Group Title: Florida Caribbean architect
Title: FloridaCaribbean architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004635/00019
 Material Information
Title: FloridaCaribbean architect
Alternate Title: Florida Caribbean architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Publisher: Dawson Publications,
Dawson Publications
Place of Publication: Timonium Md
Publication Date: Spring 2002
Copyright Date: 1997
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 44, no. 1 (spring 1997)-
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Issues have also theme titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004635
Volume ID: VID00019
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA5904
ltuf - ACJ1464
oclc - 36846561
lccn - sn 97052000
 Related Items
Preceded by: Florida architect

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23
contents, spring 2002

Dorsky Hodgson + Partners 16
Robert G. Currie Partnership 21
RS&H (Reynolds, Smith and Hills, Inc.) 22
Angela del Toro and Ricardo Miranda 24
Norman M. Giller 26


Cover photos ofthe Golden Sands, Lido Spa Hotel and CariLLon Hotel courtesy ofthe Urban Arts Committee, Miami Beach.
ArchitectU1'e by Norman M. GiLLer, AlA

florida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002







President's Message / Enrique Woodroffi, AlA

To quote an old cliche: "the only constant in life is change" -changing attitudes; changing styles; changing communities; changing legislation; changing security -a changed world since September 11 2001. In order to be able to lead our profession, we must embrace change, and be ready to challenge ourselves and our communities to create a better quality oflife.
I am privileged and excited to be your President this year. "So many opportunities, so little time." In order to work in constant change and be able to provide stability for our Association and profession, Bill Bishop (President-Elect), your Executive Committee and I have committed to a two -year work plan that provides for continuity as well as the opportunity for change. We are working on a plan that will enhance our profession and programs that will benefit the members.
Goals for 2002/2003 that have been adopted by the FAAIA Board include enhanced communication with our Chapters and communities; a Chapter grant program; proactive legislation; leadership training; a membership needs survey; and a student/architect mentoring program. There is also a strong need to maintain and strengthen our relationships with allied professions and associations.
In January, the FAAIA held a very successful Legislative Conference in Tallahassee. Over 50 Association leaders and members-at-large took advantage of the opportunity to visit with legislators and discuss such issues as privatization, tax reform, school construction and CCNA.
February 27 through March 1, the FAAIA leadership attended AIA Grassroots in Washington D.C. The theme of Grassroots was America by Design. Challenges and changes to our profession were heightened by the events of September 11 and architects must address greater security needs in creative and innovative ways. As at no other time, architects are called to leadership in meeting the current needs ofAmerica's built environment. While many of the issues discussed affect changing legislation (i.e. school modernization; security design; Brownfield legislation; transportation), changes in our Association were discussed that are similar to FAAIA goals for the next two years. We need to begin by improving communication with the public and our members. Your feedback is key to our success.
FAAIA is your organization committed to serving the needs of each of its members, the profession and communities. Opportunities for the continued success of FAAIA lie in its members, its affiliations, its communities, and within yourself Be part of the changing process. As Thomas Carlyle once said, "Leadership is an engine for creative change."
The Florida Association of the American Institute ofArchitects Annual Convention in Miami is August 7-10 -not that far away. Plan ahead and "seize the moment." I promise it will change and challenge the way you see your profession and your community.
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002






News

Tampa Cultural District to Become a Reality
A 28-square-block Cultural District in downtown Tampa is moving toward becoming a reality. The Cultural District has been the missing link in the city's "Circle of Development," a series of economic development projects that have already rejuvenated areas surrounding downtown. "Circle ofDevelopment" projects include the Florida Aquarium, a 20,500-seat Ice Palace hockey and sports venue, a World Trade Center and Port of Tampa headquarters, a new cruise ship terminal a 710-room Marriott convention hotel and other projects already responsible for nearly $6 billion in new construction over the past five years.
As conceived by city planners, the Cultural District will include the new Tampa Museum of Art, a new Tampa Bay History Center, additions to the Tampa Bay Performing Arts Center, a riverwalk, an expanded waterfront park and a refurbished campus for the city's main public library. Tampa-based architecture firm Alfonso Architects is partnering with Rafael Vinoly to design the new Tampa Museum of Art which will anchor the 28-block district. Both firms have established offices in New York and Tampa and they are in the process of develop-


MisceLlaneous views 0/the CuLturaL District courtesy o/Skidmore, Owings & Me/Tiff LLP.
ing a schematic design for the new museum.
The space plan being considered for the museum will quadruple its current exhibition space from 14,000 to 40,000 square feet. The new design will also allow much more ofthe museum's permanent collection of contemporary art, photography and antiquities to be on view while allowing significant new areas for traveling exhibitions, a museum cafe, a theatreauditorium, classrooms and an enlarged museum store.
The City ofTampa has also hired the Chicago office of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) to begin the next phase ofthe District, designing plans to redevelop 67.4 acres of land that will make Tampa's downtown, waterfront and public spaces more functional and accessible.


NCARB Adds New Titles
NCARB has introduced two new titles to its monograph series, Low-SLope Roofing II and Cracking the Codes. Low-SLope Roofing IIis the companion to number 1 and its objective is to investigate alternatives to traditional built-up roofing, including bitumen, single-ply, sprayed polyurethane foam, metal and liquid applied systems. Author Thomas Lee Smith, AIA, RRC, also discusses reroofing projects, sustainably-designed systems, and construction contract administration and warranty issues related to roofing.
In Cracking the Code, Barry D. Yatt upends the idea that building codes and standards are obstacles to design. Offering a down-to-earth approach, the author provides a sound
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002




overview of regulatory issues. Monograp h chapters move through each stage of the planning process to identify and consolidate the basic regulatory requirements that must be addressed. In addition to the model building codes, incl uding the International Building Code, Cracking the Codes covers zoning ordinance and covenants, as well as rules related to accessibility, historic preservation, environmental qualiry, and consumer protection, to name a few.
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Corrections
T he Caner Tabernacle CME Church in Orlando designed by Bock & Partners contains 15,500 square feet of renovated space, not 5,500 as reponed in the Fall 200 1 IS ue.
George Con Chroma, Inc. was not credited as photographer of John Howey's Tower 1 project which appeared in the Winter 2002 issue.
Jim Clees, RLA, ASLA, i the landscape architect with Harvard Jolly Clees Toppe Architects. He is the de igner of the traffic circle at the entrance to Clearwater Beach, not John Toppe as reported in the Winter 2002 issue.
NCARB's web site at www.ncarb.org/ publications.

