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Title: IPSA abstracts and bibliography in literature and psychology
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Title: IPSA abstracts and bibliography in literature and psychology
Physical Description: v. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Institute for Psychological Study of the Arts
Publisher: Institute for Psychological Study of the Arts
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1986-
Frequency: annual
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 Subjects
Subject: Literature -- Psychology -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Literature -- Psychology -- Bibliography -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Psychology and literature -- Abstracts -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Psychology and literature -- Bibliography -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: No. 1 (Apr. 1986)-
General Note: Title from cover.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00004601
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: aleph - 000918895
oclc - 15866765
notis - AEM9249
lccn - sn 87035333

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page i
    About IPSA
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Abstracts: Articles and books forthcoming after 1 March 1995
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Bibliography: Books published between January 1994 and March 1995
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
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        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Bibliography: Articles published between January 1994 and March 1995
        Page 34
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    Index
        Page 104
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    Announcements
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
Full Text








*IPSA**


*Institute for Psychological**
*Study of the Arts**

*IPSA ABSTRACTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY

IN LITERATURE AND PSYCHOLOGY**


*Number 10


$8.00


May 1995


Inst. for Psychological Study of the Arts 4008 Turlington Hall
(904) 392-7332, 392-0777 University of Florida
FAX: (904) 392-0860 Gainesville, Florida 32611-2036
BITNET: nnh@nervm INTERNET: nnh@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu

(c) Copyright 1994, Institute for Psychological Study of the
Arts. All rights reserved.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

About IPSA .... .......................................... ii

IPSA ABSTRACTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY
IN LITERATURE AND PSYCHOLOGY .......................... 1

Abstracts. Articles and Books forthcoming after 1 March 1995
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Bibliography
-- Books published between January 1994 and March 1995
. . . . . . . . . . .. 1 1

Bibliography
-- Articles published between January 1994 and March 1995


Index to the Book and Article Bibliographies


. ....... 58


Announcements


*ABOUT IPSA**

Located at the University of Florida, IPSA (the Institute for
Psychological Study of the Arts) was founded in 1984 by Norman N.
Holland and is currently directed by Andrew Gordon. Other
members from the University of Florida include Molly Harrower
(Clinical Psychology); Anne Jones, David Leverenz, Marie Nelson,
Scott Nygren, Bernard Paris, Maureen Turim (English); Daniel
Moors (French); Bertram Wyatt-Brown (History); Anne Wyatt-Brown
(Linguistics); Roger Blashfield and Ross McElroy (Psychiatry);
and Franz Epting (Psychology). A number of other people,
including several local clinicians, are informally associated
with IPSA, as well as faculty from the Universities of North
Florida and Central Florida.

IPSA sponsors a variety of activities in addition to the












*IPSA**


*Institute for Psychological**
*Study of the Arts**

*IPSA ABSTRACTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY

IN LITERATURE AND PSYCHOLOGY**


*Number 10


$8.00


May 1995


Inst. for Psychological Study of the Arts 4008 Turlington Hall
(904) 392-7332, 392-0777 University of Florida
FAX: (904) 392-0860 Gainesville, Florida 32611-2036
BITNET: nnh@nervm INTERNET: nnh@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu

(c) Copyright 1994, Institute for Psychological Study of the
Arts. All rights reserved.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

About IPSA .... .......................................... ii

IPSA ABSTRACTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY
IN LITERATURE AND PSYCHOLOGY .......................... 1

Abstracts. Articles and Books forthcoming after 1 March 1995
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Bibliography
-- Books published between January 1994 and March 1995
. . . . . . . . . . .. 1 1

Bibliography
-- Articles published between January 1994 and March 1995


Index to the Book and Article Bibliographies


. ....... 58


Announcements


*ABOUT IPSA**

Located at the University of Florida, IPSA (the Institute for
Psychological Study of the Arts) was founded in 1984 by Norman N.
Holland and is currently directed by Andrew Gordon. Other
members from the University of Florida include Molly Harrower
(Clinical Psychology); Anne Jones, David Leverenz, Marie Nelson,
Scott Nygren, Bernard Paris, Maureen Turim (English); Daniel
Moors (French); Bertram Wyatt-Brown (History); Anne Wyatt-Brown
(Linguistics); Roger Blashfield and Ross McElroy (Psychiatry);
and Franz Epting (Psychology). A number of other people,
including several local clinicians, are informally associated
with IPSA, as well as faculty from the Universities of North
Florida and Central Florida.

IPSA sponsors a variety of activities in addition to the











Abstracts and Bibliography We conduct the Group for the
Application of Psychology (GAP), which meets monthly for dinner
and the discussion of a pre-circulated paper (usually work in
progress). GAP members are concerned with the application of
psychology to other fields: literature, for example, or the arts,
anthropology, law, or sociology. Topics range from the history
of psychoanalysis to case presentations to the showing of
psychologically-oriented films. GAP meets jointly with the Tampa
Psychoanalytic Study Group once a year. Programs for 1994-95
were as follows:

September: Norman Holland (English, University of Florida), "The
Internet Regression"

October: Al and Peggy Tilley (English; Counseling, University of
North Florida, "Life Stories and Therapy"

November: Andrew Gordon and Hernan Vera (English; Sociology,
University of Florida), "The Unbearable Whiteness of
Being: Sincere Fictions of the White Self in the
American Cinema"

December: Bertram Wyatt-Brown (History, University of Florida),
"The Desperate Imagination: Writers and Melancholy in
the Modern American South"

January: Cynthia Griffin Wolff (Humanities, M.I.T.), "Time and
Memory in Cather's Sapphira and the Slave Girl : Sex,
Abuse, and Art"

February: Eric Rabkin (English, University of Michigan),
"Forbidden Fruit: The Thematics of Eating in Science-
Fiction"

March: Stephanie Ortega (German, SUNY at Buffalo), "Object
Relations and Violence: Margarethe von Trotta's Response
to the Question 'Where Do Lady Terrorists Come From?'"

