Group Title: FAA bulletin
Title: FAA bulletin ; vol. 8 no. 4
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004770/00002
 Material Information
Title: FAA bulletin ; vol. 8 no. 4
Series Title: FAA bulletin
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Florida Association of Architects
Publication Date: September 1946
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004770
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAA6023
notis - AME1161

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TIE- FRCRIDA

ASSIMtNJCF-AWi S


FAA


SEPTEMBER, 1946

Officers:
President: James A. Stripling-Room 1, Child Building,
Tallahassee, Florida
Vice-President: Franklin S. Bunch-Florida Theatre
Building, Jacksonville, Florida
Secy-Treas.: Sanford W. Goin-Box 677, Gainesville,
Florida

District Directors:
1. R. Daniel Hart-Thiesen Building, Pensacola
2. Robert H. Brown-P. O. Box 1116, Tallahassee
3. Guy C. Fulton-Box 2181, University Station, Gaines-
"ville
4. A. Eugene Cellar-1021 Graham Building, Jackson-
ville 2
5. Francis Walton-532 Magnolia Ave., Daytona Beach
6. Arthur Beck-1507 East South Street, Orlando
7. Archie G. Parish-213 Hall Building, St. Petersburg
8. Donovan Dean-607 Easton Drive, Lakeland
9. No Director
10. Howard Chilton-7 Plaza Building, Palm Beach
11. Bayard C. Lukens-Fort Lauderdale
12. L. Murray Dixon-2871 Fairgreen Drive, Miami Beach
13. Robert F. Smith-Shoreland Building, Miami


OBJECT: The purpose of this Association shall be
to stimulate and encourage continual improvement within
the profession, co-operate with other professions, promote
and participate in the matters of general public welfare,
and represent and act for the architectural profession in
the State.

ANNUAL CONVENTION
The Thirty-second Annual Convention of the Florida
Association of Architects will be held in St. Petersburg
November 15 and 16. A very interesting program has
been arranged by our hard-working convention cotimittee
composed of Archie G. Parish, Chairman, Elliott B. Had-
ley, Winfield Lott, Norman Six and Franklin O. Adams.
It is sincerely hoped that a large majority of members
will take time out from their usual affairs to make this
one of our outstanding conventions.
A copy of the program for the Convention is enclosed
with this issue of the Bulletin, together with a postcard
which you will please fill in and forward so that the
committee will know what to anticipate as to attendance.


BULLETIN


Vol. 8, No. 4


STATE B OARD OF ARCIIITECTUIRE
iltoridta now has 656( architects registered for practice
of their professio(n in the state, according to an announce-
ment by the State Board of Architecture. Included are
thirty-seven architects to whom certificates of registra-
tion were granted at a recent meeting of the Board upon
their passing State examinations or upon their having
passed equivalent examinations in other states. Names
of these recent registrants, most of whom will open
offices in the state, are as follows:
Name Address
Carl Ronald Bender.......-.............Rochester, N.Y.
Robert Fulton Blake, II .................... .........Boston, Mass.
Clair S. Buchart................................ York, Pa.
Herbert L. Cain ................... -.........Richmond, Va.
Anthony Salvatore Ciresi --....-.............. Cleveland, Ohio
Samuel E. Clippard -..... ........-.........-Eldorado, Ark.
Joseph Cohen.......................... .........Atlanta, Ga.
E. J. H. Cowell...................-.........New York, N. Y.
William J. Creighton....--.....- ................Atlanta, Ga.
Richard Hawley Cutting.........................Cleveland, Ohio
George Robert Griswold ...................St. Petersburg, Fla.
Gilbert Page Hall--.........-.--...... .....Jacksonville, Fla.
Fitch Harrison Haskell .......-...-............ Altadena, Calif.
Harvey John Haughey..................................Detroit, Mich.
William Ethelbur Hoover, Jr........................Pittsburgh, Pa.
J. Edwin Hopkins............. .........New York, N. Y.
Herbert H. Johnson .............. ..............Coral Gables, Fla.
Wilbert George Knoebel................................St. Louis, Mo.
Morris Lapidus...-...-............ ---.........New York, N. Y.
W illiam Gordon Lyles....................................Columbia, S. C.
Alvin R. Moore.............. ....................Key W ast, Fla.
Jack Moore.................. ................. Orlando, Fla.
Robert Burbank Murphy............................Orlando, Fla.
Robert H. Newstead....................................New York, N. Y.
Rufus Henderson Nims...--...............-.............-Miami, Fla.
G. Lloyd Preacher.................................N.... ew York, N. Y.
John Thomas Rather, Jr.......................... ..Houston, Trexas
Edward Ernest Redderson...............................Chicago, Ill.
W alter B. Sanders.................. ................New York, N. Y.
Walter K. Smith, Jr............................... Shenandoah, Va.
John F. Staub...........-- .. ...........-......Houston, Texas
Harry Sternfield ............................Philadelphia, Pa.
William Stork, Jr.....-..........-..............--Columbia, S. C.
Frank E. Watson..................................Coral Gables, Fla.
Arthur LeBaron Weeks ...........................Lake Worth, Fla.
James Carl Wise ..---.... ............-.........-- Atlanta, Ga.
Albert P. W oodard..................................... Tallahassee, Fla.







