Group Title: Florida Caribbean architect
Title: FloridaCaribbean architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004635/00018
 Material Information
Title: FloridaCaribbean architect
Alternate Title: Florida Caribbean architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Publisher: Dawson Publications,
Dawson Publications
Place of Publication: Timonium Md
Publication Date: Winter 2001
Copyright Date: 1997
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 44, no. 1 (spring 1997)-
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Issues have also theme titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004635
Volume ID: VID00018
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA5904
ltuf - ACJ1464
oclc - 36846561
lccn - sn 97052000
 Related Items
Preceded by: Florida architect

Full Text



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Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects 104 East Jefferson Street Tallahassee, Florida 32301 www.aiafla.org
2001 FAI AlA 0 FFI CERS President Miguel "Mike" A. Rodriguez, AlA Presiden t -elect Enrique Wood roffe, FAlA Secretary/lrreasurer Blinn Van Mater, AlA Vice President/Communications Mark H. Smith, AlA Vice President/Professional Development Vivian O. Salaga, AlA Vice President/Legislative & Regulatory Affairs Mickey Jacob, AlA Regional Director Larry M. Schneider, AlA Regional Director Jerome Filer, FAlA Immediate Past President
S. Keith Bailey, AlA Executive Vice President
R. Scon Shalley, CAE
Publisher Denise Dawson Dawson Publications, Inc. 2236 Greenspring Drive lrimoni um Maryland 21093 410.560.5600 800.322.3448 Fax: 410.560.5601 Editor Diane D. Greer Sales Manager Dave Patrick Sales Representatives Drew Fraser, lrhomas Happel, Joyce Fink Graphic Design Mike Horgan Printing Boyd Brothers Printing
Florida Caribbean Architect, Official Journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, is owned by rhe Association, a Florida corporation, not for profit. ISSN-OOI 5-3907. It is published four times a year and distributed through the office of the Associarion, 104 E. Jefferson Street, lrallahassee, Florida 32301. lrelephone 850.222.7590.
Opinions expressed by contriburors are not necessarily those of AlA Florida. Edirorial material may be reprinted only with the express permission of Florida Caribbean Architect. Single copies, $6.00; Annual subscription $20.00
florida / caribbean ARCHllrEClr wimer 2001
Editorial / diane d. greer
As a writer and editor, I feel compelled, along every other journalist in the world, to share so me profound thoughts about the events of September 11. As a former teacher of architectural history, I feel compelled to speculate about the future of tall buildings and how recent events may have cast them in a less than positive light. Well, no profound thoughts are forthcoming despite the fact that I have thought about little else in the weeks since I stared in disbelief at the crumbling World Trade Centers. I felt then, and I feel now, only horror, shock and sadness. I was in New York City a mere two weeks before the tragedy visiting my son and daughter-in-law. As always, I walked the streets, mostly looking up, and felt the exhilaration I always feel from the majesty of NYC's tOwering skyline. On this trip, I walked across the Brooklyn Bridge to a little park on the other side of the river and saw yet another thrilling view of NYc. It was dusk and the city was all lit up and looking fine.
I am still wondering how such terrible things can happen to good people, to good buildings, and to good cities. Much as people surely felt after World War II when they saw the ruined cities of Europe, I look at that gaping smoking hole on the south end of Manhattan and wonder what will rise in its place. I have already heard that parts ofAlexander Calder's sculpture have been recovered from the ashes and that it will be put back in place like a symbolic "phoenix rising from the ashes." There has been a lot of discussion about erecting a monument on the site to those who lost their lives. Others say rebuild the towers and still others question the wisdom in doing so. My response is naively obvious. In Manhattan, there is nowhere to go but up. Land is at a premium. When the twin tOwers came down, thousands of workers were displaced. Those buildings need to be rebuilt for commercial and financial reasons, but also for symbolic reasons. We cannot allow good architecture to become a victim of terrorism.
In a recent article in the New York Times, Anthony Vidler, Acting Dean of the Cooper Union School ofArchitecture wrote about "Designing Defensible Space." In response to the events of September 11, Vidler writes, "There will be an understandable impulse to flee (the city)." His commentary goes on to suggest that the '''new urbanism' movement, with its low-density developments designed to replicate smal l town life in premodern America, will no doubt take the opportunity to denounce tall buildings as inherently mistaken. But, he writes, "terrorism alone will not decrease the importance of city centers for the public life of societies." I agree. This is a co untry of great builders and great buildings. As long as we design and build responsibly, we must continue to do so. Leaving a huge void in lower Manhattan will serve no one.
My great hope is that by the time you read this, we will all be safe. The war will be over with its mission accomplished and there will be cause for celebration during the holidays. I pray that we will have struck a blow to terrorism and those who practice it and that the world will be a safe place for good people, good buildings and good cities to thrive.



