Group Title: Florida Caribbean architect
Title: FloridaCaribbean architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004635/00016
 Material Information
Title: FloridaCaribbean architect
Alternate Title: Florida Caribbean architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Publisher: Dawson Publications,
Dawson Publications
Place of Publication: Timonium Md
Publication Date: Summer 2001
Copyright Date: 1997
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 44, no. 1 (spring 1997)-
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Issues have also theme titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004635
Volume ID: VID00016
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA5904
ltuf - ACJ1464
oclc - 36846561
lccn - sn 97052000
 Related Items
Preceded by: Florida architect

Full Text




P

CONTINUING EDUCATION
TIREDOF THE SAME OLD SEMINAR? WE THOUGHT SO.

Introducing CE@SEA. Complete 12 Continuing Education Credits aboard Voyager ofthe Seas where you'll not only experience the largest and most innovative cruise ship ever built but engage in a detailed study of this ultimate design challenge and most innovative multi-use facility in the world.



12 hours HSW Continuing Education Credits using the most advanced, self-contained, floating city as the lab.


Detailed study of the most innovative multi-use facility in the world includes behind the scenes inspections of key facility functions and processes, led by key members of the design team and members of the Owner's project team.


Design team members present daily seminars covering design and engineering challenges, response to design issues such as fire protection and egress, logistics, and operation and maintenance.


.
J"""~~""""~
Bring the entire family, irs the best vacation value.
BOOK NOW FOR THE NEXT AVAILABLE CRUISE
February 24, 2002 The seminar format allows you to participate in all cruising activities. You
(and your family and/or travel companion) can experience the rich variety
of entertainment and recreation available on board as well as participate in

V

various shore activities and sample the rich Caribbean colonial architec
7 Night Western Caribbean ture and food.

Miami Labadee Ocho Rios
Grand Cayman Cozumel Miami

The Ultimate Design Challenge Seminar provides you with an in-depth behind the scenes study of the world's largest cruise ship while also earning you 12 CE credits in a vacation setting.
To find out more about The lfitimate Design Challenge Cruise Seminar, log on to www. CE4ME .org
Cf

1-877-5-CRUISE

Check out our on-line course offering too!


Prices arc Pel' persOll, double OCcttpmlC)\ ct7tise only and arc ill US doimn. This promoti(}11 may be withdrawII at (I1IY time with(tlIt 1I0tice. GUl'ernmC1ltal depamtt'e taxes & foes m'e additional. CC1'taitlremictiolls apply. 2001 Royal Calibbe{ttI Cmises Ltd. Sbips of orwegiall & Libeliall legistty. SL01-120967 06/2001


Caradco Impact Resistant Glass

Get the best of protection froIn the worst of all eleInents
Caradco windows and patio doors with impact resistant glass are :
SAFE. Tested and approved to meet South Florida impact requirements,
including projectile impact.
SECURE. This means additional security against unwanted intruders.
BEAUTIFUL. The design possibilities are endless. From traditional to contemporary,
in a wide range of styles and options.

For more information contact:
Millwork Sales, Inc. 3005 Mercy Drive Orlando, FL 32808
(888) 604-7979
Millwork Sales, Inc. 3250 Park Central Blvd. North Pompano Beach, FL 33064
(888) 751-2474
CMS International Export, Inc. 5780 NW 72nd Avenue Miami, FL 33166
(305) 594-9877
Parr ofrhe JELD-WEN'"family
www.caradco.coIU


florida / caribbean ARCHITECT
U. OF FLA. LIBRARIES


10


21
contents, summer2001

Carl Abbott, FAIA, Architects/Planners PA 16
Guy Peterson/OFA, Inc. 18
Robert C. Bischoff/Master Craftsman 21
The Renaissance Vinoy Resort 23
Stefanos Polyzoides, AIA 26

Cover photo ofthe Sanderling Beach House by Steven Brooke. Architectw'e by Guy Peterson, AlA,






President's Message / Miguel <'Mike" A. Rodriguez, AlA
In a few short weeks, architects from arou nd Florida will gather at me Renaissance Vinoy Resort in St. Petersburg for AIA Florida's annual convention. I'll be mere. After all it would be bad taste if me Association's president skipped our on the premier event of me year. But me real question is: "Will you be there and why, or why not?"
There is no question mat we each have our own, very distinct reasons for everything we do and perhaps you've already made up your mind about this year's convention. So I'd like to take a few minutes of your time to share wim you why I feel our convention is important and why I think you should be mere. Maybe you'll agree and decide to join us.
Conventions take place for a variety of reasons but mey all have one purpose. It's to bring togemer a group of people wim common interests ro share knowledge or information. We also hold a Board Meeting and me Associations Annual Meeting.
For me, our convention is about a lot of things. Of course, mere's me CE credit, a great Trade Show, Golf & Tennis Tournaments and many other things to do. But despite all this, there's another, more important reason to attend the convention. I enjoy spending the time with friends.
The convention provides an opportunity to spend time, outside the meetings and sessions, with people I don't ordinarily see. In fact, there's a whole group of people I see only once a year at the convention. I've been to many meetings and conventions where the greatest benefit was the opportunity it provided to share opinions and ideas with colleagues, whether about practice, me Association, or our families. In my opinion, this is the uue value of a convention. In fact, it's that "fellowship" mat I consider one of the greatest benefits of membership in AIA Florida. I probably wouldn't know half of the people in the State association if it weren't for having worked on the same committee, attended the same session, or just chatted with a group of people between sessions. Without my participation in AIA events, like the convention, there is no doubt that I would have labored the last 18 years in my own little architectural vacuum with nothing but monthly newsletters and magazines to inform and inspire me.
Instead, I've had the opportunity to meet, talk to, compare ideas wim, and learn from the most talented and respected architects in Florida, me US, and around the world, and you are them!
So this August I hope you'll join me in St. Petersburg. We'll have something for everyone whether it's the interesting courses, the gallery tours, the golf and tennis tournaments, or a design charrette to benefit me community (and earn you CE credits). There is even an evening awards gala to recognize all our good work. But most important, you never know whom you'll meet and get to share a few stories with. I hope it'll be me.
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT summer2001


It had all the potential to be brilliant. But they just didn't quite get it.
Suddenly, compromises had to be made. But not everywhere. The saving grace
was the windows. Because there's a kindred soul that shares your passion for
.
the o n 1y t h t n 9 scarler
fine detail. From 7/8 N TOL, five hardwood interiors, all the way to the only
vinyl window you would ever specify with con
fide n ce. Unlik e so many others .. they get it.


(800) 477-6808 ext
www wrath.rsb/ tld c om



Work-in-Progress

Retzsch Lanao Caycedo (RLC) Architects, Boca Raron, will design a 30,000 sf Operations Center for Seaside Development Corporation. The new building will be located in Santa Rosa Beach adjacent ro the new urbanist community of Seaside. The center will include two buildings that will be used for administrative, support, and srorage purposes.
RLC has also been retained ro design a signamre facility for Roll 'n Lock Corporation. The design fealllres a "billboard wall" that wraps the entire building. An office/showroom wi ll pierce the wall for dramatic effect.
Gordon & Associates, Architects, Mt. Dora, provided comprehensive architectural design ervices for the new $1.6 million, 14,000 sf Florida Eye Care, Laser and Cataract Centers in Zephyrhills. The facility includes a surgery center for laser refractive surgery and cosmetic eyelid surgery, 19 examining rooms, an ocular pharmacy and optical department.
Garcia Brenner Stromberg Architecture Planning Interiors, Boca Raron and Smart, is designing a 30,000 sf, three-srory country club facility ro be built in Bowling Green, Kentucky. The club will be silllated on 500 acres in the new Limesrone Golf and Country Club project. The clubhouse will integrate contemporary elements inro traditional Kentucky vernacular architecture using natural Kentucky limesrone, wood and brick. Twenty homes and 27 golf villas will be built in the sam e style.
Barany Schmitt Summers Weaver and Parmers, Inc., Ft. Myers, has designed the Marco Beach Ocean Reso rt for [he Gulf Bay Group ofCompanies. The exterior structure has been completed and the 103-room hotel/ condominium is scheduled ro open in the fall of2001. More than 75 percent of the one-and two-bedroom suites have been sold.



