Group Title: Florida Caribbean architect
Title: FloridaCaribbean architect
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004635/00017
 Material Information
Title: FloridaCaribbean architect
Alternate Title: Florida Caribbean architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Publisher: Dawson Publications,
Dawson Publications
Place of Publication: Timonium Md
Publication Date: Fall 2001
Copyright Date: 1997
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 44, no. 1 (spring 1997)-
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Issues have also theme titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004635
Volume ID: VID00017
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA5904
ltuf - ACJ1464
oclc - 36846561
lccn - sn 97052000
 Related Items
Preceded by: Florida architect

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U. OF FLA. LIBRARIES

Florida Association of the American Institute ofArchitects 104 East Jefferson Street Tallahassee, Florida 3230 1 www.aiafla.org
2001 FAlAlA Officers President Miguel "Mike" A. Rodriguez, AIA President-elect Enrique Woodroffe, FAIA Secretary/Treasurer Blinn Van Mater, AIA Vice President/Communications Mark H. Smith, AIA Vice President/Professional Development Vivian O. Salaga, AIA Vice President/Legislative & Regulatory Affairs Mickey Jacob, AIA Regional Director Larry M. Schneider, AIA Regional Director Jerome Filer, FAIA Immediate Past President
S. Keith Bailey, AIA Executive Vice President
R. ScOtt Shalley, CAE
Publisher Denise Dawson Dawson Publications, Inc. 2236 Greenspring Drive Timonium, Maryland 21093 410.560.5600 800.322.3448 Fax: 410.560.5601 Editor Diane D. Greer Sales Manager Dave Patrick Sales Representatives Drew Fraser, Thomas Happel, Joyce Fink Graphic Design Mike H organ Printing Boyd Brothers Printing
Florida Caribbean Architect, Official Journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute ofArchitects, is owned by the Association, a Florida corporation, not for profit. ISSN-OO 1 5-3907. It is published four times a year and disuibuted through the office of the Association, 104 E. Jefferson Street, Tallahassee, Florida 3230 I. Telephone 850.222.7590.
Opinions expressed by contriburors are not necessarily those ofAIA Florida. Edirorial material may be reprinted only with the express permission of Florida Caribbean Architect. Single copies, $6.00; Annual subscription, $20.00
Editorial / diane d. greer
AIA Florida's annual design awards program is important for a number of reasons, not the least of which is that it presents members with the opportuni ty to see what's being designed and built all over the state. Since the Awards for Excellence in Architecture are juried out of state, it's interesting to see what architects in other regions think is good, or not so good. The expectations of architects from New England or the Midwest are often based on a perceived vernacular that simply isn't applicable. For exam ple, I remember very well the comments of a jury member from Chicago a few years ago that expressed his disappointment at the lack of regionalism among the entries. "I didn't find any building, large or small, that was especially responsive to existing in Florida. I saw no 'verandahed' buildings. I saw no deep overhangs or porches. Those are the things that, when I come to Florida, I expect to find."
I wanted to ask that architect to describe a regional or vernacular 20-story office building. That's not to say that regionalism isn't importan t. It is. Bur, in a region that is so clearly defined by the extremes of climate and climate-related history, the stylistic demands of regionalism can be troublesome. Regionalism becomes burdensome to architects when it goes beyond creating good, energyconscious design. It imposes a sryle, if you wili, with specific srylistic components, such as wide porches, overhangs, verandas, courtyards, etc. Vernacular architecture has a vocabulary all its own and the imposition of working within that vocabulary may not be legitimate for every building in Florida.
So, what did this year's jury deem to be award-winning architecture? Eleven projects were selected, including two modern houses, a school, a warehouse, a theatre, a bandshell and assorted other building types -all good projects and not a veranda among them. In fact, the projects seemed less "regional" than I've seen in a long time.
Concrete was the material of choice with lots of color and lots of glass. Several of the projects had a sense of drama -high drama as seen in the Lincoln Cinema's colored glass walls and quiet drama as in the reflection of trees on a blank wall in Suzanne Martinson's Ellison House. Dramatic color, floating stairs and elegant details were in evidence in schools and offices and entertainment complexes.
I think the projects selected in the Unbuilt Awards category were particularly interesting. Two of them will probably never be built, as noted by the jury, but they were so intriguing in concept that they deserved recognition. Two others were extraordinarily ambitious, i.e. the rebuilding of a whole community in Nicaragua and an office with suspended pods for individual workers. A fifth project, currently under construction, is a rather magical observatory. All of the unbuilt projects were beautifully rendered -the renderings being pieces of art themselves.
A Test ofTime Award went to twO well-deserved and "timeless" projects. The Cooney House in Sarasota is a minimalist masterpiece (see architect Edward J. Seibert's descri ption of his design in this issue) and the Appleton Museum in Ocala is a perfect showc"a.se for fine art.




News

2001 AJA Florida Honors
and Awards
The Renaissance Vinoy Resort in St. Petersburg was the site of AIA Florida's Annual Meeting in August. At the Awards Banquet, President Mike Rodriguez and Immediate Pastpresident Keith Bailey recognized a number of individuals for their achievements in architecture and related areas.
The Gold Medal, the highest honor that AIA Florida can bestow on one of its members, was presented to Jerome Filer, FAIA. In addition to holding the highest leadership positions in both AIA Miami and AIA Florida, Filer has initiated and directed a multitude of innovative public awareness and membership recruitment and retention programs. He conceived the idea of using non-dues revenue to fund his chapter's budget and was invited to present a program about this innovative concept at theAIA National meeting in San Francisco. After Hurricane Andrew in 1992, he worked to implement new construction standards for the rebuilding of entire areas of South Florida. He spearheaded the establishment of an architecture library at the University of Miami, led Miami architects to resolve co nflicts with the 4th largest school district in the United States and worked with the construc-
Clockwise, from lefr: Jerome Filer, FAlA, Steven W Gift, AlA, Debra Lupton, AlA, Henry Alexander, FAlA, and Keith Bailey, AlA. tion industry and other architects to pass suitable statewide construction legislation. To increase public awareness about architecture, he created, produced and hosted a regional television program called "All About Architecture." Jerome Filer's service and dedication to AIA Florida has been enormous. The Silver Medal, named in honor of AIA Florida Past-president Hilliard
T. Smith, was presented to Keith Bailey, AIA, and Henry Alexander, FAIA. This award was given to recognize two architects who exemplifY leadership in community activities and service. ...more
Five members of AlA Florida were inducred inro the College of Fellows ar rhe 2001 AlA Convention. New fellows are, lefr to right: Donald J. Dwore, FAlA, Mike Rodriguez, AlA, President of AlA Florida, Jaime Canaves, FAlA, H owarth L. Lewis, FAIA, Johnsrone Reid, J r., FAIA, and John P. Tice, J r., FAIA.
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 2001




