Group Title: Florida Caribbean architect
Title: FloridaCaribbean architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004635/00015
 Material Information
Title: FloridaCaribbean architect
Alternate Title: Florida Caribbean architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Publisher: Dawson Publications,
Dawson Publications
Place of Publication: Timonium Md
Publication Date: Winter 2000
Copyright Date: 1997
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 44, no. 1 (spring 1997)-
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Issues have also theme titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004635
Volume ID: VID00015
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA5904
ltuf - ACJ1464
oclc - 36846561
lccn - sn 97052000
 Related Items
Preceded by: Florida architect

Full Text




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Table of Contents
5 President's Message 8 News
Highlighting news of membersand new commissions

12 Thoughts on Technology
The views of Don Singer, FAIA and Carl Abbott, FAIA
on technology in their residential designs


14 Coso del Logo
Anarchitect buildsin the forest of Puerto Rico

1 6 Riverfront Residence
Addition to aresidence on the 51. Johns River in Jacksonville
20 Bertuch Residence
Interiar renovationsrenew residence in Boca Raton

22 River Front Residence
Architect Milton Harry builds his retirement home

26 Villaggio di Las Olas
AMediterraneanstyle residential/commercial complex in Ft. Lauderdale
28 Challenger Learning Center C/)
Afirst look at an innovative learning place in Tallahassee w
-

0:::31 Product News <:(
0:: 32 Index to Advertisers 0)
-' 36 In Memoriam


Archi.......

Winter 2000/ Vol. 47, NO.4 / A Publication of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000 3




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PROJECTS PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE, CONT'D

VOA Associates Incorporated has provided full interior design services for the new Istanbul Convention &Exposition Center in Istanbul. Turkey...VOA Associates also announcecl three new commissions in Latin America: Praca
~--...;;;;;;.-....... ...;;.. .... Seculo XXI Goiania Crown Center Project),
Pl'aca Seculo XXI Goiania Ta ll?) Centet: Bl'azii Brazil, Pontao do Lago SuI. Brasilia (Entenainment Center). Brazil and Proyecto Transmillenium. Valencia, Venezuela ... Harper Partners, Inc. annOlU1ce the following projects: expansion at Bakel' Aviation Training Center. Miami. expansion and POI/laO do Lago SUi.

Entel'tainment Cenlel: Brazil
renovation of First Union Bank, ----~...:.....:...=---=--...:.....:...----Aventura. prototype branch for Commercebank in Hialeah and a contract to design airline terminal improvements for Delta Airlines as paLt of its worldwide Airport Renewal Progl'am ...Koi & Springer

PI'O.l'CCLO Tl'ansmillenium. Venezuela
Architects, (an afl'iliate of Morris Architects) announced a commission for design services for Fairfield Grand Desert ResOl't in Las Vegas... Hunton Brady Pryor Maso Architects is currently working on a new clinic for West Orange Health SOIl[/leastel'1l Ul'ological Cenle!:

Alliance Clinic ... Swedroe a_"aassee
_T_il__________
Architects has designed TUl'I1berry Place. a high rise community

...-------_in Las Vegas...Gordon & Associates has completed the Southeastel'l1 UI'ological Center in
rn~~'r:II
!!SII~~~::!3 Tallahassee ... CBB Architects received a Merit Award from AlA West. Orange "'calli) Alliance Clinic Tampa Bay for the clesign of ina B.
Harris School for special needs chiidren.. Richard G. Allen Architects completed the design for renovations and additions at Ballard Elementary School. the first elementary school build

in Bradenton in the early 1900s...The ~~iii~Si=i

Haskell Company has provided III'

I'istakon Campus. JacksolJllille
design/ build services for an FBO terminal for Jet Aviation in Teterboro. NJ ... Rink Reynolds Diamond Fisher has completed an Administration wing as
FBO Jet Aviation Terminal. the latest addition to the Vistakon Tet.erbol'O campus in Jacksonville ...
Mickey Jacob. AlA. Vice PreSident of the Communications anel Public Relations Commission. Ilas piloted an RFO proce for the Florida/Caribbean ArchiLecL magazine LhaL Learns Diane Greer as ediLar. Boyd Brothel' as publishers and Dawson Publications witll aelvertising leadership. Tile website. Friday facts and AlA Florida Directol'y an I Magazine Ilave all nourished in 2000.
Debra Lupton. AI immecliate Past Presi lent. chaireel tile Member Benefits and Recognition CommitLee which assembled the awarels committee. jury. and annual program for inelividual honor awards. built and unbuilt design awards. firm of the year and test of time awards. Once again. collaboration witil many members. and clients. peak el with a spectacular. record attended awards ceremony with film work by Diane Greer and awards presentations by NOl'lnan Koonce. MIA. CEO of AlA National. What a nightl
Mike Rodriquez. AlA. President Elect. cllaired tile BudgeL Committee and leel privatization effol'ts. WiLh the collaboration of Scott Shalley and staff. tilis group ha steered AlA florida into fiscal responsibility. leaving significant resel'ves fOI' 2001. AlA florida was pi ased La give bonuses to the AlA floricla staff and E 'ecutive Vice President. sometll ing that I Ilave not seen in recent years.
Regional Directol's. Angel Saqui. fAIA. and Larry Schneider. AlA. liaisoned with the national boa rei and were ho t La the Large Sister State Round Table held in St. Peter burg. More than fifty percent of AlA membership resides in tilese seven large states. AlA florida thoughts will be sllarecl with national taff lue to the efforts of thi conference
Througll collaboration and empowerment, my year a Presielent of AlA floriela Ilas been a year of success. but not witilout ignificant personal effort. A year and a hair or preplanning tile annual convention. a I'einstitution of tile budget committee. authoring of eciitorial chairing meetings and practicing 3l'cllitecture Ilave all been events which have "seizeel the future". Serving as AlA flol'ida PresidenL ror 2000 Ilas been a career higll watermark. no maLLeI' what the effort. Thank you fol' allowing me to serve. A I nel Lhe year 2000. honoring the past efforts of a trong AlA Florida. enCOUl'age like Rodriquez. AJ your new PresidenL. to
oli it your collaboration and continued participation.
KeU/l Bailey, AlA, is Senior Vice-President and Leader of Arcllitectural Services for tile SoutlJeastem Region of 3D/ lntemational of' Orlando, Ploricla.
Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000 9




Project: River Front Residence Location: Sewalls Point, Stuart, Florida Architect: Milton C. Harry, AlA
This River Front Resiclence was designed appear to be two feet thick with soft to create a tlexible retirement setting 1'0 1' corners and deep reveals reminiscent of a couple who remains active in a vaL'iety shell concrete walls in early coastal of personal and community activities. plantations. Simplified column capitals. The residence is sensitive to both the porches, bay windows and court ards regional history as well as to the unique with attendant wood detailing complete site, a coastal hardwood hammock rising the evocative language. 40 feet in elevation above a tidewater estuary. The preservation of the The final design achieved the propel' hammock wa a vital factor in the siting disposition of spaces and adapted tile and layout of the house. There are 30 plan to a steep hillside using multiple varieties of native trees of which 95% levels and rotated plan elements. As a were preserved. The residence was result. the leyout provides major vistas designed in an aL'chitectural vocabulary from multiple areas within the house evocative of Central Florida traditions without disturbing native growth. The that is also compatible to tile combination of levels and angles has neighborhood. The architectural idiom provided each space with
22 Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000



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Project: Villaggio di Las Olas Location: Ft. Lauderdale, Florida Architect: The Shiff Group
26 Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000



An Early Design for

Project: FAMU-FSU Challenger Learning Center Location: Tallahassee, Florida Architect: Hicl(s Nation Architects, Inc.


28 Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000


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Index to Advertisers

www.teleport.com/-aiatrust
Insurance and Financial Programs for AlA Members Health Insurance Oi abilirv !dk Insura nce Retirement Program u Business Insurance Automobile Insurance Lega Line Insurance Con tinuing Education Small Firm Professional Liabilirv What Are Architects Saying About Today's AlA Trust?"
96 % say the AlA Tru st is a valuable membership benefit. 94% of those most familiar with th e Tru st say the Trust's programs are a reason to belong to AlA. 3/4 of the participants in today's AlA Trust would recommend the program. AlA Trust
Plan information is availa ble 24 hours a day toll-free at 1-800-255-8215 Visit e-Architect on www.aiaollfine.colll Select Member Ser vices A l A Trust ProducL Eva luaLi on SLud y Wiese Research Associates 1998 -0


Architectural Coatings
Duron Paints &Wallcoverings (98-22) .. ...........IBC
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Steve Martin Harold Rojas
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32 Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000
Architectural Concrete

L.M. Scofield Co. (98-24) ... 6,32
Architectural Concrete Block
Trenwyth Industries (98-35) ..25
Audio Visual Equipment & Services
Audio Visual Innovations (98-13) .. ... .. .... . ...24
Audio Visual Systems Design & Installation
Audio Visual Innovations (98-13) .... ... .... ...... 24
Auto CAD Software
CADD Centers of Florida (98-14) . .. ...... .. ......25 Digital Drafting Systems (98-21) .. .. ....... .. .....24
CADD Services
CADD Centers of Florida (98-14) ...... ...... . ...25 Digital Drafting Systems (98-21) ....... ....... .. ..24
CADD Training
CADD Centers of Florida (98-14) ..................25
Claims Prevention
Project Development International Inc. (98-29) ............. ..... .4
Columbia Cascade/Fidler Group Architectural Products
Columbia Cascade CO.!The Fidler Group (98-19) .. .. ... .. ..25
Concrete
L.M. Scofield Co. (98-24) .. .. 6,32 V-Tong Florida Ltd. (98-34) ......1
Construction Management
Creative Contractors (98-20) . 24 O'Donnell Naccarato & Mignogna (98-27) .... .. .. . . ...... .4 Wehr Constructors Inc. (98-32).. 24
Consulting -All Window & Door Needs
Architectural Windows & Cabinets
(98-12) .......... .... 18-19,33 Forest Products (98-12) .. 18-19,33 HBS Inc. (98-12) .... .. 18-19,33 Nor-Dec International Inc.
(98-12) . ..... . .... 18-19,33 Palm City Millwork (98-12) .18-19,33 S & P Architectural Products
(98-12) ..... ..... . . 18-19,33