Morris Architects is Design Architect for the Simulator Wing at DAYTO A USA in Dayrona Beach. The 10,000 sf project includes an expansion of the existing attraction and visiror's center, a new venue for an IWERKS motion simularor theatre, and an expanded velocirorium. Morris Architects is providing Hardscape and Landscape Architecture design services for [he Promenade at Marina Cabo San Lucas, Baja California, Mexico. The project feamres colorful paving in a wave motifcombined with Pre-Columbian iconic images, banners, benches and landscaping along the Marina Promenade. Morris Architects was also commissioned by the Mexican Council for Tourism Promo
jIorido /c,!ribbeanARCHrTEer summer 2001





WINDOW & DOOR SOLUTIONS


Impact-Approved/High Design Pressure Products


Commercial/Residential


Export/Domestic



Remodel/Replacement/New Construction


For help with a project, call Greg Bevan at 800-999-4868.
~VIEWED TO BE THEBEST"
MIAMI ORLANDO TAMPA WE ST PALM BEACH SARASOTA NAPLES LARGO
Windows tough
enough to
4

stand up to a
I I 1hurricane.


~Wi!!f!g!'&t"
Visibly Berrer.'
Before you build or remodel; find out how PGrWinGuard
J Impact-Resistant Wmdows and Doors provide your home with effortless, full-time protection against flying deblis and hurricane force winds.
2601 South Andrews Avenue. Fort lauderdale 800-375-5050
Visit Our Website: www.causewaylumber.com
florida /caribbean ARCH [TEeT summer200 1



Mizner Inducted Into Hall of Fame
AlmOSt 70 years after his death, Addison Mizner has been inducted into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame. Mizner is credited with introducing the Mediterranean Revival style of architecture into South Florida. He was nominated for the Hall ofFame by the Boca Raton Historical Society. Mizner was born in California in 1872 and he traveled extensively in Latin America and Spain. He moved to Florida at the age of47 and quickly established himself as a staple of Palm Beach society.
In the mid-1920s, at the height of the Florida land boom, Mizner and his brother, Wli on, set out ro transform the small rown of Boca Raron into a magnificent planned city. The boom ended before their plans could be realized and Mizner died at the age of 6l. Bur he left a legacy ofbuilding including the Everglades Club and the Via Mizner in Palm Beach -buildings that have become the hallmark of Florida architecture.
Addison Miznel: The Everglades Club in Palm Beach which Addison Mizner designed in 19 19.
NE Hourly Billing Rates Up
According to the D esign Firm Management & Administration Report
(March 2001), Staff hourly billing rates rose 8% in 2000 over 1999, with the median rate for principals climbing from $116 to $125 (up 8%) and for senior draftsmen from 55 to 63, an increase of 13%." These statistics come from the AlE Fees and Pricing Smvey published by P MJ Resource, Inc. The survey also reveals that markup on con u1tants and reimbursable expen es stood teady at 10%, but notes a drop in the actual percentage ofNE -owner agreements that permit markups.
"Lump sum is still the most popular form of contract, accounting for 41% followed by hourly (time and materials) at 22% of all contracts, and hourly wi th maximum at 17 %. Percentage of construction COSt, historically the most popular type of contract, has sunk to a modest 9% of contracts, followed by cost plus fixed fee at 7%."
When actually figuring their fees for submittal or negotiation wi th the client, an overwhelming majority of AlEs still uses percentage of construction cost, typically supplemented by time and effort as a check.
There are a number of factors contributing to billing rates including cash flow, computer use, liability
. .
lI1surance prtce competltlOn, proposal hit rates and repeat business. T he findings of the Fee & Price Survey clearly point to steps that firms should take. For example: "Learn from the 40% median hit rate in proposals -it tell you that 60% of the typically costly proposal preparation effort is wasted."
Subscription information about the Design Firm Management Administration Report can be found online at WWW.lOma.com.
Architect's Design Group Celebrates 30 ,h Anniversary with Museum Exhibit
The Maitland Art Center, one ofCentral Florida's finest museums, will explore urban art through public sector architecture in an exhibit
florida / caribbeanARCHlTECf summer2001


Carl Abbott FAIA -Architects/Planners PA sarasota, florida
The Dolphin House, Sarasota, Florida
Top: Night view o/the housefrom the south showing
Central Space and flanking wings. Far left: Pool deck
and stair to first floor living space. Left: View from the
south window wall toward the city o/Sarasota. All photos
by Steven Brooke Studios.
jloridn / caribbean ARCH [TECT summer 2001



Guy Peterson/OFA, Inc. sarasota, florida
Sanderling Beach House, Siesta Key, Florida
Color is back in style as the structure with its gathering
reflected in design trade shows entry wall.
from Frankfurt to Paris. A Guy Peterson grew up in
recent design industry publica Sarasota and has always been
tion reported that the colors of aware of the importance of Paul
choice are not the startling Rudolph's work and the creation
"Mediterranean brights that ofwhat is now known as the
never really made it across the Sarasota School ofArchitecture.
Atlantic," bur are softer, subtler While Peterson says that the
combinations of oranges, blues, vision Rudolph had for the
greens, yellows and all
shades of lavender, from
heather to deep plum.
In a new residence in
the Gulf ofMexico designed
by Sarasota architect Guy
Peterson, the palette of
colors includes purple,
orange, and yellow, each
used on a concrete cube to
define a specific program
matic function. According
to the architect, a single
common shell found on the
beach inspired the colors of

East elevation and Children's Wing overgarage. Photo
the cubes. The purple cube
by Steven Brooke Stlldios.
houses a living room for entertaining and a guest suite, Sanderling area never really came children's living areas are in the to fruition, the intent of this burnt orange cube, and yellow house was "to advance the was selected for family living international style ofModernspaces and the master bedism" on Siesta Key where it surely room. The white cube, which began with Rudolph's design for centers the house, contains the the Sanderling Beach Club in dining room and exercise 1952. This house, designed for a functions. The white cube also family from Chicago, also serves as the grounding element furthers the tropical ideology that that "sweeps out from under inspired Rudolph's early work.

Since the house was designed for a family, including two young children, the program required a separation of functions for both daily living and entertaining guests. The program functions are contained within cubic volumes set into an exposed reinforced concrete frame. The house has approximately 7,500 sfcontained in a series of cubes that float and penetrate an 18' by 18' rein
forced concrete pavilion. Internally, concrete bridges and vertical circulation link the cubes. A continuous twOfoot band ofopen space separates all of the interior spaces from the ceiling, thus heightening the effect of floating interior spaces. A glazing system containing 3,600 feet ofglass curtain wall conneCts the programmatic volumes and provides major views to the circulation spaces. All of the glass in the curtain wall is heat-strengthened, triple-laminated, and impact

resisrant.
The main living spaces are located on the first floor above the flood base elevation. On the upper level, the master bedroom opens to a landscaped terrace on the roof that overlooks private gardens. A foyer running the full height of the residence connects the terrace and all living levels with the ground floor entry.
jloriklcaribbeanARCHITECT summer 2001



~
.......

0
LNHG ROOM
Project Credits: Guy Peterson, 0 ROOM
0
AIA: Design Archi tect; Stirling &
IP
fI ~
'----:"
Wilbur Engineering: Structural IH-II 111I1 1111111
II 11111
Engineering; Stephen Hazeltine: Landscaping Design; Pierce Construction: Contractor.

florida/ caribbeanARCHITECf summer 2001


Photos, previous page: Bischoffat work in the M aster Craftsman Studio. This page, top Jefr: A student removes a plaster cast.Fom its mold. Top right: A concrete bench fabricated to compLiment FS Us CoLLegiate Gothic architectu.re. Above: A sea serpent bolLard being instaLled. ALL photos by BiLL Langford.
and a computerized router, the craftsman can scan a model of the piece to be fabricated and
then program the router to carve it. Ornamental wood carving for a large-scale interior
installation can be produced, or
reproduced, any number of times. T hese applications can be used for reproducing artworks, architectural ornament, and furniture design and co nsuucuon.
Since graduating from FSU with a degree in Fine Arts, Bob Bischoff has had a successful career fabricating rep roductions of artworks for the Metropolitan Museum in New York City. Commercially, his work can been seen in numerous restaurants, several Las Vegas casinos, and major department rores such as Lord & Taylor and the May Company. Before joining the FSU faculty, he and his wife, Joann, completed a major stained glass commission for the University. The 14' by 24' window is in the Werkmeister Reading Room in Dodd Hal l and it has become the centerpiece for a series of smaller windows lining the east and west walls the room. As donors come
forward, the smaller windows are being filled with stained glass, rendering the room both awe-inspiring and historically significant.
The new partnership between Florida State U niversity and rhe Ringling Museum complex in Sarasota has opened up the possibility of reproducing artworks for sale in the Ringling gift shop or on the museum grounds. John Ringling was an avid collecror whose massive collection exceeded the space to display it. Much of what would have been used as garden sculpture has been relegated to a secluded spot on rhe Ringling campus and many of rhe pieces have been broken through the years. A number of these large outdoor artworks, including broken architectural details such as capitals and parts of cornices, are being reproduced for use on the Ringling campus. Eventually, some of these components may be made available for sale to museum Vlslrors.
j1.orida / caribbeanARCHlTECf summer 2001