President's Message / Miguel {(Mike" A. Rodriguez) AlA

It's hard to believe that the year is over. It's amazing how much has happened in such a short time -some good, some bad, and some unexpected. As the year began, we focused our goals on improving the profession, our businesses, and our cities. And we were successful. Our legislative agenda was accomplished and the annual convention was well attended despite the fact that this was not a license renewal year and the CE crowd is thinner. T hen on September 11 the world changed and since then our conversations have been about new topics including what will happen to our firms as a result of the changing econom y. But, despite the changes we are all experiencing, a lor is still the same and OUt knowledge, skills, and experience are more important to society than ever before.
From the beginning, my goal has been to inspire leadership among architects and encourage them to get involved in their local co mmunities and show by action, rather than words, that our profession does make a difference. laud the work of architects like Felicia Salazar, AIA, Miami, who worked to incorporate her neighborhood into the City of Miami Lakes. She has served on virtually every committee and task force involved in the formation of the City since it was incorporated. Ana Rabelo Wallrapp, AIA,Tampa, is an architect whose selfless work on behalf of the youth of her community includes volunteer work at local schools and children's hospitals as well as fundraising for the local art museum and zoo. Tom Hammer, AIA, Tampa, has provided ARE exam preparation courses for years and mentored countless young architects. Bob Broward, AIA Emeritus, has written several books and is regarded as Jacksonville's "architectural conscience." Melody Bishop, AIA, Jacksonville, the Rev. Hap Lewis, AIA, West Palm Beach, and Victor Latavish, AIA, Naples, are all working every day to make a difference and by doing so, are enriching our profession, our communities, and our lives.
After December 31, 2001, I will no longer serve as your President, but that is the only thing that will change. My commitment to continue the work of the Institute remains as strong as ever and I plan to be around for a long time. Next year, the Association will be in the excellent care of Enrique Woodroffe, FAIA, who will step in as the 2002 President. Bill Bishop will follow in 2003. cannot remember a time when we have been in better shape and it's a good thing because the work of the next few years is already man ifesting itself and we will be very, very busy.
Before closing, there is one other person I must thank. My wife and I have been married for over 20 years and during that time she has provided constant support and counsel. Without her help, my work with the Association might not have been possible. She has rearranged her own schedule to accommodate mine and she has "made do" without me while I "gallivanted" around the state working on behalf of the AIA. Although she claims that getting "rid" of me has been the greatest benefit of my participation in the AIA, I know it has not been easy for her. So, I add Lourdes Rodriguez, AIA, to the list of "regular" members in recognition of having put up with me for 20 years and for being such a large part of who I am.
Thank you and I'll see you in January.
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News

Preservation on the Move

Casa Feliz, a 1933 Spanish farmhouse designed by architect James Gamble Rogers II, FAIA, has found a new home. After a painstakingly slow rwo-week move, a crowd gathered in Winter Park on September 8, 2001, to applaud the arrival of the 750-ton brick building. Its new site is on Park Avenue adjacent to the ninth tee of the Winter Park golf course.
There is still a lot of work to be done before this project is complete. All of the funding for moving and restoring the house is being raised through private donations. About $350,000 more is needed for a new foundation and to prepare the building for use as a historical house museum.
A limited edition of 1,000 bricks is being sold for $ 50 each. These 115year old handmade foundation bricks originally came from the downtown Orlando Armory and Market House, which was razed in 1930. In 1933, Robert Bruce Barbour purchased the bricks to use in the construction of Casa Feliz. For information about the purchase of any Casa Felix commemorative items or to make a donation, contact Betty Spangler at 407/647-1039, or bye-mail at ems@rlfae.com.
Casa Feliz, the 1933 Winter Park residence designed by James Gamble Rogers, FAlA, was recently moved to a new site. Funds are currentl]1being raised to restore the historic home.
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT winter 2001


Continuing Education Reports Available
Catalogs and copies of research reports and reports of continuing education projects that were produced by the Building Construction Industry Advisory Committee (BCIAC) are now available. You can obtain copies by contacting Michael Ashworth at the Florida Department of Community Affairs, either in writing at 2555 Shumard Oak Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32399-2100, email at Michael.ashworth@dca.state.fl.us or by telephone at 850/922-6075.

Charles D. Grant, AlA, Dies at Age 61
Charles D. "Chick" Grant, AIA, died on June 9, 2001 atthe age of61. He was a 1963 graduate of Clemson University's School of Architecture and a principal in the firm ofNichols Carter Grant Architects in Atlanta,
Georgia. At the time ofhis death, Mr. Grant was the vice president ofdevelopment for the West Florida operations of Arvida in Seagrove Beach, Florida. Prior to joining Arvida, he was vice president of development at Sandestin Resort in Destin, Florida. Chick Grant was a long time member of AlA Florida and a caring mentor to many.




Work-in-Progress

C. T. Hsu + Associates, PA, Orlan do, has completed the design phase of the Boone High School Comprehensive Needs Project for Ora nge County Public Sch ools. The $28 mil lion expansion and ren ovation project involves the reorganization of the Boone High School campus by relocating parking, bus and parent drop-off and replacing portables with
The cott Parmership, inc., Orlando, designed improvements for the Cit)l ofSanford's historic
pe rmanent buildings.
Sanford Memorial Stadium. Included are a 6, OOO-square foo t addition and a 6, OOO-square foot renovation as well as a makeover ofthe entire faciliry.



The state-of the-art headqu.arters ofThe Scott Parmership Architectttre, inc. and Yesawich, Pepperdine &Brown in Orlando. The 40, OOO-square foot custom office buildingfiatttres a glass-enclosed entry and lobby, 26joot arched mISS ceilings and a large outdoor courtyard. Photo b)1 Peter Burg/Burg Photographix.
John Clees, RLA, ASLA a Landscape Architect with Harvard Jolly Clees Toppe Architects, won first place in a design competition to replace the fo untain in the "roundabout" traffic circle at the entrance to Clearwater Beach. Clees' design was clever in its simplicity. He designed a grove ofMedjool date palms set in a grid with repeating parallel berms, suggesting the waves in the Gulf of Mexico. The design leaves a IS-foot-wide circle of open





visibility around the palms, allowing drivers to see all views around the traffic circle. It will be illuminated at night with up-lights installed in the ground cover beds.
Schwab Twitty & Hanser Architectural Group, Inc. (5TH) was commissioned to design the Education and Training Center for Workforce Development at Palm Beach Community College. This new education and training facility is a response to the community's need for qualified individuals in the workplace. Valued at $28 million, the 150,000-square-foot complex will be built in two phases. The design ofthe facility integrates elements from existing campus structures. Internally, the design of the multifunctional complex must address numerous training needs, including plumbing, electrical, welding, automotive and medical, as well as computer-related functions. Large computer labs will have computer-networking capabilities, including overhead video processing, supported by state-ofthe-art cable infrastructure.
HHCP Architects in Tampa is designing a "Tuscan" look for University Village's community center, The Commons. New design features will extend to both interior and exterior areas of the 38,000-foot building, including dining, activity and recreational center. Interior treatments are also planned for the lobby, lounge areas, library and auditorium,
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT wi mer 200 1
as well as administrative, employee and marketing areas of the building.
VOA Associates Incorporated will provide architectural and engineering design services for the new Learning Resource Center (LRC) and Library at Santa Fe Community College in Gainesville. Completion ofthe 60,000-square-foot, $7.6 million project is scheduled for early 2002.
CBB Architects is putting the final touches on the new Tampa YMCA. Heavily-wooded areas frame the building which has a 50meter pool situated in front of it. T he architect limited the numbet of walls and included glass wherever possible to open up views into the gymnasium, climbing wall and workout areas. The gymnasium IS unique in that it sinks about 16 inches into the floor, enabling spectators to sit along the perimeter to watch action on the court. Using circulation areas for observation saved the cost of bleachers and their storage.

