• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Half Title
 The girl and her pets
 The orphans
 Back Matter
 Back Cover






Group Title: girl and her pets
Title: The girl and her pets
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004616/00001
 Material Information
Title: The girl and her pets and other stories
Physical Description: 16 p. : col. ill. ; 10 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Leavitt & Allen ( Publisher )
Publisher: Leavitt & Allen
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: 1865
Copyright Date: 1865
 Subjects
Subject: Pets -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Miniature books -- Specimens -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Miniature books (Printing) -- New York -- 1865   ( rbpri )
Children's stories -- 1865   ( lcsh )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) -- 1865   ( local )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1865   ( local )
Bldn -- 1865
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Specimens   ( lcsh )
Miniature books (Printing)   ( rbpri )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding)   ( local )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Date from holographic inscription on flyleaf.
General Note: Illustrations are hand-colored.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004616
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA5870
notis - AMF1484
oclc - 50683105
alephbibnum - 002446240

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Half Title
        Page 2
    The girl and her pets
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    The orphans
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Matter
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Back Cover
        Page 35
        Page 36
Full Text

























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THE

I( L AD UEMM PuTS

AND

fthei SioHea.


NEW YORK:
LEAVITT & ALLEN.


















GIRL AN] HER PETS.










THE GIRL AND HER
PETS.

TuiI little girl appears to
have two pets, a dog and a
bird. Both are very 'ond of
her, though the dog seems to
be jealous of the bird, and is
about making a spring to drive
the innocent little bird away;
but the child does not falcy
that, and pats the dog, and
c4ls him by name, and eni-
(3,





4

deavors to quiet his jealous
feelings. The bird has become
so attached to his kind little
mistress, that he will not take
advantage of his liberty and
fly Y.


THE MOUSE.

WE presume all our young
friends have seen a mouse. It
is a very common animal, and
inhabits all dwelling houses.
The mouse is very fond of
music. A story is told of a |
man who was playing a violin,'
3:

















A MOUSE.


saw a mouse run along the floor
and jump, as if it was crazy.
He continued playing, and after
sometime, the mouse appeared
as if it was exhausted, and fell
down dead on the floor.






6









THE JUNGLE BEAR.

The jungle or juggler bear
is found only in the East
Indies. It is a very ugly
animal, and very lazy, and in-
dolent in its habits. It has a
fery long nose, something like
a pig. The fur is black, and





7

long, particularly around the
head. It feeds on fruits,
and white ants. In captivity
he is mild but melancholy.


THE BUSTARD.

THE bustard looks something
like a turkey. It runs very
swiftly, but cannot easily be
induced to fly. It feeds on
berries, herbs and worms.
They are very scarce, and very
few can be found in England,
of which country, they are
natives. The female lays her






8

eggs, two in number, in a hole,
which she makes in the ground.
The male besides being larger
than his ndate, is provided with
a pouch in the fore-part of his
neck, capable of containing
upwards of four quarts of water,
with which it is supposed he
supplies the female when sit-
ting, and which he can eject
with such force as to drive off
the birds of prey.

THE BEAVER.

THE beaver is found princi-
pally in North America, and
$. "






.. 9


Zoo.
i~a


0 *


*- skin is very valuable, it ..
being used to make hats. The
weaver is easily tamed, and.
tll build dams across the...
corner of a room with brushes,
boots, fire-irons, books or any- ::
%ain it can lind. When it:I%
ase this, it will sit in the '
thinking, that it has
etructre to dam up the





10










THE STAG AND HIS
HORNS.

A STAG was standing in a
pool one day, admiring his
horns, and wished his legs
were only half as handsoqt






11

he heard the huntsman's horn
and he found his legs very
useful then,- and he would
have escaped only his horns
caught in a thicket, and he
as kept so long trying to get
ear, that the huntsman killed
Pim. Thus his horns which
e had so much admired,
roved his ruin.


THE ANT-EATE].

Yi-THis is a very curious ani-
riaand is found in America.
i3ves .on ants, which it takes



















THE ANT-EATER.

up with its long slender tongue,
which is covered with a gummy
saliva, and the ants stick to it.
Sometimes it will devour meat,
When cut "p fine.



.A .
. -





13












THE BITTERN.

THE Bittern builds it nest"
of rushes, and withered water-
plants, along the edge of some .
stream. The American Bird,






14

it is said, has the power of
casting a light from its breast,.
which illuminates the water,;
and either attracts or enablei
the bird to discover its prey,.
It is said that the female feeds
its young ones for three days
in the nest, and then leads them-
forth in quest of prey.


THE TOUCAN.