BOAlD Honors USF School of Architecture
The Universiry of South Florida (USF) School of Architecture and Communiry Design has been named the "top archi tecture school in Florida" by the Florida Board of Architecture and Interior Design, the state's licen ing board. The board made the decision after reviewing student work
ubmiued in five competitions in 2001 and 2002. The competition categories incl uded poster design, a building design for the Old mar Cultural Arts Center, the best handdrawn rendering for the Oldsmar project, the best digital rendering for the Oldsmar project and a competition for an academic program that fosters leadership skills.
According to the organizers, hundreds of students from all six architecture schools in Florida participated in the competitions and first, second and third place awards and prize money were given in each category. USF students won 10 out of the 15 awards, including four in first place. USF students also won the "People's Choice Award" and "Mayor's Choice" award for the Oldsmar competition.

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Work-in-Progress
Bloodgood Sharp Buster Architects & Planners (BSB) designed Orlando's new Sronewood Tavern & Grill. The firm's commercial division has designed four of the chain's nine restaurants, including the first freestanding prorotype in Gainesville. Because these are neighborhood restaurants, everything is designed ro neighborhood scale. The architects are very sensitive to the local homeowner's concerns about proportion and scale.
The Sieger Suarez Architectural Partnership is designer of Las Olas River House in Fort Lauderdale. Soon ro be the city's tallest building, the luxuty condominium will feature two 42-srory structures and one 34srory structute located in the heart of the downtown district. Totaling
1.2 million square feet, the project will provide a rotal of280 residential units. Among the structure's many amenities is a five-story, 30 000 square -foot, glass-walled fitness center and spa.
Architects Design Group Inc.
of Winter Park has designed the $6.5 million Municipal Complex and Administrative Center for the Village of Palm Springs. T he campus-style facility was designed to
Municipal Complex Master Plan for the
Village ofPalm Springs designed by the Architects Design Group Inc.


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BRPH Construction Services, Inc., a subsidiary ofBRPH Companies, Inc. is building the New Lift Christian FeLLowship in TitusviLLe, FLorida, utilizing the design/build method ofdeLivery. BRPH also designed the faciLifJl which includes a book shop, radio studio and coffee shop.


The Scott Partnership Architecture, Inc. designed the Congregation ofLiberal Judaism's new $3 miLLion addition and renovation now under comtntction in Orlando. Scheduled for completion this fall, the project includes 34,000 square feet ofnew construction.
centralize all services in one location with inviting public spaces. The program includes a public safery faciliry accommodating both police and fire, library addition and renovation, new public restrooms, basketball, tennis and volleyball courts, a water playground for rots, village plaza and lighted parking areas. Construction will begin in early 2002.
Retzsch Lanao Caycedo Architects won an AlA D esign Award from the Palm Beach Chapter for its design of a luxury rownhome community to be built in Fort Lauderdale. The new communiry of



MiraBay Club is being designed byl Cooper Johnson Smith Architects, Inc. just west ofInterstate 75 in Hillsborough County.
SKLARchitecture will provide Architectural and Interior Design services for the new "Original Pancake" House
restaurants in Dade and Broward Counties. There are currently four buildings in the permitting or construction phase.
fitness center, aerobics, weight training and massage areas, a high-tech entertainment area, banquet room and snack bar. The clubhouse will be a two-story, plantationstyle building willi wide veranda and hipped roof.
Cannon Design received an Award ofMerit from theAlA, New York State Chapter, for design ofthe Carol & Carl Montante Cultural Center at Canisius College, Buffolo, NY. The goal ofthe $3.4 million program was the renovation and adapti7Je reuse ofa Byzantine-Lombardic style church into a multi-purpose, 530-seat venue for cultural and academic events.
florida / caribbean ARCH [TECT spring 2002




with shower. There are several couples' suites for residents with spouses, two separate dining rooms, laundry and secondary staff areas within the Green House area.
The Manor House at Sumner on Ridgewood in Akron, Ohio. Rendering and site plan courtesy ofthe architect.
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Food Court Generation, Boomers want a choice of dining environments. Service for 150 residents does not have to be provided in one large dining room. As in hotel design, the main kitchen and a grill station can provide service to multiple smaller venues -from a formal dining room for 75, to a coffee shop, bistro, tearoom, SPOrtS bar or intimate clubroom.
Q: What role should the design team play in master planningfor new and aging senior living communities?
A: Master planning for Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs) is evolving as a process of discovering and responding to problems rather than building on assumptions. CCRCs provide the full continuum of care within a single residential campus. It's absolutely critical to involve the architect at the very start of planning -before making any strategic planning, financial or marketing decisions. An owner wanung to reposJ(Lon an eXlStlng CCRC typically decides about renovation before bringing an architect to the table, yet design professionals may suggest selective demolition that opens new opportunities on the site.
Q: How does primary research inform and shape your design?
A: DH+P conducts primary research and has a full-time researcher whose projects include post-occupancy evaluations. These studies improve OUI designs and can assist
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002
clients in making future changes in their buildings.
For example, we provide "behavioral mapping" research that measures usage patterns throughour a facility. We literally map the behavior of residents, staff and visitors, which yields wonderful clues for renovating and redesign. A space that appears to be useful may actually be underutilized. The owner may want to change that space, yet residents may resist the change, saying "we use that area constantly." If hard data shows residents that they only use the space two mornings a week, it's much easier for the owner to calm their concerns, find a new location for the activity and proceed with the renovation.
Q: With aging CCRCs vying for market share in a tight economy, what are the keys to effective repositioning?
A: Two principles are essential to reposition and stay competitive.
First, provide brand new product on site -whether it's a new type of apartment, garden home or other unit. That product must give the CCRC a new market image and, most important, provide new revenues that allow the owner to invest in non-revenue producing space.
Second, understand that these are occupied communities, which demand meticuloLls, strategic phasing developed in collaboration with the owner's financial team. You can't simply relocate residents and tell them to return next year. The challenge goes back to the master plan, which must anticipate how and where to build and indicate where to relocate people when renovation or demolition beco mes necessary.
Q; What will senior living communities and nursing homes be like 20yeat's from now?
A: Based on demographics, we'll see many more of them, with far greater variety. Different affinity groups will form communities as likeminded people come together to retire and pursue activities. These may range from academic to wellness or longevity-o riented communities to culturally-focused communities near city-center music and art reso urces.
Technology will change the face of these communities whatever their lifestyle offerings. Of course, they'll be wired to the world. But they will also use technology that's revolutionizing healthcare to de-institutionalize nursing facilities and unclutter the designed environment. The greenhouse concept as seen in Sumner on Ridgewood is an early example. Charting will be with hand-held devices, eliminating the need for nurses stations with large charts. Therapy will connect to fitness activities to indicate the connections oflife, rather than its separations into sick and well.
With security a continuing concern, Boomers will continue to value gated environments. Yet segregation by age will be moderated by new social connections within CCRCs -and by on-campus programming that will create ongoing, intergenerational exchanges with the community outside its walls.