April: Lawrence Friedman (History, Indiana University), "Erik
H. Erikson's Critical Themes and Voices: The Task of
Synthesis"

IPSA is one of the sponsors of the annual International
Conference on Literature and Psychology. The Twelfth has just
been held at the Albert-Ludwigs Universitat in Freiburg, Germany,
June 21-24. Over eighty papers were presented with scholars
coming from France, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Italy, the
Netherlands, Portugal, South Africa, Taiwan, the U.K., and the
U.S.

IPSA also maintains PSYART, an online list-conference on
BITNET and INTERNET. This list-conference offers discussion and
announcements dealing with literature-and-psychology, the
psychological study of the arts, and psychoanalysis in general.
Its 450 subscribers span the globe, and topics range from
recommended reading lists to the discrepancies between
psychological research and literary theory. Information on how











to subscribe to this free service will be found in the
Announcements section, page 64 below.

IPSA is the research component of the Graduate Program in
Literature and Psychology in the Department of English. The
program is eclectic and clinically grounded. It provides Ph.D.
candidates with a background in various schools of psychological
theory and criticism. Currently, the program offers instruction
and dissertation direction in psychoanalytic psychology, third-
force psychology, reader-response criticism, psycholinguistics,
and cognitive psychology. We offer the following graduate
courses under the general heading:

Psychological Approaches to Literature

Psychoanalytic Psychology and Criticism Andrew Gordon
Norman Holland
Peter L. Rudnytsky

Third-Force Psychology and Criticism Bernard Paris

Reader-Response Criticism Norman Holland

Lacanian Psychoanalysis and Criticism Maureen Turim

Feminist Theory and Criticism Peter L. Rudnytsky
Maureen Turim

Cognitive Psychology and Criticism Norman Holland

Finally, the Literature and Psychology Program offers
fellowships to qualified Ph.D. students. There is the Marston-
Milbauer Fellowship in Literature and Psychology and several
Teaching Assistantships with stipends up to $11,000, including
the teaching of one summer course. There is also the possibility
of a Research appointment for the position of Managing Editor of
IPSA ABSTRACTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY Applicants for support
should write to Mrs. Sonja Moreno at the IPSA address for
information.

*IPSA ABSTRACTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY

IN LITERATURE AND PSYCHOLOGY**

Managing Editor Frank Hering
Editor Norman N. Holland
Production Asssistant Sonja Moreno

We intend IPSA ABSTRACTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY to provide as
comprehensive a covering of recent work done in literature-and-
psychology as possible. To that end, each annual issue of IPSA
ABSTRACTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY includes the following:

Abstracts of forthcoming work. (Number 10 includes abstracts
of work accepted for publication as of 1 April 1995 but not yet
published.)











A Bibliography of books published during the previous year.
(Number 10 includes books published between 1 January 1995 and
1 March 1995, with a few extras.)

A Bibliography of articles published during the previous
year. (Number 10 includes articles published between 1 January
1995 and 1 March 1995, with a few extras.)

Indexes to the bibliographies.

Announcements of conferences, publications, and other
matters of interest to the profession.

This year, we have prepared IPSABIB almost entirely by computer
searches. As a result, one should try several searches when
using the index.

The objective of IPSA ABSTRACTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY is to
speed the dissemination of current research in literature and
psychology, to facilitate correspondence and the exchange of
manuscripts among ourselves, and in general to promote our field
of study within the profession and among our students. Thus, we
urge you to submit abstracts of your forthcoming works in
psychoanalytic, Lacanian, Third Force, psycholinguistic,
cognitive, and reader-response criticism or in any other
psychological or psychology-related criticism. In an effort to
make our bibliography comprehensive, we also urge you to submit
your bibliographic entries of work published in the current year.

We shall be publishing issue number 11 of IPSA ABSTRACTS AND
BIBLIOGRAPHY in the spring of 1996. For this forthcoming
issue, we ask you to submit (1) abstracts of works that will have
been accepted for publication by 1 March 1996 but not yet
published by that date, (2) bibliography entries for articles and
books that have appeared in print between 1 January 1995 and 1
March 1996, including several index terms and (3)
announcements of interest to the profession. We look forward to
your participation. In sending us abstracts and bibliographies,
please help us in our indexing by including the names of relevant
literary and psychological authors and key psychological and
aesthetic terms. *Please send your entries and abstracts to Mrs.
Sonja Moreno, Department of English, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611-2036, e-mail:
smoreno@nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu.**

The editors of IPSA ABSTRACTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY and the
members of the Institute for Psychological Study of the Arts are
grateful to the Office of Graduate Research of the University of
Florida for financial support. We also thank Ms. Sonja Moreno
for her valuable secretarial assistance and Dr. John Van Hook of
the University of Florida Libraries.
IPSA ABSTRACTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY IN LITERATURE AND
PSYCHOLOGY is published with the generous support of the
Division of Sponsored Research of the University of Florida and
Norman Holland's Marston-Milbauer Chair. Though that support
initially allowed us to distribute this publication free of
charge to members of the Psychological Approaches to Literature











