Group Title: Florida Caribbean architect
Title: FloridaCaribbean architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004635/00003
 Material Information
Title: FloridaCaribbean architect
Alternate Title: Florida Caribbean architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Publisher: Dawson Publications,
Dawson Publications
Place of Publication: Timonium Md
Publication Date: Fall 1997
Copyright Date: 1997
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Periodicals -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 44, no. 1 (spring 1997)-
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Issues have also theme titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004635
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA5904
ltuf - ACJ1464
oclc - 36846561
lccn - sn 97052000
 Related Items
Preceded by: Florida architect

Full Text



CONTENTS


Fall 1997 Vol. 44. No. 3
Cover:
Dlysdale Residence, Atlantic Beach,
Photogmph: Geo1"ge A, Cott,
Ch1"01na, Inc., 1997 AlA FlO1ida
Ar'chitectuml Photogmpher
of the Yem'

1997
Awards for Excellence
in Architecture
Firm of the Year Donald Singe1" Architect, PA. is hon01'ed fOT excelle11,ce in design, education, and service to the profession and the community, 8
Awards for Excellence in Architecture
Spillis Candela and PaTtne1"S' MaTtin and Pat Fine Ce11,ter f01" the Arts at Miwrni Dade Community College, Kendall Campus, enhances all the p1"ogmms it houses, Ar'chitects Design Oroup's philosophy of g1"een design takes on a colorful twist fOT this Omnge County Landfill Opemtions Facility, Rod1iguez and QuiToga A1'chitects Char"teTed built in lake views and a fitness cente1' for stude11,t 1'esidents of this Lynn UniveTsity Dor'mito?"y, CantileveTed pOTches of the D1ysdale ReSidence, by William MO?gctn A1"chitects, 1ise above the t1'eetops and face the sea. Donald SingeT Ar'chitect's diagonal plan for the Brody Reside11,ce on Star Island creates dynamic spaces inside and out, 12 13 14 15 16
Test of Time l O-year: George FReed, FAlA, A House Among the Trees, Mia,mi, 25-year: Spillis Candela and PaTtneTs, Miami Dade Community College, Miami. 25-yeaT: Aug1,~sto Gautie1~ AlA, and Hector Lle11,za, AlA, Pine Grove Apar-tm.ents, San Juan, (AlA PueTto Rico awar'd). 20 21 22
Unbuilt Designs Atlantic House, Key Biscayne, Castinei1"a + Axioma_3 Ar"chitects; Tampa Police DepaTtme11,t Dist1'i ct Substation, Tampa, Alfonso Architects Inc,; Hiltsb01"OUgh C011?.11Wnity College Public Se1-vice Technology Building, YbO?' City Camp1,~s, Tampa, Flad & Associates Inc. c~nd Alfonso Architects Inc; Windsor Town Center', Vem Beach, Scott MeT/ i ll, AlA. 26
Departments Editorial News New Products 3 4 6
Viewpoint by GeO?ye A. Alle11" Hon. AlA 28


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FLORIDNCARI BBEAN ,\RCIlITECT Fall 1997



EDITORIAL

FLORIDA/CARIBBEAN ARCHITECT
Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects 104 East Jefferson Street Tallahassee, Flot'ida 32301
Editorial Board John Totty, AlA, Chairman John Howey, FAlA
Karl Thorne, AlA
President John R. Cochran, Jr., AlA
Vice PresidentlPresident-elect Roy Knight, FAlA
Secretarytrreasurer Vivian Salaga, AlA
Past President William Blizzard, AlA
Senior Regional Director Hemy C. Alexander, Jr.,AlA Coral Gables
Regional Director Jolm P Tice, Jr., AlA Pensacola
Vice President for Professional Excellence Ivan Johnson, AlA
Vice President for Political Effectiveness Debra Lupton, AlA
Vice President for Communications Keith Bailey, AlA
Executive Vice President
F. Scott Shalley
Editor Margaret Barlow
Published by Dawson Publications, Inc. 2236 Greenspring Drive Tirnoniwn, Marylancl 21093
(410) 560-5600 (800) 322-3448
Fax: (410) 560-5601 Publisher Denise Rolph
Sales Manager
Dave Patrick Layout & Design Amy King
FloridalCm-ibbecUl A1'chitecf, Official Joum al of Ule Florida Association of the American lnstitute
of Archjtects, is owned by the Association, a
Florida Corporation, not for profit. ISSNOOll;
3907. It is published four times a year and
distributed through the Exe utive Office of the Association, 104 East Jefferson St., Tallahassee, Florida 32301. Telephone 9041222-7590.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not
11 cessarily those of AlA Florida. Editorial
material may be reprinted only with Lhe eXllress pennission of F7.o',-iclnJCm-ibbean krclli tecl.
Single copies, $6.00; annual subscription, $20.33. Third class postage
FLORJDNCARIBBEAN ARCHITECT Fall 1997


I
n selecting this year's Awards for Excellence in Design, jury members seemed attracted by time-honored concepts such as simplicity, clarity, sense of place, and the practical ways in which people e>..'perience a building. Award recipients featured in these pages include Unbuilt, Excellence in Design, Test of Time, and Firm of the Year. Design Awards Committee Chair, Peter Hepner, AlA, and Rick Rowe, AlA, did an outstanding job of organizing, selecting, and assembling juries.
Jurors Robert McCarter, AlA, D.E. Holmes, FAlA, and Frank Lupo, AlA, meeting in Tampa to review Unbuilt projects, made four selections. They liked Scott MelTill, AIA's Windsor Town Center (Vero Beach) for its appropriation of Greek forms and beautiful pencil drawings. Castineira + Axioma_3 Architects' sophisticated design for Atlantic House (Key

Biscayne) "has the presence to hold its own" in a mixed-dwelling submban neighborhood, they said. Jurors appreciated the way Alfonso Architects' non-institutional design for the Tampa Police Department Disttict Substation reaches out to the neighborhood. For the Public Service Technology Building, planned for Hillsborough Community College's Ybor City campus, Flad & Associates and Alfonso Architects related to neighboring structures in the historic clistrict by juxtaposing quiet elevations with industrial forms, noted jurors.
A New York jury, including Thomas Phifer, AlA, Cary Tam arid n, AlA, Kenneth Frampton, and VictOlia Meyers, selected five projects to receive Awards for Excellence. 1\vo contemporary residences designed to capture i..ncreclible local views took honors: Donald Singer Architect's Brody Residence, off Miami Beach, with its intricate geometry, and William Morgan Architects' Drysdale Residence, with its cantilevered porches above the tree-line. Projects at two universities, one public, one private, were selected. Juror's applauded Spillis Candela and Partners' Martin and Pat Fine Center for the Arts, on Miami Dade Corrummity College's Kendall Campus, for the sculptural quality of its exterior stair-towers and ground-floor plaza. The clean lines, high-functionality, and lowmaintenance aspects of Rodriguez and Quiroga Architects Chartered's Lynn University Dormitory, Boca Raton, also appealed to jurors. ROlmding out this group is Architects Design Group's totally "green" Orange County Landfill Operations Facility, in Orlando, which jurors called "an American high-tech building of real conviction."
Test of Time jurors Mark Hampton, FAlA, Donald Singer, FAlA, and Suzanne Martinson, AlA, selected two Miami projects. Chosen were George FReed, FAIA's House Among the Trees (1979), and Miami Dade Community College, master-planned in 1967 by Spillis Candela and Partners. Also included here is the Puerto Rico chapter award recipient in this category: Pine Grove Apartments, in San Juan, designed in 1960 by architects Augusto Gautier, AlA, and Hector Llenza, AlA.
The 1997 Finn of the Year is Donald Singer Architect, which, for more than 30 years has set an exan1ple of integrity and principled design. The jury that selected the Fort Lauderdale firm included Carl Abbott, FAlA, Steven Gift, AlA, Joe Chillura, Chuck Sackett, and Thomas Hammer, AlA.
Awards were presented at the 85th Summer Convention in Orlando, on August 9. We also salute the following Public Award winners: Walter Q. Taylor, FAlA, Award of Honor for Design; Hon. Nancy Liebman, Bob Grahan1 Honorary AlA Architectural Awareness Award; John P. Tice, AlA, Hilliard T. Smith Community Service Award and Silver Medal;
S. Keith Bailey, AlA, Anthony 1. Pullara Memorial Award; and George A. Cott, Chroma, Inc., Architectural Photographer of the Year.
Wrapping up this issue is a Viewpoint by George Allen, who leaves AlA Florida after eighteen years as Executive VP. George will jog a few memOlies as he recalls "how I learned to spell architecture." ME
FlO1"idafCoribbeanATchi tect serves the profession by providing current in.f0l111ation on design, practice management, technology, environment, energy, preservation and development of communities, constnlction, fmance, economics, as weU as other politi al,social, and cultural issues that impact the field.



