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Title: Bulletin of the Florida Association of Architects
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004639/00004
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Title: Bulletin of the Florida Association of Architects
Physical Description: Book
Publication Date: December 1952
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front page 1
        Front page 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Back Cover
        Page 13
        Page 14
Full Text








The Florida Association of Architects
of the

American Institute of Architects

I Fe


Introducing EDWARD DEAN (DICK) WYKE
Executive Secretary for the Association


AD'e ebr 1952


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3. 1262 07012 7849


Spec.
NA
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THE RCR D4S A aSS NM-bUCh lI

of

THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS



BULLETIN


Vol. 6 December 1952 No. 4


R. DANIEL HARI-, PRESIDENT
P. 0. BOX 928
PENSACOLA, FLORIDA

VICE PRESIDENTS
FIRST VICE PRESIDENT
JACK McCANDLESS, ST. PETERSBURG
SECOND VICE PRESIDENT
FRANCIS CRAIG. DAYTONA BEACH
THIRD VICE PRESIDENT
PRENTISS HUDDLESTON, TALLAHASSEE
FOURTH VICE PRESIDENT
IGOR B. POLEVITZKY, MIAMI
FIFTH VICE PRESIDENT
RAYMOND H. PLOCKELMAN, PALM BEACH
SIXTH VICE PRESIDENT
GEORGE CLINTON GAMBLE, FT. LAUDERDALE
SEVENTH VICE PRESIDENT
WALTER BRADSHAW SCHULTZ, JACKSONVILLE


FRANCIS R. WALTON, SECRETARY-TREASURER
14234 BAY STREET
DAYTONA BEACH, FLORIDA

DIRECTORS
FLORIDA CENTRAL CHAPTER
FRANCIS H. EMERSON
DAYTONA BEACH CHAPTER
JOEL SAYERS
FLORIDA NORTH CENTRAL CHAPTER
ALBERT WOODARD
FLORIDA SOUTH CHAPTER
ROpERT M. LITTLE
PALM BEACH CHAPTER
JOHN STETSON
BROWARD COUNTY CHAPTER
WILLIAM T. VAUGHN
FLORIDA NORTH CHAPTER
WILLIAM T. ARNETT
I ATTORNEY
BENMONT TENCH, JR., GAINESVILLE


OBJECTS

The objects of the Association shall be to unite the architectural
profession within the State of Florida to promote and forward the
objects of The American Institute of Architects; to stimulate and
encourage continual improvement within the profession, cooperate
with other professions, promote and participate in the matters of
general public welfare, and represent and act for the architectural
profession in the State, and to promote educational and public rela.
tion programs for the advancement of the profession.


--- -









SECRETARY'S REPORT OF THE BOARD
MEETING, NOVEMBER 13, 1952.. .This
meeting was characterized by three prin-
cipal reports in addition to a multitude of
other business.

Sanford W. Goin, our able past President,
who had, with the help of Mama, pushed
through our fund raising campaign, made
his final report. Sanford's report showed
us within pocket change of our $10,000.00
goal. This is tabulated in detail elsewhere
in the Bulletin. The tremendous volume of
paper work and correspondence required
for this job cannot be comprehended by any
one who has not seen this stack of material.

The second major report was that of our
Committee to employ an Executive Secre-
tary. This Committee.consisted of Russell
Pancoast, President Hart and Frank Bunch
with Attorney Tench giving a full assist.
Several persons were interviewed by the
Committee and one reached the contract
negotiating stage prior to the Convention,
but satisfactory arrangement could not be
reached. The Committee reported out how-
ever that a very satisfactory arrangement
was pending with Dick Wyke. The Board
approved the recommendation of the Com-
mittee regarding Mr. Wyke being employed
and Mr. Tench just happened to have in his
pocket a Contract all written up, which
would be acceptable to Mr. Wyke and the
Association. Since the Board meeting ap-
proved thisCommittee actionT-no action
was needed from the floor of the conven-
tion, and Mr. Wyke was later signed on the
dotted. His picture appears on this Bulle-
tin as the introduction to the membership.
He will be calling on the chapters at some
future time and may find it possible to call
on many of you individually in the course of
the year. He has already expressed ade-
sire t6 nake direct contact with chapter of-
ficers over the State at regular intervals.

The third major report of the Convention
was again made by Sanford W.Goin, whose
Committee on Service to School Boards has
been extremely active since his program
was approved by the Board at the Miami
Meeting. Sanford has published a brochure
entitled "Better Planning Makes Better
Schools," which is being circulated to all
County School Superintendents in office,to
all County Board Members in office after
the 1st of January, to all Presidents of all
PTA's throughout the State and to the men-
bers of the Association. Future additional
distribution is under consideration. When
you receive your copy of this booklet,please
become familiar with its contents because
your school authorities in your neighbor
hood will hold the same information, and
may expect you to be familiar with the ma-
terial. Much of this material is already
familiar to the practicing architect, but
the particular organization and emphasis
of the various parts should be observed .
Funds for the printing and mailing of this


report have been drawn from our treasury.

Other very important Committee Reports
occupying slightly less limelight to the
previous items were the following:

Secretary-Treasurer's report to be includ-
ed elsewhere in the Bulletin.
Mr. Tom Grand gave a report on the Re-
gional Convention in Atlanta, which unfor -
tunately did not get on the platter of the
dictating machine. If this can be obtained
in writing at a later date, some comments
may appear in a later bulletin. A great
deal of discussion followed Mr. Grand's
report concerning the location of the next
Regional Meeting, which is certain to be
held in Florida.

A Committee vas appointed following a mo-
tion by Bill Arnett, consisting of Polevitsky
Leete and Spohn to study this matter and to
make recommendations and a report.

Our Legislative Committee, in the able
hands of Frank Bunch, made a brief report
indicating that we have definite activity
under way with the other professions in the
state to eliminate the continuing appropri-
ations ban, that is the law which passed
two sessions ago which took all the money
which we contributed through our renewal
fees and placed it in the general fund of ihe
State, which must then be allocated to the
work of the Board through a Budget Com-
mission and by action of the Legislature.

State policy has been to keep a certain per-
centage of those funds. Through the assist-
ance of the Attorney General and Comptrol-
ler, we are hopeful that the group and the
State Cabinet will see fit to ask for legis-
lation in the next session to eliminate this
situation and put us back where we used to
be when our funds were earmarked in a
special fund in Ihllahassee for our particu-
lar profession and all of those funds were
available to the Board through its budget.
We seem to be making strides in that di-
rection. Future reports on this Commit-
tee's activitywill be carried inthe bulletin.
Through a motion by Sanford Goin, the
Legislative Committee was given the same
powers it has had in the past for contin-
uing its work.
Mr. Elliott Hadley, Chairman of the Corn -
mittee of Relations between Architect and
Engineers, made a written report which is
printed in full elsewhere in the bulletin .
Although the report was not adopted by the
convention in its precise form as submit-
ted by the Committee, the adopted form
represents great strides in the Architect-
Engineer relations.

Archie Parish, Chairman of the Special
Committee to study equality of dues, re-
ported out a recommendation that no
change in dues be made at this time.


_ __ ___ __


_ _;__










Tom Grand, reporting as Chairman of the
Board of Trustees of F.A.A. Loan Fund at
the University of Florida, indicates that
we have $625.15 cash on hand and notes in
the amount of $250.00. Mr. Grand makes
the following comment: "The Committee
again calls attention to the fact t a in other
fields,notably in Real Estate, practitioners
have been making a scholarship available


to students. During the past year, the Flor-
ida North Chapter was instrumental in en-
couraging the Seward Mellon Companies of
Jacksonville, Orlando and Tampa each to
award two scholarships, and the Geo. Doro
Company of Jacksonville to award one. It
is hoped that the Florida Association and
its constituent chapters will give deep and
continuing consideration to the problem of
aid to worthy students of Architecture."


STATUS OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY'S FUND (AT YEAR'S END)


Number Amount Number Amount
Contributing Contributed Pledged Pledged Total


Out-of-State Architects
Broward County Chapter Area
Daytona Beach Chapter Area
Florida Central Chapter Area


39
22
13
bb 3 --


955.00
498.00
407.00
1,537.00


955.00
498.00
407.00
1,517.0"0


Florida North Chapter Area 41 233.5 ,3430 2,343.50
Florida North Central Chapter Area 10 211.00 b 225.00 436.00
Florida South Chapter Area 73 2,555.00 3 80.00
Donation from Draftsmen's Club
of Miami 50.00
Donation from Chapter Share of
proceeds,Miami Beach Home Show 273.84 2,958.84
Palm Beach Chapter Area 23 870.00 870.00
275 9,700.34 9 305.00 10,005.34

All contributions have been acknowledged to the donors by individual letter and have been
transmitted to the Secretary-Treasurer of the Association. Additional contributions are
welcomed and needed.


Observations by the Secretary- Treasurer:
As a result of the work in this office this
past year, the Secretary-Treasurer would
like to urge the membership to give seri-
ous consideration to an important change
in the operation of the Association as to
detail. It is my opinion that about 75% of
the clerical time of handling this office has
been taken up with maintenance of accounts
and records of membership, about 25% be-
ing devoted to bulletin organization. This,
of course, does not include time involved
in attendance at meetings and travel. The
time involved for the maintenance of mem-
bership records seems disappropriate to
the value of these records. Since this As-
sociation is in effect a federation of chap -
ters and since the responsibility of the
maintenance of membership falls entirely
at the chapter level, it would be most de-
sirable if some more automatic system of
record keeping at the State level could be
instituted. No one becomes a member of
the Association without becoming a mem-
ber of a chapter, and the necessary paper
work for keeping chapter records would be
sufficient for maintaining State records if
a carbon copy could be sent to the State.
As a matter of fact, you might even carry
this one step further and have the cards in-
dicating Florida Association membership
turned over to the chapter officers with the
signature of the secretary imprinted on
them, and permit the chapter officers to
issue these cards at the time dues are paid


and merely file with the state a mailing list
broken down in categories of membership.
This mailing list would provide the State
Association with its sole contact with the
members. This would accomplishtwo
things: first of all it would avoid the great
volume of mis-sent mail which this office
has observed. Secondly, it would provide
a simple membership record requiring al-
most no time at the State level and would
require very little extra effort at the chap-
ter level. Since we are going to be pay -
ing for our secretarial muscles in the fu-
ture, it might be prudent to institute some
time saving mechanism of this sort to re-
lease these energies for more constructive
purposes.












CONVENTION BUSINESS

The 38th annual convention of the Florida
Association of Architects was called to or-
der by President Hart on Friday morning,
November 14,in the Hotel Duval, Tallahas-
see. Father Raymond Amiro gave the in-
vocation,following which Millard Davidson
of the Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce
welcomed the convention.

Nominating Committee appointments and
other routine reports followed, including
ratification of the previous executive sec-
retary's fund report and the introduction
of our newly appointed Executive Secretary,
Edward D. Wyke.

Financial report indicated that we are rrmn-
ey ahead of our expenses. A more final re-
port of this is included elsewhere in the
bulletin which brings up to date at the close
of the year of all the accounts.

As a result of Mr. Parish's Committee's
study on dues, no change was made at this
time.

An important new committee was formed
consisting of Bill Arnett, George Votaw,
Lawrence Hitt, Willis Stephens, and John
Stetson, whose duty it will be to study the
chapter areas within the state with an eye
to reassigning certain areas and regroup-
ing the Architects into a more workable
system of chapters in an effort to eliminate
the present scramble in the Florida North
Chapter, which has four separated parts.

Reports were heard from the Legislative
Committee,Public Information Committee,
Student Chapter, and Education and Regis-
tration, the last of which indicates a need
for an adult education program among Ar-
chitects to increase our understanding of
client relations, administration, site plan-
ning and professional ethics before we be-
gin any approach to the public itself. This
Committee also commended the great work
done by the Florida South Chapter through
a regular series of radio and television
programs in the Miami area. The same
medium is being employed by the Univer -
sity College of Architecture and Allied Arts
in presenting a series of six programs on
the Arts over Jacksonville TV station. This
program is entitled 'Knowledge in Action."
The work of the University of Miami re-
garding Architectural Exhibits, the efforts
of the Florida Gulf Coast Art Center at
Clearwater, and the Gainesville University
Center of the Arts,together with the student
activities of bringing "great men" architects
to speak to the school and to tie public were
also commended in this report.

The Trustees Report of the F.A.A. loan fund
and hte Student Chapter Advisory Corrnittee
were both received. Part of the Committee
of Allied Arts report is printed elsewhere


in the bulletin, and future bulletins will
shuw other material from this Corrn ittee.
Sanford CGin's report on Architectural Ser-
vices to School Boards has already come
to your attention through the brochure you
have received by now. This was referred
to in the report of the Board Meeting.More
active membership campaigns were urged
by various members speaking from the
floor.

The Saturday morning session was high -
lighted by a, long talk from Tom Harmon
regarding the work of the Institute. This
material is being turned over to tie Secre-
tary for future inclusions in later bulletins.

The usual rash of resolutions of thanks and
homage was passed.

The Secretary requests that assistance on
one of these be forthcoming from the mem-
bership. Any member knowing of the pass-
ing of one of our members in the past year
should notify the new secretary at once.

Great credit should fall to Bob Maybin and
Charles Saunders for their work in pushing
the convention mechancis through.

Jirrny Stripling found in these two men able
workers for the convention.

The officers were elected as reported else-
where herein.

After a big hassel it was finally determined
that our next convention will be held in St.
Petersburg, and the regional meeting will
not be held at the same time and will prob-
ably be held in Miami.

A committee is called for in tie near future
to re-study our by-laws in the light of em-
ployment of the Executive Secretary.

Through two motions submitted at different
times, the report of the Committee on Ar-
chitect-Engineer relations which was re-
ported under Board Meeting business here-
in, was changed materially insofar as its
adoption as a program of action is concern-
ed. Point 4 of Part B has been moved tD the
position of Point 5 of Part A. Section A2
was extended to include the following: "We
recon-nend that the matters of joint repre-
sentation at tihe sessions of tihe State Legis-
lature in matters of adverse legislation af-
fecting either or both professions be refer-
red to the Legislative Committee of both
professions for action at such time as such
Legislative Committee needs such pint rep-
resentation to defeat it." The'full report of
this Committee, printed elsewhere in the
bulletin, includes these changes.


I _ _










REPORT OF JOINT MEETING OF THE
ARCHITECT ENGINEER RELATD W
COMMITTEE, FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF
ARCHITECTS FLORIDA ENGINEERING
SOCIETY
Wednesday, November 12,1952, 4:00 P.M.
Duval Hotel Tallahassee

Submitted by Elliott B. Hadley, Chairman
Architects Corrnittee;Emil A. Nordstrom,
Chairman Engineers Corrmittee, for action
of the F.A.A.
(As adopted by the Convention through
amendments from the floor)

The Joint Comrnittee took action b proceed
with the items on an agenda submitted by
the Chairmen of the two Committees. The
following items were adopted and recom -
mended for approval by The Florida Asso-
ciation of Architects and The Florida En-
gineering Society.

The Recommendations were placed under
two main headings, namely:
A. Recorrrnendations for Irrnimediate Action
B. Recommendations for Future Action

A. For Immediate Action:

1. We recommend that joint action be taken
to protect both professions against consol-
idation with any other State Boards or Bur-
eaus.

2."We recommend that the matters of joint
representation at the sessions of the State
Legislature in matters of adverse legisla-
tion affecting either or both professions be
referred to the Legislative Committee of
both professions for action at such time as
said Legislative Committee needs such
joint representation to defeat it."

3.We recommend that in order to perpetu-
ate the work of the joint committee, the
Presidents of both organizations confer
with each other and appoint the Chairman
of the two committees in the same geo-
graphical area.

4.We recommend that the joint Committees
meet semi-annually at the time and place of
the Annual Convention of each organization.

5.We recommend that continued studies be
made to the end; that the professionalactiv-
ities of Governmental agencies, Boards or
Bureaus be limited to programming and to
guidance.

B. For Future Action:

1.We recommend the drafting and adoption
of a joint fair practice proposal which can
act as a guide to the professions.

2.We recommend that continuing studies be
made to determine the prime professional
for all classes of work.


3.We recommend appropriate action look -
ing toward the employment of Architects
and Engineers, in private practice, by Gov-
ernmental agencies and Political sub-divi-
sions, on a professional fee basis, and not
on a bid basis.


The ladies program for the Convention was
handled by Mrs. Charles W. (Kathryn )
Saunders and Mrs. Ernest (Peggy) Daffin.
The Ladies Coffee was held at 10:30 Fri-
day morning in the Lafayette Room of the
Duval Hotel with ten wives in attendance .
Mrs. John T. (Jane) Wiggington poured. .
Jane is the wife of our lead-off speaker at
the Convention. All the F. A. A. members
moved in for coffee during the recess in
their meeting. Because many of the men
arose late, this formed their first contact
with food. The ladies held a luncheon Fri-
day in the Skyline Restaurant with thirteen
wives in attendance. No bad luck has re -
sulted from this number. Another feature
of the ladies program was attendance of the
Homecoming Parade and a tour of Talla -
hassee on Saturday morning, including the
Governor's Mansion and Florida State Uni-
versity grounds.


PART OF THE REPORT GIVEN BY THE
COMMITTEE ON ALLIED ARTS, CON-
SISTING OF A TALK BEFORE AN ART
GROUP BY A COMMITTEE MEMBER


FLORIDA ART AND ARCHITECTURE
. . . by Igor B. Polevitzky ...

Perhaps before turning to the subject of
Florida art or its architecture, we should
review briefly the history of the men who
produce this work, for it is in the mentihat
the potential wealth of any community lies.

In the clanging, steaming 19th century .
the century of industrial revolution . .
the practice of architecture, like the soci-
ety in which the architect lived, lost the
genuine sense of creative art. To many a
craftsman, artisan and architect alike the
advent of the machine was a terrible thing
and many were drawn away from the craft
of the heart and the hand as a result of it.

The more progressive practitioners, how-
ever, realized that failure to recognize the
machine and failure to adapt themselves to
work with it in the thousands of new mater-
ials and methods which it created wouldkill
both them as well as their usefulness. They
refused to agree with some romanticists,
who claimed that science is an enemy of art
reviewing the age old standards, continued
their work on the basis of profound belief
that a great architecture is always a re -
flection of its times and the society where.
in it thrives.


1 _ _












The result on the architecture as well as
the art of the period was the stripping away
by these progressive pioneers of all unnec-
essary do-dads from the current architec-
tare of the day, and the turning back to the
true elementals of good design no matter
in what age it survived: the expression of
pure structure and function of the building
with materials and methods available to the
times. The result of their work was the
attainment of a rather stark and stripped
simplicity which certainly was better than
the fhmboyant filigree of the 19th century,
but which left much to be desired from the
purified but somewhat sterile structures .
One of the main public criticisms of this
newly found architecture was its Spartan
simplicity and its apparent lack of appeal
to the emotions. Many were also shocked
because none of the things which they were
used to seeing in buildings heretofore, ap-
peared in this new work and habit is one
of the great forces in human nature and is
often mistaken for esthetic appeal. Don't
forget that these men were faced by com-
plete vacuum created by the wiping out
through the advent of the machine and the
changing society, of all traditions onwhich
their training and education was based. .
Just imagine a doctor setting out in prac -
tice whd is told to throw away all the old
.texts and to start practicing entirely on his
own judgment and initiative I

Progressive architects today feel that this
was a fortunate cleansing and purification,
which will eventually permit a creative and
spontaneous action and achieve in contem-
porary architecture the basic simplicity of
a great art. What actually happened is that
instead of depending on traditional rules
and regulations, the artist and the archi-
tect both, in this revolution, were thrown
entirely on their own imagination to design
and create a new architecture for the peo-
ple of their day.

The contemporary architect fully realizes
that the often criticized starkness of con-
temporary design cried out for the work of
the heart and the hand the artist and he
is anxious to have the artist join him in the
creation of a fine contemporary indigenous
work.


He is also aware of the fact that the ut.
of buildings is all important, but he does
not forget the human values and the esthe-
tics of his utilitarian art, and he attempts
to reach beyond the utilitarian to create an
emotional effect from inert materials.

In this work he not only welcomes but needs
the assistance of creative craftsmen. In
order to make it possible for the artist to
collaborate with the architect in creating,
especially in Florida, an indigenous archi-
tecture, however, the artist must get his
feet on the ground and also work on the cre
ation of a new art that will be both practic-
al and handsome and be so priced that it can
be available to many instead of the few. .
This sort of collaborative art must be de-
signed into structures and coordinated into
them by collaboration with the architect ,
during the inception of the design. I am not
speaking of murals to be painted on walls"
after the building is finished nor of applied
pieces of sculpture here and there after the
building is completed. I am speaking 6 the
true indigenous art forms which can be not
too expensively reproduced and which can
become part and parcel of basic designs of
buildings.

It is interesting to note that throughout the
ages it is just this sort of marriage of art
with architecture which has produced the
finest work in both fields.

To the artist who is having difficulty in ped-
dling murals or pieces of sculpture here and
there to the owner after the building has been
constructed, I say this: get to know your
architects and offer to work with them. If
you have any ability, the progressive archi-
tects in this area will be happy to work with
you. Don't forget that without the knowledge
of the man and his abilities and the type of
work he produces, the architect will not be
inspired to incorporate this particular meth-
od of self expression into his designs. Let
us develop new forms and methods of self -
expression in materials and methods which
are practical as well as beautiful and which
can be available to the average man. I know
this is possible, for I have worked with same
of you who have shown tremendous ingenu-
ity in just this type of work, and I know this
type of ingenuity and craft has added im -
measurably to what might otherwise have
been cold and impersonal buildings.


I ~ .

















F. GRAHAM WILLIAMS. PRESIDENT
JOHN F. HALLMAN. JR.. EXEC. VICi


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E-PRES.










FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE
OF ARCHITECTS FINANCIAL REPORT AS OF JANUARY 2, 1953

Brought forward from year 1951 681.08
RECEIPTS:
Dues Broward C county Chapter 300.00
Dues Florida Central Chapter 471.00
Dues Florida North Central Chapter 194.53
Dues Daytona Beach Chapter 169.00
Dues Florida North Chapter 754.50
Dues Palm Beach Chapter 419.00
Dues Florida South Chapter 1,140.00
Dues Student Associate Chapter 29.00
$15 Check Deposited Dues 15.00
3,492.03
Executive Secretary Fund 9,700.34
Bulletin Advertisements 191.65
Booklets Sold ("Better Planning
Makes Better Schools") 7.50
13,391.52
DISBURSEMENTS:
Dues and fees 35.00
Convention expense 409.04
Traveling expense 133.49
Postage, miscellaneous and petty cash 314.91
Legal expense 700.00
Stationery and printing 728.04
Secretary's expense 1,000.00
F.A.A. medals 80.97
3,401.45
*Bank charges printing of checks 3.53
3,404.98
9,986.54
Total Balance in Bank 10,667.62

The lonely looking $15.00 deposit item for dues in the column above was a check which
became deposited without being credited to any Chapter. It lost its identity in our rec-
ords and we would welcome the assistance of Chapter Treasurers in finding the proper
credit.
The Executive Secretary fund item shown above is the actual cash on hand and does not
include the $305.00 pledged but not yet collected.
The Bulletin Ad account indicates only money paid and ignores the $308.34 uncollected
but due.
In the Disbursements column, our Legal expense was increased this year by work done
in obtaining the Executive Secretary contract and negotiations.
The increased Secretary's expenses was offset by the Bulletin Ad account.
The large amount for F.A.A. medals comes about because we have purchased several
years' supply at one stamping.





















ELIAS F. DE LA HAYE, 1887-1952
"Del" passed away Dec. 13 at his home in Daytona Beach. He was
born on the Isle of Jersey, July 17, 1887, and came to Boston with his
parents at the age of 10. He attended R. P. I., class of 1912.
He came to Florida in 1921 and to Daytona Beach in 1922. He held
Architectural Registration Certificate Number 252, was a member of the
American Institute of Architects, the Florida Association of Architects, the
Florida Society of Professional Engineers and was a devoted Rotarian. He
was elected Secretary Treasurer of the Florida Association of Architects
at the Dec. 9-10, 1932 Convention in Miami at which Richard Kiehnel was
re-elected President. This service to the association continued for many
years and was recognized at the Dec. 9-10, 1944 Convention in Tampa by
the following action:
Resolution No. 2
"WHEREAS, Mr. E. F. De La Haye, after years
of devoted service to the Florida Association of
Architects, serving as its Secretary and Treasurer,
in a style peculiar to his own, warm, friendly
character, and more than satisfactory to the asso-
ciation membership, has retired from the office,
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED,
That the Florida Association of Architects, in an-
nual meeting assembled, give to Mr. De La Haye
a whole-hearted vote of thanks for his long and
conscientious service in its work, and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That a copy of
this resolution be incorporated in the minutes of
this meeting, and a copy be sent to Mr. De La
Haye.
Signed: Marion I. Manley
F. Earl De Loe
Gerard Pitt
"Del" remained active in association affairs and served on committees
during the completion of the Unification program and practiced actively until
beset by serious illness in the last two years.
He is survived by his widow, Lois, and a granddaughter, Joan.










SEMINAR DISCUSSIONS

The seminar discussions at the convention
had as their topic "Legal Aspects of Archi-
tectural Practice" with ane non-conforming
lecture on some new design experiments,
taking place in North Carolina by the Buck-
meister-Fuller Foundation. This topic, to-
gether with the remarks by Mr. Haskell of
the Architectural Forum and those by Mr.
Bernard Tomson are being passed over in
this issue of the bulletin. This material
may be-reported on in later issues if space
permits.

However, the resultant discussions arising
from remarks made by John Wiggington,
-Attorney, in addressing the convention ,
should be placed before the membership at
the earliest possible date. Mr. Wiggington
in the course of his talk outlined the his -
tory of the establishment of the integrated
bar in the State of Florida and drew a strong
parallel between that profession and our
own. Mr. Wiggington's point seemed to be
that we should find ways and means of hav-
ing every architect draftsman and interest-
ed party in the State of Florida a member
of our organization. Mr. Wiggington spoke
in glowing terms of the educational and or-
ganizational advantages to the public and to
the profession of the integrated bar. At one
point he stated: "I think it is an illustration
of what I am trying to say by way cf an ade-
quate, strong,vigorous, enthusiastic organ-
ization that is more or less dedicated lo the
betterment of the profession by rendering a
better service to the public. .In discuss-
ing the problems of your profession I am
struck with the almost identical situation
that you have now with that which we were
confronted some 15 to 18 years ago.."

Mr. Wiggington continued in more pointed
discussion of the architect's plight and
criticized our weakness in funds andnum-
bers. He drew the conclusion from the
registration figures as compared with our
membership count today. We are repre-
senting about one third of the architects in
the State a definite minority. He criticiz-
ed the organization of our State Board for
having examination and admissions coupled
with discipline. He stated that the matter
of disciplining the membership should rest
with our organization. He continued to draw
a parallel between the integrated bar and
our State Association throughout his talk.
In his concluding remarks, Mr. Wiggington
stated: "You don't have the influence ,
either in your profession, among its mem-
bership or in other high places that you
should have in order to protect your pro-
fession against this thing I think is worrying
so many men in other professions."

Although the Saturday morning forum ses-
sion was not specifically organized to reply
to Mr. Wiggington, it turned out much in tiat
manner. Mr. Wiggington had made his re-


marks at the opening of our convention sem-
inar Friday morning. Following him, Mr.
Haskell and Mr. Tomson had both spoken,
Most of the conversation in the hallways
and among the officers had revolved around
mustering an answer to Mr. Wiggington's
comments.

Frank Bunch summed up this reply in his
remarks, as follows: "Through uninten-
tional lack of information on the part of
some who have given Mr. Wiggington in-
formation, he has been completely mis-
informed about the relative number f reg-
istered Architects who are members of
this organization. This morning I took the
roster of registered Architects and Archi-
tects who are registered in the State of
Florida, and made a study of it, together
with the best information which I could gain
from all sections of the State, represented
by the officers and secretaries and people
here, and here are the results. There are
a total number of 909 men who are regis-
tered to practice Architecture in the State
of Florida. Of that number, however, three
hundred fifty-three are resident outside of
the State of Florida. Now that group is not
available to the F.A.A. for membership. It
is Mot available to the chapters of this state
for membership. They are completely out-
side' of any possible discussion in this mat-
ter. In addition to that there are 19 who are
at the present time in the Armed Services
and I would consider that group is also out-
side of this discussion. It varies,of course,
considerably from time to time,but most of
those 19 are outside of the state in their du-
ties, in some places many of them outside
of the country. Now that 372 people with
whom we are not concerned in this matter -
that deducted from the total of 909 leaves
only 537 Architects who are resident in the
State of Florida and who are registered to
practice Architecture.

"Now taking the chapters; I took a break-
down of all the chapters as to corporate
members and registered associate mem -
bers,and I night interject here that accord-
ing to the by-laws of the Florida Associa-
tion of Architects, the membership shall
consist of all corporate members and all
associate rrembers of all Florida Chapters
of the American Institute of Architects.Now,
of course,that doesn't say that he has to be
registered,but in order to be fair about the
comparison I have just taken the registered
associates listed here for each chapter.And
that, together with the corporate members
of the various chapters totals 297 for the 7
chapters. That proportion then is 55.3% of
the architects who are registered and resi-
dent in the State of Florida are now mem-
bers of the F.A.A. Now,I want anything that
goes out to the membership or to the press
or any place else to be corrected to show
the true figures. Let's don't have any
printed matter out, or don't broadcast it
yourself that we represent a minority of









the registered Architects in Florida. We
represent a majority of the registered Ar-
chitects in Florida and through the efforts
of our Executive Secretary whom we just
retained, we plan to have still further high-
er percentage of representation among the
registered Architects of Florida."

Tom Grand and Sanford Goin both took the
floor to question the constitutionality of
the integrated bar as follows: "Do you think
the Florida situation with respect to the bar
would be sustained if we, the sovereign peo-
ple, contended against the sort of thing that
they have done, that is legislated a corpor-
ate party to in effect collect taxes?"

The question of size and effectiveness fi-
nally came to a head in an interchange of
remakrs between Member Panowll and our
Attorney, Mr. Tench. Through a series of
incisive questions Mr. Panowll finally wrurg
from Mr. Tench the admission that, even
though we had a much larger percentage of
members in the Association, we would have
to be just as smooth and sharp and would
have to drill the legislators continuously in
order to put through anything as sweeping
as the integrated bar. The other member
of the panel, Mr. Tomson, spoke up folbw-
ing this interchange: "I think what has just
been said is very appropriate. In discuss-
ing a membership drive there is one tiing.
what are you going to do when you get those
members? What are you going to do for
yourselves you here sitting in this room?
How are you going to be better off? I think
that is the question you have to answer. It
seems to me that you have some very im -
portant problems that you have to solve .
and ad I started to say some time ago, you
are not going to solve it by having a bill
passed. You have one of the best statutes
in the United States. Your problem is not
one of legislation; it is one of enforcement,
of the legislation you have and the prob -
lems that you face in practicing Architec-
ture in this country not in this state but
in this country. There are very substantial
things that your organization can do for the
Architects in Florida. There are things too
that you can do to make each one stronger
in your profession, and for that you don't
need any more members than you have now.
It is advisable to get as many as you can in
the group......You are running away from
the problem when you talk in terms of mem-
bership as if the solution of all your prob-
lems is going to be membership, and that
the solution to all your problems is going to
be new legislation......What you need is an
attack on your problems directly......"

Regarding membership building, Tom Har-
mon pointed out a practice followed in his
state of immediately briefing all new regis-
trants to take the examination regarding tihe
advantages of Institute membership. He
stated that all are requested to apply for
associate membership. He stated that this


gets contact with the men before tiey start
practicing and they are guided through tieir
three years of associateship and are then
either dropped or taken into corporate men-
bership. This practice was commended by
Mr. Hart and questions were put to our Mr.
Parish, Board member, who stated that un-
der the current operation, he did not feel
this could be done in our State in the ex -
amination itself.

Mr. Tench commented that our principle
problem is public relations and that em -
ployment of an Executive Secretary with
the attendant problem should take us a long
way. Mr. Tench admitted, "I think perhaps
we are a little off base when we are talk -
ing about integration."

The great politeness of the above discus -
sions belies the intense emotional tone of
the whole matter. At times, the tones were
almost profane. It is the feeling of the
writer that this searching of our organiza-
tional structure by our own leaders, to re-
ply to what amounts to a charge, will fur -
nish us with vital membership attitudes and
drive to carry on for some time. We shall
benefit greatly by Mr. Wiggington's remarks.


Although we now have an Execu-

tive Secretary with office in Bradenton

it is imperative that, for the present,

all correspondence be addressed to

Secretary-Treasurer Clinton Gamble,

1407 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale,

Florida.



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)ROVED









OFFICERS FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 1953


PRESIDENT












SECRETARY- TREASURER


Igor B. Polevitzky, Miami, Florida

Nationally known architect. His architectural
work has been published in numerous national
magazines. Life magazine published his fam-
ous bird cage house built in Miami, Visiting
lecturer and professor of architecture at the
University of Illinois, Cornell, University of
Florida, and others. Past president of Flor-
ida South Chapter, American Institute of Ar-
chitects Past Director, Florida Association
of Architects.

Clinton Gamble, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Nationally recognized school architect. Con-
ducted extensive research on shopping cen-
ters design and construction. Awarded med-
al by Florida Optometrist Society for out -
standing achievement in sight saving design
1950 in connection with advance design of
the South Broward (County), Florida High
School. Lieutenant Colonel in the C.E.C.
World War II.


VICE PRESIDENTS

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

7th


Francis Craig

Wm. Stewart Morrison

Frank E. Watson

M hurice E. Hollay

Mvbrton T. Ironmonger

Franklin S. Bunch

Jack McCandless


Daytona Beach Chapter

Florida North Central Chapter

Florida South Chapter

Palm Beach Chapter

Broward County Chapter

Florida North Chapter

Florida Central Chapter


EXECUTIVE SECRETARY


Edward Dean Wyke


DIRECTORS


Francis R. Walton
James A. Stripling
Miss Marion I. Manley
John Stetson
Cedric H. Start
William T. Arnett
Frank P. Patterson, Jr.


ALTERNATE DIRECTORS

David A. Leete
Robert H. Maybin
M. Tony Sherman
William A. Stewart
Albert Courtney Stewart, Jr.
Jack Moore
Bruce Smith


CHAPTER


Daytona Beach
Florida North Central
Florida South
Palm Beach
Broward County
Florida North
Florida Central



















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