Division of the MLA and to other MLA members who requested it,
the size and complexity of the IPSA ABSTRACTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY
has grown dramatically since its inception, and we are now
incurring a significant deficit. As a result, we must now
request recipients to help defray our costs by contributing
$8.00, the amount that we are charging institutions and those who
are not members of MLA. Please make your check payable to GAP-
IPSA and send it to Andrew Gordon, Director, IPSA, Department of
English, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-2036.
If you cannot contribute $8.00, we shall keep you on our mailing
list as long as possible; but if you do not find this publication
useful, please let us know so that we can reduce costs by
trimming our list.

*As one step in reducing our costs, we will stop mailing the
BIBLIOGRAPHY to people outside normal U.S. postage rates. We
will, however, continue to distribute the bibliography
electronically, over PSYART. We hope to reach a stage where we
can distribute it only electronically, and we would appreciate
your opinion of this plan.**

ABBREVIATIONS

U = University or Universities
P = Press or Presses

Names of the United States are abbreviated according to the two-
letter U. S. Postal Service system: AL = Alabama; AK = Alaska; AZ
= Arizona; CA = California, and so on.

ABSTRACTS

Articles and Books Forthcoming after 1 March 1995


BOKAT, NICOLE S. The Freudianism Behind Margaret Drabble's
Fatalism: Repetition Compulsion and the Attempt at Resolution
in Her Fiction Dissertation Abstracts International 54-02,
1993. Order number: AAC 9317563.
Margaret Drabble has been widely recognized both for her
preoccupation with fate, luck, and coincidence and for her
belated, "Victorian" vision. While other critics have
constructed thorough studies of Drabble's philosophy of fatalism,
they have not delved into the psychology behind the author's
philosophy. What is not assessed in these previous texts is the
ways in which the author's theories of psychological determinism
effect her heroines' lives and, in many cases, are compatible
with much of Freudian psychoanalytic thinking. The purpose of
this study, then, is to build on other critics' discussions of
Drabble's fatalism by investigating the ways in which her vision
resembles the Freudian tradition, either in theory or outcome,
despite the author's claim to the contrary.
In his 1914 essay "Remembering, Repeating and Working-
Through," Freud observes that several of his analysands
compulsively returned to unpleasant experiences. Freud's
theories attest to a psychological determinism; he believes that
internal issues of one's childhood establish a person's life and











that only through the difficult process of psychoanalysis can one
change. However, in Beyond the Pleasure Principle (1920),
Freud himself conceded that, even for the normal person,
repetition serves an impulse to work over in the mind an
unpleasurable experience in order to master it. Drabble, by
reiterating the same themes for decades, has exhibited her desire
to resolve obsessive problems which are rooted in her own unhappy
childhood: notably, her wish for more accessible parents and for
a less rejecting older sister. We can discern how the author
transfers her most ardent wishes into her fiction; each heroine
feels the need to resolve her neurotic conflicts and troubled
relationships with her family. Through the constant repetition
of themes, the author discovers solutions--often "magical" ones--
to help each character relieve her angst and live within her own
limitations, if not analytically to solve her problems.

BRUCATO, MARIA JOAN VIRGINA. Dichotomies of Vision and
Desire:Juxtapositions of Imagery in the Surrealist Poetry of
Vicente Aleixandre Dissertation Abstracts International 55-
09, 1995. Order number: AAC 9433332.
In this thesis I explore how "desire" and "union" are
manifested in several of Aleixandre's poems from his Surrealist
texts Espadas como labios (1935). These notions are woven
throughout the study and are manifested through various
dichotomies. Chapter 1 expounds upon desire for erotic union
through destruction, while Chapter 2 underscores a yearning for
the life giving forces of light in contrast to an impotent
darkness which then leads to a search for unity of man's
anima/animus. Chapter 3 develops the concept of union through
the desire for fruitful communication even though the poet is
often faced with an insufficient system of language. Finally, I
emphasize Aleixandre's vision of psychic union with the cosmos
and his desire to embrace the universe's opposing forces.
The introduction focuses upon four areas: Surrealism, its
tenets and the movement in Spain; conventional and postmodern
dream theory; Lacan's theory of language; and the Surrealist
cinema and arts.
Chapter I highlights the notions of desire, passion, and
violence manifested in the dichotomies liberty/repression,
dream/reality, and erotic love/death. Dream studies, in
particular Freudian psychoanalysis and Lacanian poststructuralist
criticism, provide the underlying theory.
Myth and the desire for unity are central notions in Chapter
II, where the dichotomies light/dark, surface/depth, and
masculine/feminine are underscored. Mythological creations and
the Jungian theory of archetypes, inherent in the dichotomy
anima/animus, are elucidated here.
In Chapter III, I discuss language and the poet's
preoccupation with unity through communication resulting in
Existentialist overtones. The dichotomies vacuity/fullness and
abstract/concrete encountered in Aleixandre's poems are discussed
along with a comparison of Cesar Vallejo's poem Trilce "V."
Lacan's theory of language and the unconscious expounded in
Ecrits are central to this chapter.
The dichotomies destruction/creation as well as the notion of
psychic unity in the "squaring of the circle" are emphasized in
Chapter IV. Here, I comment upon the importance of the Romantic











tradition in Aleixandre's poetry as well as in the Surrealist
movement, the concept of libido and dynamism in Freud and Jung,
"unus mundus" and the Jungian concepts of the mandala and
synchronicity, Finally, I interpret "El vals" from the
perspective of the Jungian concept of the circle.

DEVER, CAROLYN MARIE. The Lady Vanishes: Psychoanalysis,
Victorian Fiction, and the Anxiety of Origins Dissertation
Abstracts International 54-06, 1993. Order number: AAC 9330895.
Psychoanalytic theory and the Victorian novel alike represent
"mothers" as dead, absent, or inexplicably lost. I argue that
the representation of a missing mother signifies anxity about
causality: as the figure of physical and psychological origins,
the mother stands as the source of subjectivity and the logic of
cause and effect. Her absence represents a crisis regarding the
conditions of individual identity, agency, and sexual desire.
When Freud describes the fort-da game in Beyond the
Pleasure Principle he institutionalizes a structure in which
symbolic language stands in a direct relationship to maternal
absence: the boy playing the game achieves mastery over the
mother's desertion through the use of language. Psychoanalysts
from Melanie Klein to Lacan and Kristeva have suggested the
various implications of this structure for theories of gender and
subjectivity. I argue that psychoanalytic object-relations
theory, particularly Klein and D. W. Winnicott, challenges
maternal marginalization through mother-centered theories of
infantile development.
Victorian domestic fiction frequently considers the
implications of maternal loss, and eventually maternal return.
In Dickens's Bleak House the autobiographical narrative of
Esther Summerson demonstrates the function of maternal absence
for the construction of an authorial voice and a speaking
subject. In Collins's The Woman in White characters
constructing a detective plot rely on the dead mother as the
locus of personal origins, the source of information, and the
site of purity; the connection of the mother with the novel's
"Secret" problematizes the ideal constructed in and by her
absence. In Eliot's Daniel Deronda all structures of desire
are organized around the figure of a missing mother. When she
returns at the end of the novel, she demonstrates the
implications of women's resistance to the objectification of the
"mother."
Finally, I argue that as a narrative of personal origins,
Charles Darwin's Autobiography demonstrates assumptions about
gender implicit in such influential texts as The Origin of
Species. Darwin articulates a phantasy of parthenogenetic
reproduction reflected in theories of development and knowledge
from the myth of Athena's birth to psychoanalytic theories of
cannibalism.

EIDE, TOM. "Psychoanalysis, Literature, and Ethics."
Proceedings from the Eleventh International Conference in
Psychoanalysis and Literature Lisbon, 1995.
Questions concerning the relationship between ethics and a
psychoanalytic approach to literature are discussed.
Distinctions are made between the ethics of criticism and the
ethics of literature, and between four different aspects of each











one of these. I argue for the primacy of ethics in literary
criticism and that both the ethics of criticism and the ethics of
literature in general should be taken into account when
practising psychoanalytic literary criticism.

ELAM, HEIDE KARST. Narcissus and Hermes: The Intersection of
Psychoanalysis and Myth in the Fiction of Saul Bellow
Dissertation Abstracts International 55-04, 1994. Order number:
AAC 9425378.
This study identifies two recurrent character types in early
and middle Bellow. The protagonist, or "Narcissus," is viewed
from the perspective of Heinz Kohut's psychology of the self.
"Hermes" refers to a mythological trickster who complicates as
well as advances the hero's progress. The complementarity of the
two characters and the intersection of psychoanalytic and the
mythological materials are explored.
The psychoanalytic principles are outlined and the main
characters explained as suffering from Kohutian self-disorder.
The mercurial figure's intervention is then traced, along with
his impact on the hero's career and on the outcome of the novels.
This study tries to show the endings as strongly affected by the
mercurial agent.
The trickster is represented in minor form in Bellow's first
novel, Dangling Man wherein the hero does not transcend his
stasis and spatial limitation. Although these limitations do not
detract from this existentialist book's achievement, Bellow would
have had difficulty recreating the isolated hero in successive
works. As Dangling Man reveals, the trickster appealed to him
early on, and he subsequently developed it fully and remained
faithful to the device throughout his works.
The Kohutian analysis shows us a hero in a state of acute
anxiety, who yearns to merge with the archaic omnipotent figure
as represented by the psychological trickster. Although the
latter offers him insights, he is too self-seeking and unempathic
to heal the enfeebled protagonist. As the narcissistic heros
tend to be self-referential and alienated from work and society,
the interaction with the mythological trickster helps to overcome
a possible stalemate, leading to a more dynamic conclusion of the
narrative.
The Bellovian trickster as surrogate father, brother, or
friend is expected to compensate for the selfobject failure.
Like the mytholigical Hermes, he appears as spellbinder,
magician, hypnotist, crafty rhetorician, or psychopomp, embodying
both good and evil. Although his prototype appears most
dramatically in Seize the Day he is also prominent in the
role of the beast in Henderson the Rain King the swindler in
Herzog the giver of gifts in Humboldt's Gift the
shapeshifter in Augie March and the doppelganger or shadow in
The Victim.

