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Title: FAA bulletin
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Florida Association of Architects
Publication Date: February 1945
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004770
Volume ID: VID00015
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6023
ltuf - AME1161

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FAA


BULLETIN


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FEBRUARY, 1945


Vol. 7, No. 1


Officers:
President: James A. Stripling-State Department of Ed-
ucation, Tallahassee, Florida
VicePresident: Marion I. Manley-University of Miami,
V Miami, Florida.
SSecy-Treas.: Frederick T. Hannaford-Box 2696, Univer-
s ity Station, Gainesville, Florida
District Directors:
1. R. Daniel Hart-Thiesen Building, Pensacola, Fla.
2. Robert H. Brown-P. O. Box 1116, Tallahassee, Fla.
3. -Robeit Bittner-119 East Union St., Gainesville, Fla.
4. Franklin S. Bunch-1610 Inwood Terrace, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
5. Alan J. MacDonough-P. 0. Box 910, Daytona Beach,
Fla.
6. Donovan Dean-607 Easton Drive, Lakeland, Fla.
7. Archie G. Parish-213 Hall Building, St. Petersburg,
Fla.
S 8. John L. Volk-206 Plaza Circle, Palm Beach, Fla.
9. A. Courtney Stewart-Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
10. Coulton Skinner-736 Ingraham Building, Miami 32,
Fla.
11. Upton C. Ewing-803 Dodglas Entrance, Coral Gables,
SFla.

QBJECT: . The purpose of this Association shall be
to stimulate and encourage continual improvement within
I; the profession, co-operate with other professions, promote
Sand participate in the matters of general public welfare,
and represent and act for the architectural profession in
Sthe State.

GREETINGS: .. to all of you with this the first issue
Sof the bulletin in 1945. We hope to give you six issues,
Sbi-monthly, but a lot will depend on the number of paid-u)
I: memberships and contributions.

DEDICATION: . This first issue of the bulletin is
Dedicated to our fellow architect and friend, John L.
Skinner of Miami, whose contributions, made two years
i', ago, makes this issue largely possible.

. .REPORT OF THE 30TH ANNUAL MEETING: . .
The annual meeting of the Association was held in Tampa,
December 9, 1944. There were twenty-three members
Occ,
I -


present and one guest, Major S. L. Gatling of Orlando.
Although the attendance was not large, this was one of
the liveliest meetings of the Association that we have
ever attended. Every minute was a busy one and near
the close some members were in great fear that all neces-
sary business would not be attended to. But under the
able direction of President Stripling, we completed the
meeting on time.
The main theme of the meeting was the consideration
of the unification of the Association and the Florida Amer-
ican Institute of Architects chapters into a more closely
correlated body and the possible merging of some of the
functions of both organizations.
Preceding the annual meeting in the morning of De-
cember 8th, the association committee on Unification met
to consider their final actions. Rudolph Weaver, of Gaines-
ville, had been chairman of this committee and also a
member of the national unification committee of the A.I.A.
He had worked long and hard on a plan of unification for
the Florida organizations. His plan, which will appear
later in this article, was adopted with some modifications
and prepared for presentation to the Association group.
In the afternoon of December 8th, there was held a
joint meeting of the Florida American Institute of Archi-
tects chapters in Tampa. This meeting was attended by
representative groups of Florida architects. They in turn
adopted Mr. Weaver's plan of unification with several
modifications.
Finally on Saturday, the 9th, the original plan was
presented to the Association meeting. There was a good
discussion, entered into by practically every architect
present, of the original and the modified plans. The fol-
lowing motion was unanimously adopted:
"The association approves the plan of Mr. Weaver
as modified by the joint chapter meeting of December 8,
1944, as governing the following committee in its actions.
A committee shall be formed to work out the details for
unification plans. Said committee to be composed of one
member chosen from each of the three American Institute
of Architects' Florida chapters and three members ap-
pointed by the President of the Florida Association of
Architects. The committee shall make a report at the
next semi-annual meeting of the Florida Association of
Architects."
The adopted plan of Unification and a brief explana-
tion of the intent of each item is as follows:

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES







Plan for Unification


Fla. South
Chapter


1. WE ARE IN FAVOR OF MAINTAINING THE
PRESENT CHAPTERS OF THE INSTITUTE IN-
STEAD OF HAVING JUST ONE CHAPTER.
(Notation: The original national plan for unification
of the American Institute of Architects, since modified,
was to have one chapter in each state and several dis-
trict chapters as subdivisions thereof. We have felt
here in Florida that such a scheme would destroy the
identity of the Florida Association of Architects. This,
we are sure, no thinking architect wishes to do. Under
our plan, more chapters can be formed as the populous
centers in the state grow and each chapter will main-
tain its local identity and ability to deal with purely
local problems.)

