil-
ogy of livability and effec-
tive working in well de-
signed structures

(i) Durability of structure

(j) Bibliography

Compilation of a bibliogra-
phy for the area on Tropical
Housing and Building

Phase II. Securing New Data by
Laboratory Research and Build-
ing Applications

1. Develop a list of important
research subjects to recom-
ment to Schools of Archi-
tecture and Colleges of


Engineering especially
that might be worth while
contributions to the scien-
tific literature on Tropi -
cal Housing and Building

2. Encourage at leastone ses-
sion of annual or regional
meetings of building and
architectural groups to be
devoted to Tropical Housing
and Building.

3. Encourage the presentation
of technical and scientific
papers on Tropical Housing
and Building.

Phase IV. Compilation, Editing
and Publication of Composite
Data from all Sources.

Complimentary Publication to
Parallel Phases I, II, III and IV

Articles and brochures should
be forthcoming.
1. Increasing Livability in Sub-
Tropical Homes
2. School Building Design for
Tropical Areas
3. The Effects of Shrub and Tree
Planting on House Comfort
4. Design of Military Structures
for Housing Men in Tropical
Zones
5. Lessons on Building Comfort
from the Semi-Arid Civiliza-
tions
6. Cleverness of our Forbear-
ersin Comfort House Design
7. Misfitted Northern Architec-
ture in Tropical Settings
8. Measuring Fan Effectiveness
by its Effect on Human Beings
Instead of Cubic Feet Per
Minute





ORGANIZATION PLAN FOR
TROPICAL HOUSING AND
BUILDING COMMITTEE OF
B.R.A.B.



(It is anticipated that a more
comprehensive organization plan
will be developed as the need
and funds justifies and permits )

At the present time it is pro-
posed to set up three operation-
al committees and a Central
BRAB directing committee. For
the present, the central BRAB
committee will function also as
a fourth overall operation com-
mittee to avoid over organization.

Three of these committees will
be directed through existing state
university research organizations
located within the areas. These
universities would be (1) Univer-
sity of Florida to directthe pro-
ject for the Gulf Southeast, (2)
The University of Texas to direct
the project for the mid-Southwest
and (3) The University of Calif-
ornia to direct the project for
the Far Southwest.

The central committee will be
associated with the Washington
Office of BRAB and most of its
personnel would be selected from
the Building Research Advisory
Board.

The central committee would
have as its obligation the insular
and other regions related to the


United States either as possess-
ions, as military bases or as a
point four on mutual assistance
obligation. It would be asked,
also, to collect and organize the
information available from ar-
chitects, engineers, publishers,
Government agencies,educators
and contractors on tropical and
semi-tropical housing and build-
ing design factors including the
tropical zones of the near East,
Africa, Israel, South and Central
America and Australia.

FINANCING

Some financing is assured from
two of the State Universities.
The University of Florida has
indicated it can direct several
thousand dollars to her area en-
terprise, The University of
Texas already has under way
an area project and will continue
to expand this with available
funds. The University of Cali-
fornia is working out its own
program for a limited study.

The first phase of this program
would lend itself to a sane
"Foundation" project.

The second phase might well be
a Central BRAB obligation.

The third phase might be finan-
ced by interested professional
groups and by the sale of manu-
scripts.

The fourth phase is subject to a
contract with publishers,





COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS COMMITTEE ON UNIFORM


1952


COMMITTEE ON ALLIED ARTS:
Gustav A. Maass (Palm Beach)
CHAIRMAN
Igor B. Polevitzky (South)
James K. Pownall (Broward)
Hugh J. Leitch (North)
Albert P. Woodard (North Cen-
tral)
G. M. Peek (Daytona Beach)
Kenneth Miller (Central)

COMMITTEE ON RELATIONS
WITH CONSTRUCTION IN-
DUSTRY:
W.Kenyon Drake (North) CHAIR-
MAN
Van Knox (Broward)
Ernest Stidolph (North Central)
Ralph Spicer (Daytona Beach)
Frank Bail (Central)
John Stetson (Palm Beach)
John L. Skinner (South)

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC IN -
FORMATION AND GOVERN-
MENTAL RELATIONS:
Albert Courtney Stewart (Bro -
ward ) CHAIRMAN
Francis Emerson (Central)
Eugene Celler (North)
David B. Leete (Daytona Beach)
Herbert Mathes (South)
Robert Maybin (North Central)
Robert Nevins (Palm Beach)

COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION
AND REGISTRATION:
Wm. T.Arnett(North) CHAIRMAN
William A. Gilroy (Broward)
Charles W.Saunders (North Cen-
tral)
Francis W. Craig(DaytonaBeact)
Ralph P. Lovelock (Central)
Raymond H. Plockelman (Palm
Beach)
Frank Watson (South)


BUILDING CODES:
Miss Marion I. Manley (South)
CHAIRMAN
M. Winfield Lott (Central)
W. D. Kemp (North)
Robert E. Hansen (Broward)
James A. Stripling (North Cen -
tral)
Howard Chilton (Palm Beach)
Edwin Mabette Snead (Daytona
Beach)


COMMITTEE ON RELATIONS
BETWEEN ARCHITECTS AND
ENGINEERS:
Elliott B. Hadley (Central)
CHAIRMAN
W. R. Gomon (Daytona Beach)
Russell Pancoast (South)
J. Gordon Elliott (Palm Beach)
William K. Jackson (North)
H.D.Mendenhall (North Central)
Bayard C. Lukens (Broward)

LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE :
Franklin S. Bunch (North)
CHAIRMAN
Harry M.Griffin (Daytona Beach)
Robert Fitch Smith (South)
Jas.Gamble Rogers,I! (Central)
Prentiss Huddleston (North Cen-
tral)
Clinton Gamble (Broward)
Wm. A. Stewart (Palm Beach)

COMMITTEE ON ARCHITECT -
TURAL SERVICES TO SCHOOL
BOARDS:
Sanford W.Goin (North) CHAIR -
MAN
Forrest M. Kelley (North Cen-
tral)
Cedric Start (Broward)
Joel W. Sayers (Daytona Beach )
Alexander Hatton (Central)
Frederick Seelman (Palm Beach)
Herbert Johnson (South)





BOARD OF TRUSTEES, U OF F
FUND:
J, L. R. Grand, CHAIRMAN
George Spohn
Andrew J. Ferendino

ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR
STUDENT CHAPTER:
Jack Moore, CHAIRMAN
Myrl Hanes
James David McVoy

SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO STUDY
EQUALITY OF DUES:
Archie G. Parish, CHAIRMAN
Geo. Votaw
Willis L. Stephens


Mr. Roy A. Benjamin of the lor-
ida North Chapter has resigned
his membership in the Institute.
Mr. Benjamin is one of the old
timers in the State and has spon-
sored many of our members in
their training. Mr. Benjamin
has not been in active practice
for some time,his practice being
carried into the hands of Bill
Kemp.

The Institute membership of
Charles LeRoy Kinports has
been terminated.


NEW MEMBERS
ELECTED SINCE DECEMBER 1, 1951


CHARLES ELLIS DUNCAN
ARCADE BUILDING
VERO BEACH
PALM BEACH CHAPTER


ELIOT CHAPIN FLETCHER
4805 SWANN AVENUE
TAMPA 6
FLORIDA CENTRAL CHAPTER


WILLIAM GARRETT TAYLOR
2035 DE LEON-AVENUE
VERO BEACH
PALM BEACH CHAPTER


FRED C. VANDUSEN
218 W. CHURCH STREET
JACKSONVILLE 2
FLORIDA NORTH CHAPTER


JEROME LAWRENCE SHILLING
1Z70 N.E. 102 STREET
MIAMI SHORES 38
FLORIDA SOUTH CHAPTER


HARRY EDWARD BURNS, JR.
P. 0. BOX NO. 1352
ATLANTIC BEACH
FLORIDA NORTH CHAPTER





A1A CHAPTERS & CHAPTER OFFICERS IN STATE


DAYTONA BEACH CHAPTER
President Ralph Spicer. 550 N.
Oleander Avenue, (P.O.Box 1671)
Daytona Beach, Florida
Secretary Joel Sayers, 216
Brookline Avenue,Daytona Beach,
Florida

FLORIDA CENTRAL CHAPTER
President George H. Spohn, 210
Park Avenue No., Winter Park
Florida
Secretary W. Kenneth Miller,
209 S. Orange Avenue, Orlando,
Florida

FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL
CHAPTER
President Charles W.Saunders,
212 North Adams Street, Talla-
hassee, Florida
Secretary Chester L. Craft,
Assistant State School Architect,
Department of Education, Talla-
hassee, Florida


C--_


PALM BEACH CHAPTER
President- Raymond H. Plockel-
man, 325 Worth Avenue, Palm
Beach, Florida
Secretary Gordon Elliott, 3700
Eastview, West Palm Beach,
Florida

BROWARD COUNTY CHAPTER
President Walter E. Pauley,
2800 E. Las Olas Boulevard,
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Secretary Morton T. Iron -
monger, 1229 E. Las Olas Boule-
vard, Fort Lauderdale, Florida

FLORIDA NORTH CHAPTER
President John L. R. Grand ,
University of Florida, College
of Architecture & Allied Arts,
Gainesville, Florida
Secretary Jack Moore, 518
N. E. 4th Avenue, Gainesville ,
Florida


FLORIDA SOUTH CHAPTER
President Robert Fitch Smith,
Shoreland Arcade, Miami 3Z,
Florida
Secretary- H. George Fink, Sr.,
204 Aragon Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida









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