Ocean Avenue Bridge, Boynton Beach, Florida
T he new O cean Avenue Bridge, completed in early 2001 at a cost of $23 million, was the first trunnion bridge of its kind in Florida to introduce solid concrete decking and inverted prestressed concrete T-beams on approach spans. It replaced a substandard bridge connecting two separate waterfront communities. In order to create as Iowa profile as possible and maintain the required 21-foot Coast Guard clearance, the main bascule girders were designed to project upward and through the deck, thus lowering the entire bridge. Art was integrated into the base of all the towers reflecting aquatic life indigenous to the area. Landscaped pathways that encourage pedestrian activity lead to a lighted passive waterfront communal space below the bridge.
Lichtenstein Consulting Engineers in Ft. Lauderdale were the project engineers.
Phoros: Ocean Avenue Bridge in Boynton Beach, Florida. All photos courtesy olC; Walker.

florida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002


The architectural response to the high-bay industrial shop areas. program imperatives was achieved by W indows into spaces along the street creating an internal street -Technolallow prospective students or business ogy Street -as the interface berween partners to observe the educational the rwo-story academic area and the process. Another significant design response was the creation of a rwostory atrium on the academic side of the building that links the facility's various departments and functions. This space allows for flexible group interaction and displays ofstudent projects in a rotunda at the east end of the atrium. Efficiency was gained by having this space function as a main entry, main circulation linkage and interdisciplinary meeting and display space.
Finally, the project takes advantage of its natural Florida setting of pines, palmettos and wetlands by juxtaposing technology and nature in an environmentally-responsible way. The learning resources room with an extensive computer commons area is located in a second rotunda with a 1800 view.
Pho(Os, (Op: Machine Trades Lab .from Technology Street showing Computerized Milling Machine in the foreground; Above, lefr: Computer Network Administration Labs; Above, righr: Interior view o/the atrium. All photos courtesy o/the architect.
Project Credits: Lawrence D. Ellis, AlA, Principal-in-Charge; John V. Quattrone, AlA, Lead Designer and Project Officer; Scott Coleman, Project Architect/Design Team; Dana DeClerk, AlA, Interior Design; Christopher D. Flagg, ASLA, Master Planning; Tilden Lobnitz Cooper, Mechanical/Electrical/Structural; Zev Cohen & Associates, Civil; FF&E, Commercial and Governmental Interiots.
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002


j/Qrida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002



With 85 years and a whopping 11,000 buildings to his credit, Norm Giller insists that while he was designing in the 1940s, 50s and 60s, he wasn't trying to create a movement or a new style. He was simply designing modern buildings. He recently said, "It's only in retrospect that people categorize and label architectural styles. I was just designing contemporary buildings using whatever the technology was at the time and incorporating different materials as they came on to the market."
Whether consciously or not, Giller's work from 1945 to the early 70s was the foundation for what is now referred to as Miami Modern, or MIMo. MIMo is the post-World War II descendant of Art Deco. It featured motifs such as
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002
boomerangs, as well as cheese-hole masonry and unusual roof designs. It was also very sleek and elegant with daring angles and lines and lots of glass. Giller's Carillon Hotel is a good example, along with Morris Lapidus' Fontainebleau and Eden Roc Hotels. Giller's innovative work included the first two-story motel in Miami; a 1950 construct with back-to-back rooms, outdoor balconies and catwalk hallways that became the prototype for South Florida motels. In 1957, he designed the Carillon Hotel, one of North Beach's first high-rise hotels.
Giller's impact as an architect extended beyond the buildings he designed. He served as a military architect during World War II and later, he was instrumental in founding the Design Review Board of Miami Beach. As its first chairman and a longtime board member, Giller set design standards that kept builders from constructing plain, boxy buildings with no outstanding architectural features. Giller remembers that, "It wasn't easy, but eventually architects realized that if they didn't
comply, they wouldn't be permitted (to build). Finally, they and their clients got the word that our standards were set high and they had to meet them."
During the 1950s, Giller was head of the lOth largest architecture firm in the U.S. and the only Florida firm in the nation's top 25. He was one of the first to use airconditioning in residential buildings and he pioneered the use of PVC pipe, initiating a change in national building codes. His firm designed and constructed hundreds of buildings for the Alliance for Progress in Latin America. Throughout his career, Giller has been active in the American Institute ofArchitects and he was instrumental in getting accreditation for the University of Miami School ofArchitecture. In 1961, he


Practice Aids

Emergency Call Systems: Key Things to Keep in Mind
The economy is tight, and winning contracts to design or renovate assisted living facilities in the Florida market is extremely competitive. How can your firm present a stand-out proposal? One way is to incorporate new systems that give clients technological innovation and marketability, co upled with good value.
Frequently architects haven't researched emergency call systems before submitting a design proposal. This is due, in part, to a comfort level with older, established technologies such as pull-cords and nurse call systems. However, recent advances in telephone-based systems provide facilities with lower maintenance, better value for their money, more services and greater peace-of-mind.
Why is an updated emergency call system a strong selling point in the design of a resident community? Newer, more efficient systems travel with residents as opposed to fixed systems that might be out of reach when they are most needed. Telephone-based systems allow Staff to communicate easily with residents and ascertain who needs urgent help. The newer systems appeal to a younger and more active group of retirement community members, many of whom don't need round-the-clock care.
The following overview of emergency call systems will help you to define features that may be important to clients.
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002
THE STANDARD: PULL-CORD SYSTEMS
Most independent and assistedliving facilities today still use some variant of the pull-cord system. This simple bur limited system costs approximately $350 per apartment installed. It is activated when a resident pulls on a wall-mounted cord located in the bedroom or bathroom. Once pulled, an annunciator panel indicator light within the facility is activated, showing which room needs assistance. But, with this system, staff and residents can't communicate directly and the resident must be able to get to the wall unit to signal for help. Pull-cords can be costly to maintain because problems (wire shorts, chafing) can occur anywhere along the wiring and troubleshooting is often expensive because wiring is in the walls and above the ceilings. Finally, any facility using this system must designate a staff member to monitor the annunciator panel, which limits staff mobility and interaction with residents.
PULL-CORD WITH VOICE OPTION
This system allows residents and staff to communicate verbal ly in an emergency situation. After a resident pulls a cord, a tone emits from the central panel to signal the staffer that help is needed. The staffer and resident can talk, but only one-at-atime. This wired system offers a slight improvement over a traditional pull-cord, but maintenance is still difficult and costly due to wire degradation. Power loss issues must be addressed during the design to assure that residents at further ends of the facility can be heard as clearly as those close to the annunciator panel.
NURSE CALL SYSTEMS
Designed for hospitals and later used in nursing homes, nurse call systems are a more sophisticated version of a pull-cord system. Today they are used in assisted living facilities and they feature a pull-cord along with intercom speaker capability. When a resident uses the pull-cord, staff members are alerted to the call via an annunciator panel or a monitor that displays caller information. This sophisticated system requires a dedicated wiring system and can provide valuable operations reports.
Because nurse call systems were designed for hospital applications, adapting them to assisted living facilities means that the facility does not receive a system tailored to its needs. At a cOSt of $400 to $1,400 per apartment, using a nurse call system outside of a hospital setting makes a less acute facility pay for services it often can't use (nurse presence, code blue, etc. ) Like any oth er wire-based system, repair and expansion are problemati c.