vaulted ceilings, leather and wrought iron chandeliers and stenciled cypress beams were the order of the day. W hen the hotel opened in 1925, there were 375 guesrrooms with an average size of 250 sf. Original acco mmodations at the Vinoy Park Hotel contained oversized closets to house the large steamer trunks winter guests brought with them, thus making the rooms fairly small. The total cost of the original project was $3.5 million.
The $93 million rescoration succeeded in rescoring the hotel co its former glory. It is currently listed on both the National Register of Hiscoric Places and Hiscoric Hotels of America. In order to qualify for membership in the latter, the artwork and restoracion construction had co replicate the original. In fact, there was so much attention co detail that the original Washingconia Palm Trees that were planted around the hotel when it opened in 1925 were dug up, put in a nursery, and replanted in their original posltlons.
Previous page, [Op: The Renaissance Vinoy Resort as it looks today. Bo[[om: The Vinoy~ Landmark Tower with its Mediterranean Baroque StltCCO detail. T his page, [Op: Exterior detail of the dining room windaw. Bo[[om: The newly refilrbished hotel lobby. All
photos courtesy ofthe Renaissance Vi110Y Resort.
forUM / caribbean ARCH mCf summer 2001


Stefanos Polyzoides, AlA los angeles, california

Above: Gvano New Town in Tucson, Arizona, is a modeL ofsustainabLe deveLopment in tl desert environment. It uses covered patios, shaded courtyards, deep0' recessed openings, rammed-enrth or tldobe waLls, wind towers, and other passive cooLing techniques as practicaL remedies to the desert heat. The Neighborhood Centel; pictured here, is within eas), waLking disttlnce oftlLL residences and it gathers the community together for indoor and outdoor Leisure and recreation activities. ALL photos courtesy ofthe architect. Right: UCLA Southwest Campus Student Housing, Los AngeLes, CaLifornia. This 15-acre heavily wooded site wiLL eventuaLly consist ofa 1,200-unit hOllsing compLex for singLe graduate, profossio'l7tlL and upper division undergraduate students. The first phase includes master pLanningfor the entire site and the construction ofapproximately 525 twobedroom and 3 00 studios ofhousing with 1,375 parking spaces partiaLly beLow grade. Inspired by L.A's traditionaL Courtyard Housing, the project ties into the urban fobric ofthe neighborhood. Next page: The newest buiLding for the NaturaL Resources Defonse CounciL (NRDC) in Santa Monica, CaLifornia. The 15,000 sfproject wiLL incorporate the most effective technoLogies avaittlbLefor energy and water conservation; integration ofrenewabLe and recyclabLe materials; and consideration ofthe Ltltest technoLogies in highly efficient buiLding materials. The sensitivity concerning lISe ofthese products extends to examining the impact that the manufocturing process and means ofshipping the products has on the environment.

jloridn / cflribbctlnARCHITECT summer 2001



Practice Notes


The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) is stressing to architects that "fishing without a license" is unacceptable. In response to the question, "Is it acceptable for a registered archi tect to come in to a state where hel she is not registered to offer professional services without first getting registered there? NCARB's answer is "No,' it is not acceptable. However, it is importan t to note that the rules applicable to "fishing expeditions" are designed to assist qualified archi tects who are seeking wo rk beyond their own state lines. The rules have been developed to assure the "host" jurisdiction, as well as prospective clients, that you the architect seeking work -are qualified to carry out the services you are offering, should you be commissioned to perform them. And, it is a process that further validates the field's commitment to protecting the health, safety and welfare of the public.
Many state registration boards either have adopted rhe rules relevant to "fishing rights" from NCARB 's Legislative Guidelines or have written rules similar to them. According to Section IV of the Guidelines, if you are a non-resident architect, you must meet three criteria before you may offer services in a srate beyond yo ur own.
1) You must hold a current and valid registration issued by a registration authoriry recognized by the host state board;

2) You must hold an NCARB certificate; and
3) You must notify the state board, in writing, that you will be "present in the jurisdiction for the purpose of offering to render archi tectural
.

servlces. Additionally, you must state in this notice that you will "deliver a copy of the notice to every porential client. .. and that you promise to apply immediately to the board "if selected as the architect for the project in that jurisdiction.
NCARB's Legislative Guidelines also recognize a related issue namely, whether or not, as a nonresident architect, you may come into a jurisdiction to compete in a design competition without first being registered. The requirements for competition are virtually the same as those for non-resident architects seeking a commission in a state beyond their own. To participate in a design co mpetition, you must hold a valid registration and an NCARB Certificate, and you must also noti fy the host board, in writing, that you are participating in the competition. Further, you must state in your noti ce that should YOll be chosen as the architect for the proJect, you will immediately apply to the state board for registration.
NCARB publishes and regularly updates Member Board Requirements, a document which provides state-by-state rules on such practice questions as those discussed here. The document also notes the individual state boards' requirement for "initial regis tration" and "reci procal registration." Both of these publications can be obtained by contacting NCARB at 202/783-65 00 or you can visit the Council web site and view individual state requireme nts at www. n ca r b 0 rgl st a te b oard s I index.htm!.
forida /caribbeanARCHITECf summer 200]




Perms-Shield cladding system, which provides the low-maintenance exterior and durability customers have come to expect from Andersen."
The forest green exterior option is available in a complete range of Ander en 400 Series windows and patio doors -tiltwash double-hung windows, casement and awning windows, specialty windows, and Frenchwood hinged and gliding patio door.
See Andersen at the AlA FLorida Tradeshow, August 3, 2001 at the Renaissance Vinoy Resort & Golf CLub, St. Petersburg, FLorida, Booth
#15.
CREATE DYNAMIC SPECIALTY CEILINGS
To help design professionals take the guesswork out of specialty ceiling design; USG Corporation has introduced the USG Design Wizard for Specialty Ceilings. This new software enables design professionals to specify unique ceiling options using four of USG's specialty ceiling lines -CADRE Ceiling Coffers, COMPAsSOTM Suspension Trim, the CURVATURATM 3-D Ceiling System and the RENDITIO STM Compurer-Generated Ceiling System.
Intended for use with AutoCAD 14.01 or AuroCAD 2000, the Design Wiza rd allows des ign professionals to prepare more accurate 3-D renderings and specifications that can be exported inro their own plans.
"The Design Wizard saves incredible amounts of time by facilitating the design process," says Graeme Gee, product manager, Specialty Ceilings, USG Corporation. "By telling the software exactly what to do including plugging in the numbers and making choices on color, grid size and suspension profile -rhe Design Wizard shows design professionals how it should work by generating a precise design that eliminates gue swork and miscalcul ations.
For further information about the
USG Design Wizard for SpeciaLty
Ceilings, contact USG Corporation 125 S. Franklin St., Chicago, lL
60606, caLL 1-800-USG-4YOU or
visit the USG Web site at
www.usg.com.
METAL TOUCHES EVOLVING AS DESIGN TREND
Whether it's a home kitchen sporting all the professional stainless steel appliances normally found in a five-star restauran t or a master bathroom featuring elegant brushed nickel hardware, metals are fast becoming the "in" design product in the home. This escalating trend is especially being felt in kitchens and baths, two of the most popular rooms of the home.
"Warm metals, such as copper and bronze, are becoming popular in kitchen and bath settings," says Mary Jo Peterson, CKD, CBO and president of Mary Jo Peterson Design consultants in Connecticut. "These warm metals complement the growing trend of using hues from the orange family -which can range from pumpkin ro terra cotta ro tangerine -as accents in the home.
Bath accents using METALLONTh'.
"Blue is the color that most
industry professionals agree will have
the greatest impact in the coming
years. Cooler metals, like stainless
steel and nickel actually strengthen
shades of blue -especially when they
have a brushed or satin finish. And,
warmer metals like brass and copper
metals will continue to grow in
popularity during the next several
years in the home.
One way designers can add
metal accents to homes is with
products finished with
METALLO TM. Available as a finish
option on a wide variety of millwork,
trim, moulding and window prod
ucts, METALLON is a real metal
coating. Available in brass, copper,
florida / caribbean ARCHlTECf summer 2001


JUST PUBLISHED!


