Group Title: House document 62d Congress, 2d session ; Document no. 271.
Title: Manatee River, Fla. Letter from the secretary of war transmitting, with a letter from the chief of engineers, reports on preliminary examination and survey of Manatee River, Fla., with a view to securing a depth of 13 feet from the mouth to Palmetto and Bradentown, and thence such depth to Ellenton and Rye as commerce may demand.
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 Material Information
Title: Manatee River, Fla. Letter from the secretary of war transmitting, with a letter from the chief of engineers, reports on preliminary examination and survey of Manatee River, Fla., with a view to securing a depth of 13 feet from the mouth to Palmetto and Bradentown, and thence such depth to Ellenton and Rye as commerce may demand.
Series Title: House document 62d Congress, 2d session
Physical Description: 17 p. : fold. map ;
Language: English
Publisher: U.S. G.P.O.
Place of Publication: Washington
Publication Date: 1911
 Subjects
Subject: Manatee River (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Manatee River
 Notes
General Note: December 11, 1911 -- Referred to the Committee on Rivers and Harbors and ordered to be printed, with illustrations.
Funding: House document (United States. Congress. House) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004578
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AAA5798

Full Text


62D CONGRESS, HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. DOCUMENT
Sd Session. No. 271.





MANATEE RIVER, FLA.



LETTER

FROM


THE SECRETARY OF WAR,

TRANSMITTING,

WITH A LETTER FROM THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, REPORTS ON
PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION AND SURVEY OF MANATEE
RIVER, FLA., WITH A VIEW TO SECURING A DEPTH OF 13 FEET
FROM THE MOUTH TO PALMETTO AND BRADENTOWN, AND
THENCE SUCH DEPTH TO ELLENTON AND RYE AS COMMERCE
MAY DEMAND.

DECEMBER 11, 1911.-Referred to the Committee on Rivers and Harbors and
ordered to be printed, with illustration.



WAR DEPARTMENT,
"Washington, December 9, 1911.
SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith a letter from the Chief
of Engineers, United States Army, dated October 25, 1911, together
with copies of reports from Capt. G. R. Spalding, Corps of Engineers,
dated April 15, 1909, and January 7, 1910, on preliminary examination
and survey, respectively, of Manatee River, Fla., made by him in com-
pliance with the provisions of the river and harbor act of March 3, 1909.
Very respectfully,
H. L. STIMsoN,
Secretary of War.
The SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.


WAR DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS,
Washington, October 25, 1911.
SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith, for transmission to
Congress, reports dated April 15, 1909, and January 7, 1910, with
map, by Capt. G. R. Spalding, Corps of Engineers, on preliminary






2 MANATEE RIVER, FLA.

examination and survey, respectively, called for by river and harbor
act of March 3, 1909, of Manatee River, Fla., with a view to securing
a depth of,13 feet from the mouth to Palmetto and Bradentown, and
thence such depth to Ellenton and Rye as commerce may demand.
The existing project for improvement of Manatee River provides
for a channel 100 feet wide and 13 feet deep from Tampa Bay to
McNeills Point, 5 miles; 9 feet deep on to Rocky Bluff, 12 miles
from mouth; thence 75 feet wide and 4 feet deep to Rye, 22 miles
from mouth; also a cut-off channel 100 feet wide and 6 feet deep con-
necting the river with Terraceia Bay. Under this project the cut-off
channel has been dredged as projected, a 9-foot mean low water
depth obtained as far up as Rocky Bluff, and a 4-foot depth thence
to Rye, this latter stretch having deteriorated, however, until not
over 2 feet can now be carried to Rye.
The district officer and division engineer recommend an increase
in the project dimensions of the channel up to Bradentown and
from Rocky Bluff to Mitchelsville, near Rye, and the construction
of a turning basin at Bradentown, all at an estimated cost of $100,000
and $5,000 annually for maintenance.
These reports have been referred, as required by law, to the Board
of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors, and attention is invited to the
board's report herewith, dated April 3, 1911. A public hearing was
held at Bradentown by the board, and while believing that the estab-
lishment of a regular line of steamers between Manatee River and
Gulf ports would undoubtedly be beneficial to the community, the
board is of the opinion that the commerce likely to be handled in this
way would not be commensurate with the cost of original construc-
tion and of future maintenance of an adequate channel nor sufficient
in amount to attract seagoing vessels as expected. It is developed
also that the project depth above Bradentown has not been fully
maintained at all times, which has resulted in inconvenience and
difficulty.
After a careful consideration of all the facts and information
available, the board concludes that the needs of commerce will be
fairly well met if the existing project is maintained, and that for
the present no change in this project is warranted.
After due consideration of the above-mentioned reports I concur
in general with the views of the Board of Engineers for Rivers and
Harbors, and, in carrying out the instructions of Congress, I report
that in the opinion of this office the improvement by the United
States of Manatee River, Fla., further than as already provided for
in the existing project, is not deemed advisable at the present time.
Very respectfully,
W. H. BIXBY,
Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army.
The SECRETARY OF WAR.

PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION OF MANATEE RIVER, FLA.
UNITED STATES ENGINEER OFFICE,
Jacksonville, Fla., April 15, 1909.
SIR: In compliance with department letter of March 8, 1909, I have
the honor to submit the following report on preliminary examina-
tion of-







MANATEE BIVER, FLA. 8

Manatee River, with a view to securing a depth of thirteen feet from the mouth
to Palmetto and Bradentown, and thence such depth to Ellenton and Rye as
commerce may demand.
An examination of this stream with a view to its improvement
was made in 1881. The report of the examination, with plan of im-
provement, was printed as part of Appendix K 25, Annual Report of
Chief of Engineers for 1882, pages 1319-1321.
The Manatee River flows in a westerly direction from its source
and empties into the southern end of Tampa Bay. It has a total
length of about 45 miles. From its mouth to Rocky Bluff, a distance
of about 12 miles, it is a tidal estuary, averaging about 1 mile in
width. The present head of navigation is at Rye, a point about 10
miles farther upstream. This portion of the stream is about 750
feet wide at its lower end, just above Rocky Bluff, and decreases in
width to 40 feet at Rye.
SWork of improvement beganon this stream in 1883 and has been
continued at irregular intervals since. Before improvement there
was an available depth of 8 feet on the bar at the entrance at mean
low water. Thence to Bradentown, a distance of about 7 miles, the
available depth was 7 feet. Above Bradentown the estuary was
obstructed by shoals having from 3 to 5 feet of water over them.
The available depth in the narrow portion of the river was about 2
feet.
The present project for this improvement contemplates a channel
100 feet wide and 13 feet deep from Tampa Bay to McNeills Point,
a channel 100 feet wide and 9 feet deep to Rocky Bluff, and a chan-
nel 75 feet wide and 4 feet deep to Rye, and a cut-off from Manatee
River to Terraceia Bay 100 feet wide and 6 feet deep. This cut-off
is from the north side of the river about 5 miles above the mouth and
enables the light-draft steamers plying between Manatee River and
points on Tampa Bay to serve the interests in Terraceia Bay, which
water opens into Tampa Bay, and avoid the long detour necessary
in passing in and out the mouth of Manatee River.
Work is now in progress under this project and the following re-
sults have been obtained: A navigable channel of 9 feet at mean low
tide exists from Tampa Bay to Ellenton, and this depth will have
been extended to Rocky Bluff as contemplated in the project within
six weeks, the present depth through the section from Ellenton to
Rocky Bluff being 7 feet; the cut-off to Terraceia Bay has an avail-
able depth of 6 feet at mean low tide; a channel has been dredged,
4 feet deep, from Rocky Bluff to Rye, but this channel has dete-
riorated until not over 2 feet can be carried to Rye.
The original estimate (1881) for the 13-foot channel from Tampa
Bay to McNeills Point was $70,000. This estimate was based upon
an examination, no survey in the general sense of the term having
been made. The act of 1882 appropriated $12,000 for improving
Manatee and Peace Rivers, Fla., and of this sum $11,000 was allotted
to the Manatee River. Owing to the fact that this sum was insuffi-
cient to complete the project, it was decided to expend the greater
part of the $11,000 in improvement of the channel between Manatee
and Bradentown, so as to permit vessels of 8-foot draft to ascend the
river as far as Manatee. With the remainder of the money a careful
survey of the river was made, and estimates were prepared for chan-
nels 14 feet deep and 100 and 200 feet wide from Tampa Bay to







4 MANATEE RIVER, PLA.

Bradentown and thence 8 feet deep to Rocky Bluff. The estimated
cost of these channels was, respectively, $304,038.38 and $564,413.10.
In 1903 an examination and survey of this river was made by
Capt. Deakyne, Corps of Engineers, and the results of this survey
and his recommendations, together with the recommendations of
the Board of Engineers, which, by committee, made a personal in-
spection of the locality and conferred with members of the boards of
trade of the villages along the river, is printed in the Annual Report
of the Chief of Engineers for 1904, pages 1749-1756. The recom-
mendations of this report formed the basis of the existing project.
The result of expenditures under these existing projects will be a chan-
nel of 9 feet from Tampa Bay to Rocky Bluff, 6 feet in the Terraceia
cut-off, and 4 feet to Rye. No useful dredging work can be done to-
ward securing a 13-foot channel to McNeills Point with funds in
hand, as no channel of greater depth than 9 feet can be maintained by
*dredging alone, unless continuous dredging be resorted to, which is
out of the question on account of expense.
There are nine post offices between the mouth of the river and Rye
and an estimated population of 6,000 people intimately concerned
in the improvement of this river.
There are about 25,000 acres of land under intense cultivation in
this section, the produce being largely citrus fruits and vegetables.
A branch line of the Seaboard Air Line Railway passes through the
Manatee section and connects by spurs several of the more important
shipping points, and this railroad has met existing water transporta-
tion rates. The Favorite Line of river boats operates two daily
boats between river points and Tampa, and this line has at Tampa
satisfactory transfer facilities with the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad
Co. Satisfactory transfer arrangements with coastwise steamers out
of Tampa have not up to the present been secured.
I am of the opinion that the extension of the projected 13-foot
channel from McNeills Point to Palmetto and Bradentown would not
cost a large amount of money, and believe that the benefits to the
entire Manatee River section would be entirely commensurate with
the probable cost. There would not, however, as indicated, above,
be any advantage in the extension of this channel unless steps are
taken to make a permanent channel across the bar at the mouth of
the river. It is also believed that a deeper channel is required from
Ellenton to Rye, and directing works will probably be needed to
maintain the channel.
Authority has been received from the Chief of Engineers to defer
dredging on the bar awaiting further developments.
Communication by small coastwise steamers to Mobile, New
Orleans, and other Gulf ports is earnestly desired, as a market in that
direction can be found for at least three-quarters of the exports and
at one-half the cost for transportation, whereas at present all ship-
ments by water and mostly those by rail have to be rehandled at
Tampa,. with a consequent loss in time and damage to produce.
Even in the present inadequate condition of the channel, effort has
been made to ship direct to the western ports by shoal draft coasting
steamers which are compelled to lie at anchor in the open bay to
complete loading. The effort continues to maintain such a line, but
with poor success and irregular schedule.






MANATEE RIVER, FLA. 5

Commercial statistics.

Imports. Exports.

Tons. Tons.
Palmetto....... .... ..... ............................ ............................ 5,712.5 10,109.9
Terraceia ............ ....... .. .......... .................................... 2,106.5 7.252.5
Ellenton.......... ... .. ......... ......... ...................... ................ 1,337.7 9.837.6
Rocky Bluff ............ ........... ................. ................... 3,000.0 6,455.0
Bradentown 1..................... .... ...... ... 4,592.8 1,662.4
Manatee (estimated)................................................ 2,000.0 7,000.0
Between Rocky Bluff and Rye (estimated).................................... 1,500.0 4,000.0
Total.... ................. .......... ..... .................. 20,249.5 46,317.4
1 The main distributing center.

It is estimated that about 40 per cent of the incoming freight and
15 per cent of the outgoing freight is by water.
The Manatee section is growing rapidly both in population and
acreage of cultivation. It can probably show an increase for the
last eight years of fully 10 per cent annually.
In my opinion Manatee River is worthy of further improvement,
and it is recommended that an allotment of $1,000 be made to cover
the cost of a survey upon which to base plans and estimates.
There are submitted with this report statements from the boards
of trade of Palmetto and Bradentown, and statement of C. P. Fuller
& Co., of Ellenton, and two joint resolutions of the above boards of
trade.
Very respectfully, GEO. R. SPALDING,
Captain, Corps of Engineers.
The CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, UNITED STATES ARMY
(Through the Division Engineer).
[First indorsement.]

OFFICE OF DIVISION ENGINEER, SOUTHEAST DIVISION,
Savannah, Ga., April 17, 1909.
Respectfully forwarded to the Chief of Engineers, United States
Army.
I agree with the district officer that this locality is worthy of a
survey and recommend the allotment of $1,000 for this purpose.
DAN C. KINGMAN,
Colonel, Corps of Engineers,
Division Engineer.
[Third indorsement.]

BOARD OF ENGINEERS FOR RIVERS AND HARBORS,
Washington, D. C., April 26, 1909.
Respectfully returned to the Chief of Engineers, United States
Army.
Based on the information now available, the board is unable to
reach the conclusion that this river is worthy of further improvement
by the United States. It believes, however, that to fully determine
this question a survey is necessary, and that its cost is justified. It
recommends, therefore, that a survey be made and estimates sub-








6 MANATEE RIVER, FLA.

mitted for the work required to secure a channel as contemplated
by the act.
For the board:
D. W. LOCKWOOD,
Colonel, Corps of Engineers,
Senior Member of the Board.
[Fourth indorsement.]

WAR DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS,
Washington, May 7, 1909.
Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War.
This is a report on preliminary examination of Manatee River, Fla.,
authorized by the river and harbor act of March 3, 1909.
Inviting attention to the report of the Board of Engineers for
Rivers and Harbors, in the preceding indorsement, I recommend that
a survey of the locality, as proposed, be authorized.
W. L. MARSHALL,
Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army.

[Fifth indorsement.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 8, 1909.
Approved.
ROBERT SHAW OLIVER,
Acting Secretary of War.


LETTER OF ASSISTANM ENGINEER F. W. BRUCE.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., March 15, 1909.
DEAR SIR: The river and harbor act of March 3, 1909, as doubtless you are
aware, provides for a preliminary examination of Manatee River."
The duty of making this examination has been assigned to me by Capt.
George R. Spalding, engineer officer in charge of the Florida district, who will
endeavor to be present at a public hearing at such time as may be convenient
to all concerned and best suited to an early completion of a report thereon.
In my report I am required to submit information in regard to the present
and prospective demands of commerce, its character and amount, whether
general or local, and its value. It is believed that your body, through its
organization, can secure for me the information better than I can secure it by
personal investigation.
It is desired that your statement shall first show the necessity, as it appears
to the people of Bradentown and vicinity, of obtaining a channel depth of 13
feet from Manatee River to Tampa Bay.
In submitting commercial statistics it is desired that the following items be
fully covered:
(a) The amount and value of water-borne commerce of Manatee River for
year ending December 31, 1908.
(b) The number of vessels and their tonnage at present engaged in commerce
on Manatee River.
(c) The amount of rail shipments to and from Manatee section for the year
ending December 31, 1908.
(d) The present saving in freight per ton of water over rail shipments.
(e) The ajnQunt of commerce, and its character, which will seek water trans-
portation in preference to rail if the improvement is accomplished, and the
resultant saving to the people.
(f) The number of wholesale or jobbing houses in Manatee River section and
the area of country commercially tributary thereto, what character of produce








MI-ANATEE RIVER, FLA. 7

does this territory produce and consume, and the approximate amount of such
trade in tons and its approximate value.
(g) The statement should also cover the growth, commercially, and the popu-
lation of the Manatee River section, the reason for its growth or nongrowth, and
a description of present transportation facilities.
When the statement is ready for submission, it is the desire of Capt Spald-
ing to be present and have it read in an open meeting of your board of trade
on or about April 1, 1909. In the meantime the engineering features of the
examination will be in progress.
An earnest cooperation of your body will add greatly to the probably favor-
able presentation and consideration by Congress of the wishes of the people in
your locality.
Very respectfully, F. W. BRUCE, Assistant Engineer.
The SECRETARY OF THE BOARD OF TRADE,
Bradentown, Fla.



LETTER OF JOHN W. JACKSON, PRESIDENT MANATEE RIVER BOARD OF TRADE,
PALMETTO, FLA.

DEAR SIR: Representing the combined shipping interests of Palmetto, Ellen-
ton, Terra Ceia, and Rocky Bluff, and replying to your letter of March 15, 1909,
relative to a preliminary examination of Manatee River, with a view to secur-
ing a depth of 13 feet from its mouth and thence such depth to Ellenton and
Rye as commerce may demand, and asking for other information upon which
to base your report, beg leave to report as follows:
PALMETTO, FLA.

Freight received for the year ending December 31, 1908:
Number of pounds, 11,425,135 (5,712.567 tons).
Number of packages. (Could not secure this information.)
Freight forwarded for the year ending December 31, 1908:
Number of pounds, 20,219,782 (10,109.891 tons).
Number of packages, 169,696.
Estimated value of outgoing freight for 1908 ($1.50 per crate), $254,544.

TERRA CEIA, FLA.

Freight received for the year ending December 31, 1908:
Number of pounds, 4,213,000 (2,106.5 tons).
Valuation of incoming freight (amount paid for freight), $5,106.43.
Freight forwarded for year ending December 31, 1908:
Number of pounds, 14,505,000 (7,252.5 tons).
Number of packages, 145,050.
Estimated value of outgoing freight, $217,575.

ELLENTON, FLA.
Freight received for the year ending December 31, 1908:
Number of pounds, 2,675,124 (1,337.562 tons).
Value of incoming freight (freight paid), $6,040.31.
Number of cars, 166.
Freight forwarded for year ending December 31, 1908:
Number of pounds, 19,675,266 (9,837.633 tons).
Valuation of freight (freight paid), $38,452.20.
Total number of cars, 836.
Estimated value of outgoing freight, $223,639.
Total outgoing freight for Palmetto, Terra Ceia, and Ellenton, $695,758.
BOCKY BLUFF.
Freight handled for the last six months of 1908 (the business was burned out
the first six months):
Received, 3,000 tons.
Forwarded, 6,455 tons.
Estimated value not known.







8 MANATEE RIVER, FLA.

The business for the first three months of 1909 will show an increase over
the same period of last year of over 75 per cent. This by reason of the fact
that the season has been much better and prevailing prices much higher and
a general increase in the activity of the business world.
(a) The value of the water-borne commerce on the Manatee River for the
past year can not be had at this time accurately, but it runs into the thousands,
and under more favorable circumstances, such as we seek, it would increase
100 per cent next year.
(b) The H. B. Plant, 125 tons; Manatee, 100 tons; Terra Ceia, 150 tons;
Morgan, 700 tons; Manteo, 600 tons; Favorite, 300 tons. (The foregoing ton-
nage is approximately correct.)
(c) Given at the first of this statement.
(4) St. Louis: Water, on oranges, 57 cents per box; rail, 78 cents; saving
21 cents.
Cincinnati: Water, 54.6; rail, 70 cents; saving 15.4 cents per box oranges.
Chicago: Water, 57 cents; rail, 83.5; saving 36.5 per box oranges.
St. Louis: Cabbage, water, 70 cents; rail, 98.4; saving 28.4 per crate.
Cincinnati: Water, 70 cents; rail, 90.5; saving 20.5 per crate.
Chicago: Water, 80 cents; rail, $1.11; saving 31 cents per crate.
This saving is given on a crate basis as all freight takes this kind of a rate.
As you will see from these items, the saving is quite considerable when it is
noted that almost all the shipments are forwarded by package.
- (e) All heavy freight incoming of any and all kinds. All the products of the
farms, such as tomatoes, cabbage, peppers, beans, potatoes, eggplant, and, in
fact, all shipments that will not require refrigeration.
(f) There are no wholesale or jobbing houses on the Manatee River. There
would be if the proper freight rate could be had. The area of country tributary
hereto is about 300 square miles. All kinds of vegetables, oranges, grape fruit,
farm products, fuller's earth, timber, resin, turpentine, and fish.
(g) The growth has been over 200 per cent in the last 10 years, both in
population and in commerce. The reason for this growth is the fact of having
a fine rich productive soil, good health, a pleasant climate, and other favorable
conditions.
We have the Seaboard Air Line Railway as the only transportation by rail
and some small boats now on the river.
In submitting the above statements, we wish to say that we have here the
Manatee River and Terraceia Bay, two of as fine waterways as can be had,
with the needed improvement which we are asking, a fine soil, a splendid
climate, and an industrious class of people. The people have done much to
develop the country and should have some recognition from the Government,
and we ask that a uniform depth of 13 feet be made from the mouth of the
Manatee River to Rocky Bluff, and that, if necessary, jetties be constructed
at the mouth of the river, and that further improvements in the river be made
as soon as possible.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Yours, truly, JNo. W. JACKSON, President.
Capt. GEO. R. SPALDING,
Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville, Fla.




STATEMENT OF BRADENTOWN (FLA.) BOARD OF TRADE.

Freight tonnage received at Bradentown, Fla.-Miscellaneous merchandise-.
Brick and lumber.

1908.
Pounds.
January ------------- -------- -- 597, 339
February----------------------------------- 1, 144, 843
March ------------------------------- 831, 202
April ---------------------------------731, 610
May --------------------------------- 221, 862
June-------------------------------- 136, 224








MANATEE RIVER, FLA. 9

Pounds.
July ------------ -------------------------------------- 433, 72
August ----------------------------------------- 504, 138
September---- ------------------------------------------.. 269, 566
October--------------------------------- 1,368, 787
November----------------------------------------------- 1,461, 062
December----------------------- ------------------------ 1, 485,338

1909.
January -- --.- --------.----- ------- 811,412
,February-- -------------- ----------------- -----441, 771
March- --------------- -------------- 803, 396

Total (5,621 tons) ------------------------- 11,242,282

Freight tonnage from Bradentown, Fla.


Vegetables. Fruit. Miscella-
neous.

1908.
January ...... .... ...... ...................--------- 49,770 74,335 76,227
February ......... .....- .............-- ......... 88,575 162,710 149,000
March ..... ................................... 3,520 140,320 598,242
April. .... ............................ 104,695 164,600 262,850
April=--------------------------------------- ------------------*----- 37,975 11,880 335,362
May ....... ...................... ................................... 37,975 11,880 335,362
Jun................... ................................. 19,040 700 19,490
July....... ------- *--- 57,611
Jly.................................. .............. ........................ 57,611
August ... ----------..................... .--.. ............ .--- .... ........ 49,538
Auguemt ----.----------- ---i-------------- ---"------- ----------- ------- --------- --.-.--- a2,0
September.....--- ..-- .................................---------...... .............. ..... ...... 420,201
October.. ...... ... ................. ......... 18,755 109,211
November ........... ---------- ----............................................. 69,480 137,530
December ...... .a..... ....................-............. ............a... 260,000 103,300
1909.
January..................................... 51,610 80,410 48,642
February ....................................................... 130,810 262,764
Febr ary .. . .a .-- *--------- *-- --------------- -- **----------- --------- 0 -76
March ....... ............- ......------........a.................... 503,390 82,000 39,000
Total..................................................... 858,575 1,196,000 2,668,968

Total tonnage, 4,723,543 pounds (2,3611_i4 tons).

Tonnage on incoming steamers for year beginning Jan. 1, 1908, and ending Dec.
31, 1908 at Bradentown Wharf.
Pounds.
January -------------------------------------------------- 463,333
February------------------------------------------------------ 528,14
March---------------------------------------------------- 542,419
April ------------ -------------------------------------- 383, 870
May --------------- ------------------------------------ 306,918
June ------------------------------------ --- 335, 766
July ---------------------- ------------------------------ 306,378
August ------------------------------------------------- 351, 114
September -- ----------------------------------------------- 315, 915
October-------------------------------------------------- 392, 580
November----------------------------------------------- 429,078
December------------------------------------------------- 395,446

Total (2,375z9A tons)-------------------------------- 4, 750, 957









10 MANATEE RIVER, FLA.

Incoming business by sail and lighter during same period.
Pounds.
155 barrels of oil, at 400 pounds per barrel------------ ------ 62,000
397 barrels of gasoline, at 400 pounds per barrel --- --------- 158,800
42 barrels of sugar, at 300 pounds per barrel ---------- ----- 12, 600

Total (116 -- tons) ------ ---------------------- 233,400

1,100 cubic yards of sand--------------------- ------ 3, 00, 000
1,200 cubic yards of shelL ----- --------------------- 1, 440,000
1,000 cubic yards of stone-------------------------------- 2, 800,000

Total (3,770 tons) ---------------------------------- 7, 540,000

Cords of wood_ -----.--------------------- 780
All of\the above sand, stone, and wood from upper Manatee River on lighter.

Outgoing tonnage handled by the Southern Express Co. for the year beginnng
Apr. 1, 1908, and ending Mar. 81, 1909.
[River office of Southern Express Co., Bradentown, Fla.]
Pounds.
261 barrels of iced fish, at 200 pounds per barrel- ---------- 52,200
341 boxes of oranges, at 80 pounds per box-------------- ---- 27,280
1,037 crates of vegetables, at 50 pounds per crate---------------- 51, 850
General merchandise in pounds-------- ------------ --- 1, 872

Total (67 tons)------------------------------------- --- 133,202
This office is not a receiving office.

Outgoing business by steamers from Jan. 1, 1908, to Dec. 81, 1908.
Pounds.
5,469 boxes of oranges, at 80 pounds per box_------------- 437,520
2,246 crates of vegetables, at 50 pounds per crate----------------- 112, 300
Hides----------------------------------------------------------- 19, 845
288 barrels of rosin, at 500 pounds per barrel_------------------- 29,400
70 barrels of spirits, at 420 pounds per barrel---------_------- -- 29,400
General merchandise in pounds--------------------------------- 216, 273

Total (422 5-2 tons) ----------------------------------844,738

Tonnage incoming steamers during the months of January, February, and
March, 1909.
Pounds.
January---- -------------------------------------------- 472,729
February--------------------------- ----------------------- 490,855
March ------ ------- -------------------------------- 401,445

Total (682 i29 tons) 1 -------------------------1,365, 029

Incoming business by sail and lighter during the same period.
Pounds.
41 barrels of oil, at 400 pounds per barrel _-- -------------- 16,400
102 barrels of gasoline, at 400 pounds per barrel------------------- 40, 800

Total (28 tons) ------------------------------------ 57,200

Tonnage by outgoing steamers from Jan. 1, 1909, to Mar. 81, 1909.
Pounds.
5,184 boxes of oranges, at 80 pounds per box ------------- 414, 720
1,517 crates of vegetables, at 50 pounds per crate-------------------- 75, 850
Hides-------------------------------------------- 6, 500
12 barrels of spirits, at 420 pounds per barrel---------------------- 5, 040
725 barrels of rosin, at 500 pounds per barrel---------------------- 362, 500
General merchandise------------------------------------ 54,198

Total (459MA tons) ------ ------------------ 918, 808







MANATEE RIVER, FLA. 11

LETTER OF THE C. P. FULLER CO.
ELLENTON, FLA., March 30, 1909.

ELLENTON DEPOT.
[For past year, ending Mar. 30.]
Forwarded.
Freight, 18,205,964 pounds ------------------- -------------$38,452. 20

Lettuce and vegetables ----------------------- -------cars 359
Clay ----------- ----------------------------- 416
Oranges-- ----------- ------------------------ do-- 26
Miscellaneous ----------------- -----------------do 5

Total freight-------------------------------do 806
Express------------------------ ------------------do 30

Total forwarded--- -- ------------------------do- 836
Received.
Freight charged, 594,437 pounds---------------------------- $6,040. 31

Crate material------------------------------------cars 26
Oil ------- ---------------------------- do--. 130
Miscellaneous------------------------------------- do-- 8
164
Express----------------------- --------------------do- 2

Total received ------------------------------- do-- 166
Fuller's earth mill was burned and did not operate during March, April, and
May, 1908. These three months were omitted and March, April, and May, 1907,
substituted.
ELLENTON WHARF.

Incoming freight.

1908.
Pounds.
January- -------------------- --------- 186,181
February------- ------------------------------- 170, 273
March --------- ---------------- 120,427
April--------- ------------------------------------- 177,490
May--- ---------------------------------------- 150,814
June------- ---------------------------------- 140,227
July ------------------------------- ------------------- 149,250
August ------- --------------------------------- 133,647
September-------- ------------------------------ -------- 213,449
October------ -- --------------------------------------- 219,783
November ---------- --------------------------------------- 180, 614
December---------- ---------------------------------------- 228,242

1909.
January----------------------------------------- 185,167
February-------------------------------------- 221,605
March. -------------------------------------------------- 132,092

Total--- ------- -------------- 2,609,261







12 MANATEE RIVER, FLA.

Outgoing freight.
1908.
Pounds.
January ----------------------- ------------- 68,340
February ---- ---------- ----------- 102,395
March--- --------------------------- 37,056
April.-- ------------------------------- 114,120
May --------- ------ ------------ ------------ 239,056
June ------------- ------------------- 217,375
July-- ---------------------------- 191, 295
August ------ -------------___ --- ------ 120,323
September ------- ---------------- ------- 146, 655
October------------------------------- 83,335
November ------ ------------------ 139, 600
December---- ------------------------- 9, 750
1909.
January ---------------------------------7, 000
February-_ -- -- --------- -------------- 4, 375
March --------------------------------4,065
Total ------- -------------------------- 1, 484, 742
Resolved by the Boards of Trade of Palmetto and Bradentown in joint meet-
ing assembled, That the United States Engineer Department, in charge of this
district, be requested to use its best endeavors to secure the authorization of
a 6-foot channel in the Manatee River from Rocky Bluff to Rye.
S. C. ConWIN,
Chairman Bradentown Board of Trade.


SURVEY OF MANATEE RIVER, FLA.

UNITED STATES ENGINEER OFFICE,
Jacksonville, Fla., January 7, 1910.
SIR: In compliance with department letter of May 11, 1909, I
have the honor to submit the following report upon the survey of
Manatee River, Fla.
The report on the preliminary examination of this stream ordered
by the river and harbor act approved March 3, 1909, was submitted
April 15, 1909. Attention is invited to this report for a history of
the improvement and the commercial needs of the locality as ascer-
tained at that time.
A survey of the mouth of the river was made in September, 1909,
and a sufficient number of borings were taken to determine whether
rock excavation would be required to obtain the proposed channel
depths. From the result of these investigations and the survey made
in 1887-88 a map has been prepared and is submitted herewith.
It is believed that a channel having an available depth of 12 feet
should be provided from Tampa Bay into the mouth of the river
and up to Bradentown in order to accommodate medium-draft vessels
plying the Gulf of Mexico and iMore firmly establish communication
between this river and the principal distributing points for the
product of the region tributary to the stream. The traffic on this
portion of the river has not materially increased. The improve-
ments effected have made navigation easier, but the limiting depth
of 9 feet at mean low water on the bar at the entrance has made the






MANATEE. RIVER, FLA. 13

use of the river impracticable for vessels other than those adapted
to the navigation of inland waterways. ,The lack of communication
with the important Gulf ports is keenly felt and has a most important
bearing upon freight rates to points in the Mississippi Valley and
a large portion of the South. Tampa Bay does not afford a secure
anchorage for the average moderate-draft Gulf vessel, and the trans-
fer of cargo from one boat to another in the bay off the mouth of
Manatee River could only be done under the most favorable weather
conditions.
Sixty-two borings were taken between Tampa Bay and Shaws
Point. Rock was encountered in only two of these borings at depths
of 13.7 feet and 14.7 feet, respectively. Numerous borings between
Shaws Point and Bradentown disclosed no rock, and it is believed
that none exists in this part of the river which will interfere with
the excavation of the channel proposed.
Bradentown is centrally located as regards the commercial inter-
ests of this section, and it is proposed to provide a turning basin at
this point 300 feet wide and 500 feet long. The present channel,
10 feet deep and 100 feet wide, between Bradentown and Rocky
Bluff is believed to be sufficient for the needs of this portion of the
river.
The recent work of improvement on the portion of the river above
Rocky Bluff has resulted in material development of the natural
resources of the country contiguous thereto, as is shown in the
following extract from the report of Mr. F. W. Bruce, assistant
engineer, who made the survey:
From Rocky Bluff to Rye: The recent work on this section of the river
has already increased the traffic to a wonderful extent, due to which there
have been shipped from Rye 3,926 railroad ties and 400 are ready for shipment,
with cutting in progress at the rate of between 300 and 400 ties each day.
Orange shipments amounting to 8,400 boxes have already been made, and it
is estimated that total shipments for season will exceed 15,000 boxes.
A store and warehouse is in course of construction at Rye, also a tram road
has been begun and will extend 6 miles into the timbered area.
As yet there has been no shipment of farm produce or truck for the reason
that farming has been in the past unprofitable with the then means of trans-
portation, and no one has been willing to go into that business until transporta-
tion is actually assured.
The above transportation has only been made possible by the recent work
of deepening the upper river. The lumbering industry especially never could
or would have been considered otherwise. A limited amount of rafting of logs
was done in the past, but no business in manufactured lumber. A small amount
of resin also has been taken out on small barges, and some fruit in small power
or sail boats, but nothing that might be called river transportation has existed.
In fact the expense of moving fruit has been so excessive that several orange
groves have been allowed to go to waste rather than stand the cost of proper
attention.
The progress in commerce and development is as follows:
Messrs. Tedder & Scarlet, now in the lumber business (shippers of the 4,000
ties referred to above), have in sight on their land 30,000,000 feet of lumber,
all of which must come out by the river. Two portable mills will be employed
and one stationary mill to manufacture this lumber at Rye, and a 6-mile tram
road will be built. Mr. M. W. Covington, a turpentine operator, produces about
2,700 barrels a year, about three-fourths of which is resin, a small part of
which has previously been shipped by water. He now has 800 barrels on hand
and waiting for river transportation. There is a prospect of 1,200 barrels of
spirits of turpentine the coming year and 4,000 barrels of resin.
A company is now being organized with a forest area of 60,000 acres, which
will require 10 stills to operate and will yield an output of 30,000 barrels
annually. This will go into immediate operation,
H D--62-2-vol 24--10






14 MANATEE RIVER, FLA.

The area tributary to the Manatee is very large, extending into the Myakka
River Valley, which is even now exporting fruit by the river. This area
includes some of the best land for truck farming in Manatee County and a
great impetus to that industry may be expected. The present orange acreage is
approximately 500, which will, it is believed, be increased to 2,000 within
three years if river transportation is maintained. An acre of full-bearing trees
is estimated to produce at least 500 boxes. The improvement has aroused an
astonishing amount of enthusiasm in the locality, and a power boat has been
placed on the line from Rye to Tampa, making bidaily trips and capable of
carrying 1,500 boxes of fruit.
In the report of the preliminary examination, previously referred
to, it was stated that probably directing works would be required at
certain points, notably at the entrance. This feature of the problem
has been given careful consideration and it is believed that while oc-
casional dredging for maintenance will be necessary, in the light of
results obtained by recent dredging work in this vicinity, the cost of
such work will be insignificant as compared with the cost of directing
works which could be depended upon for assured maintenance. It is
believed that the littoral drift at the entrance is almost a negligible
factor, and it is safe to assume that wave action in Tampa Bay does
not disturb the material of the bottom'below a depth of 12 feet. A
channel across the shoals at the entrance of 'the dimensions proposed,
15 feet deep and 150 feet wide, will, in my opinion, have such a de-
cided influence upon the direction of the currents that little difficulty
will be experienced in maintaining the depth required.

TERMINAL FACILITIES.
There is one private wharf at Palma Sola, the use of which is ex-
tended to all on equal terms. There appears to be no space available
for the construction of public wharves at this place.
At Palmetto there is one wharf of private ownership leased to a
steamboat company. Its use is extended to all on equal terms.
There is also a wharf at this place belonging to the Seaboard Air
Line Railway, the use of which is extended to all on equal terms.
There is public space available at this place for public wharves.
At Bradentown there is one wharf of private ownership leased by
a steamboat company, the use of which is extended to all on equal
terms. There are several wharves at this place owned by individuals
which are not open to public use. There is public space available for
the construction of wharves at this place.
At Manatee there are two wharves of private ownership. One of
these wharves is leased to a steamboat company and the use of both
"is extended to all on equal terms. There is public space available for
the construction of wharves at this place.
At Manavista there is one private wharf, the use of which is ex-
tended to all on equal terms. There is no public space available for
the construction of wharves at this place.
At Ellenton there is one wharf of private ownership, the use of
which is extended to all on equal terms. There is no public space
available for the construction of wharves at this place.
At Rocky Bluff there is one wharf owned by a corporation, the use
of which is restricted to the needs of the owners. There is no public
space available for the construction of wharves at this place.
On the upper river all landings are private, but the free use of all
is permitted to the public.








MANATEE RIVER, FLA. 15

ESTIMATE OF COST.

To assure a channel available for vessels drawing 12 feet of water,
it is believed to be necessary to dredge a depth of 15 feet at mean low
water from Tampa Bay to Shaws Point and to a depth of 13 feet at
mean low water from Shaws Point to Bradentown, including the pro-
posed basin at the latter place. It is proposed to make the channel
150 feet wide on the bottom and the turning basin, as before stated,
300 feet wide and 500 feet long. Side slopes of 3 to 1 are allowed.
The amount of excavation required from Tampa Bay to Shaws Point
is 245,000 cubic yards and from Shaws Point to Bradentown 181,500
cubic yards, which includes 26,000 cubic yards for the turning basin.
It is estimated that the dredging at the mouth of the river below
Shaws Point will cost 20 cents per cubic yard and the rest of the
dredging 15 cents per cubic yard.
It is further recommended that the present channel in the upper
river between Rocky Bluff and Mitchelsville be straightened in
places and widened and deepened so as to provide an available chan-
nel 75 feet wide on the bottom and 5 feet deep at mean low water,
dredging to be done to a depth of 6 feet at low water. This will
require the removal of 90,000 cubic yards of material, at an estimated
cost of 15 cents per cubic yard.

Summary of estimates.
245,000 cubic yards, at 20 cents------------------------------- $49, 000
271,500 cubic yards, at 15 cents--------------------------------- 40, 725
Engineering and contingencies, about 10 per cent------------------ 10, 275
100, 000
It is estimated that $5,000 will be required for maintenance, an-
nually.
It is my opinion that the Manatee River is worthy of further im-
provement to the extent indicated.
Very respectfully, GEO. R. SPALDING,
Captain, Corps of Engineers.
The CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, UNITED STATES ARMY
(Through the Division Engineer).
[First indorsement.]

OFFICE OF DIVISION ENGINEER, SOUTHEAST DIVISION,
Savannah, Ga., January 18, 1910.
Respectfully forwarded to the Chief of Engineers, United States
Army.
I am of the opinion that this river is worthy of improvement to
the extent proposed, and I think that the method of improvement
recommended offers every promise of success.
The key to the situation is the rapid excavation of a wide and deep
channel from the mouth of the river to deep water in the Gulf. The
dimensions suggested are minimum dimensions. The certainty of
success and of economical maintenance would be greater if the chan-
nel was wider,







16 MANATEE RIVER, FLA.

Excavation farther up the river, for the improvement of navigation
and to facilitate the entrance of the tidal wave, will be of distinct
advantage and will help to maintain the channel.
"The guiding and directing effect of a channel excavated in com-
paratively shallow water is remarkable, and my experience has indi-
cated that, if the channel was large enough to materially affect the
flow it will tend to improve rather than to deteriorate, unless it is
subjected to very adverse action due to shifting sands lifted by waves
and moved by littoral currents.
DAN C. KINGMAN,
Colonel, Corps of Engineers,
Division Engineer.
[Third indorsement.]
THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS FOR RIVERS AND HARBORS,
Washington, April 3, 1911.
Respectfully returned to the Chief of Engineers, United States
Army.
The existing project for the improvement of Manatee River con-
templates a channel 100 feet wide and 13 feet deep from Tampa Bay
to McNeills Point, 100 feet wide and 9 feet deep to Rocky Bluff, 75
feet wide and 4 feet deep to Rye, and a cut-off channel between
Manatee River and Terraceia Bay 100 feet wide and 6 feet deep.
There had been expended on this project to June 30, 1910, $150,060.80,
resulting in a channel 9 feet deep and 100 feet wide to Rocky Bluff
and thence 75 feet wide and 4 feet deep to Rye and a cut-off channel
as projected 100 feet wide and 6 feet deep.
The district officer believes the locality worthy of further improve-
ment, and he recommends a change in the project so as to provide a
channel of 12 feet navigable depth and 100 feet bottom width from
Tampa Bay to Bradentown with a turning basin at this point 300
feet by 500 feet and a channel 75 feet wide and 5 feet deep from
Rocky Bluff to Mitchelsville, near Rye, the estimated cost of which
is $100,000. To insure these depths he proposes to dredge to 15 feet
from Tampa Bay to Shaws Point, 13 feet from Shaws Point to
Bradentown, and 6 feet from Rocky Bluff to Mitchelsville, leaving
the present project depth of 9 feet between Bradentown and Rocky
Bluff unchanged. The estimate for maintenance is $5,000 annually.
The division engineer concurs in the recommendations of the district
officer.
On March 15, 1911, a committee of the board visited the locality,
made an inspection of the river from Bradentown to the mouth, and
held a public hearing at Bradentown, which was attended by about
40 persons interested in the proposed improvement. It appears from
all information now available that the water-borne commerce on this
stream amounts to about 25,000 tons annually, and that about 40,000
"passengers were carried by steamers to and from different points on
the river in 1910. This commerce is served principally by the Favor-
ite Line of Steamers, which operates several vessels, including three
steamers. Daily trips are made between points on the river and
Tampa.
Manatee River empties into Tampa Bay at its southern extremity.
It was stated at the hearing that the principal object of deeper water






MANATEE RIVER, FIA. 17

from Bradentown to the mouth was to make it possible for moderate-
draft Gulf steamers to proceed to Bradentown and establish a com-
merce between the Manatee River and Mobile, New Orleans, and
other Gulf ports, it being claimed that a better market could thus be
secured and at less cost for transportation. While some benefit
would undoubtedly result to the community if a regular line of
steamers were operated between Bradentown and points on the Gulf,
the cost of original construction and future maintenance of an ade-
quate channel for efficient Gulf vessels would be considerable when
compared with the amount of commerce likely to be handled in this
way. Experience elsewhere indicates that it is difficult to find suit-
able seagoing vessels of a draft of 12 feet, and that this difficulty is
becoming more apparent each year. Furthermore, the amount of
commerce available is hardly sufficient to warrant a boat line in en-
gaging exclusively in this traffic, and\ unless the service was regular
and at short intervals it would be of little value, as most of the
produce to be handled is of a perishable nature and would seek
Tampa, its present market or point of transfer.
With reference to the river above Bradentown, it appears that the
project depth has not been fully maintained at all times and that
inconvenience and difficulty have resulted. After consideration of all
available facts and information, the board has arrived at the con-
clusion that the needs of commerce will be fairly well met if the
existing project is maintained, and that for the present no further
improvement is warranted.
The district officer describes existing wharves and terminal facili-
ties, and attention is invited to his remarks on this subject. In
compliance with law, the board reports that there are no questions of
water power or other subjects so related to the improvement of this
stream as to render an enlargement of the existing project advisable
in the interests of navigation.
For the board:
W. C. LANGFIrT,
Lieutenant Colonel, Corps of Engineers,
Senior Member Present.

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