2. FOR STATE POLITICAL ACTIVITIES WE ARE IN
FAVOR OF A STATE ASSOCIATION OF ARCHI-
TECTS.
(Notation: Many of our architects have expressed
their views that we should maintain our -state incor-
porated Association and that the name "The Florida
Association of Architects" should be perpetuated. The
intent of the adopted plan is to do this.)

3. ALL REGISTERED ARCHITECTS WILL BE ELI-
GIBLE TO MEMBERSHIP IN THE INSTITUTE
SUBJECT TO INSTITUTE MEMBERSHIP RE-
QUIREMENTS.
(Notation: In recent years requirements for member-
ship in the Institute have been greatly modified. The
Institute has invited all architects to apply for mem-
bership. The entrance fee has been reduced to five
dollars, a sum sufficient to cover the cost of the neces-
sary paper work and the certificate of membership.
The first year national dues in the Institute are five
dollars. The dues increase five dollars a year until
the fourth year when they become twenty dollars, the
regular amount paid by older members. It is patent
that these small fees should not work a hardship on
any architect.)
4. THE STATE ASSOCIATION WOULD BE FORMED
FROM THE MEMBERSHIP OF THE VARIOUS
CHAPTERS WITHIN THE STATE. EACH CHAP-
TER SHALL NOMINATE AND ELECT ONE OR
MORE DIRECTORS AND A VICE-PRESIDENT.
THERE SHALL BE AN ANNUAL MEETING OF
THE MEMBERSHIP OF ALL CHAPTERS AT
WHICH TIME THEY WILL ELECT A SECRETARY-
TREASURER AND A PRESIDENT FOR THE STATE
ASSOCIATION. THIS PROCEDURE WILL FUR-


NISH THE ROSTER OF OFFICERS FOR THE
STATE ASSOCIATION, AND THE STATE ASSO-
CIATION'S MAIN BUSINESS WILL BE TO CON-
DUCT ALL AFFAIRS RELATING TO THE STATE
LEGISLATURE, ETC., WITHIN THE STATE.
(Notation: It was the opinion of the members present
in Tampa that we should maintain the present district
representation of Association on the Board of Direc-
tors. Each chapter would nominate and elect the
district directors whose districts fall within their
chapter areas. Each chapter would be represented
on the Board of Directors by a vice-president of the
SAssociation elected by the chapter. The president and
secretary-trasurer of the Association would be elected
at the annual meeting of the Association by the mem-
bers present. When additional chapters are formed
they would be entitled to a vice-president of the Asso-
ciation and would automatically be responsible foi
the election of the directors within their chapter areas.
On the last page of the Bulletin we reprint the Pro-
gram of the California Architects. It is worth read-
ing and study.)

5. THERE WILL BE NO SEPARATE DUES TO THE
STATE ASSOCIATION; SUCH FUNDS AS NECES-
SARY SHALL BE ANNUALLY ALLOCATED FROM
THE DUES OF EACH CHAPTER WITHIN THE
STATE. ANY ADDITIONAL FUNDS NECESSARY
FOR STATE ACTIVITIES WILL BE RAISED
THROUGH CONTRIBUTIONS OF INDIVIDUAL
ARCHITECTS.
(Notation: It is the intent of this paragraph that
each chapter shall so amend its by-laws to include
the Association dues in its chapter dues and to further
amend these by-laws setting forth the portion of the
dues which shall be paid to the Association secretary-
treasurer and requiring the chapter treasurer to re-
mit these funds to the Association secretary-treasurer.
All other funds necessary for carrying on the activ-
ities of the Association will have to be contributed by
the individual architects. The last statement does
not change the existing conditions.)