Florida Architecture, A Celebration: The History ofthe Florida Association ofArchitects, AlA, 1912-2000
This beautiful 248-page, full color book tells the story of the 88-year history of the Florida Architects Association. The book traces the
history of the association in 10-year intervals and parallels it with the architectural thinking of the time. It is a book about the architecture of the Florida/Caribbean region seen through the work of Florida AlA members. Illustrated with over 200 professional photographs of award-winning architecture, this book is a record of the events, the people, and the buildings that have helped to shape Florida's built environnlent.
For a copy ofFlorida Architecture: A Celebration, contact the AlA Florida office at (850) 222-7590. The cost of the book is $29.95, plus tax and shipping.



The Borde Group
4847 S. Orange Blossom Trail
Orlando FL. 32839

Profe ional Security

Design Consultants

Phone: 407-851-8734
Fax: 407 -851 -1215

ii.



CADD
CENTERS OF '" ORm.
Need AIA Learning Units?
CADD Centers of Florida is an
authorized AlA Training Facility
offering classes in
AutoCAD,
Architectural Desktop,
and 3D Studio VIZ.
We also offer sales service and
support for your software and
hardware needs.
Call 800-222-4889 or visit

www.caddfla.com
,-'''of,

autodesk'(,g
forida / caribbean ARCHITEeT
summer 200 1




The metal oxide coating is INSIDE the glass which eliminates problems currently experienced with outside-coated glass block, along with superior sun-blocking performance!
For more information, contact:
Glass Masonry Inc. 5000 Oakes Road, #F Fort lauderdale, Fl 33314 Phone: (800) 940-4527 FAX: (954) 584-8824 www.glassmasonry.com



AV System Design & Installation
Sales & Rental
Event Staging & Production
Rental
Repair
j.W~Audio ~T Innovations
Tampa/Corporate 800.282.6733 Jacksonville 888.387.9572 Orlando 877.550.6205 www.aviinc.com
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT summer 2001



Alphabetical

INDEX to ADVERTISERS

Archi Pro Staffing Agency Inc.(37-36) .............................. 33
Arch Wood Protection (37-10) .............. .................... ......... 35
Architectural Windows & Cabinets (37 -11) .... ................... 8-9,33
Audio Visual Innovations (37 -12) ............................... ....... 34
The Bordes Group (37 -13) ................................................. 32
CADD Centers of Florida (37-14) ...................................... 32
Caradco (37-15) ........ .......................................................... 1
Causeway Lumber Company (37-34) .................... ............ 12
Collinsworth Alter Nielson Fowler & Dowling Inc.

(37-16) ..................................... ....................... ............. 35
Creative AIts Unlimited (37-32) ................... .... .................. 38
Creative Contractors (37-1 7) .............................................. 34
Digital Drafting Systems (37 -18) ................................ ....... 33
Duron Paints & Wallcoverings (37-19) ...... ....... ................. IBC
Federal Millwork Corp. (37-31) .... ..................................... 32
The Fidler Group/Columbia Cascade (37-20) ...... .............. 37
Florida Wood Council (37-21) ...... ..................................... 4
Forest Products (37-11) ........................ .............................. 8-9,33
Glass Masonry Inc. (37-22) ................................................ 34
HBS Inc. (37-11) ........ ........ .......... ...................................... 8-9, 33
Kraft Construction Co., Inc. (37-35) .............. .................... 36
Masterpiece Tile Co. (37 -23) .............................................. 35
McCathren Associates (37-24) ................... ........................ IFC
Most Dependable Fountains (37-25) ..... ............................. 34
Nor-Dec International (37-11) ........ .................................... 8-9 33
O'Donnell Naccarato & Mignogna Inc. (37-37) ............ ... 37
Palm City Millwork (37-11) .................. .... ......................... 8-9, 33
Pella Windows & Doors (37-26) .... .................................... 12
PGT Industries (37 -27) .... .......................... ......................... OBC
S & P Architectural Products (37-11) ................................. 8-9, 33
S & S Craftsmen (37-11) .............. ...................................... 8-9, 33
Smyth Lumber (37-11) .................. .... .......... ....................... 8-9,33
SUl1coast Insurance Associates (37 -28) ................ .............. 6
TRACO (37-33) .................................................. ................ 25
VlRACON (37-29) ........ ...... ............................................... 40
Weather Shield (37-11) .... ........ .................................... ....... 8-9, 33
Window Classics (37-30) ................ ...... ............................. 2


florido / caribbean ARCHITECT summer 2001







15 different design families. Select from over 200 designer colors. Specifier catalog available See more at www.timberform .com
F The Fidler Group
460 w.84th SI., Miami, FL 3301 4 Phone 305/558-6667 Fax 305/558-6669
IL@ @ &:rllID ~ IF@ IT )If@TIll ~
Make the florida / caribbean ARCHITECT quarterly work for you.
Reserve your ad spacefor the next issue by calling Dawson Publications today
(800) 322-3448 x125
Your AD could go here... Call Dawson Publications, Inc. today and reserve your ad space in the next issue of
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT
(800) 322-3448 x125
florida Icaribbean ARCHITECf
summer 200l

O'DONNELL NACCARATO & MIGNOGNA, INC.
STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS, SPECIAL INSPECTORS,
CONSTRUCTION MANAGERS

OVER 40 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE
IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

SPECIALIZING IN THE DESIGN OF

PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR PROJECTS
321 15TH STREET WILLIAM C. MIGNOGNA, P.E.
SUITE 200 PRESIDENT
WEST PALM BEACH, FL 33401 (561) 835-9994 FAX: (561) 835-8255



Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects 104 East Jefferson Street Tallahassee, Florida 32301 www.aiafla.org
2001 FA/AlA OFFICERS President Miguel "Mike" A. Rodriguez, AIA President-elect Enrique Woodroffe, FAIA Secretary/Treasurer Blinn Van Mater, AlA Vice President/Communications Mark H Smith, AlA Vice President/Professional Development Vivian O. Salaga, AlA Vice President/Legislative & Regulatory Affairs Mickey Jacob, AlA Regional Director Larry M. Schneider, AlA Regional Director Jerome Filer, FAIA Immediate Past President
S. Keith Bailey, AIA Executive Vice President
R. Scott Shalley, CAE
Publisher Denise Dawson Dawson Publications, Inc. 2236 Greenspring Drive Timonium, Maryland 21093 410.560.5600 800.322.3448 Fax: 410.560.5601 Editor Diane D. Greer Sales Manager Dave Patrick Sales Representatives Joyce Fink, Drew Fraser, T homas H appel Graphic Design Mike Horgan Printing Boyd Brothers Prinring
Florida Caribbean Architect, Official Journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute ofArchitects, is owned by the Association, a Florida co rporation, not for profit. ISSN-001 5-3907. It is published four times a year and distributed through the office of the Association, 104 E. Jefferson Street, Tallahassee, Florida 3230 1. Telephone 850.222.7590.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those ofAlA Florida. Edirorial material may be reprinted only with the express permission of Florida Caribbean Architect. Single copies, $6.00; Annual subscription, $20.00
floritkt / caribbean ARCHlTECf summer 200 l
Editorial / diane d. greer
What do we, the people, have the right to expect from our public buildings? Probably beauty and function at the very least. But, by what measure do we decide whether our public buildings meet these criteria? What system do we use? And whose idea of commodity, firmness, and delight do we buy into? What is the true measure of the success of an idea while it is still on paper and years before it becomes a three-dimensional reality?
There is an article in the current issue of Architecture Boston entitled, "When Politicians Design: Boston 2000." Henry Cobb FAlA ofPei Cobb Freed was the architect of the new Federal Courthouse on Boston's Fan Pier although, according to the article, "critics say the leading voices in the design of the building belonged to two Federal judges." Responding to a problem in Boston that is described as "design that is too often the end product of political deals and consensus," George Thrush, AlA, head of the architecture program at Northeastern University, summed up the situation this way: "Perhaps the conflict is in how a city should be run versus how it should be built. Architecture and democracy are in inherent conflict. Cities should be democratic, but the art of cities may be a different matter.
Last October, the General Services Administration approved the design for a new federal courthouse in Orlando. Construction of the $60 million, fourstory building was set to begin in 2002. As it turns out, the courthouse mayor may not be built. Its design has become a very controversial issue. At the heart of the controversy is a decision by a peer review panel composed of four GSA employees, twO federal judges and former Architecture editor-in-chief Deborah
K. Dietsch to go with a design by the aforementioned Henry Cobb. That decision was later changed by the GSA, leaving the judges irate, the GSA defensive, and the community confused. Although a variety of concerns about the GSA's choice have been registered, aesthetics seems to loom largest with the judges who have all but admitted that "it is the look of the building that most displeases them." As reported in the Orlando Sentinel the GSA proclaimed that the design they selected meets "functional, security and aesthetic goals." The question is "by whose standards does it meet these goals?"
This issue is tough one. If building design is treated like a popularity contest, we're all in trouble. At some point, we must bow to the "experts." The problem is that there are all kinds of expertS and even more critics. While it was once acceptable for political leaders to execute their civic visions in brick and stone, the residents of today's cities are much less likely to "cede such power without protest." And a micro-version of that sentiment is that judges are much less likely ro roll over when they are unhappy about the design for a courthouse in which they will be presiding. So where does it all end? In the arena of public architecture, design by committee has become the rule. But, is this process toO democratic or not democratic enough? In Boston, it may be toO much so, bur in Orlando, not enough. Is there a middle ground where everyone's voice is heard?