Gordon & Associates, Architects, Mount Dora, provided comprehensive architectural design services for two new health care facilities in Vero Beach. The firm which has been committed exclusively to the private medical community since 1977, recently designed the 5,400 square-foot Medical Specialties Procedures and the 8,200-square-foot Aesthetic Surgery Cen ter.
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Dale S. Parks, AlA sarasota, florida, with CC+ P Architects
G. Wiz/Blivas Science and Technology Center, Sarasota, Florida
The challenge faced by des ign architect Dale Parks was to reinforce an existing aesthetic while breathing new life into a building long associated with being a library. The G. Wiz/Blivas Science and Technology Center is housed in a 32,000-square-foot building designed by Walter Netsch in Skidmore, Owings and Merrill's (SOM) Chicago office. Netsch had originally designed the building in 1975 for use as the Sarasota County Library. Utilizing his Field Theory parti, Netsch oriented the structure on a 30' by 30' structural grid thilt was overlaid by a corresponding 45-degree grid system. The resultant plan generated a series of triangulated spaces that in turn were extruded vertically to create the wedge volumes evident on the exterior of the building.
With a long term lease, cooperation from the City of Sarasota and generous contributions from donors, the design of a new science and technology center was undertaken. T he scope of work included the demolition and redesign of the existing interior spaces to accommodate the program established by the client and the architect.

Phoro, rop: Waterfront view ofG. Wiz Center. Above: Postcard, c. 1915. showing the libraryl as it looked flt the time ofits construction. Postcard courtesy ofDale Parks. Facing page: Formal entry to the Center showing glass prism. All photos by Dickinson Studio.
Recognizing the need for incorporating exhibits as an integral parr of the design process, industrial designers created the exhibits and graphics. In cooperation with CC+P Architects in Sarasota, Design Architect Dale Parks, AIA, sought to give the building a new iconography. Acknowledging the uniqueness of the original parti, he accentuated the building's geometry by introducing a crystalline design element that would reinforce the original aesthetic. By peeling back the existing roof along the grid lines and enclosing some exterior spaces, the new glass prism follows the grids established by the original architect. This long triangulated space serves as the gallery for traveling exhibits and the arrival/ transitional point between the exhibit space and the classroom/ administrative areas. Within this space, the architect designed a staircase and bridge structure to elevate patrons into the glass prism as they move to the second floor
florida / caribberzn ARCHITECT wimer 2001



exhibit space.
T he overall plan utilizes the former two-story book stack areas as the primary exhibit space and gift shop while the single-story east end houses the administration, classrooms, and support spaces. In addition to the large glass structure evident on the exterior of the building, Parks replaced the existing cement tile roofs with a standing seam roof system that plays off the triangulated vaults and bold profiles. He also added an exterior terrace for social events on the north side of the central lobby space and introduced color to set off the dynamic volumetric geometries that previously displayed a monochromatic paint scheme.
Clockwise from tOP left:
Interior o/exhibit space; space imide the gLass prism; floorpLan courtesy 0/the architect; interior exhibit space. ALL photos by Dickinson Studio.
The new G. Wiz Center provides a striking profile along the Sarasota waterfront and it provokes curiosiry in everyone who sees it for the first time. The building is very respectful of the original architect's design and it provides a dynamic addition to the ciry's cultural center.
Project Credits: Dale S. Parks, AIA, Design Architect with Associate Architect CC+P Architects; Jenkins and Charland Structural Engineers Stewart Engineering, MEP; Design/Joe Sonderman, Industrial Design; Mero Structures, glass prism engineering and fabrication; Kellogg and Kinsey, General Contractors
florido / caribbean ARCHITECT winter 2001




standardized series of laborato ry configurations as a way of customizing the labs for individual user needs.
The research laboratories require limited and controlled public access so public areas are concentrated on the first floor. A series of card access elevators and doors help insure the necessary securi ry in research areas. For ease of access,

florida / caribbean ARCHITECT winter 200 1


John Howey and Associates tampa, flo rida
Tower 101, Tampa, Florida
This design for a 50-story tower preserves the existing sidewalk character of the city block. The plan retains the 100year-old historic low rise brick buildings that currently edge the sidewalk while a new entrance arcade connects to the tower inside the brick buildings. In contrast to the nearly monoculture high rises nearby, this project will be multi-use, including communications, apartments, offices hotel and retail.
The building concept is a steel-trussed tube where the outer wall face is framed with diagonal structural members placed

"
at regular intervals. At the four corners, vertical tensile cables stretch from the foundation to the top and are periodically fixed to the building frame and floor.
The base diagonal wall members are 2.5 to 3-foot-square steel rubes filled with reinforced concrete for additional strength and fireproofing. With this system, each floor becomes column free between the elevator! stair core and the perimeter walls.
Exterior walls consist of insulated glass windows and spandrels made up of translucent solar panels. The energy generated here is transmitted to the mechanical floors where it is coupled with natural gas turbines to produce air -conditioning, heat and electricity. Hot water is a byproduct. It is estimated that this system will produce about 92 percent of the building's energy reqUirement.
Finally, the building components, including the frame and cable system, become a communications tower for wireless satellite transmissIOns.