6. AS THE STATE GROWS IN POPULATION, NEW
CHAPTERS CAN BE FORMED AND THE FRAME-
WORK OF THE STATE ASSOCIATION EXPANDED
ACCORDINGLY.
(Notation: This has been discussed under previous
headings. It was included in order to clarify the
intent with regard to new chapters.)


Fla. North
Chapter


Fla. Central
Chapter


Association
V.P. & Dirs.


FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS
State President and Secy-Treas. elected at the annual joint meeting of the chapters.
Governing Board of State Association
State President, Secy-Treas.,, Vice-Presidents and Directors from each chapter.


--






7. THERE WILL BE NO INDIVIDUAL MEMBER-
SHIPS IN THE STATE ASSOCIATION AS IS NOW
THE CASE, BUT ALL INDIVIDUALS WOULD OF
NECESSITY BELONG TO ONE OF THE VARIOUS
CHAPTERS, AND THESE CHAPTERS WILL MAIN-
TAIN THEIR LOCAL INTERESTS AND DIFFER-
ENCES. STATE WIDE INTERESTS WILL BE
HANDLED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF
THE STATE ASSOCIATION AND BY MEMBERS
PRESENT AT THE JOINT ANNUAL MEETINGS
OF THE CHAPTERS.
(Notation: Paragraph 7 sums up conditions as they
will exist when Unification has been fully consum-
mated. The last part might be read "and by
members present at the annual and semi-annual meet-
ings of the Association.")
Members appointed to the joint Committee on Unifica-
tion are as follows:
By President Stripling representing the Association
Arthur Beck, Orlando, Florida
Archie G. Parish, St. Petersburg, Florida
John L. Skinner, Miami, Florida
By the Florida North Chapter, A.I.A.
Russell Seymour, Jacksonville, Florida
By the Florida Central Chapter, A.I.A.
Norman F. Six, Tampa, Florida
By the Florida South Chapter, A.I.A.
Marion I. Manley, Miami, Florida
Other business completed or discussed at the Tampa
meeting was as follows:

LEGISLATIVE ACTION: . Mr. Mellon C. Greeley,
Secretary to the Board of Registration, gave a brief
review of the workings of the new state law governing
the practice of architecture. His main point was that
in suspected cases of illegal practice, it is still necessary
that a citizen or citizens of the state present evidence
to the board that will hold water in court before the
board can take action. The board has the power to apply
to the courts to subpoena witnesses but must have legal
evidence before such an application would be granted by
any court. He meant "Boys-go out and get the evidence
and we will take care of the witnesses and prosecute."
It was the consensus of opinion of members present
that this would be a poor year to bring up any new legis-
lation because of the unsettled conditions created by the
war.

REPORT ON LEGISLATIVE FUND DEBT: ... Up to
February 1, 1945, your treasurer has paid six notes held
by architects of the state for a total of $300.00. All notes
have been paid when due with one year's interest at 3%
except one which was paid without interest. The holder
of No. 4 waived the interest. Name will be furnished
on request. A complete report of our financial condition
will be furnished at the Semi-Annual Meeting and if so
authorized, will be published in a future issue of the
Bulletin. There remains $350.00 of outstanding indebted-
ness. We hope to pay this when due.

COMMITTEES FOR 1945: . President Stripling has
appointed the following committees for 1945:
Planning and Program: Term ends
Upton C. Ewing .......................... Coral Gables ........ 1945


Russell T. Pancoast ............. Miami Beach ........ 1945
Bernard W. Close .................... Jacksonville .......... 1946
Frederick G. Seelman ................ Palm Beach .......... 1946
Mellen C. Greeley .................. Jacksonville .......... 1947
Franklin 0. Adams .................... Tampa ................. 1947
Norman F. Six .......................... Tampa ................. 1948
Archie G. Parish ........................ St. Petersburg .... 1948