T h n k oft h e p 0 S S b tie S

Whatever the idea, your Marvin dealer has the window or door. Take remodeling projects,
for instance. A Marvin dealer offers you quality products, like the family of Marvin
French Doors, virtually unlimited options, and impeccable service. So visit the dealers
MARVINi~ 9.
Windows and Doors
Made lor you.
listed below. They'll help you choose a window or door that fits your unique style.
wwwmarvln.com
-:,

, ", I
" <';
:. # ~
,
16
WINDOW CLASSICS CORP.
Hollywood Miami W. Palm Beach Orlando Bonita Springs Tampa
Tel 954/966-11 48 Tel 305/266-9800 Tel 561 /659-0600 Tel 407/522-9264 Tel 941 /498-9141 Tel 813/915-141 4
Fax 954/983-7724 Fax 305/267-8197 Fax 561 /659-1555 Fax 407/522-9265 Fax 941 /498-9142 Fax 813/933-0015




YEARS

Put DPIC's 30 years of helping architects and engineers to work for your small firm today.
Professional liability insurance doesn't have to be a big expense for a small design firm. Our 30 years of dedication to the AE professions helps us to provide the best value for your insurance dollar. Comprehensive coverage at a fair price. Proactive dispute resolution with fast, specialized claims handling. Loss prevention programs help you manage your practice more skillfully, while earning continuing education credits and lowering insurance costs. New thinking from local specialist agents to help you drive your business more successfully.

Take advantage of our
experience. Free.

Choose one of two free offerings from
our extensive loss prevention library.
Visit www.dpic.com for our Buyer's Guide
to Professional Liability Insurance or The Top
10 Risks Facing Growing Firms.

Put yourself in the driver's seat. Receive a quote and get coverage -over the phone and now over the Internet -today.
1-800-741-8889 www.dpic.com




EFFORTLESS HURRICANE PROTECTION

IMPACT-RESISTANT WIND()\i'llS
Visibly Better.TN
www.pgt.industries.com
@2001, PGT


INDEX to ADVERTISERS
by Category
Architectural Coatings
Dmon Paints & Wallcoverings (37 -19) .................. IBC

Architectural Foam
Creative Arts Unlimited (37-32) .... ................. ....... 38

Architectural Products
Florida Wood Council (37-21) ................................ 4

Architectural Themes, Wood, Metal Fixtures
Creative Arts Unlimited (37 -32) .............. ............... 38

Audio Visual Equipment & Services
Audio Visual Innovations (37-12) ............ .......... .... 34

Audio Visual Systems Design & Installation
Audio Visual Innovations (37-12) .......................... 34

AutoCad Software
CADD Centers of Florida (37-14) .......................... 32
Digital Drafting System (37-18) ................ .... ....... 33

Building Contractors
Kraft Construction Co., Inc. (37 -35) .... ............ ...... 36

CADD
Digital Drafting Systems (37 -18) .......................... 33

CADD Services
CADD Centers of Florida (37-14) .............. ............ 32
Digital Drafting Systems (37 -18) ........................... 33

Columbia Cascade/Fidler Group Architectural Products
The Fidler Group/Columbia Cascade (37-20) ........ 37

Consultants -Security
The Bordes Group (37-13) .......................... ........... 32

Consulting -AJI Window & Door Needs
Architectural Windows & Cabinets (37-11) ........ 8-9, 33
Forest Products (37-11) .................................. ...... 8-9, 33
HBS Inc. (37-11) ............. .......... ................ ........... 8-9, 33
Nor-Dec International, Inc. (37-11) .................. .... 8-9, 33
Palm City Millwork (37-11) ........ ...... ................... 8-9, 33
S & P Architectural Products (37-11) ................... 8-9, 33
S & S Craftsmen, Inc. (37-11) ...... .................. ...... 8-9, 33
Smyth Lwnber (37-11) .... .......... .................... ....... 8-9, 33
Weather Shield (37-11) ........ .... ............................. 8-9, 33

ConsultinglWindows
Architectmal Windows & Cabinets (37-11) ......... 8-9, 33
Forest Products (37-11) ........................ ................ 8-9, 33
HBS Inc. (37-11) .............. .... .................... ............ 8-9 33
or-Dec International Inc. (37-11) .... .................. 8-9, 33
Palm City Millwork (37-11) ................................. 8-9, 33
S & P Architectmal Products (37-11) ............ ....... 8-9, 33

I ~Creative Arts r.....a_ Unlimited Inc.
Architectural Themeing
Retail Store Fixtures
Corporate Environments
Sculpture Graphics
Museum Exhibits
727-525-2066 www.creativeartsinc.com
3730 70th Avenue North Pinellas Park, FI 33781 F727 -525-8689
S & S Craftsmen, Inc. (37-11) ................ .................. 8-9, 33 Smyth Lumber (37-11) .... ...... .... 8-9, 33 Weather Shield (37-11) .............. 8-9, 33
Construction Managers
Kraft Construction Co., Inc. (37-35) ................................... 36
Continuing Education
McCathren Associates, Inc. (37-24) ................ .......... ......... IFC
Design -Security
The Bordes Group (37-13) .......... 32

florida / caribbeanARCHlTECT summer 200 1



Doors
Causeway Lumber Company (37-34) .................... 12
Federal Millwork Corp. (37-31) ............................. 32
Pella Windows & Doors (37-26) ............................ 12
PGT Industries (37-27) .................... ....................... OBC

Doors -AJuminum
TRACO (37-33) ...................................... ................ 25

Doors & Windows
Caradco (37-15) ...................................................... 1

Drinking Fountains
Most Dependable Fountains (37-25) ...................... 34

Employment Agency
Archi Pro Staffing Agency Inc. (37-36) ................. 33

Finishes -Interior & Exterior
Duron Paints & Wallcoverings (37-19) .................. IBC

General Contractors
Creative Contractors (37-17) ......................... ......... 34
Kraft Constmction Co., Inc. (37-35) ...................... 36

Glass
VIRACON (37-29) ................................................. 40

Glass Block
Glass Masonry Inc. (37-22) ............ ........................ 34

Impact Resistant Glass
Caradco (37-15) ...................................................... 1

Insurance
Collinsworth Alter Nielson Fowler & Dowling, Inc. (37-16) .............................................................. 35 Suncoast Insurance Associates, Inc. (37-28) ............ ......................... ......................... 6
Millwork
Causeway Lumber Company (37-34) .................... 12
Federal Millwork Corp. (37-31) ............................. 32

Moulding
Causeway Lumber Company (37-34) .................... 12
Federal Millwork Corp. (37-31) ............................. 32

florida /caribbcanARCHITECT
summer 2001

Multimedia Systems Design & Installation
Audio Visual Innovations (37-12) .......................... 34

Outdoor Water Products
Most Dependable Fountains (37-25) ...................... 34

Paints -Interior & Exterior
Duron Paints & Wallcoverings (37-19) .............................................................. mc
Park & Public Site Furnishings
The Fidler Group/Columbia Cascade (37-20) .............................................................. 37
Professional Liability
Collinsworth Alter Nielson Fowler & Dowling, Inc. (37-16) .... .......................................................... 35 Suncoast Insurance Associates, Inc. (37-28) ......................................................... ..... 6
Project Management
O'Donnell Naccarato & Mignogna (37-37) ........... 37

Protective Glazing
VIRACON (37-29) ..... .... .................... .................... 40

Recreation
McCathren Associates, Inc. (37-24) ....................... IFC

Roof -Tile
Masterpiece Tile Co. (37-23) ..... ............................. 35

Security Consultants
The Bordes Group (37-13) ........... ... ........... ............ 32