The Bob Graham Honorary AlA Architectural Awareness Award was presented to Steven W Gift, AlA, for the work he has done to advance the cause of good design at the University ofSouth Florida in Tampa where he serves as University Architect and Director of Facilities Planning and Construction.
The Anthony L. Pullara Individual Award was presented to Debra Lupton, AIA. In 1999, she became the first woman to serve as President of AIA Florida. Her dedi cation to the architectural profession included the drafting oflanguage for a new Florida statute intended to augment the existing design/build law, as well as serving as FAPAC Chairman.
The Mellen C. Greeley Craftsman of the Year Award was presented to Mill-Rite Woodworking Company for renovation work on the Eden Roc Resort and Spa in Miami Beach. The Outstanding Builder of the Year Award recognized Turner Construction Company for its conversion of a 1927 Neo-classical courthouse into a regional history museum.
The Florida Architects Foundation recog nized a number of students with Bronze Medals or scholarships. The Bronze Medal was presented to Geno P. Knowles from the University ofSourh Florida, Jose Pablo Riestra from the University of Miami, Harold Somarriba from the ing from Florida A & M University and Fabio Bendana ftom Florida International University. Foundation Scholarships went to Jess Linn from the University of Miami, Dana L. Gierschke from the University of South Florida, Brandon Hicks from the University of Flo rida, Anna Barbour from Florida A & M University and Alexander Perez from Florida International University.
"An American Legacy" Offers CEU Credits
Registration is open for "An Am erican Legacy: T he Sarasota School of Architecture" Tour and Symposium November 1 -5. The program is bringing tOgether the founding architects of the Sarasota School movement who are considered to be among the most talented American designers of the 20th century. Many of these architects will be participating in the symposium as lecturers and panelists. The symposium includes five days of lectures, panel discussions, bus and boat tours, and a month long exhibition on mode rnism en ti tied "Living Modern: Architecture, Design & Art.
The program offers CEU credits for licensed professional architects and interior designers through its association with the University of Florida School of Architecture. This series provides 20 CEU credits for the five-day lecture series at a cost of $375. Three different bus tours offer three CEU credi ts each for a total of nine additional credits at a cost of $35 per tour. The $25 boat tour earns 2 CEU credits for a total of31 possible credits for the entire symposIum.
To regIster, log on to www.sarasota-architecture.org or email: info@sarasota-architecture.org or hot line 941-388-1530 or fax 941388-5 151.

University of Florida, Kelly Brown-The Healy "Cocoon House"on Siesta Key, 1948-1950. Rendering by PauL Rudolph, architect.
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fal l 2001


Why Buildings Fail: NCARB's Newest Monograph
The National Council ofArchitectural Registration Boards (NCARB) has issued the tenth title in its Professional Program monograph series, Why Buildings Fail. Written by Kenneth L. Carper, a registered archi tect and professor at Washington State University, Why Buildings Fail investigates those projects where performance does not meet expectations. Although catastrophic structural collapse often receives the greatest amount of attention, it is not the only type of building failure. This monograph identifies the issues present when technical (e.g., internal systems run amuck or don't run at all) and architectural (e.g., inappropriate cladding is chosen and must be replaced) problems characterize a building project.
Carper presents a conscientious mix of case studies and examples and notes that "Failures seldom result from a single error made by an individual." In fact, nonperformance can be caused by natural and human-made factors as well as errors made during the planning, design, construction and operation stages. In his conclusion, the author also reviews failure-avoidance strategies as well as failure litigation and dispute resolution.
The successful completion of the quiz accompanying most monographs equals 10 contact hours in Health, Safety, and Welfare and 10 AlA Learning Units. All monograph quizzes may now be completed online and the price for most ti tles is $195. To order a monograph or any other title from N CARB 's Professional Development Program, contact the Council at (202) 7836500 or visit the web site at www.ncarb.org/publications.

Construction Related Research Available
The Department of Construction Management in the College of Engineering at Florida International University has just completed a study entitled "Privatization of the Plans Review and Inspection Functions: A Feasibility Study," by John
M. Dye and David J. Valdini. This detailed study examines the question of privatization of the plans review and inspection processes within building departments. A 48-page summary is available.
David VanCise, an Inspector of Building Construction at Indian River Community College, has just completed developing a continuing education course entitled "Competent Person and Safety Training." This detailed course emphasizes Occupati onal Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Standards and Safety Training, while also integrating related information fro m building codes and interpretation, fire safety codes and construction management. A 60-page summary is available.
For a copy of the summary of either of these courses, contact: ExecutI ve Secretary, Building Construction Industry Advisory Committee, School of Building Construction -FAC 101, P.O. Box 115703, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, (352) 3929045.

Design and Architecture 2001: Making Design Matter to

Everyday People
o + A 2001 is a month-long educational event designed to raise consciousness in the general public about design and the des ign professions. 0 + !\s goal is to spread the word that design and architecture do matter and that


design can and does determine the character and DESIGN + ARCHITECTURE
quality of the physical and built environment, 2001
and therefore, our lives. ... more

floritk / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 2001



Kicking off OctOber 1 and running through the end of the month, D + A 2001 will combine exhibitions, tours, open houses, workshops and lectures in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties. Paola Antonelli, CuratOr of Design at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, will deliver the keynote address. Other D + A highlights include an outdoor sound and light show of Miami architecture, a furniture exhibition at the Hollywood Cultural ArtSCenter, "Design by Architects" featuring the product design of selected architects against the backgro und of their architectural work and the dedication of a new School of Architecture Tower at Florida Atlantic University in Ft. Lauderdale.
"Miami Modern Architecture -A Photography Exhibition" will be on display the month of October at the Seymour on Miami Beach. The exhibition celebrates architecture from the 1950s and early 1960s, a time of widespread optimism and na'ive confidence in America. Even more whimsical than the Art Deco ofSouth Beach, the architectural style ofMiami Modern, or MIMo, featured boomerangs, accordion fin walls and cheese hole masonry, as well as sleek, elegant, daring angles and lines. Hundreds of buildings, including Miami Beach's Fontainebleu Hilton, Eden Roc and Carillon hotels, exhibit the MIMo style, as do several New York City buildings through the work of Morris Lapidus.





Member News

Harvard Jolly Clees Toppe Architects won the top honor for "Outstanding Contribution to the Community in Institutional Facilities" for the University Area Community Center Complex in North Tampa. The Community Design Awards program gives the Planning Commission an opportunity to honor the very best in planning and design. The award was given by the Hillsborough County City-County Planning
19th
Commission at its Annual Community Design Awards Program Steven M. Heiser, AlA, Senior Vice President of Harvard Jolly, was the Project Manager for the 48,000 square foot facility which is designed to serve as a center of learning for the residents of North Tampa, in and around the University of South Florida.

R. J. Heisenbottle Architects
in Coral Gables will be presenting an educational workshop on "Planning and Process in Historic Theatre Restoration" at the League of His
25 th
toric American Theatre's Anniversary Conference in New York Ciry, July 16-23.
Heisenbotrle's workshop will highlight his firm's expertise in historic preservation and theatre design. The firm is currently engaged in various historic theatre restorations, including the Gusman Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, the Colony Theatre in Miami Beach, the Athens Theatre in Deland, and the Overtown Lyric Theatre in Miami.