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Dennis Lin lives and works in Toronto, Canada. For information about pricing and availability, or to request samples or images, contact Klinik at braille@openklinik.com or call (4 16) 703-5978.

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PULSAR Construction Cost Estimating Software containing the 2002 R.S. Means Cost Data is now available from Construction Estimating Systems, Inc. The PULSAR Estimating Software is widely used by military bases and government agencies nationwide using Job Order Contracting aOC) and Simplified Acquisition of Base Engineering Requirements (SABER) methodologies for construction bid delivery. T he
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002



BRAILLE rILES
DESIGHU : OENNIS UN
alMENSIONS.' J 2" 6-TilES
28 IIRA/HC CHAoIIACTfRS
MATERiAlS : CAST POLYMER

WITH Grt COAT SURFACE.

BraiLLe Alphabet Tiles, by Dermis Lin

PULSAR Estimating System
2002 version of PULSAR has improved the speed and ease of using the software by incorporating new reporting formats, easy-to-use exporting of data to spreadsheets and word processing formats and expanded city cost indices.
In addition to military bases and government agencies, a number of universities, state prisons and private corporations are increasingly using JOC and SABER methodologies in the construction estimating process. PULSAR uses the R.S.
Means Cost Database which includes over 40,000 construction line items containing labor, materials and equipment COStS, adj usted by city, for 7 15 geographic areas around the country.
This software is available for public and private sector use and it is GSA-approved. Information can be obtained by writing to: PULSAR Estimating Software, P.O. Box 1301, Forestdale, MA 02644 or calling 1-800-967-8572. The web address is www.estimatingsystems.com.




Index to Advertisers -by category Architectural Coatings
Duron Paints & Wallcoverings (95-20) ........ ........................... 39

Architectural Foam Products
Foam Concepts Inc. (95-24) ................................................... 37

Architectural Products
Florida Wood Council (95-23) ................................................. 5

Architectural Rendering
Genesis Studios, Inc. (95-26) .................................................. 40

Audio -Visual
Audio Visual Innovations (95-13) ........................................... 34

AutoCAD Software
CADD Centers ofFlorida (95-14) .......................................... 36
Digital Drafting Systems (95-19) .......................................... .. 37

CADD
Digital Drafting Systems (95-19) ............................................ 37

CADD Services
CADD Centers of Florida (95-14) ....... ................................... 36
Digital Drafting Systems (95-19) ............................................ 37

Carpets
Carpet & Rug Institute (95-16) .............................................. 34

Construction Manager
Pavarini Construction (95-31) ........................ ........................ 35

Continuing Education
McCathren & Associates Inc. (95-29) ................................... IFC

Custom Wood Flooring
Forest Accents/Hardwood Floors (95-25) ............................... 38

Doors
Federal Millwork Corp. (95-21) .............................................. 36
Pella Windows (95-32) ............................................................. 6
PGT InduStries (95-33) ...................................................... OBC

Doors & Wmdows
Caradco (95-15) ....................................................................... 1

Drinking Fountains
Most Dependable Fountains (95-30) ............ .......................... 38

Employment Agency
Archi Pro Staff Agency Inc. (95 -11) .......... .............................. 34

EnvironmentilAQ
Carpet & Rug Institute (95-16) .............................................. 34

Finishes -Interior & Exterior
Duron Paints & Wallcoverings (95-20) ................................... 39

Fire Retardant Treated Wood
Archwood Protection (95-12) ................................................. 38

Flooring
Forest Accents/Hardwood Floors (95-25) ............................... 38

General Contractors
Creative ContractOrs (95-18) ............................................ ...... 34
Pavarini ConStruction (95-31) ................................................ 35

Glass
Viracon (95-36) ...................................................... ................ 37

Glass Block
Glass Masonry Inc. (95-27) .................................................... 38

Inpact Resistant Glass
Caradco (95-15) ....................................................................... 1

Insulation
Foam Concepts Inc. (95-24) ........................... ........................ 37

Insulation -Spray/Pour in Place Foam
Icynene (95-28) ................................................................... IBC

Insurance
AIA Trust (95-10) ................................................................... 32 Collinsworth, Alter, N ielson, Fowler & Dowling Inc. (95-17) ............................................................. ............... 11 Suncoast Insurance Associates, Inc. (95-34) .............................. 8
Millwork
Federal Millwork Corp. (95-21) .............................................. 36

Molding
Federal Millwork Corp. (95-21) .............................................. 36

Outdoor Water Products
Most Dependable Fountains (95 -30) ...................................... 38

Paints -Interior & Exterior
Duron Paints & Wallcoverings (95 -20) ................................... 39

Pre-Contractor Service
Pavarini ConStruction (95 -31) ................................................ 35

Professional Liability
Collinsworth, Alter, Nielson, Fowler & Dowling Inc. (95-17) .......... .................................................................. 11 Suncoast Insurance Associates, Inc. (95-34) .............................. 8
Protective Glazing
Viracon (95-36) ...................................................................... 37

Recreation
McCathren & Associates Inc. (95-29) ................................... IFC

Resorts
The Resort at Longboat Key Club .......................................... 11

Rugs
Carpet & Rug Institute (95-16) .............................................. 34

Security Wmdows
Traco Securiry Windows & Doors (95-35) ................................ 2

Showers
Most Dependable Fountains (95-30) .................... .................. 38

Staffing Services
ArchiPro Staff Agency Inc. (95-11) ......................................... 34

Structural Products
Florida Wood Council (95-23) ................................................. 5

Stucco & Plastering
Foam Concepts Inc. (95-24) ................................................... 37

Temporary Agency
ArchiPro Staff Agency Inc. (95-11) ......................................... 34

Vacation/Cruise
McCathren & Associates Inc. (95-29) ... ................................ IFC

Wmdows
Pella Windows (95-32) ............................................................. 6
PGT Industries (95-33) ...................................................... OBC
Viracon (95-36) ...................................................................... 37

Wmdows & Doors
Caradco (95-15) ......................... ...... .................................... .... 1
Traco Security Windows & Doors (95-35) ................................ 2

