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 Front Cover
 Main
 Back Matter
 Back Cover














Title: Turning Sunshine into Gold Avalon Groves (including Purchase Contract)
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004169/00001
 Material Information
Title: Turning Sunshine into Gold Avalon Groves (including Purchase Contract)
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Lee, Thomas F. ( Preparer )
Publisher: Orlando Orange Groves Company
Manufacturer: Apopka Printing Company, Inc.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00004169
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Back Matter
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Back Cover
        Page 38
        Page 39
Full Text

TU1 NIwNG
SUNSHINE
INTO
GOLD


AVALON GROVES
























































J. N. Joiner, Ihe "Orange I'izard" of Orange Count), with an average income of thirty to
forty-five thousand dollars from his own groves, is the practical expert of Avalon Groves.


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WHEN we think of oranges, we think of sun-
shine, soft winds, flowers and palms. We think
of romance and unreal things because the turn-
ing of sunshine into golden fruit is one of Na-
ture's absorbing miracles. We seldom stop to consider the
economic side of orange growing and to understand that
this great industry is as profitable as it is fascinating.


The Economics of Orange Culture
An orange tree often begins to bear when two years old.
When 6 years old, a tree, under normal conditions, will
yield 2 boxes of fruit. Five boxes per tree may be expected
in the 9th year.
Older trees yield still larger quantities and a grove, prop-
erly cared for, will remain in full bearing well on to a
century. There are groves in Orange County, Florida, that
have been bearing 67 years and which are producing today
maximum crops of fine fruit.
An orange tree, under normal conditions, should pro-
duce a minimum of 600 boxes of fruit during its lifetime.
A low average value per box, over a long period, in
Orange County, has been $3.50.
These figures are based on production estimates ap-
proved by the Commissioner of Agriculture of Florida.


Heart of the Orange Country
AT LAKE AVALON-heart of one of the finest citrus dis-
tricts in Florida-perhaps in the world-are 400 ten-


acre grove sites within one great enclosure. Many of
these groves have been bought by local business men and
grove men at a price and on a purchase plan that has met
with local and general favor.
But the story of Lake Avalon Groves will be better
understood after more is known of its place in the
"Orange" County and in the "Orange" State.



The Golden Flood
THE wealth of Central Florida has been largely built
upon her great citrus fruit industry. The development
of her commonwealth, tinged as it is with the glamor of
romance, is founded upon very practical, serious facts-
statistics that tell a story of millions of unromantic dollars
flowing into the coffers of the State-into the pockets of
her people.
Florida was made for the culture of golden fruit, for the
growth of flowers and palms, for the production of the
beautiful things which Nature loves to bestow upon her
favored spots. The long peninsula points down into the
sub-tropics, with the Atlantic and Gulf on either side of it,
with 30,000 fresh-water lakes within her borders, and with
more than 1000 miles of coastline. The Gulf Stream-
soft winds that blow up across the Caribbean-great bodies
of surrounding water-these unite with latitude to give
that rare combination of warmth without heat, moisture
without excessive rain and floods of sunshine that are not
known in any other section of this country.

















Florida has been known for her citrus fruit, winter vege-
tables and luxurious resorts. For years her beaches have
been the playground of the rich, but today she is under-
going a great change. Her enormous interior resources
are being developed. Thousands of little farms and orange
groves checkerboard her surface. Beautiful cities have
sprung up. The State is well served with railways and a
network of paved roads, bringing remote farms in touch
with markets.
Florida has just passed through a remarkable era of
growth, during which vast capital has been poured into
development of every nature. The past two years have
probably added a billion dollars to Florida's wealth. At
the beginning of 1927 this State, with lowered taxes, no
debt and $18,000,000 surplus, leads most other sections of
United States in sound financial and economic conditions.


Orange County for Oranges
PROBABLY the first orange you ever ate came from
Florida and from Orange County, for Orange County
has been producing choice citrus fruit for nearly a century.
The County was not named by accident. The district
within its borders really is the home of the orange. Groves
nearly three-quarters of a century old are today bearing
undiminished quantities of fruit.
There is a reason for this long record of orange produc-
tion-there is a reason for Orange County's pre-eminence
in the citrus fruit industry-there is a reason why nearly


one-third of the financial returns for Florida's orange crop
come to Orange County. That reason is found in her roll-
ing hills-the ridge lands-covered with Norfolk Fine Sand
and underlaid with red clay, in the perfect drainage that
comes from these sloping uplands and from the warm even
temperature, winter and summer, that Nature has given to
this remarkable lake country.
Florida, in a recent year, collected nearly $20,000,000
for her orange crop-one-third of it came to Orange
County.


