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Title: Picture alphabet of birds
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004436/00001
 Material Information
Title: Picture alphabet of birds
Physical Description: 8 leaves : ill. ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: T. Nelson & Sons
Place of Publication: London
Edinburgh
Publication Date: [ca. 1875]
 Subjects
Subject: Birds -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
 Notes
General Note: Title from cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004436
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA5829
notis - AJU4677
oclc - 29149922
alephbibnum - 001870000

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
    Main
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Back Cover
        Page 19
        Page 20
Full Text



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Age of Birds.-The blackbird lives twelve years, blackcap fifteen, canary
., twenty-four, goose fifty, heron fifty-nine, lark thirteen, linnet twenty-five, night-
.. ingale fifteen, parrot sixty, partridge fifteen, peacock twenty-four, pelican fifty,
Pheasant fifteen, pigeon twenty, raven one hundred, robin twelve, skylark thirty,
Ssparrow-hawk forty, swan one hundred, thrash ten, wren three.


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THE ALBATROSS.


Spread out thy broad and powerful wings,
And hasten o'er the sea;
What bird, 0 Albatross, in speed
Can hope to equal thee?


THE BITTERN.


In reedy swamp and lonely marsh,
Where all is shade and gloom,
The Bittern stalks, and you may hear
His voice in sullen boom.


THE COCK.


Hark, hark, the lively Chanticleer
His shrill loud clarion rings,
And struts about in all his pride,
And flaps his shining wings.


Quack! quack! quack! the mother Duck
Is waddling to her pond,
And chides her ducklings, whom she sees
In frolic play beyond.


THE EAGLE.


Upon the lonely mountain peak,
The Eagle builds her nest,
And there, when weary of the chase,
In silence takes her rest.


THE FLAMINGO.


His neck, how long! how long his legs!
Near five feet high is he!
And what a bill! And then how fine
His scarlet coat must be!


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THE KINGFISHER.


Only in far-off marsh and mere
The Grebe will build her nest;
Observe her tawny drooping ruff,
Her large and dusky crest!


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HUMMING


BIRDS.


Like winged jewels they dart and shine,
Their feathers all aglow;
And as they flash through air, their wings
Like sparks of colour show.


THE JAY.


Methinks the Jay's a noisy bird,
Yet now with crimson breast,
Silent and fond, she watches o'er
The treasures of her nest.


_______________________________________________________________________________________-


Upon the streamlet's reedy bank
The quick Kingfisher see;
Soon, soon within his long sharp bill,
A quiv'ring fish will be.


THE LYRE


BIRD.


In far Australian wilds this bird
Will traveller admire;
With upraised tail that takes the shape
Of graceful classic lyre.


THE MAGPIE.


From bush to bush, from bough to bough,
The chattering Magpie flies;
With wings of black and white, curved bill,
And restless shining eyes.


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THE NIGHTINGALE.



Of all the songsters of the grove,
The minstrels of the dale,
None has a strain so sweet and rich
As the famed Nightingale.


THE QUAIL.


When come the leaves and buds of spring
Then comes the swift-winged Quail;
But ever quits our western lands
Before the winter pale.


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THE OSTRICH..



O'er desert sands the Ostrich skims,
Beneath a burning sky;
Swift as the swiftest horse he runs,
But has no wings to fly.


THE PELICAN.



On river banks, on shores of lakes,
Or marge of sounding sea,
The Pelican, in quest of fish,
Roams uncontrolled and free.


THE ROBIN.



The Robin is our winter guest,
And trips across the snow
To peck the frequent crumbs our hands
Are well-pleased to bestow.


THE SWALLOW.



Now hovering on rapid wing,
Now down to earth, now high,
And circling round in airy ring
To chase the painted fly.


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THE THRUSH.


How gaily sounds the Thrush's voice
In liquid notes and fast,
As if to bid the vales rejoice
That winter stern is past !


THE VULTURE.



On rugged rock the Vulture waits
To scent its carrion prey,
When down into the plains below
It takes its rapid way.


THE WREN.



A tiny bird the modest Wren,
Yet pleasant is his song;
His little nest he loves to build
The hawthorn bowers among.


In far-off lands, neathh northern skies,
And on the surfy shore,
Lives the lone Xema, and delights
In ocean's thunder roar.


THE YELLOWHAMMER.



Who does not know this favorite bird
With spotted yellow breast?
Of moss and roots and hair, with skill
He weaves his curious nest.


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THE OUZEL.



The Ouzel is a songster sweet
As you could wish to hear,
And in the woodland echoes far
His note both rich and clear.


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