Wood
Florida Wood Council (95-23) ................................................. 5

Wood -Fire Retardant Treated
Archwood Protection (95-12) ................................................. 38

Wood Flooring
Forest Accents/Hardwood Floors (95-25) ............................... 38

florida I caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002


Alphabetical Index to Advertisers
AlA Trust (95-10) .......... .......................................... 32
ArchiPro Staff Agency Inc. (95-11) .......................... 34
Archwood Protection (95 -12) ......... ......................... 38
Audio Visual Innovations (95-13) ............................ 34
CADD Centers of Florida (95-14) ............ ............... 36
Caradco (95-15) ........................................................ 1
Carpet & Rug Institute (95-16) ............................... 34
Collinsworth, Alter, Nielson, Fowler

& Dowling Inc. (95-17) ........... ........................... 11
Creative Contractors (95-1 8) ................................... 34
Digital Drafting Systems (95-19) ............................. 37
Duron Paints & Wallcoverings (95-20) ............... ..... 39


Ideal Learning Environment
Source: NaGona! study by Beth Schapiro & Associates and the IIDA Foundation

92% of teachers believe design has suong impact on students' learning & achievement


79% of teachers believe school design is important for student attendance


69% prefer carpet or a carpet & smoo th surface
combinatio n



Contact: The Carpet & Rug Institute, 800.882.8846
www.carpet-school.com

Federal Millwork Corp. (95-2 1) ............................... 36
Florida Wood Council (95-23) ............................... ... 5
Foam Concepts Inc. (95-24) .................................... 37
Forest Accents/Hardwood Floors (95-25) ................. 38
Genesis Studios, Inc. (95-26) .... ............................... 40
Glass Masonry Inc. (95-27) ..................................... 38
Icynene (95-28) .................................................... IBC
McCathren & Associates Inc. (95-29) .................... IFC
Most Dependable Fountains (95-30) ..................... .. 38
Pavarini Construction (95-31) ....... .... ...................... 35
Pella Windows (95-32) .............................................. 6
PGT Industries (95-33) ....................................... GBC
The Resort at Longboat Key Club ........................ ... 11
Suncoast Insurance Associates, Inc. (95-34) ............... 8
Traco Security W indows & Doors (95-35) ........... ...... 2
Viracon (9 5-36) .. ...... .. ........ ....... ................. ..... ... ..... 37




florida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002




Florida Association of the American Institute ofArchitects
104 East Jefferson Street Tallahassee, Florida 32301 www.aiafla.org
2001 FNAIA Officers
President
Enrique Woodroffe, FAlA
President-elect
Bill Bishop, AlA
Secretary/1rreasurer
Blinn Van Mater, AlA
Vice President/Communications
Javier Cruz, AlA
Vice President/Professional Development
Vivian O. Salaga, AlA
Vice President/Legislative &
Regulatory Affairs James Ruyle, AlA
Regional Director
Larry M. Schneider, AlA
Regional Director
Jerome Filer, FAlA
Immediate Past President
Miguel "Mike" A. Rodriguez, AlA

Executive Vice President
R. Scott Shal ley, CAE

Publisher
Denise Dawson
Dawson Publications, Inc. 2236 Greenspring Drive Timonium, Maryland 2 1093 410.560.5600
800.322.3448
Fax: 410.560.5601
Editor
Diane D. Greer

Sales Manager
Dave Patrick

Sales Representatives
Drew Fraser, Thomas Happel, Joyce Fink
Graphic Design
Mike Horgan
Printing
Boyd Brothers Printing
Florida Cari bbean Architect, Official Journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, is owned by the Association, a Florida corporation,
not for profit. ISSN-OO 1 5-3907. It is published four times a year and distributed through the office of the Association, 104 E. Jefferso n Street, 1rallahassee, Florida 32301. Telephone 85 0. 222.7590.
Opinions expressed by co ntributors are not necessarily those of AlA Florida. Editorial material may be reprinted only with the express permission of Florida Caribbean Architect. Single copies, $6.00; Annual subscription, $20.00
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002



Editorial / diane d. greer
1 have a good friend, Walter Grondzik, PE, who is an engineer and professor of architecture. He also holds several positions of prominence in national engineering organizations and he is much sought after as a conference speaker. He is a prolific writer and one of the best. Interestingly, he describes himself in terms of those things that are most important ro him, i.e. as one who is "involved in teaching and research dealing with building performance." He is also a proponent of building commissioning, postoccupancy evaluation and multi-dimensional spaces.
Several years ago, Walter wrote a very provocative piece for an electronic publication called eDesign. His article was entitled "The Sad State of Architecture in America: A 2-D, Iconic Void." It was at once humorous and frightening and some would suggest, overly critical of the profession of architecture. But, the article raises some important questions and delves inro issues that are roo often overlooked. His botrom line is this: "The reality of buildings is that they are unbelievably deep and rich environments." Permit me ro quote from the article ro make some points.
"Why has architecture become the architecture of the rwo-dimensional?" For most Americans, good image has become good architecture. 'T he dependence on image as a stand-in for realiry," he writes, "reaches its crowning glory in the architectural awards process. Virtually every award-winning architectural intervention (the new wo rd for a building) in the United States received that distinction solely on the basis of its image. Not its reality, but its image. A physical object that might cover rwo city blocks, rise 500 feet in the air and be used for over 100 years by thousands of people is represented throughout its life by its birth pictures (professional quality birth pictures, admittedly). Analogies following this theory of representation would have the Grammy Award winners being selected on the basis of the arrwork on their CD cases .... and he goes on ro make other equally apt analogies.
Three dimensions are woefully inadequate to define real buildings. The typical work-a-day office space has "10, 20, 30 -perhaps even 40 -clearly identifiable and distinct dimensions: luminance, temperature, radiance, sound pressure, privacy, gradient, appropriateness, historic co ntext, ergonomics, width and so on. It is the sum of these dimensions, as interpreted by the human brain in response to visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, and other sensations and stored experiences, that defines real architecture."
Well, OK, Grondzik writes, "it's not completely rrue thar "good" image makes "good" archirecture." Good writing can do it, too. "Many well-known architects are where they are not necessarily because their buildings are a delight to inhabit, but because they spin a mean line. Peter Eisenman, for example, sells books that celebrate an 'alternative process for making occupiable form, ... a process specifically developed to operate as freely as possible from functional considerations.'" Give me a break! As quoted by Roger Kimball in Tenured Radicals, Eisenman goes on to write, .. these dislocations have, according to the occupants of the house, changed the dining experience in a real, and, more importantly, unpredictable fashion." Is this not a verbal celebration of the architecture of the dysfunctional? And where do we go from here? Grondzik suggests, "How about the variable height handrail and differing riser heights that evoke a sensation of giddiness?"
The real point of all of this, in my estimation, is that there are serious issues at stake that cannot be ignored and in all fairness, are not being addressed in the awards process. I am as guilty as anyone because I don'r ask the hard questions before deciding what ro publish. Should I be asking if the project won the "2002 Design Merir Award for Buildings Not in Serious Litigation or the Bronze Medallion for Buildings that Really Don't Leak That Much?" I hope that doesn't become necessary.
Remember the opening premise of this editorial -"The reality of buildings is that they are unbelievably deep and rich environments." I do truly believe that. Architects must deal with them as such and design for the real world, not the world of images.



