Title: Everglades
CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE MAP IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004653/00001
 Material Information
Title: Everglades
Physical Description: 1 map : col. ; 23 x 18 cm. on sheet 62 x 52 cm. folded to 21 x 9 cm.
Scale: Scale not given.
Language: English
Creator: Everglades Area Chamber of Commerce
Publisher: Everglades Area Chamber of Commerce
Place of Publication: Everglades City Fla
Publication Date: <1981>
 Subjects
Subject: Maps -- Everglades (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Outdoor recreation -- No Scale -- Florida -- Everglades -- 1981   ( local )
Nature conservation -- No Scale -- Florida -- Everglades -- 1981   ( local )
Outdoor recreation -- No Scale -- Everglades (Fla.) -- 1981   ( local )
Nature conservation -- No Scale -- Everglades (Fla.) -- 1981   ( local )
No Scale -- Everglades (Fla.) -- 1981   ( local )
No Scale -- Florida -- Everglades -- 1981   ( local )
Genre: single map   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Summary: Includes text on the Everglades, Chokoloskee, Everglades City and the Ten Thousand Islands.
General Note: Panel title.
General Note: Includes text, advertisements and col. ill. surrounding map and on verso.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Florida Heritage Project of the State University Libraries of Florida, the Institute for Museum and Library Services, and the U.S. Department of Education's TICFIA granting program.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004653
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002689420
oclc - 46606773
notis - ANF6738

Full Text




CHOKOLOSKEE, Fla. Off the southwestern
coast of Florida in the trackless, green, Ten Thousand
Island mangrove country lies Chokoloskee, the
Seminole-named island that time forgot, now being
discovered by Florida visitors.
Although it was settled in the 1870's, had a post
office in 1891 when well-publicized Miami was in
diapers, the island was all but forgotten by the
hurrying 20th century until the late 1950's. Then a
four-mile bridge and causeway shattered the
centuries-old, sea-made isolation.
Since then the tiny, 150-acre, shell-mound
island has been striving to overhaul the Space Age
after recovering from the initial surprise of having
telephones, imported electricity instead of the diesel
variety, and school buses instead of school boats.
Slowly and steadily the island has been
developing as an 'off-the-beaten-track tourist area
capitalizing on its wilderness appeal resulting from its
unique location on the western doorstep of the
sprawling Everglades National Park.
Today, Chokoloskee which in Seminole
means "old house" (why, no one knows) features a
get-away-from-it-all atmosphere. You won't find any
movie houses (not even the nickelodeon type), nor
garish, neon-lighted night clubs. But you will find the
peacefulness of untouched wilderness, plus the
physical comfort ,Florida visitors have learned to
expect no matter how remote the area.
The sagging docks and picturesque nets of the
commercial fishermen rub elbows with modem,r
air-conditioned motels. Where once there were no
accommodations, you'll find three motels the Blue
Heron, Anglers' and Parkway. All have small boat
docks featuring electric hoists and the usual
equipment for successful fishing trips. All have
mangrove-wise guides available for fishing or sight
seeing trips.
Chokoloskee's is the appeal of the outdoors,
the appeal of untouched wilderness, winding,
mangrove-lined creeks, extensive wildlife including
numerous birds, as well as alligators, raccoons,
manatees and porpoise. It's the appeal of superb
fishing grounds, home of the fighting snook, leaping
tarpon, dogged redfish, and other saltwater brawlers.
It's the gateway to boating adventure. Rangers
have marked channels across shallow Chokoloskee
Bay, and during the winter season weekly, ranger-led
boat-a-cades probe as far south as Cannon Bay. These
are all-days trips, traveling some 80 miles via the Gulf
and inland, mangrove waters.
Few visit the island without stopping to see the
famous Smallwood general store, founded in 1906 by
early settler, C. S. "Ted" Smallwood. Today, the
general store, which.once housed the post office, is
operated by Miss Thelma Smallwood, eldest daughter
of the pioneer. The store's a bit of fast disappearing
Americana, located atop 8-foot pilings as protection
against storms.
Chokoloskee island is one big shell mound -
highest land in the section dating back to around
100 B.C., according to experts who've probed the
area. Whether it was deliberately built by indians as a
hurricane refuge, or just grew from oyster and clam
feasts is not known. But its 20-foot elevation caused
the early settlers to stay despite its remoteness.
You reach Chokoloskee by following Florida
Route 29, south from its junction with U.S. 41 (the
Tamiami Trail) which slices across South Florida
from Miami to Naples. The junction is 31 miles east
of Naples. You can also drive south on Florida 29
from LaBelle where it meets Florida 80, the West
Palm Beach-Fort Myers highway.