Heisenbotrle received an award from the National Trust for Historic

The Athens Theatre in Deland as restored by R.j. Heisenbottle Architects.
Preservation in 1998 for the Miami Edison Middle School and was recently awarded a 2001 Preservation Education/Media Award by the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation for the video "One United Band," the story of Miami Edison Middle School.
Morris Architects was selected as the only United States Design Team ro participate in the prestigious national design competition in China. This international competition will produce a design that will ultimately define a 16-mile-Iong seaside and vacation resort at China's world famous Silver Beach in Beihai Ciry, Guangxi Ptovince. Morris Architects is on a short list ofsix firms that were asked to submit a final Master Planning, Urban Design
and Economic Analysis. As part ofthe firm's strategic plan for the project, they are creating a new retail/entertainment anchor in the center ofthe resort. The "String ofPearls" theme that Morris developed for the project acknowledges Beihai's pearl industry as well as its future as an international resort destination.
Two projects by the Lakeland firm, Lunz Prebor Fowler Architects, were recognized with design
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 2001





awards by the Tampa Bay Chaper of the AlA. T he International Sport Aviation Museum Pavilion received the H. Dean Rowe, FAIA Award for Design Excellence. The pavilion is Phase I of a four-phase museum and education complex that utilizes sloping steel columns to tether the wing of the pavilion roof to the ground. The rehabilitation of Polk County Science Building at Florida Southern
Work in Progress

Architects Design Group, Inc.
of Winter Park has designed a new state-of-the-art CustOmer Service Center for the Ocala Electric Utility. The architects worked with scientists at the Florida Solar Energy Center
.
to Incorporate energy saving enhancements that will save 20% on energy costs. Architects Design Group, Inc. also designed the expansion for the Citrus County Courthouse in Inverness. The project includes the renovation of the existing courthouse and design of a new 46,000-square-foot judicial wing.
Morris Architects designed the Simulator Wing at DAYrONA USA"The Ultimate Motor Sport Attraction" in Daytona, Florida. T he new wing opened on July 4,2001 to coincide with the Pepsi 400 NASCAR event held at Daytona International College was recognized with a Merit Award. O riginally designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built in 1958, the project called for retention of the de-
Speedway. T he project included an expansion of the existing attraction and visitor center, a new venue for an IWRKS motion simulator theatre and an expanded velocitorium.
Morris Architects was Arch i tect ofInteriors for Emeril's Restaurant sign integrity while inserting new systems into a building with low floor to ceiling height and no suspended ceilings in which to conceal systems.



in O rlando. The 11 ,700-square-foot, two-story restaurant features an exhibition kitchen and food bar that serves as an on-location venue for network telecasts of Emeril's live cooking show. The project was awarded tOP honors in the Built: Commercial category by the O rlando Chapter of the AIA.
The challenge in designing T he Waverly in downtown Fort Lauderdale was to provide a luxury urban living environment in a mixed-use and retail development. As designed by Dorsky Hodgson + Partners, the building also acts as a transitional element between high rise downtown buildings and a residential neighborhood to the east. In order to give the building a lively urban profile, D H +P Principal VictOr Yue designed a fourlevel retail and parking podium and
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 2001






The Waverry in Fort Lauderdale is a mixed-use and retail development designed by Dorsky Hodgson + Partners.
a residential tower that ranges from fo ur to ten stories.
Robert M. Swedroe, Architects-Planners, AIA, PA is architect of record for BellaMare, a luxury tower condominium on the Intracoastal Waterway in Williams Island. The project will fea ture a two-story lobby, media room with theatrestyle seating, 24-hour security, valet parking and numerous other amenities.
The Scott Partnership Architec
ture, Inc. designed Regency Village
Shopping Center, Phase I, in O rlando
with a 54,OOO-square-foo t Publix to
anchor the center. Scott will also proNew designs by The Scott Partnership Architecture, Inc. include, top to bottom: Benihana Japanese
vide d es ign services for the new Steak House, Houston, Texas, Downtown Orlando YJ\1C4, Regency Village Shopping Center in Orange County, and Brevard County YJ\1C4.
Benihana Japanese Steak H ouse in
H ouston, Texas, and the Breva rd YMCA's 3-ph ase new image facelift. C ity of Bridgeport, Connecticut to
Coun ty YMCA's addition and reno design a 50-acre mixed-use project
vation in T itusville. Scott is currently Swanke Hayden Connell Ar for the Steelpoint Peninsula devel
d esigni ng D own tow n O rl ando chitects has been selected by the opmen t. The site for the project,


florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 2001


known as Bridgeport Landing, has over 3,000 feet ofshoreline on Long Island Sound. This new urban community, less than an hour's commute from Manhattan, has been designed to be a walking community and to provide pedestrian access to the entire waterfront. The neighborhood will feature townhouse and loft-style residential units, retail and restaurants, office buildings, hoteis, conference center, continuing care retirement community, marina and a yacht club.
After five decades of sculpting Jacksonville's skyline, KBJ Architects Inc. carries on the tradition of designing significant buildings on both sides of the St. Johns River. Projects currently on the drawing board include the United States Courthouse, the Police and Fire Pension Fund Headquarters, a major terminal expansion and parking garage at Jacksonville International Airport, Douglas Anderson School of the Arts, the Aviation Center of Excellence at Cecil Field, and the Advanced Technology Center at Florida Community College.
VOA Associates Incorporated
provided programming, planning and design services for the five-acre Costa de Montemar (Chile) Urban Conference Center. The conference center, due for completion in 2002, is an additional component of a highly successful time share and condominium resort already on the site. VOA's body of large-scale projects currently underway in Latin America represents a total construction value in excess of$200 million.


Bock & Partners in Altamonte Springs is designing 5,500 square feet ofrenovated space in the CanerTabernacle CME Church in Orlando. The new construction will provide the church with an enlarged Fellowship Hall capable of being divided into classrooms, a new administrative suite, a fitness center and a bookstore.
Retzsch Lanao Caycedo Architects has been retained to design rwo buildings in the new Lyons Tech Center in Coconut Creek. The rwo speculative office/warehouself1ex buildings will be one-story structures of til t-wall construction sited on eight acres.
florido / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 2001



Awards for Excellence in Architecture


Luminaire Corporate Office and Warehouse. Photo by Carlos Domenech. Architecture by Mateu Carreno Rizo & Partners.

The 2001 Design Awards program produced 19 winning projects in three categories. The Awards for Excellence in Architecture honors built projects and this year the jury met in Houston} Texas and selected 11 winners. Chairman ofthe jury was Michael Shirley} AlA} Architectural Practice Leader for the Houston office of3D International. Also on the jury were Joe Mashburn} AlA} Dean ofthe College ofArchitecture at the University ofHouston} Val Glitsch} FAlA} Visiting Lecturer and Critic at Rice University and owner ofa private woman-ownedpractice and William Tillman Cannady} FAIA} Director ofthe Center for Professional Studies in the School ofArchitecture at Rice University. Allfour ofthejury members have been the recipient ofnumerous design awards.
florida / caribbeanARCHITECT fall 200 I