Showers
Most Dependable Fountains (37-25) ...................... 34

Site Furnishings by Timberform
The Fidler Group/Columbia Cascade (37-20) ............. .... ............................................. 37
Staffing Services
Archi Pro Staffing Agency Inc. (37-36) ................. 33

Storm Protectors -Windows & Doors
TRACO (37-33) ...................................................... 25



INDEX to ADVERTISERS
by Category cont'd
Structural Engineering
O'Donnell Naccarato & Mignogna (37-37) ........... 37

Structural Products
Florida Wood Council (37-21) .............. .................. 4

Temporary Agency
Archi Pro Staffmg Agency (37-36) ........................ 33

Three Dimensional Art & Sculpture
Creative Arts Unlimited (37-32) ............................. 38

Vacation/Cruise
McCathren Associates, Inc. (37-24) ....................... IFC

Windows
Pella Windows & Doors (37-26) ............................ 12
PGT Industries (37-27) ........................................... OBC
VIRACON (37-29) ....................... ............. ............. 40

Windows -Aluminum
TRACO (37-33) ...... ............................... .............. ... 25

Windows & Doors
Architectural Windows & Cabinets (37-11) ... ............ ............... .............................. 8-9, 33
Caradco (37-15) ......... ............................................. 1
Forest Products (37-11) .................................... .... 8-9, 33
HBS Inc. (37-11) .................................................. 8-9, 33
Nor-Dec International, Inc. (37-11) ............ .......... 8-9,33
Palm City Millwork (37-11) .............. ................... 8-9, 33
S & P Architectural Products (37-11) ................... 8-9,33
S & S Craftsmen, Inc. (37-11) .............................. 8-9, 33
Smyth Lumber (37-11) .................................... ..... 8-9,33
Weather Shield (37-11) ......................................... 8-9, 33
Window Classics (37-30) .......... ............................. 2

Wood
Florida Wood Council (37-21) ............................... 4

Wood -Fire Retardent Treated
Arch Wood Protection (37-10) ...... .............. ........... 35

Wood Windows
Causeway Lumber Company (37-34) .................... 12

Wood Windows & Doors
Window Classics (37-30) .................. .... ................. 2




tion to design a high-tech, state-of-theart mobile exhibition stand, that will house the official Mexican tourism exhibition for presentation in various venues around the world.
VOA Associates Incorporated is designing the 32,000 sf Health Sciences Center at Lake-Sumter Community College in Leesburg. The estimated $4.7 million facility will house the College of Nursing and Heal th Sciences classrooms, labs, administrative and support facilities. The project is slated for completion in October 200l. Design is also underway on the second phase of Florida International University's (FlU) new Health and Life Sciences Center in Miami. VOA is providing full architectural and engineering services for the facility which is being constructed in two phases at FlU's University Park Campus, just west of downtown Miami.
CBB Architects will design the Fruitland Park Exceptional Student Center in Lake Alfred, Florida. The school will be built adjacent to the new Lake Alfred Middle School and the Homer K. Addair Career Academy, currently under construction. CBB, which specializes in educational facilities, is currently working on two Pinellas Counry schools for special needs children.
Larry Wilson Design Associates has completed the interior renovation of the sixth floor of the Dyal-Upchurch Building in downtown Jacksonille. La rry Wi lson, a partner in Ri nk Reynolds Diamond Fisher Wilson P.A., has been involved in several adaptive reuse projects. T he Oyal-Upchurch Building is a particularly fine example of early 20th-century architecture that was designed by Henry John Klutho in 1902.


Cannon Design's work for the courthouse was commissioned under Lloyd D. George U.S. Courthouse and the G fts Design Excellence Program, Federal Building in Las Vegas has been an initiative "to create and pre erve a recognized wi th the General Services legacy ofoutstanding public buildings Administration's (GSA) prestigious that embody the finest in contempoHonor Award for Architecture. The rary architectural thought."
floridf1 /caribbenn ARCHITECT summer200 1


News

Five New Fellows from Region
This year, the American Institute ofArchitects elevated 72 architects ro its prestigious College of Fellows, an honor awarded ro members who have made contributions ofnational significance ro the profession. There were 229 candidates for Fellowship in 2001 of which nine, or 4%, were from the Florida/Caribbean region. Of the 229 candidates, 72 were elevated ro Fellowship representing 3 1.4% of those nominated. Five of the nine nominated from the Florida/Caribbean region were advanced to Fellowship.
The 2001 Jury of Fellows was chaired by Th omas S. Marvel, FAIA, Thomas S. Marvel Archi tects, San Juan, Puerto Rico. T he five new Fellows from the Florida/ Caribbean region are Jaime Canaves, Donald J. Dwore, Rev. Howarth Lewis, Jr., Johnston Reid, Jr., and John P. T ice, J r.
Jaime Canaves is Associate Dean and Associate Professor in the School of Architecture at Florida International University (FlU) in Miami. Professor Canaves has elevated the standards of architectural education by teaching his philosophy of "Architecture as a Collective Experience." Can aves has worked diligently to transform the four-year pre-professional Architectural Technology program at FlU in to an accredited Master ofArchitecture degree. The program provides access to low income and minority students, bringing the benefit of diversity ro the profession of architecture. Sixty percent of the first graduating class was female and minority students.
DonaldJ. Dwore is a principal in the Coral Gables firm of Spillis Candela DMJM. As the firm's National Justice Practice Leader, Dwore's work has helped ro return courthouse architecture to the level of civic design and to reestablish the central place of courthouses in American urban life. Dwore served as a leader in the AIA's Committee on Architecture for Justice and he will be Chairman of the AIA-CAJ jury for the 2001 Justice Facilities Review Book. In March, he chaired the AlA-CAl's first virtual conference on the subj ect of "Juvenile Justice Facilities for the 21" Century."
Howarth L. Lewis, Jr. was elevated ro Fellowship for his dedi cation ro making the profession of architecture of ever-increasing service ro society. Rev. Lewis is a sole practitioner and the owner of a four-person firm in West Palm Beach. He has been the recipient of numerous awards including the 2000 AlA Florida Silver Medal for Community Service. For the past ten years, he has been president and volunteer architect of Habitat of Palm Beach County. When he accepted the position, Habitat was floundering and financially unstable. Under his leadership, the chapter now has assets in excess of one million dollars and inventory of 30 pieces of property.
Johnstone Reid, Jr. is the former President ofAlA Buffalo/Western New York where he received the 1997 Professional Service Award for his lifelong efforts. While President of AlA New York State, Reid authored a "Statute of Repose" legislative kit and grassroots strategy. T he "kit" created the grassroots momentum, which subsequently led to passage of New York's first Professional Liabili ty Statute of Limitations. AlA National honored Reid in 1998 with its GovernmentAffairs Award.
John P. Tice, Jr. is President/CEO of Bullock Tice Associates, Inc., a 30person architecture and interior design firm based in Pensacola with an office in Orlando. He is past president of AlA Florida and was a pioneer in establishing a strategic business planning system that rransformed AlA Florida's leadership culture. As a member of the Redefinition of the Profession Task Force, he was a driving force within the leadership team that framed and championed an elevated role for architects in engaging the marketplace and society. During his tenure as Chair of the Federal Agency Liaison Group (FALG), he provided the impetus and direction for the creation of the AlA Government Acquisition and Policy Council, which he continues to serve as founding chair.
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT summer 2001



entitled, "The Contemporary Art of Architecture." The month long exhibit opens to the public August 12 and runs through Friday, August 31, featuring the works of Architects Design Group, Inc. ofWinter Park, Florida. The event focuses on various government buildings that challenge the institutional approach to public sector design and inspire the imagination. Models, schematic drawings, photographs, and a video presentation spotlight various projects that define ADG's legacy as innovators of contemporary ci tyscapes throughout Central
Florida.
The Maitland Art Center is publishing a museum catalog to accompany the exhibit. This architectural monograph highlights ADG's signature projects, features insightful essays on the firm's design philosophy and chronicles its history. Also as part of the month long exhibit, the American Institute of Architects, Orlando Chapter, will be co-sponsoring a lecture on August 16, by Diane Greer, Editor of FLorida/Caribbean Architect magazine. The lecture starts at 7:00 pm at the Maitland Art Center and IS open to the public.
Residential Steel Framing Update
The North American Steel Framing Alliance (NASFA) has reported several changes in public policy and building codes affecting residential steel framing. Two of the changes that have made a signiftcant impact on the homebuilder's ability to use steel framing include the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD) decision to eliminate the soil pre-treatment requirement for termites on FHA-and VA-financed 100% steel framed homes and an ICBO code interpreta tion of UBC Sec tion 7 08, fire-blocking and draft-stopping requirements when steel framing is used. Draft-stopping would be req uired only where there are combustible materials exposed in the attic spaces.
The new H UD policy will cut signiftcant costs for builders working with homeowners using FHA or VA financing. For more information: www.SteelFramingAlliance.com
"Functional Art"
The Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago challenged Vernon W illiams Architects to renovate the museum's eXisting washrooms. The challenge was to rum the washrooms into aestheticallypleasing functional environments mat would require minimal maintenance. As a result, the architect was awarded the 2000 Design Excellence Award for Interior Architecture from the American Institute of Architects -Chicago.
In an effort to create a washroom that broke with tradition, the
archi tecr addressed the nODon of displaying artifacts and exhibits in the space so that the learning experience continued and was consistent wi th the mission ofthe museum. Incorporated into the design is a sky dome that serves as one of the main focal points of the space. Celestial motifs and indirect light create an interesting mood in the washroom where, as the arch i tect describes it, "the learning experience continues."