Barron River RV & Traler Resort
Has
Amenities & Extras Galore.


* Boat docks available
* Tennis court
* Oversized swimming pool
* Putting green
* Recreation Hall


* Large laundry room
* Adjoining marina & tackle shop
* City water & sewerage
* Direct access to deep water
* Incomparably superb fishing


Stone Crab


: ,^ ------~ -------




y^~~ m^


All of this Is yours, whenever you
want It. because you own your own
guaranteed space.

Barron River Development, Inc.
707 COLLIER AVE P.O. BOX 116
EVERGLADES CITY, FLORIDA 33929
813/695-3591 813/695-3331
813/394-3211


A Subtropical Wonder Struggles For Survival
Tropical life from Caribbean islands blends with survive. Human concern and prudent manage-
temperate species in the Everglades and magic ment must now play a strong environmental
inhabits this rich mixture in its unique setting, role.
Magic...the Everglades, never wholly known,
invites you to explore its mystery. Give this Climate governs Everglades life. The nearly
park half a chance, take the time, and you will uniform climate makes the park a year-round
discover wonder itself. You can drive kilome- attraction, but there are two distinct seasons:
ters through its skinny pine trees and miss its summer is wet and winter dry. Heavy rains fall
forests, or drive through its sawgrass and not during intense storms in late May through Oc-
experience the glades. Many take such a hur- tober. Warm, humid conditions bring abundant
tried look at the Everglades. But try it another insects (carry repellent in summer months) im-
way. Talk and walk with a ranger or take a boat portant to food chains. Precipitation can exceed
trip. Slow down. Open. your mind and spirit. Be 127 centimeters (50 inches) a year.
moved by the slow, sure movement of this river
of grass. Summer's high water levels enable animals
to range throughout the park, so you will not
River? Yes, fresh water 15 centimeters (6 then see the concentrations of wildlife so typi-
inches) deep and 80 kilometers (50 miles) wide, cal of winter months. Summer offers different
the Everglades creeps seaward on a riverbed attractions-mountainous clouds, lush vegeta-
that slopes just centimeters per kilometer. The tion, spectacular sunsets, calm waters. It means
river's lazy progress toward salt water harbors rebirth and replenishment for the Everglades...
vast natural treasures which await your enjoy- and natural change. Violent winds and torren-
ment. During the wet season the water may tial rains of hurricanes may sweep northward
seem still, but it flows, dropping gradually 4.6 during June to November. The Everglades
meters (15 feet) along its course before emp- winter is mild, with inclement weather rare and
tying into Florida Bay. Everglades.. the word insects less bothersome. With winter's dry sea-
suggests a boundless refreshment. It means son wildlife must congregate in and around the
marshy land covered in places with tall grasses, waterholes, many visible from the nature trails.
Birds change their feeding habits as food grows
The park boundary only partly contains the wa- scarce. Birds often seen at ponds along the
tery expanse for which it is named. An area of road early in the season move northward with
this marshy land and open water larger than the developing winter.
Delaware was set aside as a park in 1947. But
its great size can neither protect the environ- The Everglades is best known for its abundance
ment from the disruptive commercial agricul- and variety of birdlife. At Flamingo you can
ture and industry around it, nor assure that watch roseate spoonbills, large pink birds of-
endangered species finding havens here will ten mistaken for flamingos. The flamingos no


EVERGLADES AREA


CHAMBER

OF

COMMERCE


Red Snapper


POST OFFICE DRAWER E, EVERGLADES CITY, FLORIDA 33929
TELEPHONE AREA CODE 813 695-3941


All Emergencies
Sheriff's Office
Fire Department


longer regularly visit south Florida, if indeed
they ever did. Reddish egrets and endangered
great white herons live and breed in Florida
Bay.