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It's the superior insulation system for today's buildings.


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www.lraco.com
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TRACO' Security Windows & Doors,Inc.
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MONTHS OF CONSULTING LAYERS OF SHOP DRAWINGS. HUNDREDS OF DIFFERENT WINDOWS.
Nowadays, that's what it takes to help make something look natural.
Designed to mediate between the urban and the natural, this nature center brings the look and feel of a forest to its inner-city
surroundings.

That's no small feat, considering one of the project's major design challenges w as transferring wind loads from the extensively overhung roof system to cedar columns without deflecting and breaking glazing. To solve it, the Pella Commercial team worked with the architect to develop a thermally broken weeping mullion framing system that supports required spans while maintaining the center's naturalistic imagery.
This is just an example of the support you can count on Pella to provide -be it providing shop drawings or simply continuing contact and support. From conception through installation, Pella Commercial representatives will work with you to ensure that you meet your technical and design challenges.



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Participating advertisers are given a four digit code (located in this index). To access additional information about an advertisers products or services, you only need to dial 410-252-9595 from your fax machine, listen to the voice prompts and -PRESTO-you will receive the desired information.
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florida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002




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Need AlA Learning Units?
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We also offer sales, service and support for your software and hardware needs.
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50 interlocking homes will be called Victoria Place. The three-story homes range from 3,000 to 3,500 square feet and feature rooftop decks, elevators, garages and a community pool and cabana. Groundbreaking will take place in early 2002.
In January ground was broken for the new Winter Park Police Department Public Safety Complex. Designed by Architects Design Group, Inc., the facility will house the police department, fire administration and a new fire station. The $9 million, 73,000 square-foot-complex was designed to promote the concept of community policing and it features public meeting facilities, a media room and a state-of-the-art communications center. Preserving the historic characrer ofWinter Park's architecture resulted in the City selecting an Arts and Crafts style.
CBB Architects will design the first two buildings and develop a Master Plan for Future Growth for the 15-acre campus ofthe Hernando Pasco Hospice. The facility, which will be nearly 30,000 square feet, is being designed in eight-bed wings with family dining areas, private conference rooms, quiet rooms and screened porches. Construction is slated to begin in the fall of 2002.
BRPH Companies, Inc. received a Grand Award from the Florida Institute of Consulting EngIneers in the 2002 Engineering Excellence Awards competition. The project that was recognized was JDS Uniphase, a new manufacturing facility that offers an innovative office environment and a flexible manufacturing area. The building's exterior was designed to conserve energy through the use ofcanopies and louvers to shade exterior glass and roof drains providing for water flow into the front entrance pool.
Cooper Johnson Smith Architects, Inc. is the designer of the $2.1 million MiraBay Club in southern Hillsborough County. The clubhouse is part of a $400 million, 750-acre waterfront community being developed by Terrabrook. With construction scheduled to begin this spring, the clubhouse will feature a

fonda / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002


Dorsky Hodgson + Partners cleveland, fort lauderdale, washington d. c.
Sumner on Ridgewood, Akron, Ohio
This new 64.8-acre community is not a retirement community, but a "living" community. It embodies a concept that focuses on building "a human community that creates a pathway to a life worth living" .. a philosophy that is translated into the site planning and the architecture.
There are 339 units scheduled for construction during Phases I and II. Phase I will produce 189 units including the Manor House complex, Assisted-Living Greenhouses, Skilled Nursing Greenhouses, Garden Apartments and Eden Villas. Completion of Phase I is scheduled for late 2002 or early 2003. Total project cost is projected to be $47 million, financed primarily through the sale of tax-exempt municipal bonds.
The Manor House is the historic Tudor-style mansion that was a part of the original urban campus and it now serves as the focal point of social life in the living community. It also set the precedent for the style of the new campus. Designed for the wholistic needs of the residents, the Manor House has a variety of dining options, a wellness center, auditorium, clinic, cyber lounge and meditation chapel. The dining room, for example, is divided into small alcoves to create more intimate dining settings and to reduce the background noise that deters conversation. A large patio overlooking a prominent water feature provides a setting for dining alfresco. To address the needs of the casual diner, there is a "bistro" with a short order menu. The library and cyber lounge offer residents an opportunity to engage in intellectual pursuits or just visit with friends in an area adjacent to their mailboxes.

Green Houses are the small residential structures. The Green House for Skilled Nursing, for example, is for residents who require more extensive care. All bedroom suites are intended to be private living areas and each one has sitting, bedroom and kitchenette areas, as well as a bathroom
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002


Interview / Cornelia C. Hodgson) AM
Cornelia C. Hodgson, AlA, is a Senior Partner and leader of the seniorLiving Studio in Dorsky Hodgson + Partners' Cleveland office. In this capacity, she creates the vision for all architectural projects for the aging and physically-challenged. For 20 years, she has been working to improve the quality oflife for the elderly and disabled through innovative design. As a result of her on-going research and hands-on experience, she is able to assess what specific and aesthetic elements will create an environment that looks and feels like home.
Ms. Hodgson has lectured on the design of housing and health care environments at the Harvard University School of Design and she was a member of the American National Standards Institute Committee that developed specwcations for Providing Accessibility and Usability for Physically Handicapped People (ANSI Al17.1).
During the 1993 Congressional Symposium, Ms. Hodgson testified on design code issues and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), in addition to participating in the White House Conference on Aging. She has also appeared on CNN's Newswatch as an authority on gerontologicallysensitive design.
In 1977, she joined the Dorsky firm and in 1980 she became Director of Facilities fo r the Agi ng. In 1996, she became a parmer. Ms. Hodgson is licensed to practice architecture in 16 States, including Florida, where the firm has an office in Fort Lauderdale. She previously taught architecture at Kent tate University and worked for the U . Department of Housing and Urban Development in Chicago.
T he following i an interview with Cornelia Hodgson conducted in January, 2002.
Q: Does tomorrow's aging
((Boomer)) malket demandfundamentaL changes in design approachesfor senior living envi,onments?
A: Absolutely. The Baby Boom generation's expectations will mean radical, permanent changes. Boomers' experience as consumers, world uavelers and real-time communicators is already making the concept of "retirement communities" obsolete. We need to understand three key u ends.
First, this is the Multiple Choice generation, geared to alternatives. Its members will not respond to onedimensional choices of either "sick or well" -of independent housing or a nursing home. They will demand holistic connections to a deeper concept of well ness. They will expect residential options acro s the full continuum of care. Boomers will, for example, seek independent housing options from apartments, villas and garden homes to cluster housing and from low-rise to high-rise. The range ofsupporting services and amenities wiiJ expand proportionately. Most important, nursing facilities will move completely away from the current institutional medical model.
econd, the next aging generation is design savvy. They invented corporate graphics and slick product de ign. Appreciating and demanding quality design, they are more conscious of the built environment.
Third, Boomers have a strong desire for a sense of community. In seeking th is connection, they will push "retirement communities" which we prefer to call living communities -to incorporate principles of New Urbanism and traditional neighborhood design. These consumers have already found that while technology may have replaced certain social relationships, it's not enough.
Q: How can design teams accommodate the desire for choices and variety while respecting cLients) budget Limitations?
A: Inventive design can provide an array of choices without boosting cost. Functional, operational issues drive the solutions. Raised as the
florida / caribbean ARCHITECf spring 2002