Civic Improvement:
Harry M. Griffin, Chairman .................. Daytona Beach
Archie G. Parish .................................... St. Petersburg
Arthur Beck ........................................................... Orlando
Publicity:
Lawrence Hitt, Chairman ................................ Orlando
Henry A. Tilden ........................................ Winter Haven
Russell Seymour ............................................ Jacksonville
Competitions:
George A. Coffin, Chairman ...................................... Miami
Archie G. Parish .......................................... St. Petersburg
M arion I. M anley ................................................ ......M iami
Educational:
Guy C. Fulton, Chairman ................................ Gainesville
Franklin 0. Adams .................................. Tampa
Franklin S. Bunch ............................................Jacksonville
Legislative:
James Gamble Rogers, II, Chairman .......... Winter Park
Jefferson Powell .... ......................................... Jacksonville
Daniel Hart ................ ...................... Pensacola
Practice:
Upton C. Ewing, Chairman ..................... Coral Gables
Guy C. Fulton ............................................ Gainesville
Mellen C. Greeley ......................................... Jacksonville
Russell T. Pancoast ...................................... Miami Beach
E. F. De La Haye ...................................... Daytona Beach
Board of Trustees, University of Florida Fund:
Mellen C. Greeley, Chairman ........................ Jacksonville
Frederick G. Seelman ...................................... Palm Beach
W. Kenyon Drake .......................................... Jacksonville
Relations between Architects and Engineers:
Carl N. Atkinson, Chairman .................................. Tampa
Walter De Garmo .................................... Panama City
Lee Roy Sheftall ....................................... Jacksonville
Memorial to Rudolph Weaver:
Franklin S. Bunch, Chairman ........................ Jacksonville
Andrew Ferendino .......................................... Miami Beach
Mellen C. Greeley ..................................... Jacksonville
State Capitol:
M. Leo Elliott, Chairman ...................................... Tampa
John L. Skinner ....................... .................... Miami
W. Kenyon Drake ...................................... Jacksonville
Secretary and Magazine:
F. Earl De Loe, Chairman ............................. Winter Park
I)onovan Dean ........................ ...................... Lakeland
Marion I.'Manley .................................................. M iami
Eugene Cellar ............................................ Jacksonville
Gerard Pitt .................................................... ...... M iam i

MEMBERSHIP: . The treasurer has received dues
checks for 1945 from the following members. We need
the "fins" to finish paying off the Association Legislative
Fund debt. With an active paid-up membership this year
we will be "all clear" and have a small fund for future
contingencies. In order to partly defray the expenses
of future Bulletins, we will glady credit members with
any amount they wish to subscribe. We have, up to Feb-
ruary 5th, 44 members in good standing as follows:


Gerard Pitt
Franklin Bunch
Donovan Dean
M. Leo Elliott
Franklin 0. Adams
W. 0. Sparklin
Marion I. Manley
Norman F. Six
James Gamble Rogers, II


Walter De Garmo
A. Courtney Stewart
Mellen C. Greeley
John R. Tanner
George Haas
Vladimir E. Virrick
T. Hunter Henderson
August Geiger
Alan J. MacDonough







Gordon Severud
John F. Adams
Prentiss Huddleston
Robert Bittner
E. F. De La Haye
James A. Stripling
Abner C. Hopkins
Clyde E. Harris
Russell Pancoast
Marion C. Wyeth
Stephen Zachar
John E. Pierson
John L. Skinner


Fred A. Eskeridge Maurice Fatio
Francis J. Kennard Richard Kielinel
Clarence A. Martin Gordan Mayer
Howard M. Reynolds S. J. Welch
Rudolph Weaver


REPORT ON 1944 MEM1BERSHIIP: .. It was neces-
sary that the secretary furnish the American Institute
of Architects in Washington, 1). C., a report on 1944
membership, in connection with the Association's mem-
bership in the Institute. In gathering these statistics, the
following interesting information was compiled:. (1) Total
number of architects registered in Florida--577. There
were 154 paid-up memberships of the F.A.A., which is
27 percent of the total; (2) Total number of registered
architects claiming Florida as their residence-377. Paid-
up memberships-Florida residents-104, which is 32.8
percent of the total of resident architects; (3) Total
number of non-resident architects-253. Paid-up member-
ships of non-resident architects-50, which is 19.8 percent
of the total of non-resident architects; (4) The non-
resident architects paid 32.5 percent of the dues paid in,
in 1944.
Summing up the above statistics and allowing for men
in the service, the dues for whom are waived, 52.1 percent
of the resident Florida architects failed to support their
association, and 57.3 percent of the non-resident architects
failed to support the association. This is not a very en-
couraging picture. Your editor entreats you to get behind
your association with your support. The Florida Associa-
tion of Architects is your protection from encroachment
by others on your profession. Whether it is completely-
or only partially successful--depends upon YOU.

CALIFORNIA UNIFICATION PROGRAM
In order to better serve the membership and the public,
the organizations representing the architectural profes-
sion within the State of California are in the pI ocess of
revamping their By-Laws to provide for a central co-
ordinating body. The first step necessary to achieve this
unified action was taken by the State Association of
California Architects which, with the help of the Chapters
of the American Institute of Architects, has set up the
California Council of Architects.
In the past few years two new problems have arisen
which required revisions in the By-Laws of the Associa-
tion. One of these was the American Institute of Archi-
tects' program of unification. The other was the problem
of students and draftsmen and their relationship to the
architectural profession. There are organizations taking
active steps to bring architectural students and drafts-
men within their jurisdiction. It was the consensus of
opinion among the architects that the interest of the stu-
d(ents and draftsmen could be best served within the
profession rather than through trade or industrial or-


Wahl Snyder
Harold D. Steward
Frederick T. Hannaford
Harry M. Griffin
John L. Volk
Bernard W. Close
L. M. Barrett
Henry V. Pope
Robert F. Smith
Coulton Skinner
A. Eugene Cellar
Willis L. Stephens
Guy C. Fulton


By-Laws and will call upon the American .Institute of
Architects to sanction the revisions where these are not
in agreement with the present requirements of the In-
stitute. We believe that unification, as it is now proposed
under the California Council of Architects, is one of the
greatest steps forward the profession has taken.


ganizations. At the Directors' meeting of the American
Institute of Architects held in Indianapolis in May of
this year a presentation was made of the case of the State
Association of California Architects in relation to the
unification program proposed by the American Institute
of Architects. It was agreed that California would en-
deavor to arrive at a working basis whereby the State
Association of California Architects and the various
Chapters within the State could fit into a national unifica-
tion program. This has since become the first order of
business for the State Association.
The By-Laws Committee for the State Association of
California Architects was requested to re-write the exist-
ing Constitution and By-Laws so as to provide for uni-
fication and for the affiliation of students and draftsmen.
The work of this Committee met with the whole-hearted
endorsement of all groups within the State. Under this
proposal, and with the addition of a few minor suggestions
made by various individuals, a California Council of Archi-
tects was to be created which Council would be composed
of representatives from District Chapters. These districtt
Chapters would be co-terminous with the present geo-
graphical boundaries of the Chapters of the American
Institute of Architects.
It was also provided that the District C(hapters should
have their membership open to all registered architects
within the districts. The various Chapters within the
State were to prepare amendments to their By-Laws which
would permit the formation of these district organizations.
The major problem facing unification under the Dis-
trict Chapter plan was that of non-dues-paying members
of the State Association of California Architects. The
new By-Laws provide that the California Council of Archi-
tects may take the necessary legislative action to become
a State corporation empowered to direct all the activities
of the profession within the State. This organization
would be empowered to regulate the practice of archi-
tecture and levy all fees connected therewith as well as
for assessments necessary for the establishment of an
adequate executive staff and assistants whose duty would
be to promote the interests and welfare of the profession.
Under this corporation ALL ARCHITECTS WOULD
AUTOMATICALLY BECOME DUES-PAYING MEM-
BERS OF THE DISTRICT CHAPTERS, and unification,
in its entirety, would be achieved.
At the Convention of the State Association of Cali-
fornia Architects held at the Fairmont Hotel in San
Francisco on November 3rd and 4th, the revised By-Laws
were adopted. These By-Laws provide for a Northern
and a Southern California Association of Architects which
would be the interim organizations set up pending forma-
tion of the District Chapters. The California Council of
Architects was formed and is now acting as the coordinat-
ing group for the two interim associations. When a
Chapter of the American Institute of Architects amends
its By-Laws to provide for student and draftsmen affilia-
tion as well as an equal voice in all matters of State or
local nature for all architect members it will automatically
become a District Chapter of the California Council of
Architects and will supersede the Association within its
area. When all of the District Chapters are formed the
two Associations shall cease to exist. At this time, the
Chapters of the American Institute of Architects in the
State of California are taking active steps to revise their




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