Some 50 pairs of endangered southern bald
eagles nest along the coast. Look for the eagles
from the breezeway of the Flamingo visitor cen-
ter. Other rare and endangered species found
here include the Florida panther, manatee,
Everglades mink, green sea turtle, logger-head
turtle, brown pelican, Florida sandhill crane,
Everglades kite, short-tailed hawk, peregrine
falcon, Cape Sable sparrow, and crocodile.
Other species also require the special protec-
tion Everglades National Park provides for sur-
vival. These include the alligator, reddish egret,
spoonbill, Florida mangrove cuckoo, osprey,
and round-tailed muskrat. But for this protected
habitat, many would soon be threatened with
extirpation.

Large populations of Cape Sable sparrows once
found at Cape Sable and Big Cypress are almost
gone. Only widely scattered individuals remain.
Taylor Slough's muhly grass prairie supports
an active population, but non-native, exotic
plants threaten to close in the open prairie this
sparrow depends on for its survival. Short-tailed
hawks prey on the sparrow, and ants can kill
its nestlings. When abundant habitat fostered
an abundance of Cape Sable sparrows this
natural predation posed no great threat to the
species.

The rare, shy, harmless manatee weighs close
to a ton and measures more than 4.6 meters


(15 feet) in length. It is entirely herbivorous,
a docile, plant eating being. Man's motorboats
and propellers pose this easy-going sea cow's
greatest threat. The Florida panther (cougar)
is among North America's rarest mammals. The
major threat to these big cats, seen but rarely
in the pinelands and along the park road, is
loss of the extensive habitat over which they
stealthily'stalk their prey.

The alligator is the best known Everglades citi-
zen. Unfortunately, its hide has been greatly
prized for high fashion shoes and handbags.
The alligator once waged a losing battle against
poachers and habitat loss, but it has now staged
a comeback under nation-wide protection. Re-
cently, 75 percent of the nation's alligators
were removed from the endangered species
list and reclassified as threatened.

The alligator has earned the title of "keeper of
the Everglades." It cleans out the large holes
dissolved in the Everglades' limestone bed and
these function as oases in the dry winter sea-
son. Fish, turtles, snails, and other fresh-water
animals seek refuge in these life-rich solution
holes which become feeding grounds for alli-
gators, birds, and mammals until the rains re-
turn. Survivors, both predators and prey, then
quit the holes to repopulate the Everglades.

Crocodiles, less common than alligators, are
distinguished by their narrower snouts and
greenish-gray color. You would be lucky indeed
to see one of these shy and secretive creatures
mostly found in the Florida Bay area. The croc-
odile's survival hinges on the preservation of


911 Airpo
t',,3-3341
695-3341



its dwindling habitat, which somewhat overlaps
the alligator',.

Life hangs by a thread here. The problem?
Water, fresh water, the life-blood of the Ever-
glades, It appears to be everywhere, but man
has drastically blocked its free flow through
south Florida. Conflicting demands compete
for precious fresh water and the Everglades,
at Florida's tip, struggles to survive. Species,
forms of life, hang in the balance. Despite an
apparent lush richness, water supplies are
critical and porous limestone underlies the
entire park. Rooting plants have only a thin
mantle of marl and peat atop this limestone for
their support. If not protected the Everglades'
fragile richness would quickly vanish.

Problems abound. Agricultural development
east of the park drains residual pesticides and
chemical fertilizers into Taylor Slough. Irriga-
tion and nearby canals deplete water supplies,
increasing the threat of fire which destroys the
thin soils, which invites invasion by exotic plant
and animal species that upset habitat patterns.
Native vegetation critical to Everglades ecol-
ogy is depleted. The diversity and complexity
protecting the fabric of life is diminished. The
problems are linked and mutually reinforcing.
Metropolitan Miami mushrooms, posing severe
ecological problems. An aerial view of south
Florida and its canals looks today like a plumb-
er's schematic diagram. Once the benefactor
of south Florida's naturally well-watered rich-
ness, the Everglades now competes at the end
of a controlled supply line. To the north, flood
prevention, irrigation, frost protection, pest


rt nearby





control, drinking water and sewage dilution
systems siphon off shares. When rainfall is
ample few problems arise. But in drought years
arrangements for sharing have been required.