New Florida Building Code Presents Challenges to Architects Unfamiliar with
Wind-Borne Debris Requirements
John W Knezevich, PE.
After several months of delay, the new Florida Building Code finally became the governing code in the tate of Florida effective March 1,2002. With last minute legislative action at the end of the year, the effective date of the Code was postponed from January 1 to March l. The legislation does permit the construction of projects designed in anticipation of the January 1, 2002, if desired.
Almost 10 years in the making, the new Florida Building Code unifie the tandard Building Code and the
outh Florida Building Code into one complete documem. While the new Code does not actually provide for a completely unified buLlding code as originally planned, the multi-volume documem does provide a single source for the state's building regulations. WhLle most of the Code is similar ro those upon which it was modeled, there is one ignificant change that will affect architects statewide. Glazed openings must be resistant ro windborne debris from hurricanes or structures will have to be designed for higher wind pressures.
Architects and engineers who work regularly in sourheast Florida are fam iliar with the provisions fot hurricane damage mitigation in construction. ew design and construction and major rehabilitation of buildings in southeastern co umies will not be significantly affected by the new code. The Florida Building Code provides for High Velocity Hurricane Zones that are designated as Dade and Broward counties. These sections appear at the end of each chapter of the Code and essemially repeat the provisions of the So uth Florida Building Code.
Architects who work in counties on the West Coast or north of Martin County on the East Coast, however, face a whole new challenge when it comes ro designing buildings. Fir t, they will need to master the new code and the effect it will have on the design of glazed openings that now have to meet specific and rigorous guideline for withstanding wind-borne debri
Architects will also have to fam iliarize themselves with the types of building materials and products that are code compliant or risk causi ng serious delays and costly overruns.
ince all glazed materials used in coastal regions of Florida must now be tested for impact resistance or be
hunered, the design of glazed expanses must be considered in tandem with the availability of existing code-compliant glazing or shuner systems.
Architects must design buildings with code-compliant product in mind. Custom glazing schemes must be fabricated, tested and certified which often results in time delays and added COSts. Designs that call for specific code-complaint product must consider compatibility with actual field conditions.
The good news is that the new Florida Building Code will help Florida citizens climb our of the State's insurance nightmare. It is estimated that construction costs will only increase by 30/0 to 50/0 as a direct result of code compliance. However, savings resulting from insurance rebates for protection from potemial hurricane damage will far outweigh these COSts. In the wake of Hurricane Andrew, adoption of the new code is validation for the insurance industry that architects, engineers, comractors and developers can build properties that are resistant ro wind-borne debri from hurricanes. As insurance premiums rise, developers will welcome the discounts that the new hurricanedanlage-resistan t codes deliver.
For architects, especially those who look to glazed openings for their most dramatic design features, the new codes in hurricane-prone regions may be limiting at first. But new product is being designed, tested, certified and distributed evety day. In the end an immediate focus on the new building code and a steady eye on code-compliant glazing options will enable Florida's architects to continue to create ourstanding -and withstanding -design.
John W Knezevich, PE. is Vice President ofLZA Technology in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. LZA specializes in the design, evaluation and implementation ofbuilding products to comply with specified code requirements.
jloritk I caribbean ARCH ITECT
spring 2002




RS&H (Reynolds, Smith and Hills, Inc.) jacksonville) florida

The Advanced Technology Cemer, Daytona Beach Florida

Florida school systems and colleges face many challenges not the least of which is limited funding for new facilities. Architects must ask themselves how they can devise design strategies to deliver exciting and inspiring educational environments within limited budgets. At the same time, these facilities must be well constructed of durable materials and be able to withstand decades of hard use with few maintenance dollars available.
Key design goals and strategies for the new Advanced Technology Cemer (ATC) were ro provide a modern high tech image expressive of the school's purpose and program use durable low-maintenance materials and make maximum use of narurallighr. In addition, systems such as HVAC and data networking were used as learning tools. Rather than hiding programs, they were showcased to provide maximum visibiliry to potential business partners.

The Advanced Technology Center is a 155,000-square-foot technical school project that set out to demonstrate it was possible to meet these goals while delivering an innovative educational program. ot only was the project completed within budget, but at project completion, 750,000 in budget savings was delivered back to the owner. The total cost of the building was $17.75
million or $114.50 per square foor.
The ATC faciliry represems a new approach to work force education. Responding to the need for job creation, as well as the need to develop a trained work force for area businesses, the school makes ample use of partner hips with local businesses.
Each of the key program areas of Information Technology/Computer Graphics, Automotive Technology, HVAC Technology, Building Construction Technology, and Manufacturing Technology, have local business and industry partners that assist with "real world" issues as well as with equipment and training. These partnerships result in creating a highly relative work force.
florida I caribbean ARCHITECf spring 2002




Angela del Toro and Ricardo Miranda san juan, puerto rico
Housing Rehabilitation in the Playa de Ponce ward, Ponce, Puerto Rico
The Housing Rehabilitation Program was created in 1985 to begin rehabilitating the housing in the Arenas-Betances ward in Ponce. With a $1 million budget ftom the Puerto Rico Housing Department, the work progressed to include the Playa de Ponce ward. All of the work that was done, both remodeling and new construction, was coordinated to comply with the architectural, urban design and construction standards established by the Office ofTerritorial Order and the Historic Center for the Autonomous Municipality of Ponce. In addition, the Autonomous Municipality of Ponce, along with the Puerto Rico Housing Department and the Community Infrastructure and Development Program, implemented a Disaster Recuperation Action Plan. This plan was part of a congressional initiative that assigned $4.5 million to the Autonomous Municipality of Ponce for repairs to dwellings and improvements to roads, sidewalks and storm sewers.