Top and Above: Bmdley Corporation's
washroom lAvatory system in Chicago's Field
Museum.
florida / caribbeanAR HITECf summer200l


The name of this Gulf Coast residence is derived from the fact that the cove directly in front of the house is a playground for an active family of dolphins. But, the house could JUSt as easily be called "The Floating House." That's the first reaction visitors have upon entering the central space with its high ceiling and sweep of glass walls. The views from within all sides and angles of the house are dramatic and the interior space seems unencumbered by walls. Architect Carl Abbott says that the dramatic view lines across the bay to the city beyond established the design direction for the house. The small irregularly shaped site has water on two sides and the house is a tower which opens wide to the views.
The plan and massing of the house, which at first seems complex, is actually a contemporary version of the Florida Cracker dog-trot plan. Instead of an open hallway or breezeway dividing the living spaces, as was the early tradition, this house is "divided" by a large central space that extends from the entry terrace to the rear terrace. On one side of the central space is the solid block of the Guest Suite and on the other side is the multi-level master suite. These two flanking forms anchor the central space which has a large flat-plane roof with wide overhang. The high end of the roof is at one corner of the central space and the low end is diagonally opposite.
This large floating roof has its highest point facing west to "scoop" in sunset colors. The balcony to the east lowers the view and directs the eye down to the narrow bayou. Terraces and balconies open up the view from every level of the house.


-.,
I I )
I I I I
Top: Main entrance to the house and stair &0 the first floor living space. Photo by Steven Brooke Studios. Above: Plan offirst floor living level courtesy ofthe architect.
Project Credits: Carl Abbott, FAIA, Gregory A. Hall, Michael O'Donnell: Architects; Steve Wilbur: Structural Engineer; Tom Hensey: Contractor.
jlorickJ /caribbean ARCHITECT summer 2001





Robert K. Bischoff/Master Craftsman tallahassee, florida
In January 2000, Florida Srate University introduced the Master Craftsman Program. This program of crafts design and fabrication offers courses to students through its Fine Arts and Interior Design departments. Under the direction of FSU alumnus Robert Bischoff, in the program are learning techniques for reproducing historic ornament and building decorations for both interior and exterior use. Ultimately, the program will become a source ofqualified craftsmen for architects and interior designers. These crafts are particularly
the program was conceived as a means of creatmg an awareness of what constitutes a finely crafted object and teaching the skills and professionalism to fabricate the objects. This

non-degree program offers a series of electives to students, professional artists and architects that includes the use of contemporary machinery and materials, model and mold making, stained glass design and production, and reproduction of historic architectural elements. The architectural work being done in the Master Craftsman Studio includes the production of building ameni
ties such as benches, bollards, sign age, plaques and seals, all of whicl1 are being used on the campus. Additionally, students
florida / caribbeanARCHITECT summer2001
val uable to architects involved in historic restoration who need particular patterns or architectural components reproduced to match the original. This includes interior crown moldings, mantels, window and door surrounds, brackets, etc. The exterior ornament that is being reproduced includes everything from medieval gargoyles to brackets, capitals, decorative copings, trims and moldings.
Traditionally, architectural decoration has been costly to fabricate and there are few craftsmen with the knowledge and skill to produce it. This has been particularly true for exterior ornament that is subject to the perils ofweather. Often it is the first thing cut from a construction budget. Now, however, with the introduction of new lightweight materials and computer technology,
architects can specuy the sort of detailing that some clients demand but few can afford.
New materials such as fortified plaster, a plasterplastic mixture, enable artisans to create compo

nents that are much thinner, lighter and easier to install. Fortified plasters cast into designs that are 3/16"-to -114" thick are actually stronger than
traditional forms that are much thicker. There are approxin1ately
50 different e1astometric materials available today for mold making. These materials make the mold~making process easier and broaden the scope and size ofwhat can be cast. Computer imagining is one of
the most exciting new teclmologies being used in this field. W ith three-dimensional imaging



The Renaissance Vinoy Resort st. petersburg, florida
The AIA Florida 2001 Convention will be held in Sr. Petersburg, August 1 -4, 2001. T he site for the meeting is the newly renovated Renaissance Vinoy Resort, formerly the Vinoy Park Hotel. The Vinoy was built in 1925 and remains one of the most historic hotels in Florida. New York architect Henry L. Taylor designed the hotel and Florida architect William Cox directed the 1992 restoration.
T he history of the Vinoy Hotel is a lot like the history of Florida. It survived hurricanes, lack of rail transportation, competition from other hotels, and the Great Depression, only to permanently close its doors in 1975.
The first owner and promoter of the hotel was Aymer Vinoy Laughner, a Pennsylvania millionaire who moved to Sr. Petersburg in 1920 to carry out land development plans. The Vinoy, like the Don Cesar, was built to attract the tourists who were beginning to pour into Florida during the 1920s. When it was completed in 1925, the Vinoy was a visual landmark that could be easily seen from
both downtown St. Petersburg and from the water. A 1926 promotional
/
brochure described the hotel as occupying a 14-acre site with palms and tropical plants, fountains and flowerbordered walks. "Contemplating the hotel from Waterfront Park which faces the main entrance loggia, the observer is struck by the sweep and freedom of line derived from the adroit massing of the building: one part seems the outgrowth of another and by easy gradua
tions the structure ascends from the low line of the bayfront to the pinnacle of the observation tower."
In fact, the seven-story hotel has a structural system of reinforced concrete with clay tile infill covered with stucco. The central block has four wings, three of which are five stories and one that is two stories and contains the dining room. The main entrance is through an arcade in the south fa<;:ade of the main block. At the west end of the main block is an observation tower. The tower, the main entrance, and the major window in the dining