THE Red-beaked Toucan, is
no bigger than a common
SPigeon; its bill is six inches
and a half long, and more than





15










n A TOUCAN.

:two inches deep. The fea-
kthers on the throat are white,
;and on the breastthere are some
beautiful red feathers. The
|claws, legs and feet are ash-
colored, and the rest of the





16

body black. The Toucan is a
native of South America, and
* feeds on vegetables, fruits and
berries.






THE



AND

* 0fit 8e o>







NEW YORK:
LEAVITT & ALLEN.




















THE ORPHANS.
usan-im iin m ....an .." : ......... ,. . .i. -.. .. ....


ILV


.^:










THE ORPHANS.

WHAT a sad thing it is to
have no father or mother, to
kncw that henceforth, no
father's gentle voice to guide,
no mother's bosom on which to
repose the weary little head,
as she lulls you to repose, with
some sweet little song. Poor
little ~ ildren how we SF 4
pity tltm, and strive by
means in our power, to Make
(3)





4 -

their path, as gentle and as
easy as possible. Little Mary's
mother died when she was very
young, and she was left to the
care of her sister, who promised
her parent to be a mother to
Sher. Poor girl, you have taken
upon yourself a great respon-
sibility, and you should pray
for strength to fulfil your trust.



S THE SHIPWRECK.

SnIPS are sometimes over-
.-taken by storm on the sea, and
are wrecked. Most- vessel::
^-~~, -





5


THE SHIPWRECK.


have J ts by which the per-
sons W board may escape a
watery grave. The picture re -
presents a party of ren ho
have taken to one of. the






6

small boats, to escape. The
sea runs very high, and they
seem to be in danger of being
swallowed up.


THE FOX AND THE
FROG.

A FROG thought that he
*possessed great abilities, and
gave out among the beasts that
he was a .great doct and
could improve the persWal ap-
pearance of any one, and ex-
tract teeth, and make the hair
grow. A sly old fox wh. had















THE FROG AND THE FOX.

lost his tail, called on the frog
and wished it restored. The
frog confessed it was beyond
his skill. The fox told him he
was a fool, and that he had
better remove the blotches on
Jiis own skin, and cure hs.
,^..|





8

lantern jaws and that hobbling
walk, before he thought of
curing others, "Cure your self
Dr. Frog; there is not one
amongst us so much in need of
health and advice, I assure
you."


THE CAPYBARA.

THE Capybara looks some-
thing like a pig, and is covered
with hairs like bristles, which
makes the resemblance more
remarkable. It is found in
South America, and hides in






9


THE CAPYBARA.

the bushes in the day time, and
only goes forth at night to
search for'food.

THE PEACOCK.

THIS is one of the most






10









THE PEACOCK.

beautiful of the bird kind. It
seems to be aware of its beauty,
for it is very proud and delights
to exhibit its gaudy colors. It
is very graceful, and as it
walks its long tail sweeps the
ground. It has a shrill,








squeaking vice, which is very
disagreeable.


THE FIELDMOUSE.

THE Fieldmouse is a great
pest. It lives in the fields,
and destroys the grain, and
strips the bark off of young
* trees, and does as much mis-
chief in the open air, as the
common mouse does in the
House. It does great daniage
to corn, stripping the earsTM-
most entirely. They retire to.
holes among brushwood, and






12








THE FIELDMOUSE.

under the trunks of trees, where
they lay up large stores of
grain, acorns and nuts, for
their winter's food. The hogs
do great damage by rooting up
the ground in search of the
stores of the Fieldmouse.





13

THE SKUNK.

THIS animal is remarkable
for the intolerable odor of the
fluil that it hides in pouches,
which it has the power of
throwing upon its enemies, and
serves as a complete means of
defence, the least quantity of
it being sufficient to produce
suffocation. Clothes will retain
the smell of it for weeks; and
nothing will render them sweet,
Except burying them a short
Time in the fresh earth. As
soon as the animal is killed,
Sand the glands containing this
Sfluid cut away, the American





14










THE SKUNK.

Indians eat the flesh, and say it
is as sweet as that of young pig.

THE ARMADILLO.

THE Armadillo lives exclu-





15







THE ARMADILLO .

sively in the warmer parts of
America. They eat carrion,
insects, and sometimes fallen
fruit. They are covered with
scales that resemble armor.
When in their holes, they can
only be brought forth by smoke
or water. The natives con-
sider them great delicacies






16

when roasted in their shells.
The armadillos have rather a
pointed snout, long ears, short
and thick limbs, and stout
claws; all of which are well
adapted to their habits of bur-
rowing.




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