FEAL, ROSEMARY GEISDORFER AND CARLOS FEAL. Painting on the
Page: Interartistic Approaches to Modern Hispanic Texts. New
York: SUNY Press, 1995.
Painting on the Page devises critical strategies that
combine psychoanalysis, feminism, semiotics, and philosophy as
they may be applied to late nineteenth- and twentieth-century
Spanish and Spanish-American literature in relation to painting











and to larger questions of art theory and literary history. Key
psychoanalytic concepts treated: the mirror stage and its
relations to mirrors and art; desire, primarily in Freudian,
Lacanian, and object-relational terms; oedipal themes; language
and art as fantasy. Authors studied are Pardo Baz/an, Valle-
Incl/an, Salinas, Mart/in-Santos, Ayala, Donoso, Vargas Llosa,
and Cabrera Infante. Visual artists whose works are analyzed
include Bosch, Fra Angelico, Titian, El Greco, Jordaens, Goya,
Ingres, Boucher, Klimt, Dal/i, Magritte, Duchamp, and Bacon. The
book concludes with a dialogue between the co-authors.

GILLOOLY, EILEEN. Smile of Discontent: Feminized Humorous
Discourse in Nineteenth-Century British Fiction. Dissertation
Abstracts International 54-07A, 1993.
Drawing upon cultural, gender, and psychoanalytic theory, this
study argues that the humor of Jane Austen, Elizabeth Gaskell,
and George Eliot is gender-marked: It betrays frustration
particular to their narrators' status as middle-class British
women; it criticizes representations of femininity popular in
nineteenth-century culture; and it covertly attacks internalized
cultural assumptions about female behavior while defending
against the pain of such assumptions by turning them into jest.
Following a prefatory discussion of the terms "feminized" and
"humorous" (rather than "female" and "ironic") to describe the
discourse analyzed, the first chapter theorizes a humor that is
rhetorically and effectively distinct from traditional varieties.
Rather than an expression of aggression against a sexual or
ethnic other, "feminine" humor acts--through "passive" tropes
like meiosis and periphrasis--to defend the self against the
frustration of the paternal principle. Subsequent chapters
discuss the humorous strategies of particular novels. In
Mansfield Park and Persuasion humor subverts the dominant
textual construction of femininity by, for example, mocking in
other characters those "feminine virtues" prized in the heroines.
In Cranford the young female narrator's humor defends her
from internalized expectations of daughterly selflessness even as
it retaliates--through tropes of mutilation--against figures of
authority who enforce such expectations. In The Mill on the
Floss humor forms a material bond between narrator and heroine,
protecting the latter from the demands of the law and offering
itself as an interpretive alternative to Maggie's childish
frustrations; once Maggie is eroticized, however, the humorous
bond ruptures, and the narrator maternally abandons her to her
lawful fate. The richly dispersed occurrences of humor in each
text together comprise evidence for a dialogically distinct
discourse. In effect, the "feminized humorous discourses" of
these texts sabotages the authority of their sober expression,
thereby conveying--even as it disguises--a "feminine" critique of
nineteenth-century British middle-class culture.

GOODMAN, LAWRENCE F. Oscar Wilde's Literature: Masking
Narcissistic Anxiety. Dissertation Abstracts International 55-
08, 1995. Order number: AAC 9501497.
Wilde's literary career was shaped by his narcissistic needs
and his texts reflect his efforts to develop a cohesive sense of
self. Consistently, critics have collapsed the components of
Wilde's literature and his literary identity--aestheticism,











transgression, and dandyism--producing a vision of his art as
static and homogeneous. I argue against this by differentiating
the components of Wilde's literary identity. Defining his
relationships to aestheticism, transgression, and dandyism as
period specific, I describe his career developmentally. I argue
that Wilde had a narcissistic personality disorder and that
through his art he constructed a series of compensatory
structures that addressed his narcissistic needs. These
structures, coincident with the components of his literary
identity, form "masks" that Wilde dons to replace his enfeebled
sense of self with a cohesive one.
I account for both Wilde's initial attraction to aestheticism
and the resistance to it manifest in his art. He used the
rhetoric of aestheticism to forge a cohesive sense of self during
his American lecture tour. This sense of self began to break
down due to increasing narcissistic anxiety. I connect this
anxiety to Wilde's homosexual activity, and trace its literary
representation in The Happy Prince After the aesthete mask,
Wilde used the criminal mask. What begins as a character sketch
in "Pen, Pencil and Poison," becomes a prototype for Wilde and
his characters. The criminal mask was Wilde's attempt to derive
psychological strength from his transgressive sexuality. From
Dorian's fate in Dorian Gray however, we know that this mask
also failed. The shame that forces Dorian's suicide illustrates
the debilitating backlash to the mask. In his plays, Wilde
develops the third mask, the dandy. It is the contrapositive of
the criminal mask--denying historical reality rather than seeking
affirmation from that reality. I trace the development of the
dandy mask from "Lady Windermere's Fan" and "An Ideal Husband" to
"The Importance of Being Earnest," reading this last as a "utopia
of denial." After Wilde's incarceration, he developed the mask
of the Christ-figure. This last mask permeates Wilde's final two
works, "De Profundis" and "The Ballad of Reading Gaol."

GORDON, ANDREW. "'Close Encounters': Unidentified Flying Object
Relations." Psychoanalytic Review (1995).
Applies Christopher Bollas's notion of "the transformational
object" to the UFOs in Steven Spielberg's film Close Encounters
of the Third Kind The hero regresses back to infancy in
search of a maternal object that will totally transform his
psychic world. The fundamental appeal of the film is regressive,
a search for a "special affect."

GORDON, ANDREW. "Shame in Saul Bellow's 'Something to Remember
Me By.'" The Saul Bellow Journal (1995).
A study of shame as a predominant element in Saul Bellow's
comic fiction, using his novella "Something to Remember Me By" as
a paradigmatic example. The Bellow hero typically is a vain
shlemeiel who undergoes a comic scourging, which is intended to
teach him a lesson. In "Something to Remember Me By," the
elderly narrator tells a story from his adolescence as a legacy
for his only child. It is a comic rite de passage in which
the teenage hero learns the facts of sex and death through
humiliation. Yet the shame ultimately has a reparative effect;
shame is shown to be both a necessary and an instructive human
emotion.











JOHNSON, GEORGE M. "'The Caged Skylark;: A Psychobiographical
Portrait of G. M. Hopkins." Biography 18.2 (Spring 1995).
A timely psychobiographial reevaluation of Gerard Manley
Hopkins (1844-1889) reveals that he suffered from manic-
depression, with its accompanying characteristics. Through his
poetry, Hopkins attempted to adapt creatively to this condition,
a strategy nowhere more evident than in the "dark" sonnets of
1885.

KAHANE, CLAIRE. Passions of the Voice: Hysteria, Narrative,
and the Figure of the Speaking Woman, 1850-1915. Baltimore:
Johns Hopkins UP, 1995.
This book explores a breakdown in the conventional
sufficiencies of narrative voice in late Victorian texts, a
breakdown provoked by hysterical gender conflict, but
subsequently recuperated as modernist praxis. Beginning with the
presmise that Victorian delineations of gender were increasingly
undermined by the women's movement and its promotion of the woman
who claims discursive authority, especially as figured by the
feminist orator, I explore the disruptive effects of that figure,
both as an external social reality and a disquieting internal
imago, on narrative voice. The figure of the woman with a potent
voice not yet subverted by a gendered narrative syntax that
defined the speaking subject as masculine, and thus the
narrator's ability to tell a coherent story, but more generally
augured a sexual anarchy in representation that preceded and
prepared for modernism. Because the voice itself is psychically
construed as a fetishistic object, the speaking woman was
apprehended as a vocal Medusa, fascinating and fearsome to the
very narrative voice that imagined listening to her. Hysteria as
exemplified in Freud's proto-modernist narration of the Dora case
is my critical paradigm for reading that apprehension and its
effects in problematic texts by Florence Nightingale, Alice
James, Charlotte Br nte, Olive Schreiner, Henry James, Virginia
Woolf, Joseph Conrad, and Ford Madox Ford. A timely contribution
to an ongoing current dialogue about the effects of the New Woman
on fin-de-si'ecle sexuality and the rise of modernist
narrative praxis, this book is set apart by its foregrounding of
voice, its construction of a psychoanalytic anatomy of hysteria
for reading particular voices, and for its analysis of male- as
well as female-authored texts.

NEVELDINE, ROBERT BURNS. Unsafety: Bodies at Risk From Wordsworth
to Wojnarowicz Dissertation Abstracts International 54-08,
1994. Order number: AAC 9401464.
Roughly since the time of the Romantics, the body, designated
as "queer" or otherwise, has placed itself at risk both
discursively and physically, in order to question dominant
notions of what it is to be a human subject in Western society.
This body has pitted itself against competing forces, whether
material or "virtual," in the arenas of artistic endeavor,
playing out conflicts in various texts from Romanticism to
postmodernism in order to demonstrate the operations of
competition and contestation without strict recoure to the
dialectical model. Lacanian psychoanalysis, Foucauldian
archaeology, and Deleuze/Guattarian schizoanalysis provide a
syncretic method for discussing the obsessive, convulsive body--











in Wordsworth's pastoral poetry, in William Godwin's and Mary
Shelley's gothic romances, in musical and fictional minimalism,
and finally during the AIDS pandemic. What results is a human
subject which has recreated itself in terms of extreme forms of
experience through the flesh, as well as new forms of textuality
embodying that subject.

RANDLE, GLORIA THOMAS. Good-Enuf Mothering: The African-
American Woman in 19th- and 20th-Century Literature
Dissertation Abstracts International 55-08, 1995. Order number:
AAC 9501539.
My study concerns the role of the mother, and the psychology
of mothering, in five African-American women's texts written
between 1861 and 1987: Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life
of a Slave Girl Pauline Hopkins's Contending Forces Nella
Larsen's Passing Gwendolyn Brooks's Maud Martha and Toni
Morrison's Beloved
I undertake a close reading of each narrative within the
context of the social and political climate of its era in order
to underscore both the internal and external forces that create
the unique and complex conditions facing African-American mothers
at particular historical moments. My analysis of the mother's
psychic state is underpinned by psychoanalytic theory that helps
to clarify my approach. Major theorists whose work I reference
are Frantz Fanon, Anna Freud, Sigmund Freud, Melanie Klein, Heinz
Kohut, and D. W. Winnicott. At the same time, I examine both the
usefulness and the limitations of psychoanalytic theory in the
interpretation of African-American women's literature.
The adaptation, in my title, of D. W. Winnicott's term "good-
enough mother," which characterizes the adequate maternal
nurturer, reflects my special concern with the psychological
implications of mothering in an oppressive and antagonistic
environment, particularly with regard to the race and gender
issues that psychoanalysis typically does not address.
Throughout, I examine not only the extent to which each text
approaches, but also the manner in which it complicates, the
traditional definition of "good -enough" mothering.

REED, GAIL S. "Clinical Truth and Contemporary Relativism:
Meaning and Narration in the Psychoanalytic Situation." Journal
of the American Psychoanalytic Association (Slated for issue
number 3 of 1995).

REED, GAIL S. _Clinical Understanding. Northvale, NJ: Jason
Aronson, 1995.
The collected papers by Dr. Reed on applied psychoanalysis
will range from such hard to come by papers as a 1976 paper
entitled "Dr. Greenacre and Captain Gulliver," published in
Literature and Psychology ; a paper entitled "The Antithetical
Meaning of the Term 'Empathy' in Psychoanalytic Discourse"; an
unpublished contribution to a 1984 panel on applied
psychoanalysis at the New York Psychoanalytic Institute entitled
"On the Discipline of Applied Psychoanalysis"; a 1983 paper on
Candide entitled "Radical Simplicity and Impact of Evil"; two
important articles in Psychoanalytic Quarterly one in 1981,
"Toward a Methodology for Applying Psychoanalysis to Literature,"
the other, in 1985, "Psychoanalysis, Psychoanalysis Appropriated,











Psychoanalysis Applied."
More clinical writings include "Rules of Clinical
Understanding in Classical Psychoanalysis and in Self Psychology:
A Comparison" ( JAPA 1987); "On the Value of Explicit
Reconstruction" ( Psac Quarterly 1993); "'The Transference
Perversion': Meaning and Narration in the Psychoanalytic
Situation" ( JAPA Forthcoming); and two cases describing the
uncovering of the unconscious meaning of the formal
characteristics of the patient's way of free associating: "On
the Communicative Form of Severely Inhibited Associations;" and
"On the Communicative Form of Profuse, Sexualized Associations."

SMITH, VICTORIA L. Loss and Narration in Modern Women's
Fiction Dissertation Abstracts International 55-08, 1995.
Order number: AAC 9500550.
This dissertation examines the relationship between loss and
narration in twentieth-century women's novels. I show that the
investigation and reevaluation of the figural and material
processes of women's loss enable a representational system for
women. Fictional narration of specific losses offers a way to
reconceive loss as a gain, by turning narration into a monument
to loss, a (re)claiming of history, even a seduction of the
other--woman or reader.
Opening with questions of feminism, psychoanalysis, narration,
and postmodernism in and through critical texts, I stress not
only how loss--a kind of dereliction--might be figured
differently for women than for men, but also how issues of race
and sexual orientation stand as blind spots in feminist theory
and in the literary debates around postmodernism. Turning form
these overtly theoretical considerations to their performance in
fictional texts, I discuss, in the second chapter, the
(re)telling of history and the creation of self in Toni
Morrison's Beloved and Gayl Jones's Corregidora In
chapter three, I read Virginia Woolf's Orlando through an idea
of autobiography, arguing that woman's history is only available
to her through the story of another. Woolf's writing enacts a
seduction and foregrounds an idea of language at a "loss."
Chapter four considers the rules of narrative structure and the
space that woman occupies within that structure through a reading
of Jeanette Winterson's Sexing the Cherry The following
chapter examines the rhetorical structure of narration in Djuna
Barnes's Nightwood Here, Barnes's narration acts as a mode
of (re)telling history for those who have been systematically
written out of discourse. The final chapter takes up an idea of
writing as performance and seduction in Bertha Harris's Lover
Overall, this study aims to introduce and articulate the
notion of melancholia with a difference--that is, to show how
narrating loss can be a strategy of resistance, empowerment and
recuperation.

STEWART, ELIZABETH. Destroying Angels: Messianic Rhetoric in
Benjamin, Scholem, Psychoanalysis, and Science Fiction
Dissertation Abstracts International 55-09, 1995. Order number:
AAC 9502302.
This dissertation uncovers the covertly analogical rhetorical
structures of Jewish merkabah --mystical theories of creation,
Walter Benjamin's theological historical materialism,











psychoanalytic theories of creativity, and New Wave science
fiction and "cyberpunk." The texts I examine are all
characterized by a speculative esoterism that foregrounds the
trope of paradox, of the "stormy" and indeterminate origin and
that insists on a rigorous injunction against images through the
ethical trope of the "face-to-face." The dissertation's
theoretical grounding is circumscribed by the thought of Walter
Benjamin; Gershorm Scholem (and his appropriation of kabbalistic
esoterism); Harold Bloom (and his appropriation of Scholem and
Freud); the psychoanalysts D. W. Winnicott, Marion Milner, and
Wildred Bion; SF theorists Darko Suvin, Fredric Jameson, and
Scott Bukatman; the radically "stormy" and "gender-troubling"
thought of Judith Butler; the apocalypticism of Derrida; and the
strong, ethically grounding framework of Emmanuel Levinas.
Binding the three parts--Jewish Messianism and Theories of
Language, Psychoanalytic Theories of Creativity, and the Rhetoric
of Science Fiction--together is their common use of irony and
paradox as a rigorous critical tool. The messianic rhetoric that
the dissertation attempts to uncover (while messianism
simultaneously makes revelation impossible) is presented as an
"alternate epistemology" (as regards the "dialectic of
enlightenment"), a "transitional area" lying outside of hierarchy
and thus also outside of the "oppressor/oppressed" dialectic, and
is, in this scense "positive." The psychoanalytic chapter, for
example, deals mostly with the realm in between the subject and
his/her other, a fluid space in which creation of the subject and
of the world occur simultaneously and which is the murky origin
of both ideology and ideological transformation.
My concentration falls on such "transitional areas" as source
for an "alternate epistemology" and on their ethical
implications. Reading Benjamin's work in terms of Relation as I
do and bringing texts from such disparate fields into an
oscillating constellation of relationships on a variety of
different discourses sheds new light on these texts while also
presenting a case for interdisciplinarity.

ST. PIERRE, CHERYL ANN. Short Stories: A Verbal and Visual
Process of Interpretation. Dissertation Abstracts
International 53-12A, 1992.
Norman Holland stresses the importance of the reader's
identity as a factor in the process of interpretation. This
study attempts to apply Holland's theory and method to the
analysis of responses to short stories expressed visually as well
as verbally.
The researcher (an artist) and a second artist were asked to
respond to selected stories by Virginia Woolf, Katherine
Mansfield, William Trevor, and Ruth Rendell. We responded by
writing protocols and by painting our perceptions of the themes,
main characters, and interrelationships of characters for each
story. In addition, both responders employed Hope Conte's and
Robert Plutchik's "Circumplex Model for Interpersonal Personality
Traits" (1981) to describe the personality traits of selected
characters from the stories.
Because Holland did not analyze visual materials, two
additional steps were required for this research. First, each
artist wrote descriptions of her paintings, based on Eugene
Kaelin's "Four Postulates for Phenomelogical 'Aesthetic











Judgment'" (1981). Second, each artist rated her own and the
other artist's paintings employing methods developed by Berlyne's
and Ogilvie's "Factor Analyses (P Technique)" (1974). Insights
about the responders' identity themes and their influence on the
process of interpretation of the literary works were also drawn
from psychohistories we wrote. All visual and verbal data were
analyzed using Holland's concepts of "Four Principles of Literary
Experience" (1973, 1975) and his "Dictionary of Fantasy" (1968).
The major findings of this study are: (1) identity themes
were manifest in both verbal and visual responses; (2) because
visual materials were analyzed, Holland's usual methods were
modified; (3) the combined model was useful for describing the
relationship between each individual's identity theme and the
visual and verbal responses to the fiction.

ZSCHOKKE, MAGDALENA. The Other Woman, From Monster to Vampire:
The Figure of the Lesbian in Fiction Dissertation Abstracts
International 55-08, 1995. Order number: AAC 9500559.
This dissertation establishes a topography of the narrative
construction of female, and specifically lesbian, desire.
Because fictional narratives and psychoanalytic (so-called non-
fictional) accounts often mirror each other, I present
psychoanalysis and literature as intersecting discourses rather
than prescriptive representations of separate realities. In
Chapter 1, I read Charlotte Br nte's 1848 novel Jane Eyre
against Rhys's 1966 "prequel" The Wide Sargasso Sea The two
novels together represent a paradigmatic moment of female
subjectivity and offer a model for independent female desire.
Chapter 2 expands further on the developmental options for
female individuation. Moving from Freud to Lampl-de Groot,
Deutsch, and Homey, I demonstrate the real difficulties of a
"normal" heterosexual adjustment for the woman, in
psychoanalysis's own terms. Chapter 3 analyzes the character of
the invert or butch as a contemporary form of female resistance
to compulsory heterosexuality. Beginning with the archetypal
"butch" image as incarnate in Radcliffe Hall's Stephen Gordon, I
move on to trace the type through Bannon's Beebo Brinker and end
with the story of Feinberg's Jess Goldbert. I argue that the
butch, as the most visible lesbian image, emblematizes the
strongest refusal of heterosexual patterning, thereby becoming a
powerful icon of female subjectivity and autonomy. In Chapter 4,
I read the lesbian as detective, a figure of assured self-
reliance for the Eighties and Nineties. Since the lesbian
detective can function not only as a rescuer, friend, companion,
and inspiring role model, but also as a potential lover, the
romantic aspect is central to the lesbian mystery, along with
other secondary plots such as coming out, familial rejection, or
internalized homophobia. Chapter 5 culminates the argument by
presenting the lesbian appropriation of the vampire narrative,
reclaiming the figure as an embodiment of lesbian pleasure,
sexuality, or endurance.
The dissertation thus claims "the other woman" as the
resistor, the untameable third term in the dichotomous
heterosexual economy of male/female, and shows that lesbian
writing creates a different narrative of female desire--
excessive, autonomous, and self-determined.











BIBLIOGRAPHY -- BOOKS


1. Aberbach, David. Realism, Caricature, and Bias: The
Fiction of Mendele Mocher Sefarim. London: Littman
Library of Jewish Civilization; Washington, DC: Distributed
by B'nai B'rith Book Service, 1993.


2. Abraham, Nicolas. The Shell and the Kernel: Renewals of
Psychoanalysis. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1994-
. of>

3. Abraham, Nicolas. Rhythms: On the Work, Translation, and
Psychoanalysis of Nicolas Abraham. Collected and
presented by Nicholas T. Rand and Maria Torok; Translated by
Benjamin Thigpen and Nicholas T. Rand. Stanford: Stanford
UP, 1995.

4. Alcorn, Marshall W., Jr. Narcissism and the Literary
Libido: Rhetoric, Text, and Subjectivity. New York: New
York UP, 1994.


5. Ancona, Ronnie. Time and the Erotic in Horace's Odes.
Durham, NC: Duke UP, 1994.
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