florida /caribbean ARCHITECT summer 200 1



~~~~~~~AND HELP THEM PREPARE FOR THE WORST.

The wor~t that mother nature can di~h out require~ the pe~t hi~h-performance window~ and door~ availaple. TRACO Security Window~ & Door~, Inc. exceed~ tho~e requiremenw.
We offer a full line of impact re~i~tant produc~ -our producw are te~ted and approved to perform in a ran~e of hi~h-ri~k zone~ a~ain~t hurricane, tornado and other violent-weather ~ituation~. From the writin~ of the initial ~pec~ to quality manufacturing, te~tin~ and In~tallation, we're with you every ~tep of the way. Givin~ our pe~t, ~o you can ~ive your clienw your pe~t.
We're the only window ~upplier with ~ix manufacturin~ facilitie~ ~trategically located throu~hout the U.S. to deliver for you -where and when you need It. All packed I7y one of the mo~t exten~ive dealer ~upport network~ in America.
Now that'5 what we call a plan.


The Keynote Speaker at ALA Florida's 2000 Convenrion will be Stefanos Polyzoides, AlA. Although born in Athens, Greece, he is a registered architect in the states of California and Arizona and he has lived in Los Angeles since 1973. Polyzoides received his
B.A. and M.A. degrees in Architecture from Princeron University.
Polyzoides' distinguished career includes architecture and urban design education, design, and theory. His professional experience spans institutional and civic buildings, historic rehabilitation, commercial projects, housing, campus planning, and urban design. From 1973 unril 1997, he was Associate Professor of Architecture at the University of Southern California. He has also been Visiting Professor at several prestigious schools of architecture. From 1983 through 1990, he was on the Advisory Board for the School of Architecture at Princeton Univer-
Sl ty.
He is a co-founder of the Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU) and the currenr Chairman of the Board of Direcrors. CNU, a national association of over 2,000 architects planners, engineers, developers, governmenr officials and enviro nmenralists, works toward the resroration of existing urban cenrers, the reconfiguration of suburbs, and the protection of nature within an integrated regional structure. Mr. Polyzoides is a popular speaker on the subjects of new urbanism and
sustainability. Most recently, he participated in the 4th Annual National Symposium on New Urbanism on "Regional, Environ
mental, Social, ~nd Architectural Justice" at the University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning.
Design responsibility is shared between the two principals of Moule & Polyzoides. With his partner Elizabeth Moule, the firm of Moule & Polyzoides, Architects and Urbanists, was founded in 1990 with the goal of providing clienrs the highest standard of comprehensive architectural services. In order to accomplish this, the firm needed a new approach to architecture, landscape architecture, and urbanism
one that reunites and redefines these now-separate aspects of design practice.
"We are convinced that the visual chaos formlessness, and placelessness of today's cities and suburbs can be rectified only if architects occupy a middle ground, one that supports both
newness and conrinuity. In our view, knowledge of architectural history need not lead to reproductions of the past, but rather ro the subtle transformation of its precedents. By respecting precedenr, each project can be the starting poinr for further design that bestows formal and historical conrinuity."
florida/ caribbean ARCHITECT summer 2001


New Products


WINGUARD FROM PGT INDUSTRIES
PGT is Florida's leading manufacturer of custom wi ndows, doors and patio rooms. The company, now in its 2 1st year, is privately held and employs over 1000 at its corporate headquarters and manufacturing fac ility in Venice, Florida. Sales were $120 million in 2000. PGT's product line includes PGT aluminum and vinyl windows and doors; WinGuard impact-resistant windows and doors; NatureScape patio rooms; and Eze-Breeze sliding panels. WinGuard from PGT Industries is the only complete line of impactresistant windows and doors that is approved by the M iami-Dade Building Code Compliance Office, which enforces the strictest codes in the state of Florida for wind-borne debris and wind loading. WinGuard windows and doors combine heavy-duty aluminum frames with laminated glass and a special silicone glazing process that helps keep the glass from breaking away from the frame. Although the glass may crack on impact, the interlayer helps the glass remain intact, not allowing destructive wind into the home. WinGuard windows and doors provide built-in security protection as well as noise abatement. The full line of windows and doors includes single hung, horizontal roller, fixed lite architectural, casement, French doors and sliding glass doors.




Ceiling created using the Design Wizard from USC.
See Winguard from PGT at the AlA Florida Tradeshow, August 3, 2 001 at the Renaissance Vinoy Resort & GolfClub, St. Petersburg, Florida, Booth # 56 & 57.


COLOR IT GREEN
Andersen Windows, Inc. now offers forest green as a standard exterior color option available at no additional charge with Andersen 400 Series windows and patio doors.
"Green is an important feature in American architecture, especially for accents like shingles and shutters," says Pat Verlodt, president of Color Services & Associates, Inc., an internationally recognized color consultancy. "Andersen forest green windows and patio doors fit well with the return to traditional home styles and will also appeal to the recreational home market -including log, resort and vacation homes."
The Andersen 400 Series palette now includes fo ur standard exterior colors -forest green, white, sandstone and Terrarone all carefully selected to reflect the colors of nature, and to complement any decor, design or landscape.
"Andersen did extensive research to choose the ideal shade of green -one that blends well with the most common colors for other exterior elements, such as roofing, siding and trim," says Phil Donaldson, director of marketing at Andersen. "Additionally, our forest green products incorporate our time-proven
flO/ida / caribbean ARCHITECT summer 200 1




bronze, aluminum, stainless steel, nickel and iron rust, METALLON is comprised of95 percent real metal. It captures the design and intricate detail of the surface it is applied to, such as crown mouldings. Applied by hand in light, thin multiple coats, METALLON has hand-buffed finish options ofsatin, green patina, brushed, antiqued, textured, hand rubbed and flat.
For more information on META LLON, visit the company's
web site at www.metallon.net.
PERFORATEDGLASSTM FROM CESAR COLOR
Perforated metal that adds texture and surface interest is gaining popularity as an exterior cladding material in many high profile architectural projects. Cesar Color, manufacturers of innovative architectural glass technology for the design community, has created a product using the ChromaFusion process that looks like perforated stainless steel, but is actually a single unit oflaminated safety glass.
Unlike perforated metal sandwiched between two plates of glass, PerforatedGlass offers many improved functional features including light and visual control capability, environmental energy savings benefits and long term durability not offered by other materials.

PelforatedGLass TM patterm from Cesar Color
ChromaFusion, like most of the glass processes invented by Cesar, involves a patented technology of permanently bonding a digitally imaged interlayer between two lites ofsafety glass.
ChromaFusion is identified by its aesthetics of single or half tone colors in either solid or graphic patterns. The Perforated Glass collection, designed by artist Claire Steiner Cesar, specifically uses opaque silver and gray tones in a trompe l'oeil pattern with the depth and dimensional effect of actual metal.
Because Cesar Color uses light blocking opaque pigments to create the metal look, PerforatedGlass has solar controlling capabilities. When using PerforatedGlass on exterior walls or as skylights, designers and architects can determine how much heat and light will enter or leave the building. W hen hung from the ceiling of atriums, PerforatedGlass creates a more intimate enclosure while allowing some light to penetrate down to the floor. The remaining light bounces off the metallic surface back up to the ceiling. As an enclosure material in conference rooms, the glass offers privacy without complete enclosure.
For more information contact Cesar Color Inc., 3433 East Wood Street, Phoenix, AZ 85040. 800-275-7272 or 602-437-1201. www.cesarcolor.com.
florida / caribbean ARCHITECT summer 200 1



WEATHER SHIELDS DEALERS


SEE OUR 2 PAGE AD ON4& 5
Architectural Window & Door / S & SCraftsmen, Inc.
Ft. Meyers, Florida 941-768-1173
Naples, Florida 941-430-1220

Architectural Window & Cabinets
Jacksonville, Florida 904-725-8583
St. Augustine, Amelia Island & Panhandle 800-320-1312

Forest Products
Sarasota, Florida 941-922-0731
HBS Glass
Vero Beach, Florida 561-567-7461
Jupiter. Florida 561 -743-1090

NOR-DEC International, Inc.
Miami, Florida 305-591-8050
San Juan, Puerto Rico 787-722-5425
Santo Domingo. Dominican Republic 809-697-4251

Dominican Republic Showroom 809-227-7882

Palm City Millwork
Palm City, Florida 561-288-7086
West Palm Beach, Florida 800-273-5598

S & PArchitectural Products
Pompano Beach, Florida 954-968-3701
Miami, Florida 305-266-2635
Ft. Meyers / Naples, Florida 800-992-8959

S & S Craftsmen, Inc.
Tampa, Florida 800-922-9663

Smyth Lumber
Orlando, Florida 407-523-8777

florida / caribbean ARCHITECT summer 2001



For more information, call the 24-hour message center, 404-362-3986, or visit www.dricon.com.
For the Finest in Quality
Roofing Tiles and Slate, Make your
next project aMasterpiece!


MASTERPIECE
TILE COMPANY INCORPORATED
800-830-TILE
2080 Northwest 79th Ave., Miami, Florida 33126 305-594-4224 tel 305-594-4551 fax http://www.masterpiecetile.com

Specializing in historic and custom residential applications


A Design Professional Needs
An Insl,Jrance Broker Who:

Specializes In professional liability Offers contract review. negotiation services to engineers and aSSistance, in-house seminars and architects unique loss prevention publications
Understands professional practice Is creative and aggressive In and becomes a valued member of pursumg competitive insurance the firm's management team programs and can deliver risk
management counsel and advice Supports your Professional Society Independent of obligations to any Scholarship programs particular Insurance company
A Design Professional Needs
An Insurance Broker Who:


ale ProNet is a national association of Independent Insurance profeSSionals specializing In professional liability insurance and risk management services for engineers and architects.
Your only ale ProNet member In Flonda is:
W. Meade ColHnsworth
CPCU. ARM. AIM. AAI
P.O. Box 9315
Miami Lakes~ FL 33014-9315
305822-7800 *800-822-9303
Fax: 305-362-2443
CANFD Website: collinsworthalter.com
ale ProNet Website: aepronet.com
E-mail address: ...CollillnOr1h(iittJldd.tOlll



florida / caribbeanARCHITECT




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs