• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Section
 The children's scrap book
 Back Cover














Title: Child's illustrated gift book
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004633/00001
 Material Information
Title: Child's illustrated gift book
Alternate Title: Child's gift book
Pictorial gift for the little ones
Boys and girls' book of songs & ballads
Children's scrap book
Physical Description: 1 v. (various pagings) : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Walker, James P ( James Perkins ), 1829-1868
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver )
Avery, Samuel Putnam, 1822-1904 ( Engraver )
Jocelyn, Albert H ( Engraver )
Orr, Nathaniel ( Engraver )
Richardson & Cox ( Engraver )
Lossing & Barritt ( Engraver )
Leavitt & Allen ( Publisher )
Publisher: Leavitt & Allen
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1866
Copyright Date: 1866
 Subjects
Subject: Picture books for children   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1866   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1866   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1866   ( local )
Bldn -- 1866
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Three books with the same publisher and same publishing date bound together with a collective title on cover; each has independent t.p. and pagination with irregular page order.
General Note: All p. have hand-colored ill. and text within triple-ruled border.
General Note: Illustrations variously signed by Avery, Richardson & Cox, J.W. Orr, E. Evans, Lossing-Barritt, H. Weir, and Jocelyn.
General Note: Illustrations are hand-colored.
General Note: Without music.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004633
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA5902
notis - ALG5363
oclc - 49230759
alephbibnum - 002225091

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Section
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
        Page A-4
        Page A-5
        Page A-6
        Page A-7
        Page A-8
        Page A-9
        Page A-10
        Page A-11
        Page A-12
        Page A-13
        Page A-14
        Page A-15
        Page A-16
        Page A-17
        Page A-18
        Page A-19
        Page A-20
        Page A-21
        Page A-22
        Page A-23
        Page A-24
        Page A-25
        Page A-26
        Page A-27
        Page A-28
        Page A-29
        Page A-30
        Page A-31
        Page A-32
    The children's scrap book
        Page B-2
        Page B-3
        Page B-4
        Page B-5
        Page B-6
        Page B-7
        Page B-8
        Page B-9
        Page B-10
        Page B-11
        Page B-12
        Page B-13
        Page B-14
        Page B-15
        Page B-16
        Page B-17
        Page B-18
        Page B-19
        Page B-20
        Page B-21
        Page B-22
        Page B-23
        Page B-24
        Page B-25
        Page B-26
        Page B-27
        Page B-28
        Page B-29
        Page B-30
        Page B-31
        Page B-32
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text
























































































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..NEW YORK:


I. E A T9VITT1 cr


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1866.


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I've just returned from Milford Fair,
And I tell you, children, I saw there
Many things that would make you stare:
Trumpets, flags, and guns,
Bats and balls, and sugar plums,
Horses of tin, and woolly sheep,
Little toy banks, your money to keep,
Punch and Judy, and Noah's ark,
Pigs that would squeal, and dogs that could bark,
And more things else than I could tell,
Or you remember very well.


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Old Druid is so fierce and strong,
We keep him chained the whole day long;
But when night comes we let him free,
To keep away the thieves, you see.


These little puppies are trying hard
To get up a frolic with the hens in the yard.


How full of grace
Is this little vase !


~_____~__~I_
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.Y-11





See the sea within the C!
And a vessel, too, there seems
to be.


In grooming the horse this
man fell asleep!
He must be a useful servant to
keep.


If I understand this singular matter,
The woman is asking the pump for
water.


While no one is nigh
The mouse eats the pie.


LL


ii


Be off to your den, you thievish fox,
Unless you wish to be pelted with rocks.


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These merchants wish to employ this man
To do a hard job, that no other can.


S tere died CHATTERTON,
Wonderful boy,"
Wt W(ith the gold of whose genius
Was base alloy.
More you shall know,
W, hen you older grow.


.,


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I do not know, but I should think
So frail a raft would be apt to sink.


Jane brings her rabbits something to eat;
See them cluster round her feet.


























This house, near the Lake, stands all alone,
A peaceful, quiet mountain home.


Rosa has just received a letter,
And nothing could have pleased her
better.


This
And
a


little boy hals got a sword,
thinks himself as grand as
lord.





















The arrival at London of the Queen of Oude
Causes all this trouble and crowd.


4^


I p e b w n o uh fl;
DtjR


I hope these boys were not hurt by their fall;
Only a little bruised, that's all.

_- in_


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Though old, and feeble, and nearly blind,
This good man is cheerful, gentle, and kind.


11


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The treasures of ocean who can tell?
Its stores of coral, pearls, and shell,
Beautiful weeds," that rival the flower
Growing within our garden bowers!


III


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He is very badly hurt, poor man;
I hope they will do all for him they can.


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Well, this is a singular-looking crew,
Of whom I know no more than you.


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A good old dog was Fido,
He took excellent care of Lido.
All who saw them said it was queer, The leaves of tIis palm
That he was so pleased when she was near Are as lon,' as your arm.


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Alone in the woods and nobody near,
They'll never find their way home I fear.


Now you're astride
You'll have to ride,
For the goat won't stop
Till he's ready to drop.


How lonely and drear
The woods appear.


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That's right,
Fly your kite;
Let it sail away,
There's a good breeze to-day.


tily tripping, heel and toe,
Merrily round and round we go.


Don't disturb those birds, my boy,
'Twill give them pain, and you no joy.


X4
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This beautiful experiment
AIatys affords great merriment.


The Ostrich is very strong and fleet,
But its lead is about the size of its feet,
So it doesn't know much, as I suppose
you've heard,
And is generally called "the stupid bird."


A dangerous neighbor, I should
say,
And wish myself safely out of
his way.


I,_


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A pavilion in Turkey is called a Kiosk,
And a building like this above, a Mosque.


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Uncle expends his ample means
In buying all sorts of queer machines;
With which, when we go to spend the day,
He very kindly lets us play.


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This little woman looks so very sad,
I guess she wants something that
can't be had.


Both stoled priest and mailed knight,
Possess much power for wrong or right.
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"Laugh, little baby, laugh and crow,
Nothing like laughing to make you grow !"'


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These wandering negroes and their African wives
Never saw a white face before, in their lives.


Ah! a regal crown is a glittering thing;
'Tis said even Cromwell wished to be King.





























These travellers have stopped' for refrieshnment and rest,
And the peasants kindly bring their best.


The Clameleon this, and I believe
A homelier animal doesn't breathe.


I must mend my pen,
I can't write till then.


---. PC-31LIL
































Great delight these people take,
Sailing upon this beautiful lake.


Mercury-A messenger was he,
Speeding over land and sea.


Jane reads and mother sews,
Thus happily the time goes.


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Come, children, come and choose,
lWhich you prefer of these Arctic
viewVS.
The Arctic regions, you don't need
to be told,
Iave a bitter climate, which is fear-
fully cold. A
Icebergs, these masses of ice they
call,
As large as a mountain, and nearly
as tall.
The days and nights are six months
long;
There are huge polar bears, fierce
and strong.
I think we should be happy and.
glad, don't you ?
We were not born there, but live
where we do.


A1~13~~


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This man is earnestly seeking for work;
You see he is neither a beggar nor shirk.




























The fruit of the Pahn is delicious The smallest child .you see is undrest,
to eat And goes to bed first, 'cause he needs
While its leaves are useful to most rest.
shield from heat.
TOP_, ,__ 41P- .,

The fruit of the Paln is delicious The smallest child.you see is undrest,
to eat, And goes to bed first, 'cause he needs
While its leaves are useful to most rest.
shield firom he-at.


-Illl~lll~aa~---. I I -- ---LI II23


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"Open the lattice and take in this plant;"
SI would, but you see it's locked, and I
can't.'


It greatly delights this worthy pair
To breathe the pure, sweet country air.


Besides the tulips growing here,
There's a greenhouse full of flowers
near.


A little study every day,
A little work, a little play,
Plain hearty food and sleep enough,
Makes your mind clear, your body tough.


ofl


































Uncle's experiments afford us such delight
That we should not weary to witness them all night.


Grand papa, though old and blind,
Is fond of children and very kind.


This lolng-neckedd bird has cau2lght an eel,
You can easily guess how bad it must feel.


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"Remove that bauble !"--away it went;
Thus Cromwell dissolved the Parliament.
By readin7,- whenl youl older grow,-
Enllish IIistory, l'ore you will know.


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You will rarely see a handsomer face,
A form more erect, and full of grace.


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This speckled toad
Seems happy's a lord;
And this hairy worm,
Thoug-h it can only squirm,
And has not a cent,
Is quite content.


Good old Neptune chanced to pass,
And saw his image in the glass;
He stopped, and growled, and tried to bite-
In vain, the mirror would not fight.


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Perhaps it may seem a singular thing,
But this is a famous African King.


" Shameficed Billy" was this mon-
key's name;
An intelligent monkey and very
t amle.


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The man who stands here,
Dressed so queer,
Has marbles rare,
And pictures fair.
With such works of art,
So scarce and old,
He would not part
For their weight in gold.


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The ship which this Japanese artist drew
Looked less like a ship than it did like a shoe.






I It is not right for any to fight;
To use the strength that God bestows,
In dealing brutal, murderous blows.
.


_ ___
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SDon't fall, hold fast,
There, you've reached the cor-
_:" 1er1 at last.

Jack has a sweet tooth, so go where he will,
If candy's to be had, he eats his fill,-
He much amazed the Japanese, by eating fourteen sugar geese.

__ __ ____ 30______ _______ ____________I I __ __


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The Queen of Oude is mighty proud,
She lives in great state, as you see by this plate;
One attendant hands her fruit,
While another is playing on the lute,
A third stands near her with a fan,
A fourth is ready to do what she can.


I


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I






















Oh! how I like to look at the stars
Through this long telescope of papa's.


How musical, in wood or vale,
The song of the thrush or night-
ingale.


Well! this is certainly a singular group,
Ox, ass, rooster, dog and man, in one coop.























This little boy has been sick very
But I trust he'il soon be well and


long,
strong.


/ -Lr ~. -


Bah! bah!
Oh! you're


bah !
there!


pow, wow,
tWhat's the


wow!
matter now ?


In storm and shine the shepherd doth
keep
Watch and ward over his sheep;
Preserveth them from all alarms,
And beareth the lambkins in his


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CONTENT :

LUCY GRAY. By V. WORDSWORTH. 6 Illustrations, -
THE BATTLE OF BLENHEIM. SOUTHEY. 4 Illustrations,
THE FAIRIES OF CALDON LOW. MARY IIOWITT. 5 Illustrations,
CASABIANCA. By MRS. HEMARS. 2 Illustrations, -
THE OLD MAN IN THE WOOD. 4 Illustrations, -
THE WRECK OF THE HESPERUS. LONGFELLOW. 3 Illustrations,


THE
THE
THE


SANDS O' DEE. By REV. CHAS. KINGSLEY. 5 Illustrations, -
BROKEN PITCHER. 1 Illustration, -
OBSTINATE CHICKEN. 1 Illustration, .


PAGE.
7
- 11
- 15


- 19
21
- 24
28
- 31
S 32


-----I~- --1
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You yet may spy the fawn at play,
The hare upon the green,
But the sweet face of Lucy Gray
Will never more be seen.


No mate, no comrade Lucy knew;
She dwelt on a wide moor-
The sweetest thing that ever grew
Beside a human door!


" To-night will be a stormy night-
You to the town must go,
And take a lantern, child, to light
Your mother through the snow."


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OFT I had heard of Lucy Gray;
And, when I crossed the wild,
I chanced to see, at break of day,
The solitary child.


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"That, father, will I gladly do;
'Tis scarcely afternoon,
The minster-clock has just struck two,
And yonder is the moon !"


Not blither is the mountain roe-
With many a wanton stroke
Her feet disperse the powdery snow,
That rises up like smoke.


At this the father raised his hook,
And snapped a faggot-band;
He plied his work-and Lucy took
The lantern in her hand.


The storm came on before its time-
She wandered up and down;
And many a hill did Lucy climb,
But never reached the town.


----------------------- ~ -


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The wretched parents all that night
Went shouting far and wide;
But there was neither sound nor sight
To serve them for a guide.


They wept-and, turning homeward, cried,
In heaven we all shall meet !"
When, in the snow, the mother spied
The print of Lucy's feet.


At daybreak on the hill they stood
That overlooked the moor-
And thence they saw the bridge of wood,
A furlong from their door.


Then downward, from the steep hill's edge,
They tracked the footmarks small;
And through the broken hawthorn hedge,
And by the long stone wall;


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This thievish fox has just come from his den,
And stolen, you see, a fine fat hen.


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Gathering flowers! see what a heap
The girls have plucked since John's
been asleep.


What's this little girl doing under
the tree ?
She is fast asleep, it appears to me.


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They kept this cow in the field too late,
And now she has broken down the gate.


Each of these girls has got a dolly;
One is named Maggie, the other Polly.


They've no mills to grind their corn in the Empire of Japan,
So they pound it to pieces as well as they can.


T stands for
Trumpet,
Table,
and
Tree,


And hundreds
of things
besides
these
three.


19


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Iere we see a Christmas Tree,
Laden with toys, for good girls and boys,
And abundance of fruit, which I think may suit
The palates of all, both great and small.







, _______________ ______


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Herbert has brought Polly some food,
Which Polly declares is "very good."


"Oh! Sister May
Let us stay all day,
And see the pretty
"The air is so sweet,
And'tis such a treat
To feel the soft turf


[play.
lambkins

[feet."
under our


'Tis very seldom you will see
A happier party than this seems to be.



Children all
Should play ball;
Besides the fun,
'Tis healthy to run.
._


12


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Is not this a beautiful thinw,
This marble boy-the Genius of Spring ?"


s:" ,, '--: .... ::- -
The Wild Boar looks very much like a pig,
Only he is many times as big.


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This little girl is trying to read,
But she has been very sick indeed.


This is the famous Benjamin West,
An American Artist, and one of the best.


This Imlb, the children love him so,
Will follow them wherever they go.


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Here is a sailor boy writing a letter,
With his trunk for a desk, wanting a better.


"Turn round, Polly, don't be afraid,
I've brought you sugar, and figs, and


bread."


Look out my man, there they go!
The whole lot, tipped off in the
SHOW.


_ _~ I _~ __
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" 'Oh! the poor, blind widow,
Though she has been blind so long,
She'll be blithe enough when the mildew's
gone,
And the corn stands tall and strong.'
"Oh! the poor, lame weaver,
How will he laugh outright
When he sees his dwindling flax-field
All full of flowers by night !'


"And some they brought the brown
lint seed,
And flung it down from the Low:
'And this,' they said, 'by the sunrise,
In the weaver's croft shall grow.


"And then outspoke a brownie,
With a long beard on his chin:
'I have spun up all the tow,' said he,
And I want some more to spin.


___________ JaJJ I= ~ ~ s ~lb C- Ilb.. I li r


"'I've spun a piece of hempen cloth,
And I want to spin another:
A little sheet for Mary's bed,
And an apron for her mother.'


I


"'And there,' they said, the merry winds
go,
Away from every horn;
And they shall clear the mildew dank
From the blind, old widow's corn.


__
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"With that I could not help but laugh,
And I laughed out loud and free-
And then, on the top of the Caldon Low
There was no one left but me.

"And all on the top of the Caldon Low,
The mists were cold and gray,
And nothing I saw but the mossy stones
That round about me lay.

"But coming down from the hill-top,
I heard, afar below,
How busy the jolly miller was,
And how the wheel did go.


' And I peeped into the widow's field,
And, sure enough, were seen
The yellow ears of the mildewed corn,
All standing stout and green.

"And down by the weaver's croft I stole,
To see if the flax were sprung-
But I met the weaver at his gate,
With the good news on his tongue.

"Now, this is all I heard, mother,
And all that I did see;
So, pr'ythee, make my bed, mother,
For I'm as tired as I can be."


a


13


~
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The b)oy")* stood on the burning deck,
Whence all lbut hiinm had fled;
The flame thlit lit t1ie little wreck,
Sllone round him o'er tle dead.

Yet, beautiful and bright he stood,
As born to rule the storm;
A creature of heroic blood,
A proud, though childlike form.

1 The flames rolled on-he would not go
Without his father's word;
1 That father, faint in death below,
His voice no longer heard.

Young Casabiannc, a boy naout thirleen years old, son to the admiral of the Orzent,
remained at his post (in the battle of the Nile) after the ship had taken fire, and all the
guns had been abandoned, and perished in the explosion of the vessel, when the flames
had reached tile powder.


- III~C- IIICI~ ~pe~99~ I~--I ~Yr i yl~-T I ~--C-1lrl--113-i


I- I ___











He called aloud: "Say, father, say,
If yet my task be done ?"
He knew not that the chieftain lay,
Unconscious of his son.

"Speak, father !" once again he cried,
If I may yet be gone!
And "-but the booming shots replied,
And fast the flames rolled on.

Upon his brow he felt their breath, .
And in his waving hair,
And looked from that lone post of deathh-
In still, yet brave despair.

And shouted but once more aloud:
"My father! must I stay.


While o'er him fast, through sail and shroud,
The wreathing fires, made way.

They wrapped the ship in splendor wild,
They caught the flag on high,
And streamed above the gallant child,
Like banners in the sky.

There came a burst of thunder sound,
The boy-oh where was he ?
Ask of the winds that far around
With fragments strewed the sea.

With mast and helm, and pennon fair,
That well had borne their part;
But the noblest thing that perished there,
Was that young gallant heart.


i"' e I L II L s---s I -I~Pb - -~IL--i ~ .1 I rs~llY1


j


F


-AV





" And you must milk the tiny cow,
Lest she should go dry;
And you must feed the little pigs
That are within the sty.
"And you must watch the speckled hen,
Lest she should go astray,
Not forgetting the spool of yarn
That I spin every day."


_i


I


ii


THERE Was an old man who liv'd in a wood,
As you shall plainly see-
He thought he could do more work in one
day
Than his wife could do in three.
"With all my heart," the old woman said,
"If you will allow,
You shall stay at home to-day,
And I'll go follow the plough.


im-


- I I I- ~II~--- ~~ -- = 1-- -~--~~ - ---- -- -~


TI
















The old woman took her stick in her hand,
And went to follow the plough;
The old man put the pail on his head,
And went to milk the cow.


But Tiny she winch'd, and Tiny she flinch'd,
And Tiny she toss' l her nose;
Aind Tiny gave him a kick on the shin,
Till the blood ran down to his toes.


And a "Ho, Tiny !" and a Lo, Tiny !"
And a Pretty little cow, stand still;"
And "If ever I milk you again," he said,
It shall be against my will."

And then he went to feed the pigs
That were within the sty;
He knocked his nose against the shed,
And'made the blood to fly.

And then he watcli'd the speckled hen,
Lest she shouldd go astray;
But he quite forgot the spool of yarn
That his wife spun every day.


IsI. '


I-I r I I ---- YI~ U _I1L - L L~- I-- II_ ~ I. _- 'I





And when he saw how well she plough'd,
And made the furrows even,
Said his wife could do more work in a day
Than he could do in seven!


Ii


___
,_ ~,, ----~I--- - Icl~q B1~-~L .II IIIIIII--I I r I ~ ---
I~ I I __ ---- _I II I I


And when the old woman came home at
night,
He said he could plainly see
That his wife could do more work in a day
Than he could do in three.


Yr




























In the woods, near the hill,
Stands Matth.ew Grimes' Mil ;
VWhile he lives in a cabin near,
You see it there, just in the rear.


This fellow entered the house to
thieve,
And the soldier assisted him to
leave.


Iere's a Japanese begging priest,
Though he hasn't a clerical look in
the least.


___


---
-- ------------
--- P~_C--~PS~--- I--~~~--s X ~b~~ ~A -- -- a -- I -L

























Here's a gay Butterfly
And a sweet little bird


arrayed in her best,
sitting snug in her nest.


Black and white Rabbits, with red eyes and long ears;
One-two-three-four-five, it appears.


r --- -- I 7_~


.L- ----~------ -- -' 1
r _L I -~L- L- ~-f.-L -s~r~L IL L I I1I~JI~ J~L-- L - 7





Look here, Miss Jane, don't write at \
word more ,
Till you have picked up these books -
from off the floor. Twelve miles I've walked since half past
three,
And am just as tired as I can be,
So down I'll sit beneath this tree,
And eat the apples that I see;
If afterwards I fall asleep,
:- Faithful Fido watch will keep.





Frank sits reading his book in the
chair,
Ann sits on the floor looking cross
as a bear.

:, ___ __ _ _ ___________________________


S. . . . ...-.. ... . .- .- - - -- -- --. .1


How ruffled and startled this birdie So fond of dancing is Caroline Hill,
appears, Though all alone she can't keep still.
I wonder what it can be he fears!





















These two little children are lost in
the wood,
Wouldn't you show them the way
out if you could ?


Sister Alice, open your eyes,
Don't you know it is time to rise ?


The little children here you see,
Have lain down to sleep under a tree.


,,_ : _-.--_i-
Puss looks as if she would like very
well
To taste the bird that boy has to sell.


B, for Button
Which M makes;
R, for Mutton
Which B bakes.


This creature loAs sad,
I guess he feels bad.
























That's the smallest engine I ever saw,
Yet only look! what a load it can draw.


The watch is sick,
It will not tick.


That's the thing,
Now give a good spring.


This curly-haired, fat-cheeked little Puck,
You see has got an orange to suck.










































So careful has little Arthur grown,
His mother trusts him with a cup of his own.


" Speak, Tray," says Fred,
"And I'll give you this bread."


There, I declare I've lost my cent,
Here's a hole in my pocket, and that's
how it went.


Ilau ~p-l---- Iji I I bC- II~I ~r~-- -- --- I


-"Y ---I I~ILU-IIIII~- -Y~.---~.B-.--CIe~- ~l~ij~ .Y 1 1111 -
-~--I-------~------------'-~


f 7





_ __ __ _II_ _ _


These three, as you can see,
Are having a pic-nic under the tree;
The other's a Gipsey, I know very well,
And she has come their fortunes to tell.


"Don't go near the bull," was my very last word,
And I am quite sure that Henry heard-
But he did not obey me and you see where he is;
I'm sorry indeed, but the fault was his.


I i


. lli/:).





K.~ dl__


ALAS, alas!" the little maiden cries,
As on the ground her pitcher broken lies-

The pitcher which so many times she bore,
Full from the well, back to the cottage door.

Ah, Jessie! thou may'st learn a lesson sad,

And yet a lesson needful to be had;
All earthly things are sure to fall at last-

The things that are above alone stand fast.


won m MIl















WHOSE FATE SCO GORY,
MAKES TillS A MELANCHOLY STORY.


" Go not down that distant walk;
Yonder flies the savage hawk;
His sharp eyes will quickly meet you,
If you go I'm sure he'll eat you."


CHICKEN.

- "Nasty hawk is far away,
I may safely go and play;
If he comes, my legs will bring
Me beneath your sheltering wing."


So it skipped off in a trice,
Scorning mother's good advice;
And when it thought at home to sup,
Down came the hawk and gobbled it up.


I 'I


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L1 -- ---El







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