Index to Advertisers

Alphabelicallndex
AlA Trust (98-10) ... ......... ..32 Creative Contractors (98-20) .....24 PGT (98-28) .................IFC ArchiPro Staff Agency Inc. (98-11) .24 Digital Drafting Systems (98-21) ...24 Project Development International Inc.
Duron Paints &Wallcoverings (98-29) .................... .4

Architectural Windows & Cabinets
(98-22) ...................IBC S &PArchitectural Products

(98-12) ...... .. .......18-19,33

Forest Products (98-12) ...18-19,33 (98-12) ............... 18-19,33 Audio Visual Innovations (98-13) ..24 Glass Masonry Inc. (98-23) ......10 S & S Craftsmen Inc. (98-12) .18-19,33 CADD Centers of Florida (98-14) ..25 HBS Inc. (98-12) .........18-19,33 Smyth Lumber (98-12) ....18-19,33 Caradco (98-15) ...... .... ..OBC L.M. Scofield Co. (98-24) .. . 6,32 Suncoast Insurance Associates Inc. Causeway Lumber Co. (98-16) ...25 Masterpiece Tile Co. (98-25) ......6 (98-30) ....................11 Cold Spring Granite Co. (98-17) ...10 Most Dependable Fountains (98-26) .10 TRACO (98-31) ............... 7
Nor-Dec International Inc. Trenwyth Industries (98-35) .. ....25 Collinsworth, Alter, Nielson, Fowler &
(98-12) .. .............18-19,33 Weather Shield (98-12) .. ..18-19,33

Dowling, Inc. (98-18) ...........6

O'Donnell Naccarato &Mignogna Wehr Constructors Inc. (98-32) ...24 Columbia Cascade CoJThe Fidler
(98-27) .. .................. .4 Window Classic Corp. (98-33) ..... 2
Group (98-19) ...............25 Palm City Millwork (98-12) .18-19,33 Y-Tong Florida Ltd. (98-34) ...... ..1


Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000 35



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U. OF FLA. LIBRARIES

AlA Florida

Quality-Based Selection: Understanding Florida's Consultant's Competitive Negotiation Act (CCNA)
learning Objectives
Aher this course you will be able to:


Explain what the Consultant's Competitive Negotiation Act (CCNA) is
and what professional servicesare covered by it.



list at least three factorsthat may be considered in an agency's
determination of the most qualified firm.



Explain how design-build projectsare handled underthe CCNA.


INSTRU CTIONS

Read the course "Public Procurement of Professional Design Services in Florida"using the learning objectives above to provide focus to your study. For this course you will receive 1LU Hour of HSW.


Complete the questions on the last page of this booklet. You maycheck your answers on the AlA Florida web page, www.aiafla.org.


Return the form on the back page with payment to:AlA Florida, 104 E. Jefferson St., Tallahassee, FL 32301.


REPORTING
AlA MEMBERS:Thecourse will be reported to AlA National and will appear on your AlA Transcript. NON-MEMBERS: a certificote of completion will be mailed to you for your records.




cilities to a political subdivision. Neither does the Act apply to procurement by other private parties.
III. Professional Services covered by the Act.
The CCNA applies to the public procurement of professional services within the scope of the practices of architecture, landscape architecture, professional engineering and registered sur
.
veymg or mappmg.
IV. Projects covered by the Act.
The types of activities covered by the Act include:
(a)
A specific project estimated to have a construction cost in excess of $250,000

(b)
A grouping of minor construction rehabilitation or renovation activities estimated to have a total construction cost in excess of $250,000.

(c)
A grouping of substantially similar rehabilitation or renovation activities estimated to have a total construction cost in excess of $250,000.

(d)
A planning or study activity where the professional fee is expected to exceed $25,000.

(e)
A continuing contract whereby the firm provides professional services to the agency for projects in which the construction costs do not exceed $500,000, or for a study activity where the fee does not exceed $25,000.

(f)
A continuing contract for work of a specified nature with no time limitation in the contract but with the right of termination. (There is some debate regarding the interpretation of this language in the Act.)

(g)
The development of a "design criteria package" by a "design criteria professional" for purposes of the procurement of a design-build contract.


V. Notice requirements.
Each public agency must uniformly and consistently provide a public announcement on each occasion when any of the covered professional services are to be procured if the project construction costs will exceed $250,000 or the professional planning or study activity will exceed a $25,000 fee. Each announcement must include a general description of the work and indicate how professionals may apply for consideration. State agencies provide notice in the Florida Administrative Weekly which can be obtained through annual subscription. Counties, municipalities and school boards typically advertise the need for professional services in the newspaper having the greatest circulation in the area of the project.
VI. The qualification process.
Many agencies permit professionals to submit annual statements of qualifications and performance data. The professional finn or individual desiring to provide services to the agency must first be certified by the agency as a qualified pursuant to law and the regulations of the agency. Therefore, it is imperative that the professional's licensing status be intact and that the professional


IX. Exceptions to the CCNA process.
There are instances where the CCNA process is not required to be followed. In cases of valid public emergencies, certified by the agency head, agencies are excused from the public announcement requirements contained in the CCNA. Furthemlore, as noted below, when agencies or school boards intend to reuse plans, certain aspects of the CCNA are not required to be followed.
X. Reuse ofplans.
School boards are, by law, encouraged to consider the reuse of existing construction documents where such a reuse is feasible and practical. Furthermore, school boards are specifically authorized to purchase the architectural services for the design of educational or ancillary facilities from any other school board in the state of Florida provided that the purchase is economically advantageous to the board and is not without notice to and permission from the architect of record. (See 235.211(4), Fla. Stat. (1997)[Tab 2]). All agencies, except school boards, must provide in the original notice for professional services that they intend to use the plans for future projects. After satisfying this requirement, there is no requirement that the agency provide further public notice when the reuse actually takes place. On the other hand, school boards are not required to announce in their notice for professional services for the original project that they intend to reuse the plans at a future time.
Xl. Limitations on continuing contracts.
As pointed out previously, continuing contracts must be procured under the same competitive selection and negotiation system as other contracts. Continuing contracts whereby a design professional may be hired for miscellaneous work for a period of time must generally be limited to projects under certain financial thresholds, i.e., projects in which construction costs do not exceed $500,000 or a study activity where the fee does not exceed $25,000.
XII. Design-build projects.
The CCNA contains special provisions relative to design-build projects. The design-build process initially included in the Act contemplated the retention of a "design criteria professional" (selected in accordance with the CCNA) who would prepare a project "design criteria package" which is specifically described in Section 287.055 (2)(1) of the Act. Design-build firms would then be selected, in accordance with the qualification-based CCNA process, to design and build the project in confomlance with the design-build package. The Act has been subsequently amended to provide for the selection of the design-build film based upon competitive proposals, including plice. A design-build finn is defined under the Act as a partnership, corporation or other legal entity certified or registered as:
(a) a general contractor or registered building contractor;
(b) an engmeer;
(c) an architect; or
(d) a landscape architect.



The Department of Management Services (DMS) is required to, and has adopted, rules for the award of design-build contract and its rules apply to all state agencies except the Department of Transportation and the State University System. The DMS procedures for contracting for design-build services are contained in a separate chapter of the Florida Administrative Code. (Chapter 60-D-13, Fla. Admin. Code (1998). Before submitting a proposal, firms offering to provide design-build services must atisfy DMS's qualification requirements set forth in Rule 60D-S.004(1)(a) and (2)(a), Fla. Admin. Code. DMS employs two methods in awarding design-build contract competitive selection and negotiation and competitive proposals. The competitive selection and negotiation process is, basically, the CCNA process utilizing the same qualification criteria utilized in selecting firms for architectural projects. However, the design-build firm is required to negotiate a contract on a guaranteed maximum price basis for all costs including reimbursable costs plus fixed lump sum fees for design, project management, overhead and profit.
Under the competitive proposal selection process, design-build firms submit proposals, including a proposed plice and a conceptual design. Agencies are then required to establish a relative weighing factor, that is the maximum permissible score in the form of a percentage, for each proposed building system component. The weighing factors are to total one hundred percent. The agency will then review the conceptual design proposed by each firm and give each component a score somewhere between zero and the maximum permissible score for the component.The proposed price is then divided by the total of the scores for all components of each proposer. The quotient will be the adjusted plice. The low qualified proposer is the proposer whose adjusted price is the lowest. The agency is to award the contract to the firm with the lowe t adjusted price if the price is within the project budget of the agency.
Under either selection process described above, the agency first hires a design criteria professional, selected in accordance with CCNA. The design criteria professional prepares a design criteria package for the design-build project which is intended to furnish sufficient information to design-build firms for preparation of bid proposals or for competitive negotiations. The film to whom the design-build contract is awarded is responsible for creation of the project design based on the criteria in the design criteria package. The design cliteria is to specify performance criteria for the building including, but not limited to, size, net interior space provisions, location, material quality standards, cost, construction schedule, site development requirements, landscaping, grading, utihty provisions for water, power, telephone, storm water disposal and parking provisions. The design criteria professional, of course, is not eligible to render services under the design-build contract.
The department of Transportation's rules regarding design-build contract acquisition are separately set forth in the Florida Adm.inistrative Code. (Ch. 14-91 and 14-7S, Fla. Admin. Code)
Municipalities, political subdivisions are required to award design-build contracts using one of the two methodologies described above. Ifthey elect the option of qualification-based selection, then they are required to employ or retain a licensed design professional to serve as the agency's representative. Furthermore, if they use a competitive proposal process, they are required to use an appropriate design criteria professional in evaluation of responses or bid ubmitted by designbuild firm s, assistance in approval of the detailed working drawings for the project and evaluation of con truction compliance with the design criteria package.


Conclusion
The CCNA ha been both praised and cursed by procuring agencies and professional It has been modified several times in order to address new delivery system, unique selection and negotiation issues, etc. However, it has met the test of time in providing quality design for Florida' public entitie and assuring an equitable di tribution of work among Florida's design professional



287.055 Acquisition of professional architectural,engineering, landscape architectural, or surveying and mapping services; definitions; procedures; contingent fees prohibited; penalties.
(1)
SHORT TITLE.-This section shall be known as the Consultants' Competitive Negotiation Act."

(2) DEFINITIONS.-For purposes of this section:

(a)
"Professional services" means those services within the scope of the practice of architecture, professional engineering, landscape architecture, or registered surveying and mapping, as defined by the laws of the state, or those performed by any architect, professional engineer, landscape architect, or registered surveyor and mapper in connection with his or her professional employment or practice.

(b)
"Agency" means the state, a state agency, a municipality, a political subdivision, a school district, or a school board. The term "agency" does not extend to a nongovernmental developer that contributes public facilities to a political subdivision under s. 380.06 or ss. 163.3220-163.3243.

(c)
"Firm" means any individual, firm, partnership, corporation, association, or other legal entity permitted by law to practice architecture, engineering, or surveying and mapping in the state.

(d) "Compensation" means the total amount paid by the agency for professional services.

(e)
"Agency official" means any elected or appointed officeholder, employee, consultant, person in the category of other personal service or any other person receiving compensation from the state, a state agency, municipality, or political subdivision, a school district or a school board.

(f)
"Project" means that fixed capital outlay study or planning activity described in the public notice of the state or a state agency under paragraph (3)(a). A project may include:

1.
A grouping of minor construction, rehabilitation, or renovation activities.

2.
A grouping of substantially similar construction, rehabilitation, or renovation activities.



(g)
A "continuing contract" is a contract for professional services entered into in accordance with all the procedures of this act between an 9gency and a firm whereby the firm provides professional services to the agency for projects in which construction costs do not exceed $500,000, for study activity when the fee for such professional service does not exceed $25,000, or for work of a specified nature as outlined in the contract required by the agency, with no time limitation except that the contract must provide a termination clause.


(h) A "design-build firm" means a partnership, corporation, or other legal entity that:
1. Is certified under s. 489.119 to engage in contracting through a certified or registered general contractor or a certified or registered building contractor as the qualifying agent; or
2. Is certified under s. 471 .023 to practice or to offer to practice engineering; certified under s.
481.219 to practice or to offer to practice architecture; or certified under s. 481.319 to practice or to offer to practice landscape architecture.
(i) A "design-build contract" means a single contract with a design-build firm for the design and construction of a public construction project.
U) A "design criteria package" means concise, performance-oriented drawings or specifications of the public construction project. The purpose of the design criteria package is to furnish sufficient information to permit design-build firms to prepare a bid or a response to an agency's request for proposal, or to permit an agency to enter into a negotiated design-build contract. The design criteria package must specify performance-based criteria for the public construction project, including the legal description of the site, survey information concerning the site, interior space requirements, material quality standards, schematic layouts and conceptual design criteria of the project, cost or budget estimates, design and construction schedules, site development requirements, provisions for utilities, stormwater retention and disposal, and parking requirements applicable to the project.


(k)
A "design criteria professional" means a firm who holds a current certificate of registration under chapter 481 to practice architecture or landscape architecture or a firm who holds a current certificate as a registered engineer under chapter 471 to practice engineering and who is employed by or under contract to the agency for the providing of professional architect services, landscape architect services, or engineering services in connection with the preparation of the design criteria package.

(3) PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT AND QUALIFICATION PROCEDURES.

(a)
Each agency shall publicly announce, in a uniform and consistent manner, each occasion when professional services must be purchased for a project the basic construction cost of which is estimated by the agency to exceed the threshold amount provided in s. 287.017 for CATEGORY FIVE or for a planning or study activity when the fee for professional services exceeds the threshold amount provided in s. 287.017 for CATEGORY TWO, except in cases of valid public emergencies certified by the agency head. The public notice must include a general description of the project and must indicate how interested consultants may apply for consideration

(b)
Each agency shall encourage firms engaged in the lawful practice of their professions that desire to provide professional services to the agency to submit annually statements of qualifications and performance data.

(c)
Any firm or individual desiring to provide professional services to the agency must first be certified by the agency as qualified pursuant to law and the regulations of the agency. The agency must find that the firm or individual to be employed is fully qualified to render the required service. Among the factors to be considered in making this finding are the capabilities, adequacy of personnel, past record, and experience of the firm or individual.

(d)
Each agency shall evaluate professional services, including capabilities, adequacy of personnel, past record, experience, whether the firm is a certified minority business enterprise as defined by the Florida Small and Minority Business Assistance Act of 1985, and other factors determined by the agency to be applicable to its particular requirements. When securing professional services, an agency must endeavor to meet the minority business enterprise procurement goals under 1 s. 287.0945.

(e)
The public must not be excluded from the proceedings under this section.

(4)
COMPETITIVE SELECTION.



(a)
For each proposed project, the agency shall evaluate current statements of qualifications and performance data on file with the agency, together with those that may be submitted by other firms regarding the proposed project, and shall conduct discussions with, and may require public presentations by, no fewer than three firms regarding their qualifications, approach to the project, and ability to furnish the required services.


2(b) The agency shall select in order of preference no fewer than three firms deemed to be the most highly qualified to perform the required services. In determining whether a firm is qualified, the agency shall consider such factors as the ability of professional personnel; whether a firm is a certified minority business enterprise; past performance; willingness to meet time and budget requirements; location; recent, current, and projected workloads of the firms; and the volume of work previously awarded to each firm by the agency, with the object of effecting an equitable distribution of contracts among qualified firms, provided such distribution does not violate the principle of selection of the most highly qualified firms. The agency may request, accept, and consider proposals for the compensation to be paid under the contract only during competitive negotiations under subsection (5).
(c) This subsection does not apply to a professional service contract for a project the basic construction cost of which is estimated by the agency to be not in excess of the threshold amount provided in s. 287.017 for CATEGORY FIVE or for a planning or study activity when the fee for professional services is not in excess of the threshold amount provided in s. 287.017 for CATEGORYTWO.


(d) Nothing in this act shall be construed to prohibit a continuing contract between a firm and
an agency. 5) COMPETITIVE NEGOTIATION.
(a)
The agency shall negotiate a contract with the most qualified firm for professional services at compensation which the agency determines is fair, competitive, and reasonable. In making such determination, the agency shall conduct a detailed analysis of the cost of the professional services required in addition to considering their scope and complexity. For any lump-sum or costplus-a-fixed-fee professional service contract over the threshold amount provided in s. 287.017 for CATEGORY FOUR, the agency shall require the firm receiving the award to execute a truth-innegotiation certificate stating that wage rates and other factual unit costs supporting the compensation are accurate, complete, and current at the time of contracting. Any professional service contract under which such a certificate is required must contain a provision that the original contract price and any additions thereto will be adjusted to exclude any significant sums by which the agency determines the contract price was increased due to inaccurate, incomplete, or noncurrent wage rates and other factual unit costs. All such contract adjustments must be made within 1 year following the end of the contract.

(b)
Should the agency be unable to negotiate a satisfactory contract with the firm considered to be the most qualified at a price the agency determines to be fair, competitive, and reasonable, negotiations with that firm must be formally terminated. The agency shall then undertake negotiations with the second most qualified firm. Failing accord with the second most qualified firm the agency must terminate negotiations. The agency shall then undertake negotiations with the third most qualified firm

(c)
Should the agency be unable to negotiate a satisfactory contract with any of the selected firms, the agency shall select additional firms in the order of their competence and qualification and continue negotiations in accordance with this sUbsection until an agreement is reached.

(6) PROHIBITION AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES.

(a)
Each contract entered into by the agency for professional services must contain a prohibition against contingent fees as follows: ''The architect (or registered surveyor and mapper or professional engineer, as applicable) warrants that he or she has not employed or retained any company or person, other than a bona fide employee working solely for the architect (or registered surveyor and mapper, or professional engineer, as applicable) to solicit or secure this agreement and that he or she has not paid or agreed to pay any person, company, corporation, individual, or firm other than a bona fide employee working solely for the architect (or registered surveyor and mapper or professional engineer, as applicable) any fee, commission, percentage, gift, or other consideration contingent upon or resulting from the award or making of this agreement." For the breach or violation of this provision, the agency shall have the right to terminate the agreement without liability and, at its discretion, to deduct from the contract price, or otherwise recover, the full amount of such fee, commission, percentage, gift, or consideration.

(b)
Any individual, corporation, partnership, firm, or company, other than a bona fide employee working solely for an architect, professional engineer, or registered land surveyor and mapper, who offers, agrees, or contracts to solicit or secure agency contracts for professional services for any other individual, company, corporation, partnership, or firm and to be paid, or is paid, any fee, commission, percentage, gift, or other consideration contingent upon, or resulting from, the award or the making of a contract for professional services shall, upon conviction in a competent court of this state, be found guilty of a first degree misdemeanor, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s.


775.083.
(c) Any architect, professional engineer, or registered surveyor and mapper, or any group, association, company, corporation, firm, or partnership thereof, who offers to pay, or pays, any fee, commission, percentage, gift, or other consideration contingent upon, or resulting from, the award


or making of any agency contract for professional services shall, upon conviction in a state court of competent authority, be found guilty of a first degree misdemeanor, punishable as provided in s.
775.082 or s. 775.083.
(d)
Any agency official who offers to solicit or secure, or solicits or secures, a contract for professional services and to be paid, or is paid, any fee, commission, percentage, gift, or other consideration contingent upon the award or making of such a contract for professional services between the agency and any individual person, company, firm, partnership, or corporation shall, upon conviction by a court of competent authority, be found guilty of a first degree misdemeanor, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083.

(7)
AUTHORITY OF DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT SERVICES.-Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, the Department of Management Services shall be the agency of state government which is solely and exclusively authorized and empowered to administer and perform the functions described in subsections (3), (4), and (5) respecting all projects for which the funds necessary to complete same are appropriated to the Department of Management Services, irrespective of whether such projects are intended for the use and benefit of the Department of Management Services or any other agency of government. However, nothing herein shall be construed to be in derogation of any authority conferred on the Department of Management Services by other express provisions of law. Additionally, any agency of government may, with the approval of the Department of Management Services, delegate to the Department of Management Services authority to administer and perform the functions described in subsections (3), (4), and (5). Under the terms of the delegation, the agency may reserve its right to accept or reject a proposed contract.

(8)
STATE ASSISTANCE TO LOCAL AGENCIES.-On any professional service contract for which the fee is over $25,000, the Department of Transportation or the Department of Management Services shall provide, upon request by a municipality, political subdivision, school board, or school district, and upon reimbursement of the costs involved, assistance in selecting consultants and in negotiating consultant contracts.

(9)
APPLICABILITY TO EXISTING CONTRACTS.-Nothing in this section shall affect the validity or effect of any contracts in existence on July 1, 1973.

(10) APPLICABILITY TO DESIGN-BUILD CONTRACTS.

(a)
Except as provided in this subsection, this section is not applicable to the procurement of design-build contracts by any agency, and the agency must award design-build contracts in accordance with the procurement laws, rules, and ordinances applicable to the agency.

(b)
The design criteria package must be prepared and sealed by a design criteria professional employed by or retained by the agency. If the agency elects to enter into a professional services contract for the preparation of the design criteria package, then the design criteria professional must be selected and contracted with under the requirements of subsections (4) and (5). A design criteria professional who has been selected to prepare the design criteria package is not eligible to render services under a design-build contract executed pursuant to the design criteria package.

(c)
Except as otherwise provided in s. 240.209(3) or s. 337.11 (7), the Department of Management Services shall adopt rules for the award of design-build contracts to be followed by state agencies. Each other agency must adopt rules or ordinances for the award of design-build contracts. Municipalities, political subdivisions, school districts, and school boards shall award design-build contracts by the use of a competitive proposal selection process as described in this subsection, or by the use of a qualifications-based selection process pursuant to subsections (3), (4), and (5) for entering into a contract whereby the selected firm will subsequently establish a guaranteed maximum price and guaranteed completion date. If the procuring agency elects the option of qualifications-based selection, during the selection of the design-build firm the procuring agency shall employ or retain a licensed design professional appropriate to the project to serve as





the agency's representative. Procedures for the use of a competitive proposal selection process must include as a minimum the following:
1.
The preparation of a design criteria package for the design and construction of the public construction project.

2.
The qualification and selection of no fewer than three design-build firms as the most qualified, based on the qualifications, availability, and past work of the firms, including the partners or members thereof.

3.
The criteria, procedures, and standards for the evaluation of design-build contract proposals or bids, based on price, technical, and design aspects of the public construction project, weighted for the project.

4.
The solicitation of competitive proposals, pursuant to a design criteria package, from those qualified design-build firms and the evaluation of the responses or bids submitted by those firms based on the evaluation criteria and procedures established prior to the solicitation of competitive proposals.

5.
For consultation with the employed or retained design criteria professional concerning the evaluation of the responses or bids submitted by the design-build firms, the supervision or approval by the agency of the detailed working drawings of the project; and for evaluation of the compliance of the project construction with the design criteria package by the design criteria professional.

6.
In the case of public emergencies, for the agency head to declare an emergency and authorize negotiations with the best qualified design-build firm available at that time.


(11)
REUSE OF EXISTING PLANS.-Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, there shall be no public notice requirement or utilization of the selection process as provided in this section for projects in which the agency is able to reuse existing plans from a prior project of the agency, or, in the case of a board as defined in chapter 235, a prior project of that or any other board. Except for plans of a board as defined in chapter 235, public notice for any plans that are intended to be reused at some future time must contain a statement that provides that the plans are subject to reuse in accordance with the provisions of this subsection.

(12)
CONSTRUCTION OF LAW.-Nothing in the amendment of this section by chapter 75281 Laws of Florida, is intended to supersede the provisions of ss. 235.211 and 235.31. History.--ss. 1,2, 3,4, 5, 6, 7, 8, ch.73-19;ss. 1, 2, 3,ch. 75-281; s. 1, ch. 77-174;s. 1, ch.77-199; s. 10,ch.84


321;ss.23,32, ch.85-104;s.57,ch.85-349;s.6,ch.86-204; s. 1,ch.88-108; s. 1,ch.89-158; s. 16,ch.90-268; s. 15, ch.91-137;s. 7, ch. 91-162;s.250, ch.92-279;s.55, ch. 92-326; s. 1, ch. 93-95; s. 114, ch. 94-119; s. 10,ch.94-322;
s.868, ch.95-148;s.2, ch.95-410;s.45, ch. 96-399;s. 38, ch. 97-100; s. 1, ch. 97-296; s. 80, ch.98-279. 1Note.--Repealed by s. 27, ch. 96-320. Section 287.0945(9), created by s. 1, ch. 96-412, was redesignated by the reviser as s. 373.607.
2Note.--The amendment to s. 287.055 by s. 23, ch. 85-104, was repealed October 1,1995, by s. 32, ch. 85-104. The text of the amendment to paragraph (3)(d) by s. 23, ch. 85-104, was incorporated in an amendment by s. 45, ch. 96399, after the October 1, 1995, repeal of s. 23, ch. 85-104, by s. 32, ch. 85-104, took effect. Paragraph (4)(b) was also amended by s. 23, ch. 85-104, but has not been amended since the 1995 repeal. With the language from the s. 23, ch. 85-104, amendment removed, it would read: (b) The agency shall select in order of preference no fewer that three firms deemed to be the most highly qualified to perform the required services after considering such factors as the ability of professional personnel; past performance; willingness to meet time and budget requirements; location; recent, current, and projected workloads of the firms; and the volume of work previously awarded to each firm by the agency, with the object of effecting and equitable distribution of contracts among qualified firms, provided such distribution does not violate the principle of selection of the most highly qualified firms. The agency may request, accept, and consider proposals for the compensation to be paid under the contract only during competitive negotiations under subsection
(5)


235.211 Educational facilities contracting and construction techniques.
(1)
Boards may employ procedures to contract for construction of new facilities, or major additions to existing facilities, that will include, but not be limited to:

(a)
Competitive bids.

(b)
Design-build pursuant to s. 287.055.



(c)
Selecting a construction management entity, pursuant to the process provided by s. 287.055, that would be responsible for all scheduling and coordination in both design and construction phases and is generally responsible for the successful, timely, and economical completion of the construction project. The construction management entity must consist of or contract with licensed or registered professionals for the specific fields or areas of construction to be performed, as required by law. At the option of the board, the construction management entity, after having been selected, may be required to offer a guaranteed maximum price or a guaranteed completion date; in which case, the construction management entity must secure an appropriate surety bond pursuant to s. 255.05 and must hold construction subcontracts. The criteria for selecting a construction management entity shall not unfairly penalize an entity that has relevant experience in the delivery of construction projects of similar size and complexity by methods of delivery other than construction management.

(d)
Selecting a program management entity, pursuant to the process provided by s. 287.055, that would act as the agent of the board and would be responsible for schedule control, cost control, and coordination in providing or procuring planning, design, and construction services. The program management entity must consist of or contract with licensed or registered professionals for the specific areas of design or construction to be performed as required by law. The program management entity may retain necessary design professionals selected under the process provided in s. 287.055. At the option of the board, the program management entity, after having been selected, may be required to offer a guaranteed maximum price or a guaranteed completion date, in which case, the program management entity must secure an appropriate surety bond pursuant to s. 255.05 and must hold design and construction subcontracts. The criteria for selecting a program management entity shall not unfairly penalize an entity that has relevant experience in the delivery of construction programs of similar size and complexity by methods of delivery other than program management.

(e)
Day-labor contracts not exceeding $200,000 for construction, renovation, remodeling, or maintenance of existing facilities.

(2)
For the purposes of this section, "day-labor contract" means a project constructed using persons employed directly by a board or by contracted labor.

(3)
Contractors, design-build firms, contract management entities, program management entities, or any other person under contract to construct facilities or major additions to facilities may use any construction techniques allowed by contract and not prohibited by law, including, but not limited to, those techniques known as fast-track construction scheduling, use of components, and systems building process.

(4)
Except as otherwise provided in this section and s. 481.229, the services of a registered architect must be used for the development of plans for the erection, enlargement, or alteration of any educational facility. The services of a registered architect are not required for a minor renovation project for which the construction cost is less than $50,000 or for the placement or hookup of relocatable educational facilities that conform with standards adopted under s. 235.26(2) and (3). However, boards must provide compliance with building code requirements and ensure that these structures are adequately anchored for wind resistance as required by law. Boards are encouraged to consider the reuse of existing construction documents or design criteria packages where such reuse is feasible and practical. Notwithstanding s. 287.055, a board may purchase the architectural services for the design of educational or ancillary facilities under an existing contract agree





ment for professional services held by a school board in the State of Florida, provided that the purchase is to the economic advantage of the purchasing board, the services conform to the standards prescribed by rules of the Commissioner of Education, and such reuse is not without notice to, and permission from the architect of record whose plans or design criteria are being reused. Plans shall be reviewed for compliance with the state requirements for educational facilities. Rules adopted under this section must establish uniform prequalification, selection, bidding, and negotiation procedures applicable to construction management contracts and the designbuild process. This section does not supersede any small, woman-owned or minority-owned business enterprise preference program adopted by a board. Except as otherwise provided in this section, the negotiation procedures applicable to construction management contracts and the design-build process must conform to the requirements of s. 287.055. A board may not modify any rules regarding construction management contracts or the design-build process.
History.-s. 8, ch. 73-345; s. 8, ch. 74-374; s. 9, ch. 75-292; s. 13, ch. 77-458; s. 2, ch. 78-428; s. 9, ch. 80-414; ss.24, 50, 52, ch. 81-223; s. 1, ch. 84-349; ss. 14, 26, 27, ch.85-116; ss. 1, 4, ch.86-1;s. 10, ch.90-241 ;s.5, ch. 94-292; ss. 17, 35, ch.95-269; ss. 1, 3, ch. 95-410; s. 144, ch.97-190;s.6, ch.99-329.


AlA Florida Quality-Based Selection:

Understanding Florida's
Consultant's Competitive
Negotiation Act (CCNA)

1.

2.


3.

4.


5.
6.
What is the Consultant's Competitive Negotiation Act (CCNA)? a) Acost and qualification based public procurement system b) A cost-based public procurement system c) Aqualification-based public procurement
system
Who is required to abide by the CCNA? a) All state agencies and school districtslboards b) All state agencies, municipalities, counties and other
political subdivisions (taxing districts) and school districts and boards. c) All state agencies and municipalities, counties and other political subdivisions (taxing districts)
What professional services are covered by the Act?
a) Professional services within the scope of the practices of architecture, landscape architecture, professional engi neering and registered surveyi ng or mapping
b) Professional services within the scope of the practices of architecture and professional engineering c) Professional services within the scope of the practices of any profession licensed by the state of Flolida.
ew construction and construction rehab or renovation exceeding what dollar amount are covered by the Act? a) $150,000 b) $120,000 c) $250,000
At what dollar amount do planning or studyactivities become covered by the Act? a) activities exceeding $15,000 b) activities exceeding $10,000 c) activities exceeding $25,000
What are the cost limitations of continuing cont.racts as defined by the Act? a) Construction costs not exceeding $250,000; studyactivity
fees not exceeding $50,000 b) Construction costs not exceeding $250,000; studyactivity fees not exceeding $25,000 c) Construction costs not exceeding $500,000; studyactivity fees not exceeding $25,000
7.
Is the development of a "design criteria package" by a "design criteria professional" for the purposes of the procurement of a design-build contract subject to the Act? a) Yes b) No c) Yes, onlyif Ule contract exceeds $500,000

8.
What are the minority business enterplise procurement goals for state agenCies when procuring for architecture and engineering services? a) 4% for Hispanic-Americans; 3% for Asian Americans and

5% for American women b) 11%for black Americans, 3% for Asian Americans ~U1d 7% for American women c) 9% for Hispanic-Americans; 1% for Asirul-Amerio Llls and 15% for American women

9.
What is the minimum number of firms rul agency must review before making a determination of the most qualified firm? a) 5 b) 3 c) 2

10.
What factors are to be considered in an agency's determina tion of the most qualified firm? a) ability of firm personnel; recent, current and projected

workload of the firm; compensation proposal b) ability of firm persOlUlel; compensation proposal; whether a firm is a certified minority business enterplise c) ability of firm personnel; past performrulce; wheUler a firm is a certified minolity business enterprise

11.
What factor may not be requested, accepted or considered? a) whether a firm is a certified minority business enterprise b) compensation proposal c) past performrulce


More questions on the back


Quality-Based Selection: Understanding Florida's Consultant's Competitive Negotiation Act (CCNA), cont.
12. What happens if the Agency is unable to negotiate a satisfactory contract with any of the top three ranked firms? a) The agency must hire a profeSSional mediator to negotiate with the top-ranked firm until a satisfactorycontract is reached b) The agency may abandon the submittals and select a professional firm that has done satisfactory work for them in the past
c) The agency must select additional firms from the propos als submitted, in order of their competence and qualillcat ions and continue negotiations until it reaches an agreement
13. The CCNA contains special provisions that allow fees to be considered in the selection process for what type of projects? a) design-build projects b) histOlic preservation construction
c) continuing contracts exceeding $500,000 in construction costs
Registration Form

14.
What two state agencies are exempt from DMS rules for the award of design build contracts? a) the Department of Transportation and the Department of

Education b) the Department of Transportation and the Department of Corrections c) the Department of Transportation and the State University System

15.
Under the Competitive Proposal Selection Process, to whom is the contract to be awarded? a) the firm with the highest score for the conceptual design b) the firm with the lowest adjusted price within the agency's


project budget c) the firm with the lowest proposed price within the agency's project budget
Return this completed form withpoymentto AlA Florida, 104 E. Jefferson SI., Tallahassee, Fl32301
Fee: AlA Members-$25 Non-members $50
Name
o Check Enclosed (payable to AlA Florida) Firm o Bill my credit card
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Tallabassee, FL3230J



~
-Message

I
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r t
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Member collaboration and empowerment are key to tile su ces of AlA Florida in 2000. "Wllat has AlA done for me lately?" Ilas been effectively answered by an Executive Committee that has ision. the personal drive to ensure succe s and the leadership to move the Board of Directors to a tion. Let's briefly r view the effolts of the AlA F'lorida leadership in 2000.
The Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Commis ion led by Vice Pre ident Enrique (Hemy) Woodroffe. FAIA. has collaborated with Scott Shalley. Cilris Hansen. like Huey. Senatol' Chari s Clary. FAIA. and commis ion members to autllor or co-author three succe sful legislative bills that will improve the practice of al'chitecture in F'lorida. Indemnification from client errol's. privatization of DBPR aclmini trative functions. and a unified state building code all have an immediate and long-term po iLive impact. Collaboration with sister organizations leverageel our single voice into a forceful coalition. At a national level. for the third time in four yeal's. AlA F'loriela members Il ave been recognized with Component Affairs awards fOI' the "out tanding inclivielual contribution in governmental affairs". with Larry Schneider. AlA. being the most recent recipient. Angel Saqui. FAIA. our outgoing Regional Director. repre ented F'lorida well by running for a vice president pOSition at the national level. AlA F'lorida staff wa at tile heal't of all commission's work and hosted the legislators open house at AlA Florida headqualters during the legislative session. making it Ule mo t successful yet with the most legislators ever in attendance. PAPAC. chaired by Martha Cesery Taylor. AlA. raised and distributeel record funds.
The Membership Commission of AlA Florida. llncler the leaclership of Secretary!l'reasurer Vivian Salaga. AlA. significantly posted growth amono all chapters. During tile tenure of our Executive Vice President. Scott Shalley. membership losse have been replaced with a twenty percent growtll. restoring membership back to our higllwater mark seen in the 1980s.
Maek Smith. AlA. Vice President of the Professional D velopment Commi sion. with IA/F'L taff and DOD members. llad a superlative annual convention in Boca Raton with r ord numbers of architects, guests. trade show booths. CES seminar participant and profitability. All projections for SllCC s were xceeded. "Honoring tile Past and Seizing the F'uture" has launc!l d AlA F'lorida into the new millennium. AlA F'lorida's new book. "Florida Arcllitecture ... A Celebration". autllored by myself. Diane Greer and John Howey, FAIA. was showcased and chronicles the hi tory of AlA F'loriela architects who have been leaders, along witll many examples of buildings of higll de ign excellence. ~1cGra\\' Hili/Dodge ponsored our "Millennium Po tel''' ancl Millennium Awards honored numerOllSwortllY firms and architects.

Continued Page 9 Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000 5






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Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects
104 East Jefferson Street Tallahassee, F'loricia 3230 I \V\\'w.aiaOa.org
Editorial Board
John Totty, AlA John I-Iowey. F'A1A Karl Thorne. F'A1A
2000 OFFICERS President
Kith Bailey, AlA
Vice President/ President-elect

Miguel (Mike) A. Rociriguez, AlA
Secretary/ Treasurer
Vivian Salaga. AlA
Past President
Debra Lupton. AlA
Senior Regional Director Angel Saqui. 1i'AiA Regional Director
Larry t chneicier. AlA

Vice President, Professional Development
Mark H. Smith. AlA

Vice President, Legislative and Regulatory Affairs
Enrique Woociroffe. F'AJA

Vice President, Communications
Mickey j acob. AlA
Executive Vice President
R. Scott Shalley. CAE
Interim Managing Editor
John Totty. AlA
Publisher
Deni e Dawson Dawson Publications. Inc. 2236 Green pring Drive Timonium. Marylanci 21093 410.560.5600 800.322.3448 Fax: 4 10.560. 560 I
Sales Manager
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Sales Representatives

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Design
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F'loricJa Caribbean Architect, Official Journal of the F'loriela Association of the Amercan InstiLUte of rchitects, is Dwnecl by the Association. a F'lorida corpol'ation, not for profit. IS N-OO I 5-3907. It is publishecJ foul' times a year and is ciistributeel til rough the Office or the Association, 104 East Jefferson Street. Tallahasse F'loricJa 32301. Telephone 850.222.7590. Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of AlA F'loriela. Editorial material may be reprinted only with the expres permission of F'loricJa Caribbean Architect. Single Copies. $6.00: Annual Sub ription. 25.00
4 Florida Caribbean Arcnilect Winler 2000




Index to Advertisers

S&SCraftsmen Inc. (98-12) 18-19,33 Smyth Lumber (98-12) .. 18-19,33 Weather Shield (98-12) .. 18-19,33
Consulting/windows Architectural Windows &Cabinets
(98-12) .............18-19,33 Forest Products (98-12) ..18-19,33 HBS Inc. (98-12) .......18-19,33 Nor-Dec International Inc.
(98-12) ....... ......18-19,33 Palm City Millwork (98-12) 18-19,33 S & PArchitectural Products
(98-12) .... .. ..... . 18-19,33 S&SCraftsmen Inc. (98-12) .18-19,33 Smyth Lumber (98-12) ...18-19,33 Weather Shield (98-12) ..18-19,33
Doors Causeway Lumber Co. (98-16) ..25 PGT (98-28) ...............IFC
Doors -Aluminum TRACO (98-31) .. ......... ...7
Doors & Windows Caradco (98-15) ...........OBC
Drinking Fountains Most Dependable Fountains (98-26) .......... ........10
Employment Agency ArchiPro Staff Agency Inc. (98-11) .. . ..............24
Finishes Interior & Exterior Duron Paints &Wallcoverings (98-22) ..... ..... .......IBC
General Contractors Creative Contractors (98-20) ...24 Wehr Constructors Inc. (98-32) .24
Glass Block Glass Masonry Inc. (98-23) ....10
Granite Cold Spring Granite Co. (98-17) .............. ... .10
Impact Resistant Glass Caradco (98-15) .. ... .... . OBC
WEATHER SHIELD DEALERS

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Architectural Windows & Cabinets
Jacksonville, Florida 904.725.8583
St. Augustine, Amelia Island & Panhandle 800.320.131 2

Forest Products
Sarasota, Florida 941.922.0731

HBS Glass
Vero Beach, Florida 561 .567.7461
Jupiter, Florida 561 .743.1090

NOR-DEC International, Inc.
Miami, Florida 305.591.8050
San Juan, Puerto Rico 787.722.5425
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic 809.697.4251
Dominican Republic Showroom 809.227.7882

Palm City Millwork
Palm City, Florida 561 .288.7086
West Palm Beach, Florida 800.273.5598

S & P Architectural Products
Pompano Beach, Florida 954.968.3701
Miami, Florida 305.266.2635
Ft. Meyers / Naples, Florida 800.992.8959

S & S Craftsmen, Inc.
Tampa, Florida 800.922.9663

Smyth Lumber
Orlando, Florida 407.523.8777

Inspectors Liability Insurance
O'Donnell Naccarato & Mignogna Project Development International Inc.

(98-27) .. . .. .... .. .... .4
(98-29) ...... .... . ..... 4 Insurance
Millwork
AlA Trust (98-10) ............32

Causeway Lumber Co.
Collinsworth, Alter, Nielson, Fowler, & Dowling, Inc.(98-18) .... ....6 (98-16) ..................25 Project Development International Inc.

Mouldings
(98-29) .................. .4

Causeway Lumber Co.
Suncoast Insurance Associates Inc. (98-30) . ...... .. ....... .11 (98-16) ......... ......... 25
Florida Caribbean Ar(hitect Winter 2000 33



PUBLIC PROCUREMENT OF
PROFESSIONAL DESIGN SERVICES IN FLORIDA

by
J. MICHAEL HUEY
Huey, Guilday, & Thcker, P.A.
Tallahassee, Florida

I. History.
In 1971 the Florida legislature adopted the recommendations of a special gubernatorial committee by enacting legislation creating a qualification-based public procurement system for the acquisition of professional design and other services. This law, known as the Consultants' Competitive Negotiation Act (CCNA), became the model design professional procurement policy for the country and has been adopted in whole or part by most other states. The intent of the CCNA was to e tablish a procedure wherein public agencies were required to (a) give public notice of projects;
(b) elect the most qualified firm for the identified project by con idering pertinent criteria other than compensation; and (c) negotiate a fair and reasonable contract with the selected fum.
In judicial proceedings during the early 1980s, it was determined that, while the CCNA specifically required consideration of selection criteria which did not include professional fees, the Act did not expressly prohibit public agencies from considering fees during the selection process. (City ofJacksonville v. Reynolds, Sm,ith & Hills Architects, Engineers and Planners, 424 So. 2d 63 (Fla. 1st DCA 1982) and Florida Association of the A,nerican Institute ofArchitects v. Pinellas County, Case No. 79-1200845-7, Pinellas County Circuit Court 1982, aff'd per curiam, 436 So. 2d 188 (Fla. 2d DCA 1983). After these rulings, the Legislature, in 1988, clarified its position by specifically amending the CCNA to provide that public agencies may request, accept and consider proposals for the compensation to be paid under the contract only after the most qualified firm has been selected and contract negotiations have commenced. (See 287.055, Fla. Stat. (1997) [Tab 1]). In June of this year, the issue again became the subject of a lawsuit filed by the Florida Surveyor and Mapping Society against the City of Jacksonville. (Complaint, Florida Surveying and Mapping Society, Inc. v. City ofJacksonville, Case No. 98-03447-CA, Duval County Circuit Comt). In this suit, the Society contends that the City is requiring fee information to be submitted by firms seeking to be selected for specific projects in violation of the express language in the Act precluding compensation proposals until the most qualified firm has been selected and negotiations with that firm have commenced. This case will likely tum on whether the court believes legislative intent was to preclude requests for any fee information before the selection of the most qualified firm versus precluding requests for a complete fee proposal.
II. Public bodies required to follow the CCNA.
The CCNA applie to the tate and its agencies, municipalities, counties and other political subdivisions (taxing districts, etc.) and school districts or school boards. The Act does not apply to procurement of professional services by a non-governmental developer that contributes public fa


Index to Advertisers

Multimedia Systems Design & Installation
Audio Visual Innovations (98-13) ... .......... .. ...24
Outdoor Water Products
Most Dependable Fountains (98-26) ..... ......... ....10
Paints Interior & Exterior
Duron Paints &Wallcoverings (98-22) .. ... ......... ..IBC
Park & Public Site Furnishings
Columbia Cascade Co.lThe Fidler Group (98-19) ....... .... . 25
Professional Liability
Collinsworth, Alter, Nielson, Fowler & Dowling, Inc. (98-18) ....... 6 Suncoast Insurance Associates Inc. (98-30) .. .. .... ........ 11
Roof -Tile
Masterpiece Tile Co. (98-25) ....6
Showers
Most Dependable Fountains (98-26) . ... ....... ... .10
Site Furnishings by Timberform
Columbia Cascade CO.IThe Fidler Group (98-19) ........... ..25
Staffing Services
ArchiPro Staff Agency Inc. (98-11) .................. 24
Storm Protectors -Windows & Doors
TRACO (98-31) ..............7

Structural Engineers
O'Donnell Naccarato & Mignogna (98-27) ..... .. ... .... . .4
Temporary Agency
ArchiPro Staff Agency Inc. (98-11) ..... ...... .......24
Windows
PGT (98-28) ......... ......IFC



PartiCipating advertisers are given a four digit code (located in this index). To access additional information about an advertisers products or services, you only need to dial 410-252-9595 from your fax machine, Listen to the voice prompts and -PRESTOyou will receive the desired information.
34 Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000
Windows -Aluminum
TRACO (98-31) .. .... ........7

Windows & Doors
Architectural Windows &Cabinets
(98-12) ....... ......18-19,33 Caradco (98-15) ... ..... . OBC Forest Products (98-12) . 18-19,33 HBS Inc. (98-12) ... . . 18-19,33 Nor-Dec International Inc.
(98-12) .. ..... ......18-19,33 Palm City Millwork (98-12) .18-19,33 S &PArchitectural Products
(98-12) .. ... .. . ..18-19,33 S&SCraftsmen Inc. (98-12) .18-19,33 Smyth Lumber (98-12) ...18-19,33 Weather Shield (98-12) ..18-19,33 Window Classic Corp.
(98-33) ........ .. .. ... ...2

Wood Windows
Causeway Lumber Co. (98-16) ..25
Wood Windows & Doors
Window Classic Corp. (98-33) ... ................2
INC






Puerto Rico Test of Time Award


It li as designeel by HenrJ KluilIJ. AlA and opened in 1966.
PEOPLE
The Haskell Company has promoted Roland N.
Udenze, AlA, to project design principal in the
company's NE group ...Morris Architects congratulates
Scott Martin, sen;ing as intern architect in the firm 's
Orlando office, on winning first place in the Millennium
2000 Competition for architecture students in Florida
schools ...Michael Corbett ancl lgnacio Javier Reyes,
AlA, have been named project managers for Schwab,
Twitty and Hanser Architectural Group ... Wedding,
tephenson & Ibarguen, Architects, marked its 40'"
anniversary this year. The firm was founded by C.
Randolph Wedding, FAIA, in 1960...GLE Associates
announce the addition of Heber (Bud) Stone, Jr .. AlA,
as senior architect... Rink, Reynolds, Diamond, Fisher
Architects and Larry Wilson Design Associates make
the following staff announcements: Craig Davidson,
Glen Dasher, AlA and William Dasher, AlA, become
shareholders; Glenn Hettinger project architect, Geri
Travis senior designer and Emily Sheih and Duane
Kozachenko as intern architects ... Kevin Michael
Lariviere has joined Cannon Design as project
architect... PQH Architects announces these additions:
John A. Fischer, AlA, Associate Vice President. Paul
Bjorn. AlA. project architect. Vincent Hager, AlA,



project architect and Miguel Martinez, intern
Ignacio Javier Reyes Kevin Michael Lariviere
architect ... CBB Architects has been named a
principal member of MAG-NET Healthcare
Enviro nments. A national strategic alliance of
architectural fil'ms ...Song + Associates was named
"Architect of the Year" by the Palm Beach County Water
tilities DepartmenL...Mark C. Meatte, AlA. has
joined the Healthcare Studio of PappasJSA...







8 Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000



know the specific regulation of the agency which may affect his or her ability to be qualified. Each agency must determine the firm or individual to be employed to be fully qualified to render the service. The agency is required to evaluate the professional firm' capabilities, adequacy of personnel, past record, experience, certification as a minority business enterprise and any other factors determined by the agency to be applicable to its particular requirements. Agencies must endeavor to meet the minority business enterprise procurement goals which, for architectural and engineering contracts, are nine percent (9%) for Hispanic-Americans, one percent (1 %) for Asian-Americans and fifteen percent (15 %) for American women. (287.0945 1 (4)(n)1.b, Fla. Stat.)
VII. The shortlisting process.
For each proposed project, agencies are required to evaluate the firms which have submitted statements of qualifications and performance data and to conduct discussions with no fewer than three firms regarding their qualifications, approach to the project and ability to furnish the required services. An agency may require public presentations by the "shortlisted" firms but this is not required. The agency must select in order ofpreference, no fewer than three firms deemed to be most highly qualified to perform the required services. The factors to be considered by the agency are:
(a) the ability of the professional personnel;
(b) whether a fum is a certified minority business enterprise;
(c) past performance;
Cd) willingness to meet time and budget requirements;
( e) location;
Cf) recent, current and projected workloads of the firms; and
(g) the volume of work previously awarded to each firm by the agency with the object
of effecting an equitable distribution of contracts among qualified firms provided
this does not violate the principle of selection of the most highly qualified firms.

Agencies may not request, accept or consider proposals for the compensation to be paid to the firm during this selection process.
VIII. The negotiation process.
Agencies are required to negotiate a contract with the most qualified firm at compensation which the agency determines is fair, competitive and reasonable. Should the agency be unable to negotiate a satisfactory contract with the firm considered to be the most qualified at a price that the agency determines to be fair, competitive and reasonable, negotiations with that firm must be formally terminated. The agency is then required to undertake negotiations with the second ranked firm to attempt to contract. Failing in its attempt with the second firm, the agency must undertake negotiations with the third ranked firm. If the agency is unable to negotiate a satisfactory contract with any of the three ranked finTI s, the agency must select additional firms in the order of their competence and qualifications and continue negotiations until it reaches an agreement with one of the firm


In Memoriam

AlA Florida and AlA Puerto Rico Illourn the loss of two prOlninent colleagues ...
Jan Abell,FAlA
Tampa
" he loved her work. She was tireless. That was a big part of her personal success."
KemJeth Garcia. partner of Jan Abell speaking of IJer untimely death in September.
Jan was a leader in preserving histOl'ical stl'llctures around Tampa Bay for more than 25 years. Jan was born in Chicago, received her bachelor's degree in architecture from Ollio niversity 1969. and worked in the Tetherlands and Rochester. NY before afl'iving in Tampa in 1975. After working a few years with McElvy, Jennewein. Stefany and Howard. she established her own fil'm in 1979. Partnersllip with Kenneth Garcia came in 1982.
Jan's resume is an impressive list including academics. honors and awards. professional and community awards as well as many building projects. She served as juror in a number of design award progl'anls. including AlA National Honor Awards in 1993. She also was a prolific lecturer and writer.
She held the Beinecke-Reeves Distinguished Chair in Historic Preservation at the University of Florida Col1ege of Architecture where she had also served as visiting professor. In 1997 Jan received the Distinguishecl Service Award from the University of Florida. She was also involved with the Master of Architecture program at the
ni ersity of South Florida.
In 1999 Jan received the Outstancling Award for Restoration from the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation. That same year she received an Award of Excellence from Hillsborough County Planning Commission ror several pI'ojects. including Port Tampa City Library and University of Tampa. In 1990 Jan was awarded the Medal of Honor from Florida Central Chapter of the AlA and was elevated to the American Institute of Architects College of FeUows in 1994.
Within the profession Jan served on the ational Register Review Board. was Chairman in 1998, served on the FAAlA Foundation Board. and was a long time member of the Arts Council of Hillsborough Count). She wa also Chair of the Tampa TIleatre Foundation. Lnc.
"Jan literally wrote the book on how to preserve old houses." comm nted Linda Saul-Sena, longtime friencl and Tampa city councilwoman. "She was pivotal to every effol't of historical preservation and urban redevelopment in the area."


Jorge del Rio, FAlA
Puerto Rico
It might seem easy to write about Jorge because of his vast amount of exemplary designs in tropical modernism. Definitely it is more difficult to write about who he was and what he did. What Jorge also gave us was his advice, friendship, exemplary moral life. his unconclitional help in the daily professional and social struggle we all faced together.
He graduated in 1956 at the University of Havana with a Master in Architecture. His designs in Cuba from 1956 to 1960 show his command and commitment with tropical modern design as guided by his mentor and friend Mario Romanach.
He moved to Puerto Rico that same year and his extraorclinary rendering abilities earned him placement in the best design offIces on the island. He was a teacher at the School of Architecture in the University of Puert.o Rico from 1967 to 1969 and again 1984 to 1985, and was recognized by that institution for his teaching abilities and professional practice in 1977 and 1984.
His many design awards include a 1967 PIA AwaI'd for his elderly housing project at Cidra. PR and numerous AlA Puerto Rico Honor Awards for design in 1976. 1977 and 1980. In 1982 he was awarded a recognition to those architectUl'al community members that have excel1ed in favor of Puerto Rican Culture and in 1989 he was awarded the Henry Klumb Design Achievement Award. the highest recognition given by the Colegio de Arquitectos de Puerto Rico.
He was jurol' at the 1978 AlA Puerto Rico Awards Program. sharing jury duties with I. M. Pei, and was a featured speaker at the 1979 AlA Florida Annual Convent.ion. He was elevated to Fellow in 1980 and was PreSident of AlA Puerto Rico in 1984. BedI'idden, he participated in AlA Puerto Rico Test of Time Awards for 2000.
Jorge gave us his architecture but also gave us his limitless love and brotherhoocl in Christ. He will be remembered as an indivisible composition of exemplary father and loving husband. hard working architect, toiling daily with his tenacity even from his wheelchair in his last years. wise and amiable teacher to his students at the School of Arcllitecture. member of professional, civic and religious oI'ganizations to which he dedicated his time. effort and money, and ever present friend who lived Jose Marti'S words: "Dut)1 shall be met simply and natul'aUy."
36 Florido Caribbean Architect Winter 2000







The metal oxide coating is INSIDE the glass which eliminates problems currently experienced with outside-coated glass block. along with superior sun-blocking performance!
For more information. contact:
Glass Masonry Inc. 5000 Oakes Road, #F Fort lauderdale, Fl 33314 Phone: (800) 940-4527 FAX: (954) 584-8824 www.glassmasonry.com


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Based 011 Ihe 1997 AlA Firm S1II1Ie.\' Reporl. cOlllpleled by a siralified sample oj1II0re Ihal1 4.000 AIA firms, (/ joilll projeci by AlA. MccrawHill lItld Reade.r. DPIC is the largest if/sllrer ojsUIl1eyedjirm w;lh 10 or more sraff members.

Brian Hadar, Phil Nolen, Richard Hansen or Danny De La Rosa Call 800.741.8889 or e-mail: www.suncoastins.com "Now serving all of Florida with offices in Tampa, Tallahassee and Miami"

A.M. Best Roting U AU (Excellent). Policies ore underwrinen by Securily Insuronce Compony of Hortford, DesignProfessionols Insuronce Compuny and TheConnecticut Indemnily Compony. Theissuing compony vories by stote. DPIC
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Thoughts on Technology from Two


Wiliioul liglli. space is meaningless. Tecllllology can be our master or oul slave.
Don Singer, FAIA
Technology affects our lives. It is those Ii es that are the "Problem ets" that form the basis for. ancl set the goals of. Architecture.
When a client wants a sophisticatecl electronic lighting system it does not alter the way one should think about how light enhances the living ell\rironment. 'vVhen the client's program implies an oversized living space that demands pre-stressecl concrete technology. it is the design concept that motivates the use of tecllnology. not the technology mo[,ivating design. And. when the use of' laminated glass obviates the n ed for an expensive. rOll-down shutter system. the motivation should b the maintenance of the design idea. not the glory of tile glass technology.
Technology has opened doors for us, but it should not be the Force that shapes th doors. It is the ongoing search for the tt'ue nature of the problem that provides the motivation that will most honestly shape those doors as well a all the other a pects of form anel function.
The technology of building provides the products we have available.
While we owe it to client to embrace technology, to give them all the
aelvantages of tile new possibilities. we have a further obligation. We
are obligated, to ourselves and to our client to u e that technology
and reate meaningful space that is tl'l1e to their need.
12 Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000

Known/Recognized for


Elaine and I just retur'ned from a trip that took u through Ch31'lottesville. Virginia and provicleel us the opportunit to visit Monticello. Thomas Jeffersolfs 18th centllL'Y "farmhouse". For those of you who have been there. you wiJI know what I mean when I say that Jefferson used technology to make space. and life. better. He was an amazing human being. certainly. What he did in the way of usino technology to reinforce his design ideas -light defining and improving space, hidden mechanical systems elevating his abilities as a host to a level of grace -was. (OK. I know this is a pun) revolutionary!
He used the technology he had at his disposal. and more that he created out of need, to free his clesign idea. his concept of the house and its site. from the burdens of the ordinal' It is that tlU'llst. that motivation. that raises Jefferson's architecture at Monticello to the level of art,
Technology without focus -a focus on Architecture -is mere gadgetry. Used with the purposefulness of a clear focus on the humanity of architecture and the importance of design as a commitment to the future and to ongoing life. it is a worthwhile tool. The better the technology avaiJable to us. the better we should be as Architects.



Renowned Florida Architects Residential Design
Wilh IIU" l'iell'S diagonally up ancl c/owo a l(:: IWI'I'OW beach, IlIe !Jouse wJ'aps fJack and forms a large Gallr/yarel.
Carl Abbott, FAIA
Architecture can be timeless. reflecting the spirit and soul of the design Vision. The Pal'thenon i no less great Architecture because it was not done on the latest version of AutoCad 01' that its columns were made with a hand chisel. vVhile technolog conti nues to improve the efficiency at Wllich designs become reality. it Sllould always be seen as a means to an end --a changing and increasingly refined chisel'.
In my firm. we stl'ive to apply technology where functions can be gained 01' cost saved. Certain areas of architecture. notably 1V0rking drawings anel coordination with consultant b nefit from leveraging technology in the form of improved speed and fficiency.
The proliferation of options only increases the most comple,\ et time-honored of technologies --listening to tile Client. From lhe beginning. we work closely with tile Client. usually meeting at tile site itselr. As the program is evolving we develop paper forms along with loose sketclles --we encourage the Client to explore the wiele range 01' design options with us in an intuitive and tactile manneI'. Bringing a rllll rendered. 3D walk-through at an early stage is not a part of this Process. Instead, these ear'ly in-depth meetings generate the nucleus of the Concept. Only after the Concept is formed elo we use computers. In Olll' office we have higilly proficient people. working with a full range of high-speed computer. gl'3phicS packages and other tool
Technology has changed the way people live their Lives. often in ways they have little power to control. Architecture. by contrasl. is centered on th ability to design our Environmem ---we creat our environment --arter that it creates us.
In our work. there is an abstractne that I want to nourislHhe human Quality. e ploration. and playflllness. Architecture Iloulel I)e empowering ---Technology is usefUL to the extent it is empower'ing.
Cooper Abbon and Mark Abbott; contributed [hOUg/l[S and eC/il.orial advice for Chi arlic/e.
Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000 13



A House Rising and Facing

Like a

Project: Casa Del Lago Location: Trujillo Alto, Puerto Rico Architect and Client: Carlos Betancourt, AIA


. (
I ARSTA...OOA

.~. L""""':'MCO_ ,~
fOQO~"...:>CrI '!Il~I!.-..ee
.. ll''
14 Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000


Surrounding Views Sentry Box


~

-1
1
"""""'r rl
'-1-1----,
;
o 0
The house is set deep within the forest. lVith a plateau defin ing a vestibul and a steady slope do\\m to tile eclge of a water reservoir.
Long, sleepless nigllts revolved around the design for' a hou e that would ['eveal a s)mlbiotic relationship between exterior' and interior spaces. From the out et. the design was not to rely on [1IL'niture: framed views towarels the landscape would suffice_
The sllrrOllilcling landscape inspired a house built out of lightweight horizontal wood bands incorporating aromatic mahogany doors and \\~ndows. bracecl \\~thin a reinforced concrete frame. Materials such as corrugated metal roof and colored cement tiles 1V0ulei recall the old plantation houses.
Within the mind or the architect. the Ca a del Lago "woulel rise and face tile SlilTollnding views. like a sentry box. The interplay between the [Tee fOl'm of the trees and the sloping contours against the stern structural grid would be full of surprises. like Pandora's box."
The main nOOL' opens wiele to both, the north-facing deck and to the views to the south. Behind a redorange tinted. plywood-faced wood wall. Wllich is a backdrop to the dining ar ea, lies the kltchen. 1 0 modular IJtchen cabinets here, each piece is conceived as an independent part of the whole. Decks for entertainment spill out in strategic opportunities ai, the basement and main noor, maklng the best use of the surrounding land features.
Upstairs, a white jacuzzi tub set between two black polished granite slabs commands the scene from the master bathroom. A glass window swings out from the tub's edge. opening to the sUI'roullCling treetops and lake beyond
The house will ventually reach a high level of selfsufficiency. At present it is equipped \~th a cistern and solar powered water heater. vegetable and fruit garden is contemplated in the landscaping plan.


Contact:
Carlos Betancourt, AlA
Telephone: 787-977-2800
Fax: 787-977-2830
E-mail: ABA@spiderlink.net


Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000 15








Addition greatly enhances

The 0\\ ners of tliis I'i\ er froilL residence required Lhe addition of an e:o.Lcnsive famil) entel'LainmenL area as well as an i 'olaLed guest suite. all to be l'OIlSLi'uctecl while they occupied the existing house.
\s the design cie\ eloped. the ellLerlainmenl area e:o.ceeded available space above the garage. Indi\'iciual I'unctions were then allowed to canLilev<::,r past the confines of the first 11001' and assume geometry appropriate for interior and exterior expression. TllUS. the home theatre walls curve on tile intel'ior to enhance acousLics and create a "sllicld" to tile motorcourL on the exterior facacie.
The guesL suite generated an unanticipateci Lhil'd 11001'. To avoid overpowering the existing residence. as well as neighboring
Project: St. Johns River Front Residence Location: Jaci(sonville, Florida Architect: Bruce-Terrell Architects, Inc
['esielences. Lhe third 11001' was designed as an ellipLoiel with a fabric covereel open ail' patio. The form is set back from the s cond floor outline anel recedes visually in mass due Lo curved wall planes and glass block.
This design thus allowed construction LO pI'oceed without interrupting Lhe exisLing envelope until final finish stages when old was tied into new.
Outside. the existing pool and patio was bracketed at side yards with sculptural Lrellises anel an open-ail' "shellform" awning, set low into tile Ilillsiele to provide shade. but not obstruct view of the I'iver. The circul3J' trellis fulfillS the role of "true north" indicator and sundial.
CONTACT:
Phone: 9042965701
Fox: 9042966102


16 Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000




livability of river front residence


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Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000 17


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New interior space rendered in
natural wood and industrial

elements

I be/ieFe we must recoonize and embrace lfle ongoing (JI'ocess of l eclmology anel teclwological advancement,. We are living in an age of rapid eleclronic. biogeneUc and teclwical engineering expansion. Our living and 1I'0rkspaces should renect t/Wl. Tl7i means taking anot/Jer 'erious look at moclemism, W/licll clealt Witll tl7e introduciJon of tl7ese issues a century ago. Society is accepting and becoming more comfortable wit/l modemism as toclay's" lifestyles clwnge, as a result of t l7ese ac/lrancements. Tl7is is a very positive tl7ing. It is mally pl'Ol'iding a renewecl inter est br l l7e general public towards arcl7itecture in general. I tl7ink it can safely be said that. after nearly an entire centLII'J~ moclemism is I)ere to star
J think it is very interesUng t/wt people are realizing modem ism does not l7ave to mean sterile and cold. Tl7e OWllers of t/lis 170use, for example. are thriJ/ed witl) tile feeling of security and warmtl) in tlleir 170me. Tl7is is acl7ievecl by using materials SUCll as nalUral wood and by maintaining a sense of Iwman scale.
-Stalement by ll7e Ar cl7itect.
This project is a [' novation and expansion of an existing zero lot line pat,io home. Because tile existing sloped cathedral ceiling was so voluminous. the design solution was realized by inserting a second level office loft and bedroom connected by a bridge into tile exisLing space. Some tructural columns were replaced for aesthetic reason however. the ceiling lines and roof trusses were not elisturiJeel.
An aesthetic of industrial modern elegance was accomplished through the use of materials such as steel and concrete contrasting with maple anel lacquered accents. A suspended cur ved wall of maple panels with incorporated lacquered cabinets separates the family room fTom the living room. The counter. which runs the entire length of the house along the outside wall. is poured concrete. The owners desired an oversize dining room for large family gatherings. It is elevated to provide views to the pool area anel Ilelp define the importance of the space. Two dining room tables were ULilizeel. which can be connected for such famil occasions. They also desired a sepal'aLion between the entry foyer and living area. A series of perforated metal panels pal'tially enclosing the dining area provide the solution. In the master bath. vanity heights are designed specifically to heights proporLional for the t\ 0 owners.

CONTACT:

Phone/Fox: 561-746-1113
E-mail: oneilarchitect@iuno.com


20 Florido Caribbean Architect Winter 2000






.


Project: Bertuch Renovation/Addition
Location: Boca Raton, Florida
Architect: Mitchell O'Neil, AIA
Interior Designer: H. Allen Holmes, Inc
Contractor: Carrere General Contractors, Inc.

Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000 21





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Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000 25





As zoning reforms and a redevelopment renaissance strive to draw new residents to downtown Ft. Lauderdale, The Shirr Group has completed Villaggio di Las Olas, the city's first true mixed-use development.
This upscale residential/commercial complex. in the heart of East Las Olas Boulevard shopping and dining district, is a private enclave of villas. town homes, boutiques and cafes set in a Mediterranean stype village surrounding an Italian piazza. It was designed to realize the full potential of the city's recent zoning reforms that opened the way for' mixed use, residential and commercial with parking garage. Responding to the demand for "in-town" housing, The Shiff Group took on the dual roles of owner and builder, buying the last piece of land suitable for a sizable mixed-use development.
,
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, I


"OUl' design-builcl approach to construction results in fast-track completion of a project at a predictable cost," noted the architect. "At the same time, our emph asis on architectural inventiveness and functionality helps Villaggio achieve a classic, yet highly livable sense of place.,.
Taking inspiration from a neighborhood setting that includes a Venetian-style canal. the design team created a commercial/residential complex with the ambiance of a classic Mediterranean village. The five story Villaggio di Las Olas includes 24 vill as, both flats and townhomes, averaging 1.400 to 2.400 square feet. Two levels of parkin o under the building p['ovide safe and secure entry while street level restaurant/retail, with waterside seating along the Himmarshee Canal. completes the living experience.

CONTACT:
Phone: 9544638900
Fax: 9544638552
Email: michaels@shiff.com
web: www.shiff.com

Florido Caribbean Architect Winter 2000 27



an Innovative Learning Center

The Challenger Learning Center of the Florida A&M Universit -Florida State University College of Engineering will be a 30.000 square foot racility located at Kleman Plaza in downtown Tallahassee. The Center is planned to house a space orientated Learning Center for middle school students in surrounding school districts. It will also contain an IMAX theater. planetarium and exhibit spaces which will be open to the public as well.
The project is in early phases of preliminary design with a scheduled opening time of spring 2002. The sketches and plan shown here represent an early view of an exciting and innovative type of educational center.
The facility is being designed to capture the attention and stimulate the interest of students and visitor's in outer space with a theme of space exploration and aerospace education. In addition to provid ing specific spaces for the IMAX theater and planetarium. interior spaces will provide tlexibility for various functions.
Extel'ior facades will be sca led to the sUI'rollllding streetscape and the ground level plan is planned to promote pedestrian activities and events in and around Kleman Plaza.


Florida Caribbean Ar(hitect Winter 2000 29


Product News


An English Original

For those who long for the look and charm of an English bath, Watermark offers the new Stratford Series Bath Faucet. The faucet features 1/4 turn ceramic disk cartridges that are superior to compression cartridges used in faucets that come directly from England.
Stratford is available in 33 finishes and comes with acomplete line of matching bath accessories including cabinet knobs, towel bars, showers (pressure balanced, concealed thermostatic and exposed thermostatic), exposed tub fillers and more. Stratford comes with a lifetime warranty on the valve and finish.
For more information contact: Watermark Designs at 800-842-7277 or visit their website at www.watermark-designs.com.



Curvatura 3-D Design Possibilities from USG
The new CURVATURNM Elite 3-D Ceiling System being introduced by USG Corporation offers architects and designers additional design possibilities by adding a narrow suspension profile to the company's current, curved ceiling system selection.
Available in a broad selection of shapes, textures and colors, the CURVATURA Elite Ceiling System offers an elegant, attention-getting addition to a variety of commercial applications. The wavy arcs of the ceiling system can be formed into a wide range of dimensional layouts to achieve a variety of design objectives.
A narrow-faced, 9/16-inch profile with a slight reveal provides a non-interrupted, monolithic ceiling plane. The product is ideal for projects that require a fine, detailed look such as office environments, entertainment and gaming areas, high-bay areas and retail spaces. Its slim profile allows the addition of definition and drama to interior spaces.
For more information about CURVATURA Elite 3-D Ceiling System, call USG Interiors, Inc.
at 800-USG-4YOU.
Stair Treads from Allstate Rubber
Allstate Rubber introduces a new line of vulcanized real rubber stair treads. Manufactured from vulcanized rubber for color fastness, installation flexibility, dimensional stability and longer wear, Allstate stair treads add a design element where few options existed.
Available in 3 patterns and 37+ colors, the palette is designed to complement other interior finishes and floor covering. Custom colors are offered for a small minimum.
Allstate stair treads are available nationally through local distribution or factory direct. For samples and information contact Stolar Industries/Allstate Rubber at: 800-491-9968



The Rich Heritage of Italian Majolica
Walker Zanger, known for high-quality, handmade ceramic tile and stone introduces its new
Deruta Collection of hand painted tile. This introduction marks the first time tile with Deruta
designs is available in the United States.
Named after the hillside Umbrian town from which they originate Deruta ceramics have been admired for more than six centuries and are known the world over for their brilliantly glazed hues, classic designs and graceful forms. Buildings decorated with terra-cotta finishing and majolica tile are a familiar sight throughout this quaint Italian town. Brightly colored tile frames windows; edge cornices and generally embellishes the architecture of Deruta.
Each hand painted piece from the Deruta Collection gracefully displays the careful craftsmanship of the artisan, whose brushstrokes are evident in every liner, deco and border, making each tile an authentic work of art. The line brings Old World Italian beauty to any space with a selection of nine different, richly detailed liners, four different borders, and two decos.
For more information call Walker Zanger at: 800-540-0235 or visit their website at www.walkerzanger.com to find a distributor near you.
Florida Caribbean Architect Winter 2000 31





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