Mellen C. Greeley, Secretary of the Board, states
that during the past year ten architects who were
formerly registered in Florida have died. They are
as follows:
Name Address
Burge, Flippen David.............................. Atlanta, Ga.
Curtis, Victor Marr.......................Saftey Harbor, Fla.
Dechman, Stephen---.............................-----Palm Beach, Fla.
Massena, Gabriel F............................-Wilmington, Del.
McCormick, Wm. D..............................-- Pittsburgh, Pa.
McMichael, J. M.........----..................-- Charlotte, N. C.
Shanklin, William, Jr.....................Coral Gables, Fla.
Walker, Nat Gaillard.....................-.....Fort Myers, Fla.
Wallick, Frederick............................Winter Park, Fla.
W iley, M. Clifford........................................Lowell, Ind.


The State Board of Architecture, which is beginning its
thirty-first year of service, is now composed of Archie
G. Parish, President, St. Petersburg; Mellen C. Greeley,
Secretary-Treasurer, Jacksonville; James Gamble Rogers,
II, Winter Park; William T. Arnett, Gainesville, and Rus-
sell T. Pancoast, Miami Beach. Mr. Arnett and Mr.
Pancoast were recently appointed to fill positions made
vacant by the death of Mr. Rudolph Weaver and by resig-
nation of Mr. John S. Skinner respectively.
During the war a large number of Florida architects
served in the several branches of the Armed Forces as
well as in civilian capacities in all parts of the world.
Most of these have now returned to their home stations
and reports indicate that they are generally busy plan-
ning for the housing of the many new families in the
State, as well as planning for private commercial and
industrial and needs and especially for public buildings
and institutions. Architects of the State have plans
either under way or practically completed for many
millions of dollars worth of buildings which they hope
will soon receive the green light from Governmental
agencies. For the present, emphasis is placed on housing,
of which there never seems to be enough.
The Board issues an annual roster or list of architects
qualified to practice in Florida. The 1946 edition is in
the hands of the printer and will be ready for distribu-
tion about October 15th. This roster is used by a great
many manufacturing and distributing concerns and is
sent all over the United States.

PROGRESS REPORT ON SCHOOL OF
ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS, U. OF. F.
At our special request, Mr. William T. Arnett, Direc-
tor, has submitted some notes of interest on the School
of Architecture and Allied Arts at the University of
Florida.
The University of Florida School of Architecture
and Allied Arts offers professional work in five fields:
Architecture, Building Construction, Landscape Archi-
tecture, Painting, and Commercial Art.
Since 1944, the total enrollment in all courses has
increased tenfold, and the 1945-46 enrollment was half
again as large as any previous enrollment. An even
greater number of students have applied for admission
for the 1946-47 session. Among the large number of


veterans seeking admission to the School, our project
method of instruction, which permits every student to
advance from one project to the next without regard
to the progress of other students, is continuing to meet
with favor.
To provide for the unprecedented increase in enroll-
ment, the School has been fortunate in being able to


secure and to add to the faculty the men it has needed.
During the second semester 1945-46, two men re-
turned from leave of absence. Hollis H. Holbrook,
B.F.A., returned to the School from leave of absence
with the Navy as Associate Professor of Drawing
and Painting, teaching work in Painting and in Com-
mercial Art; and John L. R. Grand, M.A.Arch., returned
from leave of absence with the Army as Associate
Professor of Architecture, teaching work in Architec-
ture and in Landscape Architecture.
During the same period three men were added to
the faculty. McMillan H. Johnson, B.S.Arch., struc-
tural designer in the office of the Architect to the
Board of Control, joined the faculty as Assistant Pro-
fessor of Architecture, teaching work in Architecture
and in Building Construction. Forrest M. Kelley,
B.S.Arch., an architect with several years of profes-
sional experience, was appointed Assistant Professor
of Architecture, teaching work in Fundamentals of
Architecture. Norman B. Flagg, B.S.Arch., with a
number of years experience in the building field, joined
the staff as Assistant Professor of Architecture, teach-
ing work in Building Construction and in Landscape
Architecture.
For the opening of the 1946-47 session, one man
has returned from leave of absence and two new men
have been added to the faculty. The appointment of
one man additional is pending at this time.
Alfred B. Parker, B.Arch., has returned to the
faculty from leave of absence with the Navy as Asso-
ciate Professor of Architecture, teaching work in
Architecture and in Landscape Architecture. Mr.
Parker is a graduate of the University of Florida, the
holder of an exchange, scholarship at the Royal Acad-
emy in Stockholm, and of a Pan-American Airways
SFellowship for study in Mexico. His own residence
in Miami, built very largely with his own hands, has
been widely illustrated in the architectural press.
Thomas Larrick, M.A.Arch., has joined the faculty
this year as Professor of Architecture, teaching work
in Architecture and in Building Construction. He holds
bachelor's degrees in Architecture and in Architectural
Engineering as well as a graduate degree from the
University of Kansas. He has had several years of
private practice in Kansas and comes to the School
from Ohio University where he was head of the De-
partment of Architecture and University Architect for
four years. Mr. Larrick served as an officer in the
Corps of Engineers during the war and is a corporate
member of the A.I.A.
William H. Holst, a graduate of the Massachusetts
School of Art, has joined the staff this year as In-
structor in Drawing and Painting, teaching work in
Commercial Art and in Painting. Mr. Holst has had
several years experience in the Commercial Art field,
especially in lithography, magazine layout and pro-
duction, and halftone illustration and photography.
The transition of the School to a post-war status is
progressing satisfactorily, and the urgent need at this
time for men with training in architecture and the
allied arts has created an unusual opportunity for
service.

SURVEY OF BUILDING PROJECTS IN GREATER


MIAMI: We are in receipt of a survey of building
project ready for construction in Greater Miami, when
restrictions are removed. This is a factual survey and
was conscientiously made by the Miami Builders Exchange
in cooperation with the Florida South Chapter of the
American Institute of Architects.






Factual Survey of Building Projects Ready for Construc-
tion in Greater Miami, Florida, When Governmental
Restrictions Are Removed
August 15, '1946
The following facts and figures are the result of a
survey conducted by the Miami Builders Exchange among
the Architects and Engineers of the Greater Miami Area.
This Survey represents the volume of work that has
been halted in this area due to Federal Building Restric-
tions in the offices of 70 (seventy) Architects and Engi-
neers.
The balance of those surveyed and from whom we
had no reply were either Engineers whose reports, in most
instances, would be duplication of Architects reports or
Architects who have recently returned from service and
who are re-opening their offices.
This report includes actual orders to prepare plans
and specifications; all contemplated projects have been
omitted.
The results are tabulated as follows:



0.4 0 P 0 0


Single family
residences ....
Two family
residences ....