United States Courthouse sacramento, california A joint venture between HLM D esign, Orlando, FLorida and Nacht & Lewis, San Francisco, CaLifornia
"In the design of a federal courthouse, the architect is placed in a unique position of trying to satisfy two entities; the General Services Administration (the client) and the United States Courts (the occupant). This design satisfied both by meeting all programmatic and budgetary requirements."
Senior Judge Robert CoyLe, Fresno, United States Eastern District ofCaLifornia
The massing and design of this building challenge traditional ideas about large and monolithic courthouses. The building explores the idea ofexpressing the court's components in an asymmetrical composition of large and small structure. Challenged by the constraints of a tight site, the design solution yielded a compact and highly efficient plan. The architects designed a skylit rotunda to bring daylight into the dense building base and in so doing, created a strong orientation point for visitors and a dignified sequence of procession through the building.
Program requirements produced an additional challenge and necessitated a functionally-intensive design. Program challenges included creating a visual representation of the American justice system, responding to the City's urban plan and creating a dignified building on a very constrained site. Attention was given to the exterior architecrural language to convey the ideas of dignity, solidity, and permanence while stressing that the building is a contemporary product.
The jury saw the powerfuL section and entry sequence as one ofthe building's strongest features. The pubLic spaces are weLL designed and the buiLding has a strong quaLity of permanence even with the Limited materiaL paLette.
Photos by Robert Canfield, Photographer.
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 200 1



Miami-Dade Community College InterAmerican Campus Phase II miami
Rodriguez and Quiroga Architects Chartered, CoraL GabLes, FLorida
" ... thank you for interpreting our vision in such a formidable manner."
Jose A. Vicente, Ed. D. Campus President
Basic program requirements dictated almost 100,000 square feet of academic space and a 400-car parking garage in very limited site parameters. The design houses the academic program in a three-story/ L-shaped structure that i sited to accomodate several open spaces including a plaza, a breezeway and a courtyard. The scale of the threestory classroom building integrates well with an existing four-story structure for which the architect provided a new exterior envelope. The project also features the inclusion of a Computer Courtyard that is housed on the second floor of the academic building. This multiplestory space allows interior faculty offices a view into the courtyard which is covered by a curved roof that rises above the main roof to permit natural light to enter.
The jury feLt that the buildings, oLd and new, interlink to create a pLace that is greater than the individuaL parts. The internaL open spaces have a very protectedfeeLing and create an order0' progression through the site. The urban facades are refined and the arcaded base helps to activate the street.
Photos by Steven Brooke Studio.

florida I caribbea/7 ARCHITECT fall 200 I





Ellison Residence miami
Suzanne Martinson Architects, Inc., Miami, Florida Kristen Damuth, Project Designer

"The architect exceeded our greatest expectations in creating a home for us. She met our programmatic requirements and gave us a house that is perfectly suited to our present lifestyle and our future needs."
James andJanet Ellison
The client requested that this home be designed as a compound. This resulted in the creation of four elements including the main residence, the garage/office, the covered loggia and the banyan tree at the center of (he properry. The covered loggia unifies the entire composition by connecting the main living spaces creating the public and private realms and defining the norrhern boundary of the ga rden. The clean lines


and modernist detailing of rhe
house create a perfect canvas for dramaric hadows from the mature specimen trees on the lot. The exterior stair to the office provides a sculptural element within the garden. Exacting interior proportions afford spaces a sense of both grandeur and intimacy.
The jury recognized the tremendous amount of concern f01' detail in this building. The four primary elements combine to create an impressive whole with the loggia being the hardest working element in the composition. The simple material palette and the modest residential scale ofthe house are a tribute to understated elegance.
Photos by Steven Brooke Studio.


florido / caribbean ARCH ITECT fall 2001




COMPENSAR FEC, XXI Pavilion and Jubilee Plaza santafl de bogota, columbia
A collaboration between VOA Associates, Inc. Orlando, Florida and KB Arquitectos, Santaft de Bogota, Columbia
"The City has greatly valued this project from an urban and architectural point of view because it brings together nature, technology and entertainment in spaces that induce family integration."
German CoLiazos Quevedo
In keeping with the cliem's mandate, the aniculated them of this project is "The Celebration of Life." Program components include a ceremonial plaza, a pavilion that houses a food court, a cyber cafe and various co mputer-based activities, garden environments for an and recreation and [wo renovated building to serve as an Arcade and Children's Plaza. The urban parti maimains the strong axis of the existing campus while the plaza erves as a focal point. The XXI Pavilion has a structural steel frame with a glass skin that in turn shrouds a smaller concrete structure clad in carbon/aluminum composite panels. The computer-operated foumains in the plaza were fabricated in Spain.
The jmy acknowledged the wonderfully organized pian and admired the strong canopy roofthat provides shelterfor the "crystaLline box" beneath. This is a celebratory and ceremonial space that is open, inviting and important.
Photos by Enrique Guzman.

florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 2001




Lincoln Cinema Complex miami beach
Zyscovich, Inc., Bernard Zyscovich, AlA, Miami, FLOI-ida

"I loved the building so much, I bought it!"
WaLter Staudinger
Conceptually, this theater is "turned inside our. T he interior is dramatically revealed to the outside world through a 42-foot high, tateof-the-art, glass wall compo ed of colored glass panel The rransparency draws the out ide in and vice versa, mixing the energy of the street life wi th the excitement of the mo~ie audience inside. A lID-foot, fiber-optically lit marquee in tensi fies the effect of the colored glass panels, which are back! i t after dark. The glass curtain wall system was developed and modified from a generic design and can withstand the wind load for hurricanes. The architect applied glass to the cinema fac;:ade because of its association with modernity -the way it represents openness, lighrness technical innovation and a progressive view -hallmarks of the era from which Lincoln Road was born in the


1930s.
The jury thought this project had a refined, urbane Look that made a great contribution to city Life. In terms ofthe materials, transparency, refined detail and exchange between the building and the street, it goes beyond what peopLe expect in a theater.

Photos by Steven Brooke Studios.
flo ridn / caribbean ARCH ITECT Fall 2001





Airport Plaza Offices/Architect's Office destin DAG Architects, Destin, Florida
"There are no doors on the principal's offices. We have a true "open door policy" that has had a very positive impact on communications. This is one way in which the new office addressed and improved program needs."
Charles W Clary III, FAIA
This speculative office complex is within sight of the Gulf of Mexico and was already under construction when the architecture firm decided to relocate there. The program developed from a need for additional space that was flexible enough to promote the formation of multi-person teams and provide open communication between team members. T he structure is a pre-engineered metal building with a standing seam metal roof. In order ro provide adequate solar protection while promoting the use of natural light, louvers and wide eave overhangs were employed. The louvers and eaves shade the building while a white-painted aluminum canopy reflects light through the louvers to provide diffuse daylight deep inro the interior.
The jury noted that the Jou/' interconnected structures were a reaL pLus joT spec building flexibility. The building eLements work together to the benefit ofthe whoLe. The carefuLLydetailed sheLL and straightforward pLan produced an eLegant buiLding.
Photos bJl Jack Gardl1el:

florida / caribbean ARCHITECT
fall 2001




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Unbuilt Design Awards

HllSk-Jennings Advertising -Dyal Upchurch Building jacksonville
PappasJSA Architects, JacksonviLLe, FLorida
"The atriwn is articulated as a dream space that mediates the creative and pragmatic activities ofadvertising. It allows the public to visually engage the creative realm while providing an opportunity for the entire staff to occupy a series of personal pods that are suspended in the ether of the dream space, dislocated between the ground and the sky."
Pappas J :A Architects
The Husk-Jennings Advertising Agency occupies the second and sixrh floors of the hisroric Dyal Upchurch Building. This projecr involves the developmenr of the agency's m ain lobby and a vertical atrium in the building's existing light well. T he atrium, which mediates the pragmatic and creative spaces, is a dedicated spatial connection between the upper and lower levels. The lower level conrains reception, gallery, busines and offices and the upper level houses the creative staff and executive offices. Individual pods for agency taff are designed ro promote creative thought while wireless technology allows the pods to be fully inregrated with information networks. The result is an extremely flexible work environment.

The jury felt that the design was energetic and that there are yew projects that abstract their structural systems into new forms" as weLL as this one.
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall2DDl





Ft. Lauderdale Hollywood Int'l Airport Consolidated Rental Car Facility ft. lauderdale
MichaeL Kerwin, AlA, SpiLLis Candela & Paltners, Inc., CoraL GabLes, FLorida
"The building skin is a composition of precast concrete and aluminum panels arranged to meet the code requirement that mandates 50% open area for a parking garage. The solid/void panels and the composition of the space will result in positive/negative images from day to night."
MichaeL Kerwin, AlA

Th is facility provides parking space for cars at the Ft. Lauderdale Hollywood International Airport. The consolidated rental car facility and parking garage includes customer service facilities, fueling and service bays, a rental car rerum area, storage for 3,656 cars and public parking for 2,152 cars. Although the garage is classified as "open," mechanical ventilation was added to the design.
The jury feLt the design expressed a certain South FLorida regionaLism. They particularly Liked the facade treatment and the views.from the building at night.
Managuita managua, nicaragua

Maria Eugenia BLanco, Sonia Cruz De Baltodano, Hortensia Lanio, Oscar A. Machado, Delphi Design and DeveLopment, Coconut Grove, FLorida
"This proposal strives to recreate the social order that was lost to residents of this capital city (after an earthquake destroyed 200,000 homes). To achieve this, we've brought together all the major elements that make a neighborhood into a compact well-designed core with public spaces binding neighborhoods together in an orderly, hierarchical structure."
Delphi Design and DeveLopment
T his private enterprise calls for 700 minimum cost houses to be built in a developing nation whose capital city was destroyed by an earthquake. In order for owners to qualifY for government aid, the residential units were designed to be less than 60 square meters in plan. The town's main thoroughfare creates an important north-south axis between the commercial/ residential/ industrial area on the south and a lake on the north. The courtyard architectural prototype allowed the designers to create an L-shaped unit that can be enlarged incrementally without destroying the geometty of the town's urban fabric.
The jUlY feLt this was a vel)' humane design that was the evoLution ofa carefoL thoughtprocess. The scale comparisons in the drawings were impressive and the drawings, themseLves, very beautifid.


florida / caribbean ARCHITECT falJ 2001




Theatre of Sacrifice denver, colorado Deighton Babis, AlA, Tamp a, Florida
"The research and design process for this project included over twelve months of actual boxing training,
the construction of a one-half scale regulation-size boxing ring and inspiration found in the heart of Denver
and the soul of legendary heavyweight champion Jack Dempsey."

D eighton Babis, AlA
This 5,000-seat boxing arena and 100,000 square foot training center celebrates Jack Dempsey as Colorado's greatest athlete of all time. T he project is sited between an inner city neighborhood and the entertainment district where it creates a recreational venue for inner-city youths and a spectator forum for the public. T he open-air arena has two rings: the Quarencia, above the grandstands, is for contestants to speak to spectators prior to a fight and the Anapaest at the "floor" is for physical conflict.
The jury feLt that this project was more phiLosophicaL than reaL, butfascinating because it works on aLL axes.
florida / caribbean ARCHITECf fall 200 1



25-Year Test ofTime Award

Cooney Residence sarasota
EdwardJ Seibert, FAlA, Seibert Architects PA, Sarasota, FLorida
The Cooney House was built in 1966 for
3 ,000 on a 50-foOt wide lot. The house is one Story slab on grade wim drywall interior, sliding glas door and casement window wim Bahama shutters. The bearing block wall flat roof and stock casement windows gave me client "arcrutecrure" for a "builder" price.
traighr line impliciry flows through me plan providing a central, expandable glas pavilion and two bedroom suites one wim a walled court and anomer near me kitchen. The openness of me centra! pavilion and porch form a balance wim private bedroom wings. The original owner have maintained me house beaurifully proclaiming: "We are still in love wim rhis house. We live in a timeless and true work of art. Every day, every moment is unique. The house has entenained us for 34 years and cenainly passes me test of rime."
The jury felt the house was an ideaL solution for a Long narrow Lot. They would like to see more houses designed like this today.
Phoros by Wade Swicord
forido I caribb~an ARCHITECT Fall 2001


inward providing a contrasting experience in the more intimate bedroom and service spaces. On one end, the master bedroom wing opens to a private, walled co urtyard while the opposite end of the house contains two bedrooms, a bath, family room, kitchen, laundry and garage. The simplicity of form required perfect detailing. A successful flat roof design requires clean flashing and perfectly straight gravel stops and a way for the water to leave the roof without staining white walls. Both interior and exterior walls had to be perfectly fair and flat so that the spare would have perfect shadows in the strong Florida light. "Less is more," but the "less" must be flawlessly done.
Reflections
The Modernist work then being produced by a number of architects in our community is what later became known as "The Sarasota School of Architecture." This architecture is about the enclosure of space and capture of light. Clarity of geometric and structural concept, economy of means, and honesty in the use of materials were also the signatures of this native Sarasota architecture. While the basic theories had originated in Europe with the Bauhaus in the 1920's, Paul Rudolph and others of us adapted European Modernism to Florida's landscape and climate, to make a new regional architecture. I believe this was the appropriate architecture for our time, a unique new heritage that offered fresh social, economic, political and historical ideas. It was a time for new ideas, in Sarasota, and all over America. Ours was a premonition of a new way of life.
The Cooney House in Sarasota was awarded AlA Florida's 25-Year Test ofTime Award. Here is the house as photographed by Wade Swicord in 1966
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 2001



Multi Media Systems Design & Installation
Audio Visual Innovations (63-13) ................................... .47

Outdoor Water Products
Most Dependable Foumains (63-28) ............................... 44

Paints Interior & Exterior
Duron Paims &Wallcoverings (63-21) ......................... IBC

Plumbing -Decorative, Commercial & Residential
Farrey's Hardware (63-22) ............................................... 43

Pre-Contractor Service
Pavarini Construction (63-30) ......................................... 44

Professional Liability
Collinsworth Alter Nielson Fowler & Dowling Inc. (63-17) ................................... 49 Suncoast Insurance Associates Inc. (63-36) ......... ............... 8
Project Management
O'Donnell Naccaraco & Mignogna Inc. (63-29) .............. 49

Protective Glass
Solutia Inc. (63-35) ......................................... ................ 52

Protective Glazing
Viracon (63-38) .... .... .............. ...................................... ... 47

Recreation
McCathren Associates (63-27) ...................................... IFC

Screens -Hurricane
Savannah Trims, Inc. (63-34) ............... ............................ 49

Showers
Most Dependable Foumains (63-28) .............. .... ............. 44

Skylights -Hurricane
Savannah Trims, Inc. (63-34) ........ ................................... 49

Staffing Services
ArchiPro Staff Agency, Inc. (63-10) ............. .......... .......... 49

Structural Consulting
Universal Timber Structure (63-37) .................... ............. 50

Structural Engineering
O'Donnell Naccaraco & Mignogna Inc. (63-29) .............. 49

Structural Products
Florida Wood Council (63-24) ...... ........... ............ ............. 6


Sto EIFS Products
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Stucco & Plastering
Foam Concepts Inc. (63-25) ................ ............................ 43

Temporary Agency
ArchiPro Staff Agency, Inc. (63-10) ................................. 49

Three Dimensional Art & Sculpture
Creative Arts Unlimited (63-18) ...................................... 51

Vacation/Cruise
McCathren Associates (63-27) ...................................... IFC

Windows
Pella W indows (63-32) ...................................................... 4
PGT Industries (63-33) ......................... ................... .. OBC
Viraco n (63-38) .. .. .... .................................. ... .... .............. 47

Windows & Doors
Architectural Windows & Cabinets (63-11) ...... ... 30-31,45
Caradco (63-15) ................................................................ 1
Forest Products (63-11) ................................................... 45
HBS Inc. (63-11) .............. ............................................... 45
NOR-DEC Imernational, Inc. (63-11) ...... ...................... 45
Palm City Millwork (63-11) ............................................ 45
S & P Architectural Products (63-11) .................. ............ 45
S & S Craftsmen, Inc. (63-11) ............................. ........... .45
Smyth Lumber (63-11) .......................... .......................... 45
Weather Shield (63-11) ...... ................. ............................. 45
Window Classics Corp. (63-39) ......................... ............. ... 2

Wood
Florida Wood Council (63-24) .......................................... 6

Wood -Fire Retardent Treated
Archwood Protection (63-12) ........ .................................. 49

Wood Windows
Causeway Lumber Company (63-16) .............................. 46

Wood Windows & Doors
Window Classics Corp. (63-39) .... ..................................... 2


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Index by Category
Architectural Coatings
Duron Paints & Wallcoverings (63-21) ......................... IBC

Architectural Foam
Creative Arts Unlimited (63-18) ...................................... 51

Architectural Foam Products
Foam Concepts Inc. (63-25) ..... ....................................... 43

Architectural Products
Florida Wood Council (63-24) .... .......... ........................ .... 6

Architectural Themes, Wood, Metal Fixtures
Creative Arts Unlimited (63-18) ...................................... 51

Architecture/Beams
Universal Timber Structure (63-37) ................................. 50

Audio Visual Equipment & Services
Audio Visual Innovations (63-13) ....................................47

Audio Visual Systems Design & Installation
Audio Visual Innovations (63-13) .................................... 47

AutoCAD Software
Digital Drafting Systems (63-20) ..................................... 45

AutoCADD Software
CADD Centers of Florida (63-14) .................. ................. 46

CADD
Digital Drafting Systems (63-20) ............. ........................ 45

CADD Se.rvices
CADD Centers ofFlorida (63-14) ................................... 46
Digital Drafting Systems (63-20) ................ .... ................. 45

Construction Manager
Pavarini Construction (63-30) ......................................... 44

Consulting -All Wmdow & Door Needs
Architectural Windows & Cabinets (63-11) ......... 30-31, 45
Forest Products (63-11) ............................................ ....... 45
HBS Inc. (63-11) ............................................................. 45
NOR-DEC International, Inc. (63-11) .... ........................ 45
Palm City Millwork (63-11) .... ........................................ 45
S & P Architectural Products (63-11) .............................. 45
S & S Craftsmen, Inc. (63-11) ................................ ......... 45
Smyth Lumber (63-11 ) .......................... ...... ...... .. ............ 45
Weather Shield (63-11) .................................................... 45

ConsultinglWmdows
Architectural Windows & Cabinets (63-11) ......... 30-31,45
Forest Products (63-11) ................................................... 45
HBS Inc. (63-11) ................................................. ............ 45
NOR-DEC International, Inc. (63-11) ......................... ... 45
Palm City Millwork (63-11) ............................................ 45
S & P Architectural Products (63-11) .............................. 45
S & S Craftsmen, Inc. (63-11) ......................................... 45
Smyth Lumber (63-11) ...................... .............................. 45
Weather Shield (63-11) .................................................... 45

Continuing Education
McCathren Associates (63-27) ...................................... IFC

Design/Structure
Universal Timber Structure (63-37) .................. ............... 50

Doors
Causeway Lumber Company (63-16) .............................. 46
Federal Millwork Corp. (63-23) ....................................... 47
Pella Windows (63-32) ...................................................... 4
PCT Industries (63-33) .............................................. OBC

Doors & Wmdows
Caradco (63-15) ............................................ .................... 1

Drinking Fountains
Most Dependable Fountains (63-28) ............................... 44

Employment Agency
ArchiPro Staff Agency, Inc. (63-10) ................................. 49

Finishes Interior & Exterior
Duron PaintS & Wallcoverings (63-21) ......................... IBC

Fire Retardent Treated Wood
Archwood Protection (63-12) ........ ...... ............................ 49

General Contractor
Pavarini Construction (63-30) ......................................... 44

General Contractors
Cteative Contractors (63-19) .................... ....................... 46

Glass Solutia Inc. (63-35) ............................................ .... ......... 52 Viracon (63-38) ............................................................... 47
Glass Block
Class Masonry Inc. (63-26) ............................................. 50

Glass -Protective
Solutia Inc. (63-35) .............. ........................................... 52

Hardware -Decorative, Commercial & Residential
Farrey's Hardware (63-22) ............................................... 43

Hurricane Barriers
Savannah Trims, Inc. (63-34) ........................................... 49

Hurricane Skylights
Savannah Trims, Inc. (63-34) ........................................... 49

Impact Resistant Glass
Caradco (63-15) ................................................................ 1

Insulation
Foam Concepts Inc. (63-25) ............................................ 43

Insurance
Collinsworth Alter Nielson Fowler & Dowling Inc. (63-17) ................................... 49 Suncoast Insurance Associates Inc. (63-36) .... .................... 8
Lighting
Farrey's Hardware (63-22) ............................................... 43

Millwork
Causeway Lumber Company (63-16) .............................. 46
Federal Millwork Corp. (63-23) .............. ......................... 47

Moulding
Federal Millwork Corp. (63-23) ....................................... 47

Mouldings
Causeway Lumber Company (63-16) .............................. 46


florida / caribbean ARCHITECT
fall 2001



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Index by Company
ArchiPro Staff Agency, Inc. (63-10) ........................... 49 Architectural Windows & Cabinets (63-11) .... 30-31, 45 Archwood Protection (63 -1 2) ....... .... ..... .... .... ... .......... 49 Audio Visual Innovations (63-13) .............................. 47 CADD Centers of Florida (63 -14) .. ....... .. ... ...... .... .. .... 46 Caradco (63-15) ............................................................ I Causeway Lumber Company (63-16) ......................... 46 Collinsworth Alter Nielson Fowler
& Dowling Inc. (63 -1 7) ............................ .............. 49
Creative Arts Unlimited (63-18) ................................. 51
Creative Contractors (63 -1 9) ........................... .......... 46
Digital Drafting Systems (63-20) ............................... 45
Duron Paints & Wallcoverings (63 -21 ) ................... mc
Farrey's Hardware (63 -22) .......... ................................ 43
Federal Millwork Corp. (63 -23 ) ................................. 47
Florida Wood Council (63 -24) .... .. .. ........................ ...... 6
Foam Concepts Inc. (63-25) ....................................... 43
Forest Products (63 -11 ) .... ...... .. ....................... 30-31 45
Glass Masonry Inc. (63 -26) .............. ................ .. ........ 50