Len: View ftom east. Right: Aerial view ftom southeast. Models courtesy ofthe architect.
florida I caribbean ARCHITECT winter 2001



Silberstein Architects, delray beach, florida
Foght Residence, Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles
The island of Bonaire in the Netherlands Antilles is located 38 miles north of Venezuela. After spending ten winters on the island, the owners of this house bought property on which to build a permanent winter home. Bounded on three sides by residential lots and a two-lane road, the house faces west toward the ocean.
With 3,000 square feet of floor space, the two-story house has three bedrooms and two bathrooms on the first floor along with family room, storage and kitchen and a large master suite and library on the second floor. The plan resulted from a clear program and specific site conditions. For reasons of noise, privacy and security, the front of the house has two wings, garage and guestrooms connected by a privacy wall that creates a barrier between the house and the public road. The house can be entered through an ornamental doorway leading into the courtyard or through the garage. The courtyard is enclosed by the guest wing on the north, the living toom on the west and the garage on the south. A stairway leads from the courtyard to the master bedroom suite on the second floor. This sui te is directly above the living room and fronted by a terrace on the west that overlooks the court-





Legal Notes: Architect/Engineer Exposure on the Rise
]. Michael Huey and Michael D. West
For many years in Florida, architects and engineers generally could not be sued by anyone other than their clienrs for economic losses allegedly caused by the errors or omissions of the architect. Third parties such as contractors, subcontractors, lenders and others who claimed such economic losses could not sue architects who allegedly caused their loss because they lacked a conrractual relationship with the architect. The sole exception to this rule, known as the "economic loss rule," was when an architect had independent job-site authority over a contractor and caused the conrractor to incur financial losses due to the architect's negligence.
In 1999, the law protecting architects and other design professionals against suits from third parties eroded as a result of the Florida Supreme Court'S decision in Moransais v. H eathman. In that case, the Court ruled that an individual engineer could be held liable to a homeowner for economic losses resulting from a negligenr home inspection by the engineer, norwithstanding the lack of a written agreemenr berween them. The homeowner's contract was with the engineering firm, rather than the individual engineer. The Court pronounced that "professionals" could be sued by "aggrieved parties" despite the lack of a conrract with the professional. Because the Supreme Court used the term "aggrieved party," it was only a matter of time before plainriffs' lawyers began stretching the limits of liability to third parries with whom professionals -lawyers, accounranrs and others -had no direct contractual relationship.

In November 2000, the economic loss rule was further eroded in the case of Hewett-Kier Construction, Inc. v. LemueL Ramos and Associates, Inc. There, a general contractor fued suit alleging that it suffered economic losses from defects, omissions, and lack of specificity in the design documenrs prepared by an architect who designed the building for a school board. The trial court dismissed the conrractor's complainr, finding that there was no conrractual or special relationship berween the contractor and the architect. It also found that the architect was not a supervisory architect under its conrract with the owner.
The conrractor appealed and the District Court ofAppeal, relying on the Moramais opinion, reversed the dismissal and reinstituted the contractor's suit against the architect. However, this Court went one step further, stating that the economic loss rule does not prevent a suit for economic losses where a "special relationship" exists berween the professional and a third party who is "affected" by the professional's negligence. The Court found that the contractor's complaint alleged that the architect prepared erroneous design documenrs, with the knowledge that the owner would supply them to the successful bidder, and that the successful bidder would suffer economic damages if the design documenrs were inadequate. T he Court concluded the allegations were sufficienr to establish a "special relationship" berween this architect and contractor.
The ramifications of H ewettKier are truly significanr for architects, engineers and others. In order to establish a special relationship sufficienr to sue the architect, it appears a contractor or other third party now need only allege that the architect prepared negligenr design documents knowing the contractor or other third party would receive them and be financially injured if the plans were inadequate. Since almost all design projects involve preparation of plans with knowledge that the owner will supply them to a contractor and other parties, architects will have potenrial liability to such parties for errors or omissions in such plans. Indeed, we have already seen a significanr rise in the number of claims filed

florida / caribbean ARCHITECT winter 200 ]



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ICYNENE (75-25) .......................... .................... IBC

Insurance
AIA Trust (75-38) .... ............................... ............... 30 Collinsworth Alter Nielson Fowler & Dowling Inc. (75-17) ............................................................ 31 Suncoast Insurance Associates, Inc. (75-32) .............................................................. 6
Millwork
Federal Millwork (75 -21) ......................... .............. 34

Mobile Offices
Williams Scotsman, Inc. (75-34) ............................ 33

Modular Buildings
Williams Scotsman, Inc. (75-34) ............................ 33

Moulding
Federal Millwork (75 -2l) ....................... ................ 34





Combat heat/cool loss in the buildings you design
with The Icynene Insulation System

J
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Win the air wars in the buildings you design. Walls. ceilings. floors. and
basements insulated with Icynene-an environmentally friendly.
spray or pour-in-place foam-form an impenetrable defense system.
ensuring a healthier, quieter. more energy efficient structure.

The Icynene Insulation System"

Healthier, Quieter, More Energy Efficient


Index To Advertisers -by Category

Architectural Beams
Universal Timber (75-36) .... .................................. 32

Architectural Coatings
Duron Paints & Wallcoverings (75-20) .... ............ .... 8

Architectural Foam Products
Foam Concepts Inc. (75-23) .................................. 36

Architectural Products
Florida Wood Council (75-22) ....... ......................... 4

Architectural Rendering
Genesis Studios Inc. (75 -39) ..... ............................. 40

AutoCAD Software
CADD Centers of Florida (75-14) ......................... 31
Digital Drafting Systems (75-19) ....................... .... 39

CADD
Digital Drafting Systems (75-19) ........................... 39

CADD Services
CADD Centers of Florida (75-14) ................. ........ 31
Digital Drafting Systems (75 -19) ........................... 39

Carpet
Carpet & Rug Institute (75-16) ....... .......... ............ 27

Construction Manager
Pavarini Construction (75-29) .......... ....... .............. 27

Consulting -All Window & Door Needs
Architectural Windows & Cabinets
(75-12) .... ....................... ...................... 12-13,39
Forest Products (75-12) .............................. 12-13,39
HBS Inc. (75-12) ........................................ 12-13,39
Nor-Dec International, Inc. (75-12) ........... 12-13,39
Palm City Millwork (75-12) ............. .......... 12-13,39
S & P Architectural Products (75 -12) ......... 12-13,39
S & S Craftsmen, Inc. (75-12) .................... 12-13, 39
Smyth Lumber (75-12) ............................... 12-13, 39
Weather Shield (75 -12) ........ ....................... 12-13,39

ConsultinglW'mdows
Architectural W indows & Cabinets (75-12) ........ ............................. .... 12-13, 39 Forest Products (75 -12) ....... ......... 12-13 39 HBS Inc. (75-12) ............... ........... 12-13,39 Nor-Dec International, Inc. (75-12) .......................... ........ 12-1 3,39 Palm City Millwork (75-12) ......... 12-13, 39 S & P Architectural Products (75-12) ........ ...... .................... 12-13,39 S & S Craftsmen, Inc. (75-12) ...... 12-1 3,39 Smyth Lumber (75-12) ................. 12-1 3,39 Weather Shield (75-12) ................. 12-1 3,39
Continuing Education
McCathren Associates, Inc. (75-26) ....................................... .... IFC
Curved Wall Design
Around Florida Distributors Inc. (75-13) ............................. ................ 32
Custom Wood Flooring
Custom Wholesale Floors (75-37) ........... 36

florida / caribbean ARCHITECf winter 2001




P
CONTINUING EDUCATION
TIRED OF THE SAME OLD SEMINAR? WE THOUGHT SO.

Introducing CE@SEA Complete 12 Continuing Education Credits aboard Voyager ofthe Seas where you'll not only experience the largest and most innovative cruise ship ever built but engage in adetailed study ofthis ultimate design challenge and most innovative multi-use facility in the world.

Rock-Climbing, Ice Skating, Full-Court Basketball and 4-Story Mall. Enjoy unparalleled excitement on the ultimate design challenge: A$900 million, 2 year project designed by 34 separate Architectural Firms.


12 hours HSW Continuing Education Credits using the most advanced, self-contained, floating city as the lab.


Detailed study of the most innovative multi-use facility in the world includes behind the scenes inspections of key facility functions and processes, led by key members of the design team and members of the Owner's project team.


Design team members present daily seminars covering design and engineering challenges, response to design issues such as fire protection and egress, logistics, and operation and maintenance.


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J~I~114JJi~~~llli~
Bring the entire family, it's the best vacation value. BOOK NOW FOR THE NEXT AVAILABLE CRUISE The seminar format allows you to participate in all cruising activities. You
February 24, 2002
(and your family and/or travel companion) can experience the rich variety

of entertainment and recreation available onboard as well as participate in
various shore activities and sample the rich Caribbean colonial architec
7 Night Western Caribbean ture and food.
Miami Labadee Ocho Rios


Grand Cayman Cozumel Miami
The Ultimate Design Challenge Seminar provides you with an in-depth behind the scenes study of the world's largest cruise ship while also earning you 12 CE credits in a vacation setting.
To find out more about The Ultimate Design Challenge Cruise Seminar, log on to www. CE4ME .org
.Cf ~ ~f DKfr
1-877-5-CRUISE
Check out our on-line course offering too!

if-Prices are per person, double occupancy, cruise only and are in US tUillarr. This promotWn ma;y be withdrlmm at any time withllUt notice. GwernmentaJ departure taxes & Jees are additional. Certain restrictions appo/. 2001 Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. Ships ofNorwegian & Liberian registry. SL01-120967 06/2001





Are You Ready For
The CODling StorDll

-I~ I-" ', '
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200 i PGT industrie
EFFORTLESS HURRICANE PROTECTION
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IMPACT-RESISTANT WINDOWS & DOORS
Visibly Better. TM


Hurricane Products

Skylights Flood Barriers


Glass Walls French Doors


VISIT US AT
www.hurricaneproducts.com or call us at 561-640-0850

Sto EIFS Products
Customer Architectural Foam Shapes
Plastic Components PVC Accessories
Windlock EIFS Tools & Accessories

1221 NE 9TH AVENUE, FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA 33304 TEL: (954) 5226565 FAX: (954) 5226967 EMAIL: FOAMIDEAS@maiLcom WEB ADDRESS: WNW.FOAM.CC TOLL FREE: (888) 680FOAM (3626)

The Alternative Hardwood Flooring
Our beautiful wood species are selectively harvested from the bamboo forests of Southern China, the western regions of Africa, the tropical areas of Northern Brazil, and the Northern Appalachian Mountains of our homeland.
Visit us on the web : www.forestaccents.com or call us directly at 1-866-4-ACCENTS
** WE EXPORT ** FULL SERVICE ** TRY US!! **

Forest Accents
6950 Phillips Highway I #37
Jacksonville, FL 32216




Index To Advertisers -by Category Cont'd
Outdoor Water Products Most Dependable Fountains (75-27) ..................... 32 Paints Interior & Exterior Duron Paints & Wallcoverings (75-20) .................... 8 Pre-Contractor Service
Pavarini Construction (75-29) ............................... 27 Professional Liability Collinsworth Alter Nielson Fowler & Dowling Inc.
(75-17) ............................................................ 31 Suncoast Insurance Associates, Inc.
(75-32) .............................................................. 6 Project Management O'Donnell Naccarato & Mignogna Inc.
(75-28) ............................................................ 37 Protective Glazing Viracon (75-33) ..................................................... 33 Recreation McCathren Associates, Inc. (75-26) ..................... IFC Rugs Carpet & Rug Institute (75-16) ............................. 27 Screens -Hurricane Savannah Trims (75-35) ......................................... 36 Sectionals Williams Scotsman, Inc. (75-34) ............................ 33 Showers Most Dependable Fountains (75-27) ..................... 32 Staffing Services Archi Pro Staff Agency Inc. (75-11) ....................... 27 Structural Consulting Universal Timber (75-36) ...................................... 32 Structural Engineering O'Donnell Naccarato & Mignogna Inc.
(75-28) ............................................. ............... 37 Structural Products Florida Wood Council (75-22) ................................ 4
floriM / caribbean ARCHITECT winter 200]



Index To Advertisers -by Category Cont'd

Stucco & Plastering
Foam Concepts Inc. (75-23) ............................... ... 36

Temporary Agency
Archi Pro Staff Agency Inc. (75-11) ................... .... 27

Vacation/Cruise
McCathren Associates, Inc. (75-26) ..... ................ IFC

Windows
Pella Windows (75-30) .................. .......................... 2
PGT Industries (75-31) ......... ............................ a BC
Viracon (75-33) ...... ............................... ................ 33

Windows & Doors
Architectural Windows & Cabinets (75-12) ..... ............ .... ............................ 12-13, 39 Caradco (75-15) ............. ......................................... 1

Forest Products (75-12) .............................. 12-13,39
HBS Inc. (75-12) .................... .... ............. ... 12-13,39
Nor-Dec International, Inc. (75-12) ........... 12-13,39
Palm City Millwork (75-12) ....................... 12-13,39
S & P Architectural Products (75-12) ......... 12-13,39
S & S Craftsmen, Inc. (75-12) .... ................ 12-13,39
Smyth Lumber (75-12) ............................... 12-13,39
Weather Shield (75-12) ............................... 12-13,39

Wood

Florida Wood Council (75-22) ................................ 4

Wood -Fire Retardent Treated
Arch Wood Protection (75-10) ............ .................. 32

Wood Flooring
Custom Wholesale Floors (75-37) ....... ................... 36

WOUffil1 cDJ S)?0l] ~l1ffiOOcDJ a [gffiBoo
[IDS)? fficDJ\yffimtB~Boo[g Boo l1[ffiffi tM~crOcrBcDJffi (Cffi[JB[ID[Q)ceffiOD mcc;[ffiBl1cwlc ~ffi[gffiZZBODffi~
Call Dawson Publications, Inc. 800-322-3448 ext. 125


O'DONNELL NACCARATO & MIGNOGNA, INC.
STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS, SPECIAL INSPECTORS, CONSTRUCTION MANAGERS
OVER 40 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY
SPECIALIZING IN THE DESIGN OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR PROJECTS

321 15TH STREET WILLIAM C. MIGNOGNA, P.E. SUITE 200 PRESIDENT WEST PALM BEACH, FL 33401 (561) 835-9994 FAX: (561) 835-8255

florida / caribbean ARCHITECT winter 2001






Index To Advertisers -Alpha by Company

AIA Trust (75-38) ... ......................................................... 30
Arch Wood Protection (75-10) ........................................ 32
Archi Pro Staff Agency Inc. (75-11) ................................. 27
Architectural Windows & Cabinets (75-12) ......... 12-13,39
Around Florida Distributors Inc. (75-13) ......................... 32
CADD Centers ofFlorida (75-14) ................................... 31
Caradco (75-15) ................................................................ 1
Carpet & Rug Institute (75-16) ....................................... 27
Collinsworth Alter Nielson Fowler & Dowling Inc.

(75-17) ..................................................................... 31
Creative Contractors (75-18) ........................................... 35
Custom Wholesale Floors (75-37) ................................... 36
Digital Drafting Systems (75-19) ..................................... 39
Duron Paints & Wallcoverings (75-20) .............................. 8
Federal Millwork (75-21) ................................................. 34
Florida Wood Council (75-22) .......................................... 4
Foam Concepts Inc. (75-23) ............................................ 36
Forest Products (75-12) ....................................... 12-13,39
Genesis Studios, Inc. (75-39) ........................................... 40
Glass Masonry Inc. (75-24) ............................................. 33

HBS Inc. (75-12) ................................................. 12-13,39
ICYNENE (75-25) ....................................................... IBC
McCathren Associates, Inc. (75-26) .............................. IFC
Most Dependable Fountains (75-27) ............................... 32
Nor-Dec International, Inc. (75-12) .................... 12-13,39
O'Donnell Naccarato & Mignogna Inc. (75-28) .............. 37
Palm Ciry Millwork (75-12) ................................ 12-13,39
Pavarini Construction (75-29) ............... .... ...................... 27
Pella Windows (75-30) ................................................. ..... 2
PGT Industries (75-31) ........................ .. ... .. ..... .......... OBC
S & P Architectural Products (75-12) .................. 12-13,39
S & S Craftsmen, Inc. (75-12) ............................. 12-13, 39
Savannah Trims (75-35) ................................................... 36
Smyth Lumber (75-12) ........................................ 12-13, 39
Suncoast Insurance Associates, Inc. (75-32) ....................... 6
Universal Timber (75-36) ................................................ 32
Viracon (75-33) ............................................................... 33
Weather Shield (75-12) ........................................ 12-13,39
Williams Scotsman, Inc. (75-34) ..................................... 33



florida / caribbean ARCHITECT wim er 2001




WEATHER SHIELDS DEALERS

SEE OUR 2 PAGE AD ON 12 & 13
Architectural Window & Door I S & S Craftsmen, Inc.
Ft. Meyers, Florida 941 -768-11 73
Naples, Florida 941-430-1220

Architectural Window & Cabinets
Jacksonville, Florida 904-725-8583
St. Augustine, Amelia Island & Panhandle 800-320-1312

Forest Products
Sarasota, Florida 941-922-0731
HBS Glass
Vero Beach, Florida 561-567-7461
Jupiter, Florida 561 -743-1090

NOR-DEC International, Inc.
Miami, Florida 305-591-8050
San Juan, Puerto Rico 787-722-5425
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic 809-697-4251
Dominican Republic Showroom 809-227-7882

Palm City Millwork
Palm City, Florida 561 -288-7086
West Palm Beach, Florida 800-273-5598

S & P Architectural Products
Pompano Beach, Florida 954-968-3701
Miami, Florida 305-266-2635
Ft. Meyers / Naples, Florida 800-992-8959

S & S Craftsmen, Inc.
Tampa, Florida 800-922-9663

Smyth Lumber
Orlando, Florida 407-523-8777

flo rida / caribbean ARCHITECT
winter 2001












MGE Architects, boca raton, florida
The Lois Pope Life Center, Miami, Florida
The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, a Center of Excellence at the University of Miami School of Medicine, is the world's largest, most comprehensive research cen ter dedicated to finding more effective treatments, and ultimately, a cure for paralysis that results from spinal cord injury. The development of the Lois Pope Life Center was conceived to bring all of the Miami Project researchers, clinicians and therapists together under one roof. Destined to be the premier research facility in the world for spinal cord injury research, the basic design of this building was directed by its function However, the very prominence of the facility in the scientific arena and its premier location on the University of Miami (UM) School of Medicine campus also demanded a significant aesthetic response.
Functionally, the building design was developed using the basic research laboratory floor as the primary building block. Extensive exploration of floor plate configurations resulted in selection of an open,

jloricUz / caribbean ARCHITECT winter 2001
modular laboratory planning concepr. This decision gradually presented an "L" shaped building plan to appropriately satisfy efficiency, functional and operational ueeds.
The seven-floor, 118,000 square-foot building is very rational and organized at a human scale. The building's structural grid provides both flexibility and the ability for expansion while integrating with the laboratory modules. The laboratory module plan also permits horizontal expansIOn.


The basis of this modular planning concept was the development of a series of highly flexible lab spaces developed from a typical "kit of partS." The plan utilizes a




and to protect security in other parts ofthe building, the clinical research program is located on the first floor with entry through the courtyard. The courtyard itself serves as an extension ofthe clinical program area.
Both laboratory wings provide open plans that feature circulation between laboratory benches and "people spaces" or between postdoctoral workstations. A central linear plan offers maximum access to exterior perimeter windows from laborarory pods. Centrally located elevators, with card access control, permit the research staffdirect access to the laboratory floors.
With neutral-toned precast concrete panels, the building is compatible with its surroundings. Large expanses ofglass accent the contemporary style ofthe building and allow narurallight to flood into the laboratory pods. Energyefficient glazing was put into the precast panels in operable, fixed, opaque and transparent combi
naaons.
The Lois Pope Center was completed in October 2000 at a total cost of$23 million or $195 per square foot. The vast majority ofthe floor space, 64%, is laboratory space.

SEVENTH FLOOR PLAN
o so
courtesy ofthe al'chirect.
jZoridtz / caribbean ARCHITECT winter 2001



Features

50 floors above grade


797 feet to the top of the mast


4 below grade parking floors


641,600 sq. ft. total gross area


430,500 sq. ft. total rental space


200 guest rooms


22,000 sq. ft. -restaurants and bars


10,000 sq. ft. multi-purpose hall


1200 sq. ft. meeting room


28,000 sq. ft. recreation/fitness area


80 apartment units


40 units of 3 bedroom, 2 bath


40 units of 2 bedroom, 2 bath


Exclusive apartment lobby


164,900 sq. ft. leasable tenant space



160 standard rooms, 40 suites


400 parking spaces for cars

Materials
Fas;ade

Insulated reflective glass windows and spandrels incorporated with solar glass panels


Steel trussed tube structure with steel tube corner support


Granite panel and concrete stucco


Exterior paving


Grey granite with copper and


brass decorative details Interior finishes

Marble, gray granite, Italian travertine floors and walls with natural anodized aluminum ceiling panels in lobby area


Curtain wall and truss


Structural tripod glass system with cable truss



-


florida / caribbean ARCH ITECT winter 2001


yard as well as the ocean beyond. The courtyard, with its 30-foot long fountain fringed with seven water-spouting frogs on each side, acts as a buffer against roadway noise while providing privacy for the three guest bedrooms. The guest bedrooms have access to the main living room from the courtyard, as well as to the ocean.
The floor plan is axial. From the ornamental courtyard gate that serves as the front door, there is a direct view of the ocean through the courtyard, living room and terrace. The terminus of the axis between the front door and the sea is a radial cedar deck that cantilevers over the cliff. This deck is edged with cedar bollards housing indirect lights. Below the deck are lights that illuminate the sea.
Views from the house were important to the client so most of the rooms have direct views to the sea. Windows and doors are typically located opposite one another to allow cross ventilation during the months when air -conditioning is not necessary. All of the floors and bathrooms are finished in limestone and all other surfaces are painted stucco. Doors and windows were custom designed and made of mahogany by craftsmen on the island.
Photo, top: Courtyard and 30-foot fountain with water-spoutingfrogs acts as a noise buffirfor the guestrooms. Photo by Chuck WiLkins. PLan and eLevation courtesy ofthe architect.


JloricUz / caribbean ARCHITECT wimer 2001


by contractors against architects since the Hewitt-Kia decision.
Under the Court's logic, architects, presumably, will know that their plans will be provided not only to contractors, but also to subcontractors, for purposes of constructing the work, to sureties for purposes of issuing bonds, to banks for purposes of issuing construction loans, and to suppliers for purposes of furn ish i ng materials. We are presently defending architects against claims brought by subcontractors and
ureties based upon economic losses they allegedly incurred as a result of defective plans or specifications. Until the Florida Supreme Court re-addresses the liabili ty of architects to third parti es and draws a reasonable line where that liability ends, we anticipate a major increase in economic loss claims brought by third parties against architects and other design p rofessionals.
Huey, Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & WiLLiams, FA. serves as General Counsel to AlA FLorida and represents design professionals and insuTers throughout FLoTida.
Pavarini Construction Co. Salutes #~ PAVARINI Swire Properties' Vision for Brickell Key, Miami
~.
Construction Manager/General Contractor
Courts Brickell Key Mandarin Oriental Hotel, Miami


What Can We Build For You?
Pavarini Construction Co., Inc. And Introducing:
1800 Eller Drive Suite 200 Pavarini Interiors, Miami

Dedicated To Interior Build-Out Projects

Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316 501 Brickell Key Drive Suite 601 Miami, FL 33131
954.767.6000 786.777.0088

Ideal Learning Environment

Source: National study by Beth Schapiro & Associates and
the IIDA Foundation


92% of teachers believe design has strong impact on
students' learning & achievement



79% of teachers believe school design is important
for student attendance



69% prefer carpet or a carpet & smooth surface
co mbination




Contact: The Carpet & Rug Institute, 800.882.8846
www.carpet-school.com

florida / caribbean ARCHITECT wimer 200 1





elegant Kathryn TM Ensemble. Inspired by an exhibition depicting the artistry of Kohler products at the Metropolitan Museum ofArt in
1929, the Kathryn Ensemble is a stylized glance back in time, updated to meet the demand for modern traditionalism. "Bath fixtures that exude the familiar luxury of the past updated for today, are in vogue", says Mike Chandler, marketing manager for sanitary products, Artist Editions, and color. The Kathryn Ensemble brings one ofAmerica's favorite design periods into the modern era.
Fo r additional info rmation about the Kathryn Ensemble, please call 1-800-4-KOHLER or access the Kohler Co. Web site at www.kohler.com.

PYROSTOpTM FROM PILKINGTON
Pilkington Pyrostop is a fire-rated, impact safety-rated transparent wall panel that helps block heat transfer. While firerated glass typically contains the spread of flame and smoke, some locations (such as stairwells and elevator lobbies) may require a product that can also reduce the transfer of radiant and conductive heat emanating from a fire. In those cases, Pyrostop transparent wall panels is an alternative to a solid wall, allowing unrestricted amounts of glass.
Pyrostop meets the impact requirements of CPSC 16CFR1201 Category I and/or Category II. It is fire-rated for up to two hours, passing the hose stream test. It can be installed in TGP's narrow-profile Fireframes by Forster, providing maximum safety and visibility.
Pyrostop is listed with Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. and/or Warnock H ersey InternationaL in large sizes. For complete details, call Technical Glass Products at 1-888-391-FIRE (3413) or visit wwwfireglass.com.
ARCHITECTURAL FLOOD LUMINAIRE FROM COOPER LIGHTING
Cooper Lighting has introduced the new McGraw-Edison VFS Flood Luminaire, a versatile architectural floodlighting series.
Developed to satisfy the need for exceptional performance in a wide range of applications, the Vision Flood series offers five distinct, fu lly modular segmented optical modules. Utilizing a combination of 95% premium reflective ligh ting sheet, the optics provide uniform levels and increased efficiency levels up to 40% higher than other flood fixtures.
The Vision Flood's increased field efficiencies, in combi nation with high beam efficiencies, allow the use of lower wattage lamp source or fewer flxtures to accomplish the most challenging of floodlighting
tasks.

McCraw-Edison VFS Flood Luminaire, by Cooper Lighting
The Vision VFS Architectural Flood Luminaire features precisely engineered optical reflectors that create a smooth rectangular beam pattern. T his rectangular shaped beam pattern allows for wider spacing, thus reducing fixture count while sustaining optimal uniformity. All optical configurations are fully modular with standard quick disconnect for effortless removal where change-outs may be required, offering flexibility for every application including flagpoles, signage, area lighting, building facades and wall illumination. By specifying it's 40 C Rated characteristic, the Vision Flood can be used for interior applications.
For additional information on the McGraw-Edison VFS Vision Flood Luminaire or any ofthe Vision Series products, please contact Cooper Lighting, 1121 Highway 14 South, Peachtree City, GA 30269 or visit www.cooperlighting. com.
florida / caribbean ARCHITECf wimer 200 1


~
CADD
CllNTERS Of Fl.ORmA
Need AlA Learning Units?
CADD Centers of Florida is an
authorized AIA Training Facility
offering classes in
AutoCAD,
Architectural Desktop,
and 3D Studio VIZ.
We also offer sales, service and
support for your software and
hardware needs.
Call 800-222-4889 or visit

www.caddfla.com
\..''' .1

autodesk(,_
Participating advertisers are given a four digit code (located in this index). To access additional information abo ut an advertisers pro ducts or services, you only need to dial 410-252-9595 from your fax machine, listen to the voice prompts and -PRESTO-you will receive the desired information.

Florida's #1
InsurancelBond Agency


Specializing in Design
Professionals/Contractors

A Design Professional Needs
An InsurancelBond Broker Who:



Specializes in professional liability services to engineers and architects.


Understands, professional practice and becomes a valued member of the firm's management team.


Supports your Professional Society Scholarship programs.


Offers contract review, negotiation assistance, in-house seminars and unique loss prevention publications.


Is creative and aggressive in pursuing competitive insurance programs and can deliver risk management counsel and advice independent of obligations to any particular insurance company.


Understands and deals with issues relating to the procurement of any and all bonding requirements by designlbuild professionals.


A Design Professional Needs
an ale ProNet MemberlBond Broker
ale ProNet is a national association of independent insurance professionals

specializing in professional liability insurance and risk management services
for engineers and architects.
Collinsworth, Alter, Nielson
Fowler & Dowling, Inc.

Your Design/Build Insurance Specialist in Florida is: W. Meade Collinsworth
CPCU,~, AIM, AJU
&
Your Design/Build Bond
Specialist in Florida is:
Charles J. Nielson
5979 N.W. 151st St. #105 Miami Lakes, FL 33014
P.O. Box 9315, Miami, FL 33014-9315
Dade (305) 822-7800
Broward (954) 463-8601
Toll Free (800) 822-9303

The only ale ProNet member in Florida

florida / caribbean ARCH ITECT wimer 2001






You Can Go the Traditional Route. Or You Can Take the Express Way.
When building your business. getting there IS typically not half the fun. To streamline the building process, Williams Scotsman offers Concurrent Construction', a flexible, less costly alternative to traditional building methods.
With Concurrent Construction, you can expect occupancy in half the time of traditional construction, meaning you can begin producing revenues sooner. We have a wide range of attractive, workable design options that are durable and adaptable to your future needs. Let our experienced staff and project manager support guide you from concept to completion.
CALL TOLL-FREE:
866-WSBUILD
866-972-8453
to explore options with your local
Williams Scotsman sales representative.

Visit the Williams Scotsman Website at
www.willscot.com
info@Willscot.com


The metal oxide coating is INSIDE the glass which eliminates problems currently experienced with outside-coated glass block, along with superior sun-blocking performance!
For more information, contact: Glass Masonry Inc. 1235 Commons Court Clermont, FI 34711 Phone: (800) 940-4527 Fax: (352) 243-8045 www.glassmasonry.com

florida / caribbean ARCHITECT winter 2001


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