NEWS

for "working closely with AlA at every level, for the bettennent of us all." Senator Clary, said Cochran, "has taken an active role in om government, set a high example for om membership, and provided some very real input at our state's highest levels on design and construction matters." A special crui catme ofClruy, drawn by Ernest Straughn Sr., was presented to him along with his award certificate.
University of Florida Names Award Recipients
The University of Florida each yeru' recognizes members of the profession for their outstanding contributions. I.S.K. (Keith) Reeves, AlA, a 1964 graduate, president of Architects Design Group, Inc., Winter Park, received the Distinguished Architecture Alumni Award. Jan Abell, FAIA, Tampa, architect and visiting scholar at the university last year, received the Distinguished Service Award. Peter Hepner, AlA, a 1982 graduate and partner in Holmes, Hepner and Associates, Tampa, received a Young Architects Design Award.
died August 8th, at age 78, in New York.
Rudolph,who became internationally known through his exquisite ink drawings and completed landmark buildings in Sru-asota, went on to chair the Department of Archite ture at Yale University from 1958 to 1965. After leaving Yale he lived and practiced in New York City, de igning numerous projects rrulging from single-family residences to high-ri ses and megastructures around the world. In 1994 AlA Florida recognized his arc hitectural achievements by presenting him its Gold Medal.
Some of his la ndmark projects still standing are the Healy "Cocoon" Cottage (194850), the Hook Residence (1951), and the Srulderling Beach Club (1951, placed on the National HistOlic Register in 1994), all in Siesta Key; the Walker Guest House (1952), Sanibel Island; the Hiss "Umbrella" House (1953), Lido Shores; Sarasota Senior High School addition (1960); and the Milam Residence (1960), Jacksonville.
Paul Rudolph dared to dream and 1960s, which included Vicand succes fully executed his artor Lundy, Mru-k Hampton, Gene chitectural ideas as few 20thLeedy, Tim Seibert, and Jack century architects have been West, among other Submitted able to do. He was the "spiritual" by John Howey, FAlA, authm'oj leader of the Sarasota group of The Sru-asota School of Archi tecarchitects in the 1940s, 1950s, ture 1941-1966 (MIT pJess).
Linda and Rick Rowe, AlA, with 1'etTospective hon01ing Rick's jathe?; H. Dean Rowe, FA!A, joundeT ojRowe A1'ch'itects, who died Ma,y 19, in Tampa,. Shown at the August 9 Reception at the Orlando Convention, the 50-joot display j eCl tU1'ed photogmphs chmnicli ng mOTe them 30 yeaTS oj aTchitectuTe, pmj essional activities, jamily,j1iends, and associates.

In Memoriam
Frederik C. Gjessing, AlA, died on Febl1lruy 15, 1997, at his home in Martinique. He had lung cancer. Born in 1918, in St. Louis, Missouri, his long career began in New York City after service in the U.S. Navy during World War
II. As a designer for the U.S. National Park Service (1958-79) in San Juan and the Virgin Islands, he directed numerous rehabillta, tion and restoration projects, including fortifi cations and historic homes and plantations. Last December he was honored by the U.S. Virgin Islands Chapter ofAlA for his lifetime ofachievement in preserving the region's architectural heritage.
Pa ul Rudolph, one of Florida's best known architects in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s,


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Participating advertisers are assigned a four-digit code (located under each ad). To access additional infonnation about the advertiser's product and/or service, you only need to dial (410) 252-9595 from your fax machine and listen to the voice prompts for further instructions. PRESTO -you will receive additional information about advertiser's products and/or services.
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A shared dedication by individuals in the firm to "the creative potential that exists in architecture," has resulted in an average tenure of ten years. Like Singer, who throughout his career has maintained a continuing involvement in conununity and professional service, everyone in the finu follows suit.
Elaine Singer, is the firm's longtime (unpaid) administrator and bookkeeper. Singer also credits his wife and "best friend" with being "a great listener, a danmed good critic with a great eye," and with raising the couple's two daughters "with her other hand." She also is active in the conununity arts scene, as is administrator Jenifer Johnson, with the firm since 1995.
Other long-term associates Craig Barry and Roger Lebida, AlA, have been with the finu 25 and 13 years, respectively. Barry, a Fort Lauderdale native and Singer's "confidant and right hand," is legendary, says Singer for his ability "to put a building together on paper." Lebida, who carne to the finu as a student extem, is a skilled manager and active in AlA.
Wayne Jessup, AlA, with the finu from 1980 to 1988, recently retumed as a project architect. His interests run toward the environment, including Florida Keys planning and preservation. Intern architects are Carolina GarCia, AlA, and Teen Woon. Garcia, a 1994 graduate of the University of Florida, received the Certificate of Merit awarded to the year's top graduate. Malaysian-born Woon, an eight-year veteran and cunently a project manager, sings with the Gold Coast Opera, plays tennis, and speaks five languages. CADD operator and speed skating champion Pete Leiser, with tile firm since 1990, kind of speaks another language-says Singer, "He was born with computer chips in his brain." Leiser skates to fund-raise for charity. Construction management and field work is the responsibility of
FLORlDiVCARIBBEAN ARCIlITECT Fall 1997

Michael Goldy, a chief of th Mohegan tJibe and YMCA voILU1teer, and with the finn six years.
In 1964 Singer wrote:
Bea'uty is not a pT conceived ideal, but mtheT the qualitative Tes'l.dt ofpurpos/iful action. When we contemplate that lIwught, it follows quite natumlly that standaTds of beau ty clw ng as does life, a
./acl which ma,ny./ind diJjicuU to ack1wwledge. A1'ch'itectuTe m tlSl change in the same W(y fm' it i.s not taste, it is idea; it is 1wt whim, it is TeaS01t; it is not mere decomtion of junctimt, it is anticipation oflife. AnUcipation-'not imitation; that iswlwt raises aTchitectu1'e to the level ofa1t.

Wi til such fundanlental idealism and integrity, Don Singer has guided his firm in creating orderly, thoughtful centers amidst South Florida's explosive growth. Sin ce 1964, Donald Singer Architect has set an example of principled design as well as a generous sharing with the commLU1ity of its resources and intelligent spirit. .:.

Drysdale Residence,Atlantic Beach
William Morgan. FAIA
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ssues of environmental con
straint and the practice of sustainable architecture influenced the design concept for this facility. The design results in minimal impact on the environment, Llses recycled and recyclable materials, is energy efficient, and will have a useful life of 100 years or more.
This administration, training and equipment maintenance facility is the operations center for an experimental landfill. The building, as an e}..1;ension of its delicate woods-and-wetlands site and the character of the landfill,utilizes color, form, and mass to define its various functions.

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pTogmm. The so-called "identity wall"is a compelling, spatial landscapela?'chitectu?'al j eatuTe .. .a b1illiant exe1'cise in high-tech, cl'ip-on, polychromatic jo?m. Fo?' once, inside and out, an Ame1iccrl hi-Iech building of1'eal conviction.





Kevin Haas Kevin Haas
FLOIUDNCARlBBE, ARCHITECT Fall 1997

Architect:
Architects Design Group,Inc,
Principals in charge:
I.SK Reeves V, AlA,
Kevin Ratigan, AlA
Design Team:
I.S.K. Reeves V,
Kevin Ratigan, AlA,
Steve Langston, AlA

Interior Design:
Architectural Interiors, Inc., Susan laTorre
Landscape Architect:
Bellamo-Heroert &
Company, Inc.
StlVCtural Engineer:
Paul J. Ford & Company
Civil Engineer:
Brindley Pieters &
Associates Inc.
Mechanical/Electrical Engineer:
IMDC
General Contractor:
G.H. Johnson
Ecological r.onsultant:
Lotspeich & Associates, Inc.
Owner:
Orange County Board of Commissioners




AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE
'1

Drysdale Residence

Atlantic Beach William Morgan Architects, PA
E
levated, fourth-floor family living space gave the owners of this hurricane-resistant home their ocean view, Cantilevered porches visually extend the living, dining, and kitchen areas, while broad overhangs minimize glare and protect the balconies from blowing rains and summer showers, Limited windows on the two lower, bedroom floors enhance privacy and provide ventilation,
Two plywood-sheathed, wood frame towers SUppOlt the platfonns for three floors above grade, comp1ising 1630 sf, Glass blocks introduce daylight into the towers, Rafters spaced on alternating centers imp rut a distinctive scale to the interior spaces,
Building materials recall those of ru'ea seaside cottages, with natural finishes of cedar shingles and southern yellow pine finding their complement in painted white walls, railings, and cabinets, Minimizing the building's footprint allowed for tree preservation on the 60 x 125 foot lot. .:.

Architect: William Morgan Architects, PA
Principal in charge:
William N. Morgan, FAIA Landscape Architect: Janet O. Whitmill
Structural Engineer:
Bill Simpson, P.E. Contractor: Cornelius Construction Co, Owners: Mr. and Mrs, Charles E. Drysdale

PLORlDNCAR1BB8AN ARCHITECT FaU 1997


JURY: This has a st1'Ong gestalt that depends upon cantileve1'ed balconies anel roofs Clnd is st1'engthe1ted by the iconic us offe1testmtion on ax"is, including a single veTticaf st1ip oj glass blocks, The house takes
full advan tage oj a 1'estlict cl subu1'ban site by levati ng the living space cl C/?' oj the II' es. Ther e is a genel'Ous enl1yJrom the CCl1TJ01'I and overall el'o s a "ial energy)' minis enl oj Frank Lloyd Wright,




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Brody Residence, Miami Beach
Donald Singer Architect, P.A.
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Willianl Morgan Architects, P.A.
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Rodriguez & Quiroga Architects Chartered
Principal Suppliers: Architectwal Alwninum and Glass, New River Cabinet, Dal-Tile, Willianl R. Nash (plumbing), Miami Elevator, General Electric (air conditioners)
Orange County Landfill Operations Center, Orlando
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Martin and Pat Fine Center for the Arts, Miami-Dade Community College, Kendall Campus, Dade County
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We want FlO1'iclaJCwibbean Archilect to be an effective re ource for AJA members when making their purchasing decisions. As an additional benefit, Dawson Publications is offeIing a F Participati.ng advettisers are assigned a four-digit cod (located lmder each ad). To access additional infOImation about the advettiser's product and/or service, you only need to dial (410) 252-9595 from your fax machi.ne and Ii ten to the voice prompts for further instructions. PRESTO -you will receive additional info-l111ation about advertiser's products and/or services.




Miami-Dade Community College Miami, 1967 Spillis Candela & Partners, Inc.
M
aster-planned in 1967, the second MDCC campus was developed on
25 Years
185 acres in a growing suburban area. Future buildings were sited and infrastructure was established as iIutial construction proceeded. Buildings are organized along arcaded pedestrian circulation spines, giving the campus a "walk-through" character.
Facilities were designed to react with a tropical climate, incorporating passive solar methods such as roof overhangs, brise-soleil, and architectural precast sWlshades to mininuze energy consW11ption. Buildings designed 25 years ago have neither dated themselves by virtue ofappearance nor failed to adapt to the rapidly growing student body and evolving technology. Durable exterior materials, primarily architectural precast concrete and masonry, have required little maintenance over tinle.
College administrators attribute much of the success of MDCC, which now has five campuses and 125,000 students, to the architects and engineers whose "excellence" played a leading role in the college's growth and expansion .:.

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FLORI DNCARI BBEAN ARCHITECT Fall 1997


JURY: ...a master plan that clea?"ly sets the standa?'dfO?' community colleges and has continued to influence campus design. The buildings and their-exte?ior' spaces aTe extTe?nely effective inproviding shade and natuml ventilation" The buildings' handsome ar-ticulated vocabular-y c?'eates a Tevealing honesty which has resulted in a, ce?'tain timeless quality... ,an impo?"tanl example of FlO?ida architectuTe whi ch should continue to function successfullyfOT many genemtions to come.








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AlA Florida


Hillsborough Community College Public Service Technology Building
Ybor City Campus, Tampa Flad &Associates, with Alfonso Architects
JURY; Ex tTemely comjoTtable solution within the historic dist1'ict oj the Yb01' City context.. .. p1esenls a sensitive balance ojmoTe tmditional aTchitectuTe with the mOTe modeTn interventions.... This extTemely stmighl/011.va1d set ojbuildings purposely doesn't impose an institutional image on a neighbOT/wod in the delicate stages oj coming back. Some ojthe elevations aTe quiet in a good u-rban sense, with 1'ej eTences to the many indust1"ial images in the neighboThood as weU as othe?' impOTlant cla.ssical buildings. The design tea,m and client should be applaudedjoTgetting back to the tmditional bTick vocabulary, which has been discaTded by many less successjul contempoTaTY neighb01-ing buildings. :.



Windsor Town Center


Belvedere Square, Vero Beach Scott Merrill
JURY; Classical, Tegional solution with a modem ptan. Th.e uTbcm spaces maintaina degree ofconsistency while the indi'viduai buildings asse1t theiT own pel"Sonality ...asophisticateclcombi1wtionofpl.lhlic spaces consisting of varying g1"O~md planes w'ilh successful spatial tmnsilions between them. One nev l' quite sees a single building as an object butmli1.el"a et ojinter/fJckingfacades, pa?-tiaUy obs ttl" d by one anothe); l' ating a st1"Ong sens of place .... Thi. P1"Oject is ... m01'e about thescale ojthepedest1ian and the movementthrough spaces which will undoubtedly C1'eate a Tich ocial place .... perspectives C1' ate a compelling atmospheTe with c~
11"Ong spi? it. .:.




the design charettes, which moved from one hotel room to another as the committee stnlggled to find a solution. Silly me, I thought, as the user of the building, I would be consulted as to how the building was designed. Ever so patiently, I was told that I would be consulted, but only up to a point.
I was allowed to talk about how an association functioned in a building, but as to layout, it was best for me to accept the architect's solution. And for the most part, I did, even though Ted and I had some intense discussions about work stations...he wanted them smaller, I wanted them larger. But I also learned that architecture is a teanl sport. In the AlA headquarters, you can see who the team leader was, but I always knew that Charles King, who worked in the Pappas office, played a big role, as did other members of the executive committee at the time, Glenn Buff and Jim Anstis.
Getting through the design phase was a challenge, but actually constructing the building seemed to be an even bigger task. Most people, including me, do not appreciate the enomlOUS amount of detailed planning that goes into working drawings and specifications. I was introduced to this during the project, and I later came to understand the huge importance that these drawings and specifications play in the successful constnlction project. But, before we could even get underway, John Hayes prepared the "as built" drawings, and in the course of
ARCHITECTURAL

PHOTOGRAPHY INC.
Photography by:
E. "Manny" Abraben AlA RIBA PPA
Author of: POINT OF VIEW
The Art of Architectural Photography / VNR

Phone/ FAX (561) 3619551 /
Toll Free: 888ARCPHTO

doing measurem nts, he found that the surveyor had indicated the wrong dimensions of the building. This, of course, resulted in several more weeks of delay as the attorney got in volved and adjoining property owners had to sign off on the corrections.
Well, needless to say, the building was constructed, and vvith it, a very impOltant element of my architectural education was completed. As I think back to those days, I cannot help but continue to feel etemaJ gratefulness for the wonderful patience and kindly forbearance which Carl, Ted, Bob, Howard, Glenn, John, Jim, and all the rest provided me in those early years. It was hard work, but it was the start of a wonderful, fulfilling tinle for me and my family that we will always remember and hold onto for the rest of our lives :.

Ge01ye A. Allen, Han. AlA, stepping down as Executive Vice President oj AlA Florida ajte1' 18 yeaTs, has opened his own cons1llting jinn.
Cons/ruG/ion Manual


By closely matching the resistance of the wood building system to wind loads found in the Standard Building Code, the Guide to Wood Construction in High Wind Areos makes it easier to design, build and inspect single story wood frame structures. And, for multiple story homes, you can now use the Wood Frame Construction Manual. Both documents have been accepted by the State of Florida as alternative methods for achieving com pl i. ance with section 1606 of the 1994 Standard Building Code.
For flexibility, speed and beauty, build out of wood.
For information about the Guide to Wood Construction in High Wind Areos, the Wood Frame Constrvction Manual and semi nars on their use; or, to obtain a copy of either, contact the Florida Wood Council at
(407) 275-3430.
...,....
"It 's a better way to build single story homes! Ollt of wood: using the Guide to Wood Construction in
High Wind
Areas."
Charles Whitf,eld of Whiffleld Con,fruc"on Home Builder, Framln9 Con/roc/or and Mosler Carpenler

AQrid~ \\'00<1 Council Mtmbers

The Guide 10 Wood Frame Construction in High Wind Areas was developed by the High W ind Project: a collaboration of the American Forest ond Paper Associotion, APA The Engineered Wood Association, Conadian Wood Council, Florida Wood Council, Southern Forest Products Association and the Western Wood Products Association
6413 6423
FLORlDNCARII3I3E:AN ARCIIITECT Fall1997



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

Buyers' Guide
Glass Blocks Glass Ma omy Inc ....... .............................. 30
HVAC Florida Natural Gas ................................. fFC
Insw'ance
AIA Trust ...................................................... 7
Aris Insw'ance Services ............ ................ 31
Collinsworth, Alter, Nielson, et al ........... 18
Seitlin & Company Insmance .................. 25
SlllCOast Insurance Associates, Inc ....... 25

luterior Design Design Works Creative Partnership Ltd ........................................ 17
Masonry Sand Comad Yelvington DislJibutors ................. 7
Natural Gas Florida Natural Gas ................................. IFC
Photography Chroma Inc./George Cott ........................... 9
Professional Liability
CollinswOlth, Alter, Nielson, et al ........... 18
Sedgwick of Florida Inc ............................. 2
Seitlin & Company Insmance ................ .. 25
Suncoast Insmance Associates, Inc ....... 25

Project Scheduling Associated Cost Engineers ................ ...... 30
Risk Management Sedgwick of Florida Inc ............................. 2
Roof-TIle Masterpiece Tile Co ................ ................. 30
Roofs/Artificial Thatch Tropic Top/Symbold ...................... .............. 2
Sand & Gravel Comad Yelvington DislJibutors .... ............ 7
Spiral Stairways Amelican Ornanlental Corp ................ ..... 23

Upholstery Fabric Wmdows & Doors Carnegie Fabrics ......................................... 6 Ricketson Sash & Door Company Inc ... 18 Window Classics Corp ................................ 5
Wall Fabric
Wood Windows & Doors

Carnegie Fabrics ............................ ............. 6

Ricketson Sash & Door Company Inc ...... 18
WaterfallslPonds & Rock Formation Workers Compensation Tropic Top/Symbold .................................. 30 Aris Insmance Services ............................ 31
ALPHABETICAL INDEX
TO ADVERTISERS

AIA Trust ................................................................ .... ...................................................... ....... 7
Alwnimun Services, Inc ............. .......................................................................................... 19
American Ornamental Corp ............................................................................ .................... 23
Architectural Photography Inc ................................................................. ............ .............. 29
Aris Insmance Services ............ ........................................................................................... 31
Associated Cost Engineers ................................... ...................... ........... ............... .............. 30
Carnegie Fabrics .................................................................................................................... 6
ClU'oma Inc./George Cott ...................................................................................................... 9
Collinsworth, Alter, Nielson, et al .................................................................. ...... .............. 18
Comad Yelvington DislJibutors ................... ....... .................................................................. 7
CSR Rinker Materials .................................................................................................... 10-11
Design Works Creative Partnership Ltd ............................................................................ 17
Florida Natural Gas .................. ........................ ................................................................. IFC
Florida Wood Council ................................ ...................................................................... .... 29
Genesis Studios, Inc ........................................................................................................ OBC
Glass Masonry Inc ......................................... ....................................................................... 30
Intergraph Corp ........ .................................. ............... ......................................... .................... 2
Masterpiece Tile Co ........................................................ ................................................ ..... 30
Project Development International, Inc ..... ....................................................................... 23
Ricketson Sash & Door Company Inc ........................................ ..................... .................. 18
Sedgwick of Florida Inc ............................................. .......................................................... 2
Seitlin & Company lnsmance ............................................................ ................................. 25
Suncoast Insmance Associates, Inc ......................................................... ......................... 25
Tropic Top/Symbold ............................................................ ............. ................................ 2, 30
Tlus Joist MacMillan .............................. ......................................... ..................................... 18
Window Classics Corp.......... ...... ........................................................................ ................... 5
Y-Tong ................................................................................................................................. lBC


FLORIDNCARJBBI, AN AR IIiTECT Fall1997






Ifconcrete became available that could be shaped like wood, wouldn't you want to know?

Ask YTONG.
Imagine the versatility and design freedom of a concrete builcling material ea ily shaped and sawn. It s been used quite uccessfully by architect around the world for 66 yeaTS Now it's YOul'S Plea e call 1-800-YTONGFL for the architectural good news about Oul' autoclaved, aerated concrete building system. \Ve d also like to schedule your personal plant preview. Thank you!

(It~s pronollnced "eee-tong': It I7wallS shapeability.)
3701 C.R. 41: I-laine City, Florida 338--
6435




INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

Buyers' Guide
Architectural Design
Design Works Creative Partnership Ltd........................................ 17
Architectural Photography
Architectural Photography Inc ................ 29
Chroma Inc.lGeorge Cott ........................... 9

Architectural Rendering
Genesis Studios, Inc .............................. OBC

Artificial Thatched Roofs
Tropic Top/Symbold .................................... 2

Building Materials
CSR Rinker Materials .......................... 10-11

Building Products
Aluminum Services, Inc................. .......... 19

CADD
Intergraph Corp .......................................... 2

Claims Control
Associated Cost Engineers ...................... 30

Concrete
Y-Tong ........................................... ........... IBC

Construction Claims
Project Development International, Inc ..................................... 23
Construction Management
Project Development International, Inc ..................................... 23
Construction Manuals
Florida Wood Council ............................... 29

Continuing Education
Trus Joist MacMillan ................................. 18

Cost Estimating
Associated Cost Engineers .............. ........ 30

Crushed Stone
Conrad Yelvington Distributors ................. 7

FLORIDiVCARIBBEAN ARCIlITECT Fall 1997
Design Software Drapery Fabric
Intergraph Corp ........................................... 2 arnegie Fabric ........... .............................. 6

Doors & Windows Energy Technology
Window Classics Corp ................................ 5 Plorida atural Gas ................................. 1 F

Drafting Services Engineered Lumber Intergraph Corp ........................................... 2 Trus Joist MacMillan ............................ ..... 18

O
Des;gn
Design Professionals Safety

Professionals
S afety
Associa tion (DPSA), which provides

A ssociation
workers compen sation insu rance and loss control education to architects, engineers and similar groups, h as announced that it will pay premium returns of up to 40% to its members in 1997.
For more information about this group, please contact your local agent or p rogram man ager below:


ARIS INSURANCE SERVICES
2101 BUSINESS CENTER DR IV E. 230 I RVI N E. CA 92612

(888) 377-2107

64 14
31






How Do You I(eep
A Hockey Player
Cool In Florida ?

(and still save on operating costs?)
When the Ice Pilots moved to Pensacola, the Civic Center had to make sure the existing air conditioning system could handle the new ice rink requ irements. Uncontrolled humidity levels could result in fog over the ice, condensation in the building, and could affect the comfort of players and spectators.
After an in-depth analysis, engineers decided to instal l four natural gas-fired desiccant dehumidifiers. Gas-fired units cost less up front than
electric units and have a lower
operating cost in these condi-
Natural gas cooling. It's the
cost effective way to coo l and dehumidify commercial and residential space. For more information on gas-fired desiccant,
engine driven, or absorption units cal l
local gas company.

FLORIDA
NA1URALGAS
ASSOCIATION

850-681-0496 e-mail: info@gasassc.com



NEWS

ShatleyAssumes AlA Florida Post
R. Scott ShaUey became AlA Florida' new Executive Vice PI' ident on August l. The Flotida State University graduate holds degrees in Political Science and Business. He is a native of Fort Myers. Since 1993 he has
erved as Executive Vice President of the FlOlida Psychological Association.
In 1988 Shalley began his affili ation with the FPA. He was Director of Governmental Affairs prior to asswning the role of Executive Vice President. During his tenure he acted as FPA's primary spokesperson on legislative and administrative issues and was Managing Edltor of its publication, The FlO1ida Psychologist.
nderShalley's leadership,FPA experienced steady growth in membership, non-dues revenues, and convention attendance, as well as a notable rise in political effectiveness. 111e Association also initiated a mm1ber of new and profitable member benefits.
"It is an honor to be joining AlA FlOlida, "said ShaUey, "Itwill be my focus to ensure that the Association provides members with a tangible return on their dues investment. Through strong legislative representation and increased member services, AlA FlOlida can continue to serve as the voice of all FlOlidaarchitects."
A resident of Tallahassee, Shalley is an avid golfer and fisherman. In addition to service on the Board of Directors of the Florida Society of Association Executives, he is a member of the Board of 'Ih.tstee of two juvenile treatment facilities and a Deputy Supervisor of Elections for Leon County.
1998 Honor Awards Presented in Orlando
The 1997 Public Honor Awards were presented at the 85th Sunm1er Convention in Orlando, on August 9. AlA Florida President John A. Cochran, Jr.,
AlA, and lmm dlate Past President Bill Blizzard, AlA, made the presentations.
Walter Q. Taylor, FAlA, Chairman and CEO ofKBJ Architects, Jacksonville, received the Award of Honor for Design in recognition of his consistently excellent work over a 30+ year career. Taylor's approach to design continues to reflect a concern for architecture's impact on the public, and demonstrates how quality design can benefit the public welfare. Examples of architectmal designs Taylor has led include airport passenger terminals in Orlando, Jacksonville, Savarmah, and San Juan; numerous special exJubitions for the Jacksonville Art Museum; Barnett Bank of Tampa headquarters; and tl1e Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, Jacksonville branch.
Hon. Nancy Liebman, Commissioner, Miami Beach, received the Bob Grahan1 Honorary AlA Arclu tectmal Awareness Award, given to a non architect who promotes design excellence in the community. The award recogluzes her 15-year effort to preserve the architectural helitage of Mianu Beach's historic dlstricts.
John P. Tice, AlA, president of Bullock-Tice Associates, Pensacola, received the Hilliard T. Snuth Community Service Award and Silver Medal. Through extensive volunteer and community service over many years, Tice has used his leadership abilities to affect wide-ranging issues, from day care to ZOlUng.
S. Keith Ba iley, AlA, of Helman Hurley Charvat Peacock, Maitland, received the Anthony L. Pullara Memorial Award, honOling Ius declication to the profession ofarclu tectme. Last February the National Grassroot Conference recognized Ius outstanding conbibution to government affairs, noting Ius leadership in opposing the Florida Board of Professional Engineers' bid to allow engineers to de ign buildings for human habitation.
George A. Cott, Clu'oma, Inc., was named Architectural Photographerofthe Year. Since 1981, he has helped AlA architects record their work, producing superb ilnages that captme the essence of these homes, offices, and public builclings.
Bronze Medals for acadenuc and extracmricular excellence were awarded to fom top students in the state's schools of architecture. They were Karen Bala, University of Florida; Regillald Cox, FloridaA&M UIUversity; Celille Hardan, University of Miami; and Jason Westrope, University of South Florida.
New AlA Florida Officers
Debra Lupton, AlA, Orlando, was elected Fil'st Vice PresidentPresident-Elect of AlA Florida durillg the recent Annual Meeting in Orlando last month. The first woman to hold that office, Debra will assume the presidency of the State Association il1 1999.
Elected Vice President for two-year terms were William Bishop, AlA, Jacksonville, and Miguel A. (Mike) RoclJiguez, AlA, Miami. Angel Saqui, FAIA, Mian1i, was elected to a three-year term as Regional Oil'ector, su ceeding Henry Alexander as the FlOlidaiCaribbean Regional representative on the AlA Board of Directors. They will assume office January 1, 1998.
Current President-Elect, Roy Knight, FAlA, Tallahassee, will assume the office of President for 1998 on January 1. Vivian Salaga, AlA, Tampa, will fulfill her twoyear tern1 as Secretary-Treasmer, as will Keith Bailey, who will complete his two-year term as Vice President. Jolm Tice, AlA, Pensacola, will become Seluor Regional Director, fulfillillg his three-year tern1 on the AlA National Board of Directors.

President's Awards
AlA Florida President John
R. Cochran, Jr., AlA. presented Miguel A. (Mike) Rodriguez, AlA, Mianu, and FlOlida State Senator Charles W. Clary, AlA, Destin, with President's Awards for their exceptional service to the profession and AlA Flotida during the past year.
In presenting the awards, Cochran recognized Rodriguez


AIA FloTida PTesidents pr'esent, past, andjutw'e, Iwnor-G or-ge and Becky Allen at the convention in Or-lando. FTOm lejt, 1997 Pr-esidenl, John R. CocM'an, J1:, 1998 PTesident-Elect Roy Knight, jOTme1' Ex ecutive Vice Pr-esident GeoTge Allen, Becky Allen, 1996 P.reside1~t Bill BlizzW"d, and 1999 P1'esident-Elect Debm Lupton.
PLORJDNCARJBBEAJ'I! ARCIlITE T Fall 1997





AT&T Corporate I.T.S., Lake Mary, Florida Architects: AT&T Engineering, Design &Construction
FINE ARCHITECTURAL RENDERINGS

e.
GENESIS STUDIOS, INC.

225 S. Swoope Avenue, Suite 205 Maitland, Florida 32751 407'539'2606
800'933'9380 FAX 407'644'7901 www.genesisstudios.com

Portofino Bay Club, Subic Bay, Philippines Architects: HHCP Design International, Inc.



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64 16
FLORJDNCARJBBEAN ARCHIT ECT Fall 1997




AlA Florida 1997 FIRM AWARD
Sharing a Dedication to Architecture

Donald Singer Architect, P.A.
L
eating through a firm history of Donald Singer Archltect,
one can't help but notice a com
mon de ign thread. There' "a
look," a clisanTling clarity, an es
ential ideal that reaches tlu"ough
the pages chronicling the fum 's
30+ years. It is apparent, as col
leagues and critics aptly note, that
Donald Singer Archltect shapes
space; Don Singer has an eye. In
project after project, the firm has
created Ul'ba.ne, dynanuc, hanno
nious, appealing modem spaces
for living, learning, and working.
It was in 1964, the year Don
Singer established the firm, that
he design ed the four-family
dwelling in FOlt Lauderdale that
eamed hlm his first AIA Florida
Honor Award and national at
tention. Like thls project, most
of the early comnussions were
modest residences, clean-lined
and spare, with a conmlOn de
nomin ator of "orderly and
meaningful space,," Also like tlus
project, they still are handsome, Lejt to Right: Teen Woon, Carolina Garcia, Craig Ban7j, Jenije'l" Johnson, Donald Singe?; Michael
viable homes in the 1990s. Goldy, Roge?' Lebida, Elaine Singe1'; Pete Leise?: Photogmph: Ed Zealy
Then as now, l'lis was a mod
en1ist style laced with practical spectively), branches for the sun or tlle elements, the need for hance the daily lives of people in
ity. Although since the late 1970s California-based World Savings security, the ability to attract the commluUty. They don't shock
the finn has distinguished itself & Loan Association (ten, so far), downtown development, the cre Rather they offer elegant spaces,
with larger, public projects as and currently, a 5000-space ation of openness or privacy, or soft natural light, natUl'al ventila
well, it maintains a comnutment parking facility for the Fort Lau just the opportlmity to cast an tion, with the added surprise of a
to residential design. The Brody derdale-Hollywood airport. atTesting space or shadow. The shat"Ply cropped view tlu"ough a

Residence is featured in these In each case, the deceptive result is archltectUl'e as rut.
pages, having garnered a 1997
Award for Excellence.

Many Singer projects grace the South Florida urban landscape, functional structureswarehouses, shops and offices, a cowltry club, apartments-often of concrete, always of Wlexpected refinement. Following the phenomenal 1979 success of downtown Fort Lauderdale's City Park Municipal Garage, the Singer firm received commissions for larger public and commercial projects, including the
JURY: Thi.sji,nn's accomplishments aTe a wondmjul balanced represe?~tati.onofwhat the pmfession can pro'vide in the way ofvalue and se?'Vice. It was quite elea?: .. that thefi1"m is equally committed to pTOfessional as well as design excellence" This ji1"m'S yeaTS ofge?terous se?'Vioe to the pmfession, ed1wat'ion, and comm~mity are clem'ly attributes tha,t younge?' finns shoul.d model themselves ajter fm" generations to come. Not only does the firm:S wO'rk demonst'rate an absolute integration ofa disciplined m"chiteotural a.genda that clea,rly solves its olients' needs, but it maintains a human quality that will oe1tainly stand the test oftime.
roof or an open conidor.
Singer's long list of design honors and publications is pat"alleled by a longer list of commulUty activities. Since the 1960s he has taken a leadership role in local development issues atld projects, and he has stayed active in state and local AIA functions and on industry advisory boards. In 1984 Don Singer received AIA F1olida's highest tribute, the Award of Honor for Design, and in 1985 he was inducted into the College of Fellows.
The fum welcomes intems from
singular Fire Prevention BUl'eau, simplicity that seems to mark Not that Singer work has ever schools in and outside of F10lida
the Coral Springs Civic Center, Singer work grows out of a prac watlted for recognition, but ap And Si.nger frequently takes op
prototype elementary and tical solution-adapting to a dif preciation of tlle finn's consistent pOltlUuties to address student and
n1iddle schools (to date inlple fi cult or interesting site, captur excellence seems to be growing. commlUuty groups to promote at~
men ted nine and eight tinles, re ing a view, protection from the Its structures support and en clutectUl'e and the profession.
8 I>LO RlDNCMUBBEAN ARCIIITECT Fall 1997




You may be a new builder starting your first model home or an experienced developer breaking ground on your latest shopping center ... or a contractor, civil engineer or architect seeking expert advice on certain building materials' performance characteristics. But no matter what your particular interest, you need a reliable partner who knows what's
important to your success.

For more than 70 years, Rinker Materials has played a major role in Florida's construction community and today we're the largest supplier of building materials in the state. Our success comes as a result of forging partnerships with the people, like you, who are building Florida's future.
As your single source for hundreds of building materials from aggregate, cement, concrete, concrete block, stucco, drywall, brick, glass block, acoustical ceilings and walls, insulation and other speciality products and services, we'll save you both time and money. And as your partner in building a better Florida, we'll use our vast resources to ensure your success.
Whether you're looking for convenient pick-up or quick delivery, there's a Rinker location nearby. We serve Florida's construction community from more than 100 sites throughout the state.
And, no matter what size your order, our operational expertise and customer focused approach means on-time delivery of what you need, when you need it with quality products and personal service.
If you're an architect or engineer, Rinker's experience and size allows us to provide the production and technical resources necessary to support you. Our architectural and engineering representatives are available to provide professional advice and technical support on any size project.
Since 1926, when Marshall E. "Doc" Rinker hauled his first load of sand in his first truck, Rinker has been a responsive partner to Florida builders, developers and other construction professionals.
As partners working together, we can build a better Florida!




AlA Horida AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE
Martin and Pat Fine Center for the Arts
Miami-Dade Community College, Kendall Campus Spillis Candela & Partners, Inc.
T
he Martin and Pat Fine Center created a Western gateway to MDCC's growing Kendall campus. Dedicated last February, its two buildings, totalling approximately 100,000 sf, established a center for the arts and arts education on can1pus.
The smaller structure, fOlmed from three cubes, contains studios and workshops. Two upper floors of the larger building house classrooms and additional studios. Below, at either end of the plaza level, the graceful curving entrances of the theater and art gallery and the sound engineeling building are expressed as sculptural elements floating underneath the linear building. The open plaza has become a gathering space, where students walk through to nearby campus parking.
Precast concrete sunscreens covering east and west facades and extensive use of exterior stair towers add three-djmensional interest to tills new campus focal point .:.


JURY: A straighiforwaTd but beautifully p1'"oportioned classic Neo-CoTbusian jOTmat, clad injinely detailed precast elements over a Teinjorced concTetejrame. An unusually convincing use oj brise-soleil, rhythmically interrupted by powerjully sculptural staircases.
Alchitect:
Spillis Candela & Partners, Inc. Principal In Charge: Hilario Candela, FAIA Project Director: Jesus Cruz, AlA Project Manager: Jorge E. Iglesias, AlA Project Designer: Lawrence Kline Project Architect: Luis Moran, R.A.
Engineer: Spillis Candela & Partners, Inc.
Constftlction Administration: James Koepp, AlA
Owner: Miami Dade Community College, Kendall Campus








AlA Florida AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE
Lynn Residence Center
Boca Raton Rodriguez &Quiroga Architects Chartered
D
esigned to be integrated within a university campus developed during the 1960s, this three-story dorm incorporates all the efficiencies of the 1990s. Responding to a program requiring 72 dorm.itory units, a wellness center, and a modest construction budget, the architects created a simple bar-type building. By fracturing the building envelope, they expressed the diverse building ftmctions.
Dormitory units are textw"ed with window walls (that front on a lake) combining flxed aluminum, spandrel, and translucent glass panels with operable vision glass windows. In contrast, the public areas are treated with glass block.
Practical and low-maintenance, the building is connected to an existing central chilled water plant which cools the lobbies, fitness center and other public areas. The clean lines of this concrete framed structure are fmished with painted stucco :.
JURY: A delicate Neo-CoTbusian piece together with light constructivi st dogleg staircases at the corners, volumet1ically emphasized through glass block cladding. A simple plan to thepoint ofbeing schematic, but slUl pToducing an e.:r:ceptional student donnitory.

D01"mit01Y unitsfeatu1"e lake views thmugh textw ed window waUs that include ope1"able windows.
Photogmph: Patricia Fishe?
Architect:
Rodriguez & Quiroga

Architects Chartered
Principal in charge:
Raul L Rodriguez, AlA
Project Architect:
Ivan Bibas
Project Team:
Raul L Rodriguez, AlA, Antonio M. Quiroga, AlA, Ivan Bibas, Carl Penland, AlA, Miguel Perez
Structural Engineer:
Donnell DuQuesne &
Albasia, P.A.
Mechanical/Electrical Engineer:
McDowell Engineering
Consultants
General Contractor:
Edward J. Gerrits, Inc.
Owner:
Lynn University

Gtass block treatment designating public a1eas p~bnctuates C01"n r and lights inte?ior-stairwell. Photogmph: Patricia Pishe?





AlA Florida AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE

Brody Residence
Miami Beach
Donald Singer Architect,


P.A.
L
ocated on Star Island, at the eastem end of the MacAIthm Causeway (connecting Miami Beach and the city), the site of thls home is truly one of Mianli's most dramatic. The design was driven i.n large pmt by the desire to captme the spectacular views of the city skyline and Biscayne Bay.
A 24-foot square grid was used to create a series of interlocldng spaces that step back as they progress across the site, allowing each m"ea to captme the "drop dead" view of the city. The west-facillg porch shades an expanse ofglass open to the water, and the concept is reinforced in the details.
The structure is concrete masonry placed in running bond in two colors, with concrete beams exposed inside mld out. Double wall construction featmes a highJy efficient insulating core, and a grid of laminated wood beams with wood decldng, also hlghly insulated, form the roof. The gtid concept extends into the site, creating a structmal
ontinuity with the house and a visual extension that unites house, site, and city :.
Architect:
Donald Singer, Architect,
P.A.

Principal in charge:
Donald I. Singer, FAIA

Landscape Consultant:
McLean & McLean

Consulting Engineer:
Donnell, DuQuesne &
Albasia


General Contractor:
Kellerco


Owner:
Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence
Brody

_______...J


JURY: Exceptional among all the domestic entriesjO?' establishing a close geometrical modula?" jOTmat hiemtically linking the site plan o?'de?" to the volumes oj the ho~se itself. ... this ho'use displays a TigOTOUS set ojjaiT-jaced elevations both inside and out. These elevations m"e caTejully oTchestmted jr"Om a material standpoint, Tinging the changes between couned concr'ete blocks ojdijjeTent coloTS and incised conc?"ete beams. This O?'chest?'ation combined with the geometry cr'eates a dynamic, sensitively pTopm'tiO?~ed internal space,

lnte'rlocking spaces step back as they p?'ogTess aCTOSS the site. Photogmph: Ed Zealy



Alternal:ing counes oj gmy and tan block accentuate geomet?'y insicle and out, heTe cr"eate a dynamicframe. Photogmph: Ed Zealy
FLOIUDMCARIBBEAN AR IIITECT Fall 1997





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AlA Florida TEST OF TIME AWARD

AHouse Among the Trees
Miami, 1979 George F. Reed, FAIA
S
ince 1979 this suburban tropical house has served its owners well. Four
10 Years
broad, woodshingled roofs help define a modular compound secLU"ed by a continuous masonry wall. Separate spaces for the parents, children, and a family kitchendining-living area open into a common central courtyard. The intelior walls facing the courtyard are linked by a pJexiglasscovered wood trellis, with doors that open completely. SLUTOunding oaks are viewed above tlu"ough numerous skylights, and a pllmge pool cools by day and lights tile courtyard at night.
This house among the trees has provided plivacy while fostering a spirit of family. Located on a busy residential street, it has been a model of environmental and energy conservation :.


JURY: This is a-l"chitectu1"eat its best. A simple 'idea that P e'lc vades the ent'ir-ebuilding down to the smallest details... has a Tich str-uctur-al quality executed in simple, abstr'acted vocabul a1"Y. The ar-chitect clea?'ly undeTstood the impo?"tance oj place-making combined with the 1"esponsibility oj designing a building that ?"esponds to its natur-al context .... what we wish the South Flmida ver-nacular' could be about... a house that still has value and has clea'l"ly withstood the test oj time.







AWPuerto Rico
Pine Grove Apartments
San Juan, 1960-62 Augusto Gautier, AlA, and Hector Llenza,AlA
TEST OF TIME AWARD

J
ill"Y members Peter Waldman, AlA, and Enrique orten,

JURY: A1"chitect~Te as physical
Hon. AlA, se
ancl soci al enginee?ing is b1il
25 Years
lected these
liantly de?nonstmted in this
apartments for the AlA/Puerto
example oj the influence ojLe
Rico Test of Time Award. It was
COTbusieT's Radi ant City on
designed in 1960-62.
New World housing. This
Dealing with a narrow ocean
apartment complex demon
front lot with deep sides, the ar
stTates a dr-amatic structU1"al
chitects "democratized" access
eif01t ojjeTing a dense but
and gave every apartment an
democmtic appr-oach to the
ocean view by using a round
desir-ed oceanj1'ont 01"ienta
shape for the dwellings. The
ti on. 7heC01"e ojeach clove?"leaj
building design took the form of
gTOUp aTrange?nentpmvides a
three drums tied by a central
gene?"ous open-ai1'vesti bulejoT
open-air lobby, creating a clover
social inte1"action, centeTed
leaf arrangement. Staggering the
Tealistically a1'ound the kitch
cloverleafs along the lot en
e?~, with supe1lJised play ar
hanced each ocean view.
eas JOT chi ldTen.... The?"e a,re no
Stairs in the open-air central
frontalities, no hiemrchies in
lobby wind around cylindricaJ
this "island" scheme, pe?"haps
shafts which separately house
appmp1'iatejoT a seaTchjoT an
the elevator and incinerator. The
island essence by one pTejeT
circular composition is further
1ing to dwell in the midst oja
established and animated by
pine gTove mUte?' than engage
these sculptural service ele
the agenda. oj dwelling in a
ments. :.
political setting at the edge oj the ocean.

Above: Stai n in lhe open-aiT centmllobby wind a1'Ound cylind1ical shajts. Photog1'aph: CaTlos Esteva
Lejt: Round-shaped dwellings and the c1-eation oj CL se?ies oj clove?'leajs made it possible j01' eve?7J apa,Ttment to have an ocean view. PhotogTaph: CaTlos Esteva
FLORIDNCA RJ BBEM'i ARCHI TECT Fall1997





85TH ANNUAL CONVENTION





AlA Florida 1997 UNBUILT DESIGN AWARDS

Atlantic House
Key Biscayne Castineira + Axioma_3 Architects
JURY: Clearly the rnost sophisticated and beautifully detailed and O?yanized ofall the houses pTesented and considered .... seelns to combine the qualities of mass that we app1'eciate in ceTtc~in tmditional a.?ch-itect'l~'re with freedom of plan and disposition of opening and apertuTe that came with the development of modeTn anhitecture. The plan shapes space vig01"Ously...takes advantage of the FlO?"ida climate by allowing ventilation to move thTOugh ceTtain elevations while other facades ... block o~a the sun. The project stands o~~t as being done by someone who really applies a 'rath81'" rig01'"OUS set of r'ules to the wOTk... :.


Tampa Police Department District Substation



Tampa
Alfonso Architects

JURY: This pTOject cleaTly had to genemte its own intentions because oflittle natuTal enviTonrnent to playoffoJ .. likely has 'risen way above the expectc~tions of its cli811.t, which is always a gTeat compliment to the aTchitect... add1'esses its neighboThood in sornething otheT than the typical insti tutional, forbidding manne1', and clea1'ly looks rnO?'e fun thcm what one would e..'Lpect
fTOrn the typical suburban police station... The O?yanization is genemted by an axial bar that ntns th?'ough the middle, and anyfunction that could be identified as sorne kind of special piece was pulled out to play aga'inst the central element... .:.

FLORIDNCARJBBEAJ'I1 ARCllln~CT Fall 1997




VIEWPOINT
How I Learned to Spell Architecture....
By Gorge A. Allen, Hon. AlA
lIlhen I was hired to be the
IIAlA Florida executive vice pre id nt 18 years ago, I would jokingly tell people that I didn't even know how to spell "archltectm ." In my head, I knew I could manage the a sociation, but in my heart I knew I had a lot to learn about architects before I could represent them. Now I am no longer in the position, and the new chief executive officer will be finding his way.
I don't know what motivated Carl Gerken Bob Graf and Howard Bochiardy to give me the job. I was in my thirties then and ambitious to lead an organization. I had studied and trained to do this for many years. Perhaps my boast that I expected to be the "best association executive in the state" got their attention. Or perhaps it was my sincere desire to make things work or, maybe, my honest face. It certainly was not my knowledge of the architectural profession. In fact, I only knew one archltect, John Barley, and I didn't know what he really ilid. He happened to be the person who told me about the job in the first place, but that's another story.
pack up the office in Miami and move it to Tallahassee. The second part of the assignment was to find a buililing in Tallahassee whkh the as ociation could purchase as its headquarters.
Moving the office was hard work, but there was cettainly nothing architectural about it. It was 1979, and the biggest concern in those days was finiling enough gas to get you through the week. In my case, it was finding enough gas to get out of Miami and drive nine hours to Tallahassee. It is hard to imagine what we went through in those days, the lines of cars that formed every morning at each gas station, the signs that appeared at 10 or 11 a.m. indicating there was no more gas. Somehow, we found the gas and made it home, but it took a friendly gas station owner who listened to my sad story to make it happen. At the time, I didn't even know an archltect in Miami on whom I could call for help. Today, I anl glad to say that some of my best friends are archltects in Miami who would gladly pitch in to help in any way necessary.
Finding a building to serve as the association's headquarters was an organizational thing. It

It was at this point in my career that I began to find out how architects work and what they go
through to complete a project.
My initial lesson in learning about architecture and architects evolvedfmm my first major assignment as executive vice president.
My initial lesson in learning about architecture and architects volved from my first major assignment as executive vice pre ident. It had been decided before I was hired that the headquarters of AlA Florida would be moved from Mianu, where it had existed since the fifties, to Tallahassee, where all the action was, as far as state government was concerned. My job was to was much like finding a house for one's family. But, it was an arclutect who led us to 104 East Jefferson Street. Rick Barnett and Dave Fronczak were just getting started in Tallahassee as a branch office of the Tampabased fu'm, Rowe HoLmes Archltects, and they were involved with the Gallie Hall Pattnershlp. Rick and Dave and a group of attorneys had decided to renovate a centluy-old building complex in the heart of downtown Tallahassee. The financial numbers weren't working out, so they decided to sell a small portion of the GalLie Hall complex that had been the Putnam Jew
eLry Store building. Rick came into my temporary office one day and asked if we were interested. I knew it was the perfect location, and it didn't take much convincing to get the executive committee to buy the property.
It was at this point in my career that I begatl to find out how architects work and what they go through to complete a project. Rick atld Dave had already prepared a schematic design of exactly what the building would look like, complete with an interior layout and elevations. I thought this was a great leap forward in the process, but I was to learn my flfSt lesson: Archltects do not do anything the easy way, even if it makes terrific sense. The thought was that this building was fat too inlportant for an ordinary design, and that only a statewide competition would produce the right firm and the right design.
Mark Jaroszewicz, who at that time was a relatively new Deatl of the College ofArchitecture at the University ofFlorida, was apPointed to chair the design competition. He did so with great professionalism and specificity to detail, and it was the most even-hatlded process I had ever observed. It also took months to accomplish. And when it was finished none of us liked the wimung design, so we spent several more weeks finding a way to get rid of it.
Nevertheles whlle the design was not acceptable, the firm that submitted it was just what evetyone wanted. Hat-per Buzinec Architects of Coral
Gables was just getting started. They were a relatively new finn, yet the prinCipals came from good firms, which gave committee members confidence that they could do a good job. In fact, they liked them so much, the fee negotiations resulted in a15 percent top-of-the-scale fee. I was shocked, but I learned my next lesson: Archltects like big fees, even when they are paying it themselves.
At this point, I was beginning to wonder whether we would ever move into 104 East Jefferson Street. We had spent months on getting what I thought would be a design, only to find that we were really just involved in hiring an architect. John Hayes, who had worked for Bob Graf and was now working for David Harper, was assigned to be the project arclutecto A kinder more patient man you would never want to meet. His patience was perfect for the job because the actual job of design fell to the members ofthe executive committee. First they ripped apart the Hat-per design, and then they ripped apatt every other proposal that came before them. Lesson number three: Architects are very touchy when it comes to designing buildings.
By this time, Ted Pappas was the president-elect, and he began to assert his leadership in

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