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florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 200 1




Index by Company
Cont'd
HBS Inc. (63-11 ) ......... ... 30-31 45 McCathren Associates (63-27) ................................. IFC Most Dependable Fountains (63-28) ................................... 44 NOR-DEC International, Inc. (63-11) .. ..... ... ... ... .... .... 30-31,45 O'Donnell Naccarato & Mignogna Inc. (63-29) ............................ 49 Palm City Millwork (63-11 ) .. .. .. .... .. .. ....... ... 30-31 45 Pavarini Construction
(63-30) .................. ................. 44 Pella Windows (63 -32) ...... .... ...... 4 PGT Industries (63-33) .......... OBC S & P Architectural Products
(63-11) ........................ 30-31,45 S & S Craftsmen, Inc. (63-11) ........................ 30-31,45 Savannah Trims, Inc.
(63-34) ..... .... .......................... 49 Smyth Lumber (63-11) ... 30-31,45 Solutia Inc. (63-35) .......... .......... 52 Suncoast Insurance Associates Inc.
(63-36) ..................................... 8 Universal Timber Structure
(63-37) ....... ............................ 50 Viracon (63-38) ......................... 47 Weather Shield
(63-11 ) ... ..... ..... ..... ... ... 30-31 45 Window Classics Corp. (63-39) ..................................... 2
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Jacksonville, Florida 904-725-8583
St. Augustine, Amelia Island & Panhandle 800-320-1312


Forest Products
Sarasota, Florida 941-922-0731

HBS Glass
Vero Beach, Florida 561-567-7461
Jupiter, Florida 561-743-1090


NOR-DEC International, Inc.
Miami, Florida 305-591-8050
San Juan, Puerto Rico 787-722-5425
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic 809-697-4251

Dominican Republic Showroom 809-227-7882


Palm City Millwork
Palm City, Florida 561-288-7086
West Palm Beach, Florida 800-273-5598

S & P Architectural Products
Pompano Beach, Florida 954-968-3701
Miami, Florida 305-266-2635
Ft. Meyers I Naples, Florida 800-992-8959

S & S Craftsmen, Inc.
Tampa, Florida 800-922-9663


Smyth Lumber
Orlando, Florida 407-523-8777

florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 2001






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florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 2001



JUST PUBLISHED!
Florida Architecture, A Celebration: The History ofthe Florida Association ofArchitects, AlA, 1912-2000
This beautiful 248-page, full color book tells the story of the 88year history of the Florida Architects Association. The book traces the history of the association in 10-year intervals and parallels it with the architectural thinking of the time. It is a book about the architecture of the Florida/Caribbean region seen through the work of Florida AlA members. Illustrated with over 200 professional photographs of award-winning architecture, this book is a record of the events, the people, and the buildings that have helped to shape Florida's built environment.
For a copy of Florida A rchitecture: A Celebration contact the AIA Florida office at (850) 222-7590. The cost of the book is $29.95, plus tax and shipping.

INC

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Participating advertisers are given a four digit code (located in this index). To access
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Peter B. Davidsen Middle School tampa Rowe Architects Inc01porated, Tampa, FlO1'ida
"The program objectives (of Davidsen Middle School) were met and the resulting design is an easily adaptable 'prototypical' solution developed under strict budget and site constraints. It is dearly one ofour 'success stories.'"
j. Thomas BLackwell, AlA, Director 0/PLanning and Construction,
This school is sited in a rapidly growing bedroom community that was, until recently, used for agriculture and farming. A lack of architecturally significant buildings in the area generated the goal of creating a school building that would set a precedent for future design and construction. One of the major goals for the school was to create a compact layout. To accomplish this, the architects considered the project in terms of two simple, mutually-defining elements, the massing (positive) and the circulation (negative). The primary and secondary circulation elements bring rhythmic order to the massing and tie the campus together.
With a project budget of $89 per square foot and a 14-month construction period, it was essential that building systems, scheduling, and delivery issues be an integral part of the design process. Many of the design decisions were budget driven, including the use of tilt-up concrete panels on the exterior envelope. None of the classroom building elevations are the same, but their adherence to the overall design guidelines unites the school into an attractive and viable whole.
florido / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 2001
HiLLsborough County PubLic Schools

Thejury was drawn to the honest and direct use 0/materials and the thoughtfuL pogression o/spaces within a clear and orderly plan. The spaces between the buildings (the negative) contributed greatly to creating a sense o/pLace.


Cambier Park Band Shell naples
AI'chitecturaL Network Inc., NapLes, FLol"ida
"The new band shell, which greatly alters a woefully inadequate 16-year-old facility, forms an instant landmark in our most important city park and it offers a world-class venue for all types of performances."
Mal"y Margcl1"et Gruszka, City Pal"k Manage1'
Maintaining views of the stage and covering it with a 4,000 square foot roof that co uld withstand an 80-ton wind uplift load resulted in a structure with a high strength to mass ratio. The architects specified a polyester toof fabric that would transfer wind loads to the foundation through stainless steel cable connected to the space frame. Two rows of acoustical, or sound reflection, panels are patterned after the bell of a brass horn. In order to minimize encroachment on the park, eXlstll1g storage rooms were renovated for use as greenrooms and new storage rooms were tucked behind the wings of an existing stone wall where they define the pedestrian pathway. Restrooms are located below stage level where they serve the nearby commercial district as well as the band shell.

The jury thought this tough project was handLed exquisitely. The structUl"e is Junctional tlnd beautifuL and very symboLic ofits purpose.
florida / caribbef/n ARCHITECT fall 200 I





Freund House sarasota
Guy W Peterson, AlA, Guy PetersonlOFA, Inc.
"This house has a calmness and a peacefulness that I had not anticipated. The natural light sharpens every form and heightens reflections in a way that continues to surprise me."
David Freund
This house is located in a small private island residential area where jurisdictional requi rements were a strong determinant in shaping the location and parameters of the design. The entire structure, including all columns, shear walls, floors and roof, are reinforced concrete. T he house furthers the modernist and tropical ideology that inspired Paul Rudolph's early work in Sarasota and can be seen in a nearby clubhouse and cabana complex. The client has a family with young children so the program required a separation of functions into public and private space. This resulted in a house that is a series of "cubes" that float and penetrate a concrete pavilion. These cubes are linked internally by concrete bridges and vertical circulation and each is a different color to express the different functions.
The jury felt that this house succeeded on many levels: the functions are clearly ordered, the site considerations Wel"e well-handled technicatty, the natural light was beautifolly controlled, and there is a real variety ofspaces that is reinforced by the great use ofcolor.
Photos by Steven Brooke Studio.
florida / caribbean ARCH ITECT fall 2001





Bienes Center for the Literary Arts fo rt lauderdale
Singer Architects, Fort Lauderdale

"As a testament to the overall success of the Center, locaJ architects and Librarians come here seeking design inspiration. It's clearly a library department worthy of emulation."
T he site of this Center is an existing 7,000 square foot space on the 6rh floor of Broward County's main library. The library is the final project of architect Marcel Breuer and it was not completed until after his death in 1984. It is an exposed concrete structure with cast in place concrete columns and beams. C urtain walls wrap the building. The program called for four rooms with specific uses; a ceremonial room for exhibitions and lectures, a boardroom for 24 people, a reading room for scholars and researchers, and storage for the rare book collection. A microclimate system was designed to control the environment within exhibit cases and the storage vault. Building materials are free of volatile organic compounds and the facility is designed to protect books from ultraviolet light, humidity, theft and fire. The architect noted that the design of the Rare Book Room was directed by respect for the idea of knowledge and the dignity of the books that it houses.