Nature in the Everglades now depends on care-
ful, complementary management programs car-
ried on by the National Park Service and other
agencies. These programs often promote posi-
tive economic values. The National Park Ser-
vice is now studying the depletion of shrimp,
stone crab, and spiny lobster populations vital
to south Florida's commercial fishery, one of
the world's largest and finest, To protect these
valuable marine organisms research is being
conducted so that current regulations can be
reassessed and modified as needed.

Human beings are as much a part of the Ever-
glades as the alligator. But our conflicting
actions as consumers and conservers have ir-
revocably changed south Florida, altering the
Everglades ecosystem. Concern for protecting
rookeries of herons, ibis, and other wading
birds from commercial plume hunting and other
human impacts motivated creation of the park.
Ironically, millions of people now seek sanc-
tuary here from similar problems in our synthe-
tic world. Ultimately places like the Everglades
may be the last refuge, not just of eagles, croc-
odiles and wood storks, but of people too.


Barron River Development, Inc.
707 COLLIER AVE.* P.O. BOX 116
EVERGLADES CITY, FLORIDA 33929 3-
813/695-3591 813/695-3331 -
813/394-3211


Your own Mobile Home space
Your own private boat dock
a Adjoining marina & tackle shop
a City water & sewerage
a Direct access to deep water fishing
Panoramic view of Chokoloskee Bay
a Incomparably superb fishing


NAYMONo R. WOOTEN
OWNERS -OPERATOR
OCHOPEK. FLORIDA


PHONE
(813) 696-2781


WOOTEN'S
EVERGLADE AIR BOAT TOURS
AND SWAMP BUGGY RIDES
South on U.S 41 35 Ml. from Naples 2 MI. W. of Ochopee
SBIG AFE BOATS EXPERIENCED GUIDES
See The Everglades Where Movies Are Made





ST.7N3SBET PAREC

State Road 29 Opposite
Everglades National Park
RV Sites Boat Docks
Bait Tackle Gas Ice



Under New Ownership (813) 695-3851



TEL 695-4323



JANE'S RESTAURANT


HIGHWAY 29
NEXT TO COPELA14O MARKET
OPEN 7 DAYS COPELAND. FLORIDA 33926










NAPLES, FLORIDA 33940


Lod' &di \'d(la An interval ownership resort. Own %our own villa in Florida's newest

condominium hotel. Use as much as you want or as little as you wish!


813 / 597-3463


813 / 597-7161


INTERIOR DESIGNS
by
Camille B. Baumgartner




P. Box 5041 '
Evwgldes City. FL 33929
(813) 695-4428


R P APTAIN'S
S TA3.BL.E
'w 1wA.A I3>lA.

Guides Bail Tackle


Captain Everglades City, Fla.
Jim Landrum (813) 695-2741

R.V. PARK CAMPING BOAT DOCKS


Fishermen's Cove
on the water

Fihing in Ten Tlbouand Iolands
O Ew/rglad National Park


*T. ta- HALF MILs SOUTH
EVEtADoES CITY. FLORIDA 33929


PHONE
aIS-eS-4aSt I


REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKER

SHELL MOUND PARK
CHOKOLOSKEE ISLAND, FLORIDA 33925
TEL. (813) 695-2727


PHONE: (813)16952771


THORNE HOLLISTER
Manager


ERNEST HAMILTTO SIONE ..s INC
CHOKOLOSKEE, FLA. 33925

Open 7 Days A Week
ammNoM RomM m

695-2771


U


A CAMPER AND TRAVEL TRAILER RESORT
SAFE, FRIENDLY, COMFORTABLE AND CLEAN.
w/55 COMPLETE HOOK UPS.
Free Boat Ramp _
Free Sheltered Boat oockage
Picnic Tables
Clean, Bath House w/Hot Showers
Laiundramat
Boat and Motor Rental
bd- ija ii. and Ice
r.,_. n hie-ad'.g. b. t S .i 0unO lis
*E '-,eir..:e.3, K.-. .Ae.] e *...a e, are Available.
MOBILE HOME SALES & RENTALS


SHELL MOUND


Mobile Park &

Coin Laundry


M4a 4ame Ay iW ah"

Phone 695-2727
LAURA DUNCAN, Owner
CHOKOLOSKEE ISLAND, FLORIDA


KELLEY'S GROCERAl
I i 'S (,l/()(



Meats Beer Ics
Hardware a Sundry Items
Oysters in Season
Hot Sandwiches Smoked Fish
Open 7 Days
Latest Fishing Information


CHOKOLOSKEE ISLAND, Fla. PHONE 696-3633
J. C. & Millie Kelley


5 MI. EAST S.R. 29 WATER AND ELECTRIC
1 MI. WEST840A HOOKUPS DUMP STA.
ON U.S. 41 IN OCHOPEE, FLA. 33943 BATHHOUSE FISHING


TRAIL LAKES CAMPGROUNDS

(813) 695-2275


CHRYI[R PARTNERS INC.
102 East Broadway
Everglades City, Fla. 33929
General Real Estate Sales & Development

Chuck Misner Broker Salesman
Phone: 813/695-4211


PARKWAY MOTEL & BOAT DOCKS
ONLY MINUTES AWAY FROM THE FINEST
REDFISH TARPON SNOOK TROUT
Air-Conditioned and Heated Rooms and Efficiencies
*Trailer Space *Gas *Oil *Ice *Lie Shrimp *Fishing Tackle *Rental Boats
*Guida *Charter Boats *Boat Ramp *Hoist
(Hoist handle boats up to 28 feet)
695-3261 CHOKOLOSKEE ISLAND, FLORIDA

KITCHENETTES BLUE HERON MOTEL
AIR CONDITIONING P. 0. Box 1SOo
PHONE EVERGLADES, FLA. CHOKOLOSKEE ISLAND, FLORIDA 33925
(813) 695-2351 A.C. & NANCY HANCOCK


CIVIC ORGANIZATION
Lions Club
Women's Club
Tamiami Trail Lodge #262 F. & A.M. of Fla.
Everglades Chapter #215, O.E.S.
Everglades Athletic Booster Club
Everglades Betterment Assoc.


HOME
695-42 "HAPPY HARRY'S"


OFFICE
695-4211


"SCENIC AIRPLANE RIDES"


JOHNSON'S SEAFOOD, INC.
DAY OR NIGHT
(813) 695 4040


The Churches of Everglades City invite you to worship with them.


The First Baptist Church
Community Church
Church of God
Baptist Mission
Catholic Church


Everglades City
Everglades City
Chokoloskee
Copeland
Women's Club E. City


HARDWARE S DRY GOODS
FISHING TACKLE
Everglades City


DONALD L HARMON F. LAWRENCE HARMON



HARMON BROS. ROCK CO.
CRUSHED LIMESTONE FILL DIRT RIP RAP
EQUIPMENT CONTRACTING DRAGLINE.
BACKHOE AND LOADER SERVICE

PO. Box 14
Ochopee. FL 33943 (13) 1 69540


CAPTAIN CECIL OGLESBY
B..-


El


CALT.A. I N' W


W'9 TABLE


Lodge & Villas estauran .4
(813) 695-4211 6954679
Marina
695-2741 l 1618
uamlad, f*i~u Ctv. Fla in


-4

WELCOME TO THE EVERGLADES: Me w
bers of the Area Chamber of Commerce w
your visit to this unique Florida scene to -
pleasant and memorable. Headquarters of the
Chamber is at U.S. Highway 41 and Florida
State Road 29 intersection. Please ask for
assistance, information, reservation in per-
son, by phone or letter. Chamber members
offer the following activities and facilities for
the visitors' use.



FISHING: Year 'round fresh and salt water
fishing from boats, bridges, canal banks and
in lakes-your choice! U.S. 41, north side,
offers fresh water fishing (license needed)
for bass, bream, perch and catfish. U.S. 41,
south side, (no license) offers the widest
variety of methods, areas and fish to be
caught. Boats and guides give best results
among the Ten Thousand Islands and back
country bays. Open boats are used. Cabin
boats afford offshore islands and open Gulf
fishing. Bring your own tackle and refresh-
ments or ask that they be supplied. Make
reservations and plans with the captain.
Grouper, redfish, snapper, snook, sheeps-
head for eating (guide will dress them), and
ladyfish. tarpon, sailcat and shark for fun
and games.



EVERGLADES CITY : Once the Collier County
seat, now the Western Gateway of the National
Park. The Park Ranger Station is the starting
point for Boat Tours of Mangrove Wilderness
(1-1/2 hrs.) and the Ten Thousand Islands
(2-1/2 hrs.), a must for bird watchers, nature
lovers, and just "lookers." The town offers
a supermarket, hardware store, sundries,
gift shops, motels, apartments, restaurants,
seafood markets, garages, a library,
realtors, churches and a physician's serv-
ices.


EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBERS


OX5460*CHOICOLOSKEEFLORI
DA33925


I I I m


..m.o


I


F








-:06


b
~0,


...fttqi Aalk


Western Gateway to

the Everglades

The Captain's Table Is located In Everglades City, Florida,
last 4 miles south of the tamed Tamlami Trail [US 41] 1
County Road 29. Air transportation is available from maWi
airports In Miami and Tampa to Naples or Marco Island
airports, just 25 minutes away. Ground transportatNh
arrangements will be made for you by our friendly hotel stalf
Everglades City has a private airport and air charter service ti
also available. Trallways and Everglades bus companies


CHOKOLOSKEE ISLAND PARK

P.O. Box C Chokoloskee. FL 33925
Phone: 813/695-2414

.4 Camper and Traiel Trailer Resort,
S Sale
e'--" Friendly
Comfortable
0 Clean
Plan a stay with us for a time of
relaxation and great fishing.


Ochopee Florida 33943
Smallest Post Off.ce Building .nlne U S Located
35 m.les east of Naples 70 m.les west of
Miami on U S 41 Tamiam. Trail
.,', -.-. .-


r,,.^^f^ifI^^^^^ '


Located 3 miles south of Everglades
City, on State Road 29


Complete HooH-ups
Clean Bath House, Hot Showers
Picruc Tables
Pay Phones
Laundraomat
Boatramp and Dockage
Boat and Motor Rentals
Bart, Gas. Oil and Ice
Fishiung Tackle and Small
Boat Supplies
Experenced Guides Available
MOBILE HOME SALES
AND RENTALS


BARRON RIVER DEVELOPMENT, INC.
offering

Your Last Chance to own A Piece of the Wilderness!


Condominium Villas with Boat Docks at Tarpon fbint
Cooperative RV Sites at The Landings


Off the southwetlem coast of Florida in the trackless green.
Ten Thousand Island mangrove country lie1 Chokoloakee the
Sarninole-narmd Island that time forgot. now being discovered Dy
Florida visitors
Slowly and steadily the Island has been developing as an off.
the-beaten-track tourist area capitalizing on its wilderness appeal
resulting from its unique location on the western doorstep of met
Sprawling Everglades National Park
ChokoIoakee' 1s the appeal of the outdoors the appeal of un-
touched wilderneas. winding, mangrove-lined creeks. extensive
wildlife Including numerous blrds. as well as alligators raccoons
manatse and porpoise. It' the appeal of Super fishing grounds
home of the fighting snook. leaping tarpon. ooggea redfish and
other alltwater brawlers
ChoKoloaskaIslaind Is one big shell mound highest land in
the section dating back to around 100 B C. according to e.
parts whove probed the area Whether it was deliberately bullet by
Indian$ as a hurricane refuge or just grew Irom oyster and claim
feast iIs not known But its 20-foot elevation caused he early
settler to 10 allty despite its remotenessa.
You reach Chokoloakee by following Florida Route 29. south
from its junction with U S 41 (the Tamiami Trail) which slices
acrM South Florida from Miami io Naples The junction .s 31
mllen east of Naple, 79 miles west of Miami


Marina Bait Tackle Gas
Pool Tennis Putting Green


Barron River Development, Inc.
707 Collier Ave. P.O. Box 116
Everglades City, FL 33929
813/695-3591 813/695-3331
813/394-3211


Bay View

TIavelers Park


SEE ALSO


JANE'S RESTAURANT
T .


IP,


On Chokoloskee Island bordering the Ever-
glades National Park in the Heart of the 10.000 Islands
Two hundred RV sites with full hookups, pull-
thru sites, waterfront sites, tent area. bath house and
rec building, boat ramp and docks marked channel
to Rivers and Gult
Fishing the Everglades National Park
Post Office Store. Restaurant, coin laundry
with-im walking distance
Daily, weekly monthly and seasonal rates


ANGLERS MOTEL
AND
MARINA
hotel Rooms. Efficiency Rooms.
Air Conditioned and TV


AI the Marina we hae Rental Boats. Boats and Motors Canoes
1ide Service Boat It. Ice. Gas Oil. Bail. Fishing rTackle Shop


8 MI S OF U S 41 ON FLA 29



Write or Call
Bay View Travelers Park
Or Anglers Motel & Marina
Box 1400
Chokoloskee Island, Florida 33925
DPon... e11t eg caE-


REALTY WORLD.


Our Cooperative Mobile Home Community
Sunset Harbor


is
~



3-'
I'


Arnold Lee Glass
REALTORO-ASSOCIATE


Dolphin Realty of Naples, Inc..

REALTOR

2795 Davis Boulevard, Naples, Florida 33942


Bus (813) 775-1005


Res: (813) 262-8220


Everglades City
(813) 695-3331
Each office independently owned and operated


MANGROVE WILDERNESS TRIP


A thrilling discovery awaits you in the green maze of
southwest Florida's Ten Thousand Islands, a mysterious,
water wilderness now a portion of the sprawling Everglades
National Park easily accessible by boat. Where once only
mangrove-wise guides and fishermen went, you can go,
penetrating the fascinating maze of the mangrove jungle
through which twist and turn creeks some named, most
nameless; or you can explore the Outer Islands fringing the
Gulf of Mexico. Weather and seas permitting, daily boat
tours are operated by Sammy Hamilton, Jr. from the Gulf
Coast Ranger Station on the causeway between Everglades
and Chokoloskee, Fla.
The Mangrove Wilderness Tour takes you inland up
Turner's River, named in honor of an early pioneer
homesteader of the 1870's, past ancient Indian shell
mounds, through nameless waterways, where once plume
hunters operated, into Half-Way Creek and twisting and
turning through mangrove tunnels back to the docks via
another route. Birdlife is plentiful, depending upon the
water table in the feeding area. Alligators are often visible
in summertime. Most frequently seen are American egrets,
various herons, anhingas (water turkeys), cormorants, and
sometimes rare roseate spoonbills and American bald
eagles. The cruise lasts approximately one hour and three
quarters. Due to low tides at certain times of the year,
this trip may be canceled and an alternate trip provided.


The Ten Thousand Island Boat Tour takes you among
the mangrove islands bordering the Gulf of Mexico. Leaving
the NPS docks, you cross Chokoloskee Bay and head down
Sandfly Pass, twisting and turning between the green
islands. Mangroves are among the most productive of trees,
and as the leaves fall into the water, they are broken down
and form the base of the food chain in the 10,000 Islands,
feeding many of the fish and birds of the area. Continuing
through the islands, glimpsing the Gulf stretching westward
to Mexico, you reach Kingston Key, where you land for a
brief period of shelling and exploration. Leaving Kingston
Key, your tour boat passes among more mangrove islands
and returns via Indian Key Pass and Chokoloskee Bay. The
cruise lasts approximately two and one-half hours.
During the June thru August period, a special sunset
cruise into upper Chokoloskee Bay is provided, affording a
marvelous opportunity to watch thousands of birds
returning to tiny islands to roost for the night. The birds
spend the day foraging inland, but seek refuge on the
islands at night. As many as 10,000 birds are seen at the
peak of the summer season. This cruise lasts approximately
one and one-half hours.
Schedule of departure times of the trips is posted at the
concession office at the Ranger Station or you may call or
write to address on back.


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