202

147


65

10


Apartments .... 82 142
Total Units .... 1756 1761


Hotels .............. 23 12
Total Rooms .. 2532 1920 4E

Stores ............. 89 51

Warehouses .... 23 10
"Other
Construction 35 31

TOTA L ................. .........

This includes: 9 theatres, 1 term
I restaurant, 1 cabana club, 1 radio sta
1 children's home, 1 athletic club, 2 cl
celluneous building.

The Board of Directors reco
be given wide publicity, by me
the Building Industry. Addition
by calling this office. It is their
Manufacturers of Building Sup]
fully informed as to the vast 1
stIuction work scheduled for ti
This factual report does NOT
conditions, rather it is conserve
elimination of any project which
plated" and those which did not
ing order.


'There is very little need for
this survey as it clearly indica
engineers and owners are up ag
and is a typical picture of the ent
construction regulations.


NEWS AND COMMENTS: .
respondent, Gene Cellar, Directo


187 454 $ 7,891,000

34 191 1,877,000

47 271 31,841,600
1746 5263


30 65 45,624.000


us clippings from the Jacksonville TIMES-UNION re-
gardingg the Veterans Home Clinic which was organized
in Jacksonville for assisting GI's. We quote:

Home Clinics for Veterans Planned Here
A series of "veterans' home clinics" will be inaug-
urated by the Veterans" Information and Advisory
Council on July 9, it was announced yesterday, with
registered architects of the city serving as advisory
panel nmemulbers.
A. Eug ene Cellar, local architect, is chairman of
the committee in charge which, he said, will attempt
to "help veterans solve the problems of building or
acquiring a home."
Panel members will be announced later, Cellar said.
They will take a special study course to familiarize
themselves with legislation affecting veterans' housing.


flome Clinic to Open for Veterans Today
A Veterans' Home Clinic will open at 9 A.M. today
in the otlices of the Veterans' Information and Ad-
visory Council, 107 Market Street. The clinic, which
will close at 5 P.M., will provide veterans expert ad-
vice on all phases of home owning and building.
Four leading Jacksonville building authorities will
take part, in the panel discussion. They are A. Eugene
Cellar, Ivaln 1. Smith, V. Earl Mark and William A.
Johnson.
A new service for veterans, the clinic will be held
weekly.


Vets Offered Home Building Advice at Clinic


870 9322 World War II veterans planning to build homes can
'et advice on any phase of their problem, from selec-
68 208 12,692,000 tion of the site to color of the roof, at the free home
clinic conducted each Tuesday under the auspices of
17 50 4,393,000 the Veterans' Information and Advisory Council here.
But the most persistent advice given by A. Eugene
27 93 26,355,600 Cellnr, chairman of the panel of local architects who
are conducting the clinic, will be to go as slowly as
.........................$130,674,200 possible, and to do nothing without the guidance of
someone who has been in close touch with home-build-
tinal, 2 factories, 16 cuchurches, ing during the last five years.
tion, 4 ollice buildings, I clinic,
ubs, 1 airport, and other mis- Building today is full of pitfalls to the uninitiated,
Cellar declared, and the danger is accentuated by the
urgent need of so many veterans for a place to live.
nnmen(l that this Survey Sone. of them are ordering houses built with no more
.mbers and by others in idea of what they want than a decided preference for
)nal copies are available blue shutters, he said.
r opinion that the public, Aipparently the most difficult thing for the average
plies and others are not ex-serviceman to accustom himself to is present day
potentiall backlog of con- values, (Cellar continued. A veteran will be thinking
le Greater Miami Area. in terts of the roomy and comfortable house his
over-estimate the actual brother built in 1938 for $5,000, and he will confidently
itive as we stressed the describel it to an architect or a contractor and say he
:h was merely "Contem- want. one like it.
represent an actual work- Then well he is told that the job will cost roughly
810,000, he thinks he has fallen into a "den of thieves,"
Cellar pointed out.
't-he fact is, that he is much better off to get such
any comment concerning
any co ent cocernin an honest estimate than to have a jerrybuilder quote
tes what the architects, hiii a price oft 6(,500, add on several thousand dollars
;ainst in the Miami area wot o '"extras" (luring construction, and then turn
iAre country un(ler present
irovter a l( hose ol' tquestionable quality and durability.
'Ilre l local architect urged veterans who are plan-
ning to build homes to take advantage of next Tues-
.Our most faithful cor- (ay's clinic in order to get advice on their individual
)r of District 4, has sent problems.







"To the average man building a house is one of
the 'most important steps in life," he said, "and it
cannot be given too much study."


Gene also sent a clipping from the column entitled
YOUR POST-WAR PROBLEMS by Richard Hart appear-
ing in the August 23 TIMES-UNION, "Using Other Peo-
ples' Experience Best Policy for G-I Home Buyers," from
which we quote:

Helpful Fellow
One of the best economies a home builder can prac-
tice is to engage the services of a registered architect.
This is true even when the plans for the "dream house"
seem so ready made. An architect supervising con-
struction can save his fee several times over and, if
he is an expert on home planning, he has learned many
ways to cut building costs. He can prevent the usual
mistakes made in amateur home planning and he will
check the inevitable tendency to plan a home far be-
yond 'one's means. He may sound bewildering with
all this talk about cubic costs, using standard equip-
ment, reducing waste areas, etc., but his experience
in the planning of other homes can dovetail into most
peoples' dreams and render them practical.

Experience in Alterations
As a matter of fact, a practical registered architect
is a good fellow to have around when you are altering
an old house. He will know ways, from experience
and study, to rearrange rooms, put staircases in their
most appropriate places (not as easy as some people
think) and his experienced eyes will see ways of cutting
down heating costs by eliminating leakages.


FINANCIAL: For the information of new members
and as a reminder to old members, dues for 1946 were
raised at the November Convention to $10.00. Following
our new practice, a complete list of paid-up members s
listed herewith:

Abreu, Francis L. Cellar, A. Eugene
Adams, Franklin O. Celar, A. Eugene
Adams, J. F. Charn, Victor L.
Aldrich, William T. Chilton, Howard
Albert, L. K. Chisling, Elliott L.
Altschuler, J. A. Christen, W. M.
Anis, Albert Close, Bernard W.
Arnett, Wm. T. Cole, Albert N.
Atkinson, Carl N. Comm, B. Albert
Avery, Lester Cunningham, Jesse
Bailey, Joseph Davis, Arthur E.
Baxter, Wallace M. Dean, Donovan
Benjamin, Roy DeGarmo, Walter C.
Bergman, Philip De La Haye, E. F.
Betschick, A. E. R. DeLoe, F. Earl
Bittner, Robert de Minicis, I. A.
Bond, Geo. Harwell Dixon, L. Murray
Bordeaux, Wm. D. Dodd, John B.
Bradley, J. Frank Dow, Alden B.
Bruce, George Drake, W. Kenyon
Bruns, Herman H. Duff, Dillard
Bryson, Joseph H. Eckhoff, Arnold W., Jr.


Buchtenkirk, Geo. Eggers, Otto R.
Bucky, Frederick W., Jr. Ewing, Upton C.
Buckley, Rolland C. Ferendino, A. J.
Bunch, Franklin Fetner, S. Ralph
Burnham, H. M. Fink, A. Hensel
Caler, Kemp Fink, HI. George
Cates, Frederick A. Forrest, A. Lowther


France, Roy F.
France, Roy F., Jr.
Friedman, Philip
Frye, Harvey D.
Frimmer, Frank
Fulton, Harry A.
Geiger, August
Gibbs, F. A.
Goin, Sanford W.
Greeley, Mellen C.
Griffin, Harry M.
Gross, Norman P.
Haas, George J.
Hadley, Elliott B.
Hake, Harry
Hannaford, F. T.
Harrje, H. J.
Hart, R. Daniel
Hatcher, W. W.
Hauri, Martin
Hazard, F. Arthur
Ileim, Wm. J.
Hentz, Hal F.
Hettel, Joseph N.
Higgins, Daniel P.
Hitt, L. W.
Hohauser, Henry
Hollingswort, F. A.
Holmes, Geo. O.
Hopkins, Abner C.
IIoulihan, R. F.
Huddleston, Prentiss
Husson, Wim. M.
Irby, Benjamin E.
Irish, C. F.
Ironmonger, Morton T.
Jackson, William K.
Jacobson, Kenneth
Jacobson, Nels S.
Jacques, Gilbert J. P.
Jessen, Richard E.
Johnson, Win. R.
Keck, Bert D.
Kemp, Wim. D.
Kennard, Philip F.
Kramer, Geo. Lee
Lang, Albert
Leggett, F. Earl
Little, Robert M.
Look, Jas. H.
Lott, Winfield
Loven, Carl Kemm
Lukens, Bayard C.
McKissack, C. L.
Maas, Gustav
Manley, Miss Marion
Mark, V. Earl
Marsh, W. M.
Marshall, Win. H.
Mathes, A. Herbert
Merriam, Win. H.
Meyer, Theodore A.
Mizrahi, Ralph S.
Moberg, Claus R.


Moore, Glenn D., Jr.
Morgan, Lloyd
Moughton, Elton J.
Nellenbogen, Victor II.
Nelson, Harry O.
Nieder, Charles P.


Nordin, Robert M.
Normile, John
Pancoast, Russell T.
Parish, Archie G.
Parker, Alfred B.
Parman, Clarence J.
Parmelee, E. Dean
Petersen, John E.
Pierson, John E.
Pillsbury, Hugh
Pitt, Gerard
Polevitzsky, Igor B.
Powell, Jefferson D.
Probst, Edward E.
Probst, Marvin G.
Rempe, Edward T., Jr.
Robertson, E. L.
Rogers, James Gamble, II
Rosser, D. Floyd
Samwell, P. C.
Sather, F. I.
Schein, Sumner
Schneider, Roy J.
Schultze, Leonard
Seelman, Frederick G.
Severud, Gordon M.
Seymour, Russell
Sheftall, Lee Roy
Shepherd, S. Linzy
Simberg, A. J.
Sindelar, Frank
Six, Norman F.
Skinner, Coulton
Skinner, John L.
Smith, Ivan H.
Smith, Robert F.
Snow, A. Folger
Southwell, Arnold
Sparklin, Wm. O.
Spohn, Geo. H.
Spry, Kenneth J.
Start, Cedric
Stephens, Willis L.
Stevens, Raymond C.
Steward, Harold D.
Stewart, A. Courtney
Stripling, James A.
Swartburg, B. Robert
Tanner, John R.
Telchin, Charles S.
Toombs, Henry J.
Troxel, Lynn
Turner, P. Pamorrow
Twitchell, Ralph S.
Ungaro, Manfred M.
Vaviloff, M. M.
Volk, John L.
Wakeling, Roy W.
Walker, Frank Ray
Walton, Francis R.
Weakley, R. DeC.
Weed, Robert L.
Wenner, Bruce C.
Wohl, Harry


Wohl, Martin M.
Woods, Frank W.
Wyeth, Marion S.
Yonge, Chandler C.
Zachar, Stefan H.
Zannoth, George G.




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