The Great Lake Section
SITHIN Orange County lie 1,500 lakes, one of them-
Lake Apopka-with an area of 80 to 100 square
miles acting as an effective frost guard.
Not more than 2 % to 5 % of Florida's area is orange land
-only 2 to 5 acres out of every 100 acres are suited to the
culture of citrus fruit. This gives to orange land a pecu-
liar value. The raw land in the ridge country is valued
at $200 to $500 per acre and the land planted to trees
takes on a value, when in full bearing, averaging $2,000
per acre. An acre of orange trees, properly cared for,
under normal conditions, will often pay 25% annually on
the $2,000 valuation.
Orange County has more than her share of this desirable
ridge land and the Norfolk Fine Sand which covers it, with
its underlying red clay subsoil, is said by citrus experts to
combine the needed factors which produce sturdy tree
growth and perfect fruit.
























































































Century old oaks festooned with Spanish moss


Sunshine and Springtime at Christmas time


Palms that bend to see themselves in mirror lakes
















Many Square Miles of Orange Trees
M ANY square miles of Orange County's surface is now
covered with orange groves. Today the greatest
grove development in Orange County is taking place on the
Lake Avalon tract, a development probably greater than
any other one single enterprise of its kind in the world.
The prospective grove purchaser is interested, first, in
the orange country itself. He wants to know that it really
is adapted to the production of oranges. He must be sat-
isfied as to conditions of soil, drainage, temperature and
location. But this is not all. The majority of grove buyers
in Florida regard such purchase as the first step toward
permanent residence in that State, County and Community.
Therefore, other conditions are of an interest almost equal
to that of soil, drainage and temperature.
F :;IF
A Network of Highways
HE thinks of highways because transportation has come
to be the most important factor in a community's
growth and prosperity. Over 700 miles of paved and hard-
surfaced roads in Orange County form a network of speed-
ways which link groves and farms, winter truck gardens,
golf courses, country estates, villages and resorts with
cities and with rail transportation. Florida is now a State
of good roads and Orange County has built its brick,
asphalt and concrete highways over its rolling hills, past its
hundreds of little lakes, through its lower-lying truck lands
to its farthest country home, farm or grove. Hundreds of


miles of good roads form one of the most impressive fea-
tures of this country of homes and orange groves. The
present program of road-building in Orange County calls
for the expenditure of 7 Million Dollars during the next
3 years. During that same time 18 Million Dollars will
be spent for good roads radiating less than 40 miles from
Orlando as a center.
Then comes the question of the civic center-towns and
cities, schools, churches and clubs, means of recreation and
diversion and withal, there must be substantial evidence
that an investment here will steadily appreciate in value.


Orlando
IN the center of Orange County has been built one of the
most beautiful cities in the United States. They call it
"The City Beautiful"-it deserves that name. Within its
limits lie 31 fresh-water lakes, clear blue sheets of water
around which have been built magnificent homes set in
palms, tropical shrubbery and great oaks festooned with
Spanish moss.
Orlando's citizens possess a civic spirit that has delib-
erately made its parks and streets and homes beautiful.
Here are churches of most denominations, fine schools, the-
atres, clubs, hospitals, excellent hotels and flourishing
banks. This city is the appropriate trade center civic
center of Orange County. It is now a city of 32,000 in-
habitants. It is a city of beautiful homes and a winter
resort whose population doubles each year during the
tourist season.










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Orlando will appeal to you as a supremely desirable
place to make a home. Its fine climate and beauty make it
one of the fairest residential spots in America today. The
resources of the surrounding territory upon which its pros-
perity is based, are rich and only partly unfolded. You
will find here the influences with which you would surround
your family. You will step into a wholesome outdoor life,
unexcelled anywhere, with a summer and winter climate
equally agreeable-equally delightful.
Having found that, wholly aside from orange culture,
here is a supremely satisfying place to live-you will be
ready to learn of Lake Avalon Groves.
The wide development and the beautifying of Orange
County and Orlando was not accidental, nor did it happen
overnight. Nature, of course, contributed an unsurpassed
climate, rolling hills, lakes, pines, palms, and oaks, sun-
shine and blue skies, but it remained for men of unusual
type to convert these things into wealth and usefulness and
to build a community throbbing with vital human force.
The men of this county and city have been and are today
builders. You immediately sense an unusual spirit of cre-
ative activity when you go among them. Their civic bodies
are sources of constructive energy. The leaders of this
community hold their leadership because they have dem-
onstrated their fitness.
In 1921 a group of thirty of the real leaders of Orlando
and Orange County determined to undertake orange cul-
ture on a large scale. In the group were officers and stock-
holders from nine of the eleven banks of the county-rep-