Broward County M ain Libra1), statement

The jury Jelt this was an outstandingly clear presentation and that evel), detail ofthe project was done right. The contrast between had and soft materials, the detailing and the colors aff contribute to this beautifidly crafted space.
florida I caribbean ARCHITECT fall 2001




Luminaire Corporate Headquarters and Warehouse mzamz
Mateu Cm'reno Rizo & Partners, Inc., Coral Gables, Florida
"The design of our corporate headquarters building meets and exceeds all expectations. It is very much consistent with our philosophy of design as a way oflife. We live what we sell."
Nasir Kassamali, Owner
In each of the three p rojects the architect has designed for this client, "design as a way of life" has been clearly articulated in the built forms. The C orporate Headquarters building consists of two major elemen ts; a corporate office that is public and a warehouse that is private. These components are connected by a "bridge" that acts as a delicate transition between the two spaces. The distinct yet related functions of the two spaces are treated architecturally as separate volumes with each function wrapped in different, and appropriate, skin. Concrete panels define the warehouse and the office componen t is a rectangular glass structure with steel-framed spaces. The central space is a void in the second floor that creates a volume to accommodate the vertical ci rculation and visually tie the floors together. The use of glass on the exterior and for interior partitions gives the building a transparent quality that is consistent with the company's philosophy.


The jury saw "magic in the Linkage between these two buildings. Two very different buildings were designed in a way that's appropriate to their functions. DetaiLing, composition and articuLation ofmateriaLs are exceLLent.
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 200 l







Okaloosa Walton Community College Observatory niceville
DAG Architects, Inc., Destin, Florida
"The Observatory program, comprised of Path, Vestibule, Classroom, Light lock, Telescope tower and Dome,
has been organized as a teaching device that allows both students and the general public to embark on
an elliptical orbit... becoming a particle in motion, rotating around the structure similar to the rotation
and orbit of the earth, moon, the planets, comets, and interstellar phenomenon."

DAG Architects Inc.
Scheduled for construction in the late summer of 200 1, the observatory will house an advanced custom-built reflecting telescope. This telescope will be connected, via high speed Internet to users around the world. Construction materials consist of reinforced concrete block, brick veneer, stucco and plaster.
The jury filt that the form ofthe building and the organization ofthe plan were highly original
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 2001


Seaside Ceremonial Landmark Design Competition "Entry By Sea" seaside
Matthew Kragh, AlA, and Nico Anderson, Architectural Network Inc. Naples, Florida
"The 'Gateway to Seaside by Sea' was an idea-based competition for a landmark gateway structure. The competition entries were encouraged to reflect Seaside's established traditions and bridge the communities' past with its future."
Architectural Network Inc.
This concept for accessing the Town of Seaside from the water involves having a place for guests to moor boats while visiting the town. A water taxi service is used to transport people from the mooring structure to the beach. The mooring structure has a boat-like form that is mobile and flexible enough to function as a protective structure, even in hazardous weather. From the beach, guests climb stairs to a structure containing showers, restrooms and personal lockers. T his new access to the Town of Seaside places visitors in the heart of the commercial area close to shops, restaurants and hotels.

The jury saw this project as having strong anthropomorphic qualities. They felt that it was an extremely original solution, although in practical terms it would probably have to be rebuilt often because ofthe wear from salt water, wave action, etc.


florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 200 I




10-Year Test ofTime Award

Appleton Art Museum ocala
Rowe H oLmes Barnett Architects, Tampa, FLorida
The Appleton Art Museum was designed in 1983 and completed three years later. In an attempt to avoid resorting to the popular cliches of Post-Modernism, the architects chose an axial plan. This spatial arrangement produced a formality consistent with the owner's imperative of providing an appropriate backdrop for the museum's artworks. The predominant interior and exterior cladding is travertine marble and archi tectural detail was kept to a minimum, further emphasizing the importance of the exhibits.

The jury feLt there was a great deaL ofrestraint in the execution ofthis building. The design has a lyricaL quaLity that continues to make it a wonderfuL pubLic sp ace.
Photos by George Cott Chroma, Inc.


florida / caribbean ARCH ITECT faJl 200 I



Reflections on the Cooney House / EdwardJ Seibert, FAIA
"In architecture... or in any creative venture...it is the concept that counts.
Paul Rudolph, today acknowledged as one of the important architects of the last century, started his career in Sarasota. I believe that most of the principles of "The Sarasota School" originated with him. Nearly 50 years ago, as a young draftsman, I heard him discuss with Henry Russell-Hitchcock the idea that lesser talents in architecture needed an "academy" wi th a set of design principles and standards to follow. This, of course, had been the case with a Beaux Arts education which many of us had. Listening to this and other conversations, I decided that Rupolph was to be my master and teacher, a new Vitruvius. Like some others, I believed I had "found the answer." This was my beginning, as it was for others who worked hard and were creative. We sometimes had to break the rules.
The Team
The Cooney House was a successful project because the people who worked on it had a common vision and the whole became greater than the sum of its parts.
The house is a result of the meeting of minds between two friends Dick Cooney and I had known each other back when we were doing work for the Sarasota School Board. He was School Board attorney and an art collector with a number of fine paintings by local artists. He was knowledgeable about art and architecture, and he agreed with me that the Modernist direction was germane to our time. When he bought a lot in 1965, he wanted to build at a reasonable price, but the house had to end up as architecture, a contemporary work of art. Could I design such a house? For a guy like Dick Cooney, I knew I could.
Frank Thyne was another friend who came to Sarasota to learn to be a builder. His academic background made him an apt student of architectural theory and he quickly understood the principles of architectural design. Frank agreed to build the house. The final member of our team was Terry Rowe, an interior designer of intuitive talent who had worked with me on other projects. He understood the spatial concept of buildings and how to handle the space in, around, and between furniture. The big globe light fixture, the strong color scheme, and all of the furnishings were the result of his input.
The House
Clarity of concept and meticulous detail and workmanship using ordinary materials are what make this design work. Thirty-five years ago, this house was built on a 50-foot lot as simply and inexpensively as we could make it. It had bearing block walls, a flat roof, stock windows and stuCCO and drywall finishes. What was special about the house was the pavilion living area with its 10-foot ceiling, full height glass walls and visual extension to the outdoors. We took advantage of the heavily planted neighboring lots for the view from the living pavilion and porch, but the remainder of the four-bedroom house turns
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 2001



End Notes

The recent AlA Florida meeting at the Vinoy Renaissance Resort in Sr. Petersburg provided a wonderful opportunity ro sketch the surroundings. The hotel, built in 1925, is a Mediterranean Revival jewel that many conference attendees rook the opportunity ro draw. Presented here are some sketches (and lecture notes) by Clifford Ouch, AIA, Principal in the Jacksonville firm of Cronk Ouch Miller.



florida / caribbean ARCHITECT fall 2001



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