Playa de Ponce ward is located south of the capital city of San Juan. Its physical characteristics, including built environment and urban grid, are greatly influenced by the ward's principal materials suppliers and two reference points -the Caribbean Sea and the City ofPonce. Important buildings such as the Customs House, Our Lady of Carmen Church and the Old Chamber of Commerce have an 18th-century Spanish Colonial history. These buildings still have the original wooden floors and roof trusses with clay tile. But, rapid growth in the ward during the 1970s increased the problem of overcrowding and diminished the quality of urban life.
On the shores of the Portugues River, rows of humble wooden houses, with little or no ornamentation, speak to the economic situation of the inhabitants. Within the urban grid, there are a substantial number of modest structures of Creole construction.
Intervention by architects Angela del Toro and Ricardo Miranda sought to restore original materials and architectural detail to buildings in the urban area. The utmost care was given to the conservation and/or reproduction of architectural details such as cornices and moldings. In addition, the architects sought to retain the identity and cohesion of the community by reactivating public spaces, building on empty lots and realigning structures. Urban furniture in the form of signage, bus stops and waste containers, and the restoration of a park and a plaza, added to the success of the project. This rehabilitation program offered the additional benefit of aiding the local economy by creating jobs for small contractors and materials suppliers in the area.
Restored houses and infiLl structures within the urban core of the Playa de Ponce. before (left) and after (right) restorationlconstntction. Photos courtesy ofthe architects.
florida / caribbean ARCH ITECT spring 2002





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Photo, top left: Nomzan M. Giller, c. 1960; Top righr: Carill florida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002


developed a master plan for Sourh Beach, one of the earliest comprehensive urban plans in the US.
Archi tecr Giller considers the twO-tory motels in Sunny Isles a happy medium between the lowend motor courts and the luxury hotels of the day. The concept of a two-story motel took advantage of the lifting of gasoline rations after World War II. The allure of the open road and the need for budget accommodations for America's burgeoning middle class helped to make these motels the most popular type of lodging in Florida.
The Ocean Palm Motel on Collins Avenue was a cutting edge design. It was dubbed a "motel" and each of its rooms had a kitchenette and an exhaust fan as a pre-AC cooling system. Because the rooms were built back-to-back, Giller created a catwalk balcony that served as an outdoor hallway.
"This is how a design develops," Giller explains. "You give a building a nice shape using basic design theories. If a building is so high and so long, it must be pleasing to the eye. Then there are the materials. In the case of this motel (the Ocean Palm), we used stone, stucco and especially, concrete which can be molded into anything. The building is like a sculpture. It can take any shape. You design it any way you want."
The Ocean Palm eventually became the prototype for motels all over the country. Developers jumped on the bandwagon and began building two-story motels that incorporated the latest technology, including jalousie windows, continuous concrete shades over windows and air-conditioning.
At the other end of the spectrum, Giller's Carillon Hotel of 1957 was one of Nonh Beach's first high-rise hotels. At 150 feet, the structure reached the maximum height allowed at the time. The building also utilized Rat slab concrete construction that allowed for an additional floor without violating the height restriction. With four facades complete with his trademark folded vertical concrete elements, the Carillon was designed to be

appreciated from every direction, including the ocean.
Recently, Norm Giller was honored with a tribute that brought together notables Peter Slat in, editor of the New Yorkbased architecture magazine Grid, Miami Herald Architecture Critic Beth Dunlop, Miami Beach Mayor Neisen Kasdin and Leonard Wein, chair of Miami Beach's Urban Arts Committee. According to Wein, "The relationship between New York City and Miami is a close one. The archi tectural "cross-pollination" between the two cities occurred naturally as New York developers wintered in Miami and then transferred the design ideas they saw to Big Apple." Wein went on to say that, "MIMo should be the next thing to be discovered. The architecture of this region is set in a rich context and should not just be branded Art Deco."
A photography exhibit, sponsored by the Urban Arts Committee, entitled "New York! Miami Modern Architecture" wiJl be on display at the Municipal Arts Society in New York City March 13 -May 10, 2002.
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002



PHONE-BASED SYSTEMS
Phone-based emergency-call systems take emergency communication to a higher level. In contrast to pull-cord systems, telephone systems don't require additional wiring and can be installed as easily as plugging in a phone. What's more, money is saved by co mbining an emergency call system and a phone in one unir. If an older pull-cord system already exists, JUSt leave it in the walL The wires don't have to be removed. Phone-based systems are both less expensive and easier to maintain than pull-cord systems because they use standard phone wiring that is already regularly maintained.
There are many different types of phone-based systems on the marker. For some, residents must knock receivers off of the phone base in order to summon help. Functionally similar to pull-cord systems, residents can only communicate with staff if they are near a phone.
In recent years, a few companies have taken telephone-based systems one step further and created complete emergency call ystems that overcome the fixed location pull-cord problem and provide residents with a range of enhanced services. In addition to receiving a phone with full features that doubles as an emergency call device, residents also wear an emergency call button at all times. This button is styled to resemble a necklace or wristwatch. For apptoximately $550 per apartment (no installation required), residents have increased mobility and never worry about being toO far from a phone to summon help. This rranslares to financial benefirs for the facility, quicker response time, decreased liability (since response time is faster), fewer hospiralizarions andlor faster recovery from accidents or medical problems.
Increasingly, assisted living facility residents seek a warm, homelike environment; similar to rhe one they have left behind. With the rise of rerirement communiries linked to on-site nursing homes, tech-savvy residents in rheir sixties want comfort combined wirh the latesr conveniences. Portable call buttons are also ideal for a group of acrive seniors who want the added protection of on-call emergency services when exercising or swimming alone or living with a chronic health condition.
Personalized phone features that are available thtough some telephone systems may be attractive. Built-in voice features allow visually impaired re idents easy access to phones. With the same voice capability, residents (or their relatives) can program reminders into their phones for a personal touch ("take medicine at
3:00 P.M.," "Granddaughter's birthday party on Saturday afternoon"). A new feature will even CUt off a resident's computer modem at the first touch of her emergency button. All of these enhancements encourage seniors to stay mobile and active and can be used as marketing tools to make a facility "top-of-theline."
So, research emergency systems before you design your next assisted living facility. Knowing the latest offerings could make the difference between sealing a deal and being left behind.
Donald A. Arthurs is Lifeline Systems'Director ofMarketingfor Senior Living Systems in Framingham, Mass. www.lifelinesys.com
florida I caribbean ARCHITECT spring 2002


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