resentative business men, professional men, grove men-
leaders in State, County and City.
They knew that aside from personal gains that they and
every man in the county would indirectly but surely profit
from an enterprise that ultimately should produce a mil-
lion boxes of fine fruit. They knew that everyone in
Orange County must also directly benefit from the influx of
desirable residents who would come as owners of 10-acre
unit groves as they are made ready. They had still another
motive, namely, to maintain the supremacy of Orange
County in the volume and quality of its fine fruit. Such
a development would mean greater prosperity-more pack-
ing houses-greater labor demand-and perhaps $5,000,-
000 added to the annual income of Orange County people.
It was the broad view typical of Orlando and Orange
County pioneers that has built a County and City unique
in this country.
Being leaders and knowing that their participation in
such an enterprise would be regarded by many as an assur-
ance of its soundness and a guarantee of its success, they
spared no effort to secure a tract of land and a location
regarded today by citrus growers as one of the most
desirable, if not the choicest, in Florida.

3f A
Why Lake Avalon Tract Was Selected
T is important and of interest to know why the present
Lake Avalon tract was selected by these men-many
of them old and successful orange growers who had made
a fortune in the culture of citrus fruit:












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An orange tree in Florida grows best in Norfolk Fine
Sand, underlaid with red clay. This soil produces the
sturdiest tree growth and the finest fruit.
There must be both soil and air drainage.
Soil drainage is best secured in rolling land and per-
meable soils.
Good air drainage is possible only where there are hills
and valleys, because the colder air invariably settles to
the low levels.
Last, but most important, the orange tree thrives best in
localities of warm and uniform temperatures. The tender
fruit-bearing foliage and branches do not withstand con-
tinued low temperature. The heart of the Lake District of
Florida is one of the most favored of the State.
Two facts support this claim. First, the Reports of the
United States Department of Agriculture and, second, in-
surance companies basing their figures upon long years of
actual experience, write their policies against frost damage
in this district, at a cost far below that of most other sec-
tions of Florida.
To meet these exacting conditions, 4,480 acres surround-
ing Lake Avalon were purchased. The tract, so far as is
known, is the largest project of its kind carried on by one
corporation and within one great enclosure. It is certain
that the experience, responsibility and character of the
men back of it are not surpassed by those of any other
similar undertaking.
I have mentioned the three indispensable elements for


which these men were looking, now let me speak of other
important factors:


Location of Lake Avalon Groves
THE property is 18 miles southwest of Orlando. One
reaches it by automobile in about forty minutes over a
paved and hard surfaced road. Between Orlando and
Lake Avalon Groves and along this highway, is a pano-
rama of orange groves and truck gardens until one reaches
Winter Garden-four miles from Lake Avalon-the center
of enormous truck development-a thriving and prosperous
city of fine banks, churches, schools and business houses.
From Winter Garden to the property-a ten-minute drive
-the road is bordered with groves.
Tildenville, with churches, schools and commercial
houses, is but two miles and a half from the property.
Therefore, in the minds of these men, it was important
to have their property close to shipping point at Winter
Garden, close to Orlando and with ready access to
churches, schools, country clubs, commercial houses, pack-
ing plants and trading centers and to have it linked with
these by a paved highway.
Lake Avalon Groves surround Lake Avalon, in a section
of low rolling hills or ridges covered with Norfolk Fine
Sand and underlaid with red clay. Of course, this was one
of the indispensable requirements to the purchase of any
tract. Here, then, are 4,480 acres-something more than
4,000 acres of rolling orange land with scarcely a waste
acre, after the lake areas have been deducted.























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A Frost Curtain

IMMEDIATELY to the north of the property is Johns Lake
and some three miles from the northern edge of the
property, but still plainly in sight, is Lake Apopka with 80
to 100 square miles of water surface.
All about Lake Avalon Groves and for 100 miles to the
north, are these great bodies of warm water. Nature has
hung a curtain of warm air over this Lake section-a frost-
barrier 100 miles thick through which northern breezes
still carrying the sting of cold, seldom penetrate. Old
timers say that no serious frost damage has ever been felt
by growers immediately to the south of Lake Apopka.


Official weather reports compiled by United States Mete-
orological Observer, Weather Service Branch at Orlando,
for the years 1916 to 1920, inclusive, show that the lowest
average temperature for any month during that period
was 55.4 degrees in January, 1918, and the highest mean
temperature for any month during that period was 84 de-
grees in August, 1916. Winter temperatures, that is, dur-
ing a period from December to March, average about 64
degrees, and summer temperature, that is, from June to
September, inclusive, average about 82 degrees. A com-
plete record of temperatures and rainfalls at Orlando for
1916 to 1920 follows:


Year
1916-Mean temperature for the month............................
Total precipitation .....-...... .. ........... .........
1917-Mean temperature for the month.............................
Total precipitation ......... ....... .. --.-......------
1918-Mean temperature for the month.......-.~.....~..-.........---
Total precipitation .......... ----...-.-----.. --........--
1919-Mean temperature for the month.- ............- .............
Total precipitation ......... .......... .. ...... -....- -------
1920-Mean temperature for the month...---......-...-..............
Total precipitation ..................- --... ---....-- ---.....


Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr.
66.4 61.9 64.7 70.6
1.08 .63 .18 2.59
66.2 62.0 69.8 72.2
1.15 .99 2.31 .56
55.4 68.6 72.6 71.4
4.22 .04 1.68 8.24
55.5 60.0 63.0 65.0
2.99 4.75 5.00 1.17
58.01 57.05 61:05 67.00
1.04 4.85 .58 6.72


May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov.


78.3
4.80
75.8
5,78
75.5
2.11
75.5
10.37
75.00
6.67


80.8
6.87
80.8
3.89
81.0
5.37
79.0
5.19
78.00
5.89


83.2
7.61
83.4
2.91
80.1
12.29
81.05
1.1.09
82.00
8.49


84.0
5.76
82.8
8.15
82.2
3.24
82.2
5.45
83.00
5.35


79.8
4.93
79.5
8.77
78.8
5.92
80.1
2.33
82.00
13.96


75.2
4.26
72.9
3.55
77.0
7.25
80.1
.80
68.00
1.55


67.0
4.60
62.8
.19
66.8
2.30
73.0
3.99
65.00
3.62


There were two other lesser considerations-one, the
abundant supply of artesian water and the other, beauty of
location and surroundings. Lake Avalon itself, in its nat-
ural state, is a dream lake spread between low-lying hills-
a sheet of blue water shimmering in the sunshine and re-
flecting images of the great pines and oaks that grow about
its margin.


It is a fitting place for orange groves-for the turning of
sunshine into gold-for palms and Australian oaks-for
Lake Avalon villa sites where the bougainvillea, the hibis-
cus and the oleander justify the name of "La Florida"-
"The flower place."
This tract was chosen four years ago. When it had
been definitely selected and the original owners had finally


Dec.
63.2
3.09
56.8
.92
62.1
3.23
63.01
5.45
60.00
2.23


























































































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transferred title, then the group of thirty local men in-
vited thirty men from various parts of the United States,
with equal responsibility and standing in their respective
communities, to help them develop the property. This
made sixty men in the organization. It put back of the
project a force in money, experience and successful accom-
plishment such as never had been attempted before in
citrus culture. (See personnel of group, pages 26, 28.)
The undertaking called for the expenditure of hundreds
of thousands of dollars before anyone might be invited to
inspect the planted groves. First, the property was en-
closed with miles of stoutly built woven wire fence. Next
came the clearing of oak, pine and shrubbery; then the
platting or sub-dividing of the property into ten-acre grove
plots, boulevards, highways, parks and villa sites about
Lake Avalon.
Orange Boulevard, a 50-foot driveway running through
the property, and other drives have been beautified with
plantings of Australian pine, oak, palms, oleander, hibiscus
and bougainvillea. The streets or highways are so laid out
that each ten-acre grove faces one of them.


Artesian Water
AN artesian well 407 feet deep, provides water of fine
quality for domestic use, spraying and for use of
tractors.
With clearing, platting and roadmaking under way,
came the planting of groves. Then began the important


technical work of the orange grower. Most of the men
of the original group are successful orange growers or are
connected with some business dependent upon the great
citrus industry. They, therefore, knew better than to take
chances even in the early stages of this work. They needed
a man as superintendent whose ability and experience was
above question.
t A
A Practical Director of Development
M R. T. M. MINK, president of the First National Bank
of Winter Garden and a successful orange grower,
was selected as first superintendent of planting and grove
care. Upon his death, one of the most successful orange
growers of Central Florida, filled his place-J. N. Joiner,
also an officer of the First National Bank of Winter Garden.
Mr. Joiner for years has been known as "The Orange
Wizard of Orange County." His own groves return him
a net annual income of $30,000 to $40,000. His success is
based upon the belief that care and the proper application
of plant food are the most important factors in grove devel-
opment. He is doing for Lake Avalon Groves today what
he did for his own groves-namely, building sturdy trees
to produce maximum crops of good fruit.
Captain Joiner has planted standard varieties-the Pine-
apple orange, the Valencia and the Tangerine. Forty
years of experience have taught him that these varieties
give steady production from November to January, en-
abling him to take advantage of very early and very late
high prices. He insists that trees should be planted 25

























































































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'Luoking hebt acroB, Lwo miles of Young grove en A!alon.


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feet apart instead of 30 feet, thus giving to Lake Avalon
Groves 69 trees to the acre instead of 49. He claims that
the additional 20 trees per acre is the difference between
profit and loss. Avalon Groves today want for nothing
that money, effort and excellent care can provide.


Home People Buy Groves
THESE men undertook this project believing that when
it was completed, they would have 400 ten-acre groves
which would be purchased by northern people, but the
unexpected happened. As they began to plant, they found
many local buyers ready to take groves as they were
planted. These local buyers knew the men back of the
development and what they stood for. They knew the
property and the quality which made it ideal from the
standpoint of orange culture. They knew that surround-
ing groves were among the finest in Florida.


$47,000 in One Year
MR. J. N. JOINER now owns groves about two miles
from the Lake Avalon property. He was among the
first to buy a grove on the new tract. From his home grove
of 40 acres, in a recent year he sold $47,800 worth of fruit
and paid an income tax of more than $4,000. He bought
a 10-acre grove on Lake Avalon properties, because he
knows the management, the tract and the certainty of
results.


The work of planting Lake Avalon Groves is now stead-
ily progressing. The groves are now being sold on terms
which place them within reach of the man of even mod-
erate earning capacity provided he has a desire to save-
to lay aside the "nest egg" which will care for his later
years-or the man whose competency already provided,
wishes to build a dream home where fascinating work
may be combined with play.
The Orlando Orange Groves Company, Inc., as the orig-
inal group is now called, has worked out a plan of pur-
chase that has met with general approval:


Cost and Terms of Payment
IRST, the Company agrees to take care of the grove for
five years, assuming responsibility for the preparation
of the ground, the selection and planting of nursery stock,
fertilizing, cultivating, pruning, spraying, picking and
packing of fruit-everything that will make the growing
trees into a sturdy, producing orange grove at the end of
the five-year period.
Such a ten-acre grove is sold for $12,500 upon the fol-
lowing terms:
$3,b00 in cash and $300 each quarter until the end of
the fifth year. Price subject to advance without notice.

No Taxes or Interest for 5 Years
DURING the period of payment there will be no interest
charges on deferred sums nor will there be tax pay-
ments to be met-both of these being assumed by the Com-












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companions, returned from a Florida fishing excursion.


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pany, together with overhead costs. The remainder is due
at the end of the sixth year with interest for the final year.
Basing the estimate upon past experience, the net returns
to the grove purchaser from fruit in the fourth, fifth and
sixth years should be sufficient to liquidate this remaining
payment and relieve him from further cash outlay. Five-
acre units will be sold if desired, but at an added cost of
$50 per acre.


Insuring the Grove Owner
THE buyer who has made the initial payment of one-
fourth of the purchase price cannot lose in case of
death. If he dies with his contract in good standing, the
Company relieves his estate or heirs from further cash pay-
ment and takes the net proceeds of the grove to pay out
the contract. When these net proceeds are sufficient to
complete his payments, the deed is delivered by the bank
to his heirs free and clear of all encumbrances.


How Title Transfer Is Made
UNDER this plan of purchase, deed is executed upon
receipt of contract and first payment in the home office
in Orlando, Florida. A policy insuring title is then depos-
ited with the deed in the State Bank of Orlando & Trust
Company, with instructions to deliver same to purchaser,
when remaining payments shall have been made. Deed
and title insurance policy, therefore, pass immediately front


the Company into the hands of a Trust Company, from
which they may be secured at any time purchaser desires
to complete payment. This is done for his protection.


Company Care After 5 Years
AS stated above, the Company defrays every expense of
grove care, interest and taxes for the first five years,
including this in purchase price. At the end of five years,
if the grove owner wishes the Company to continue the care
of his grove, it will do so for actual cost plus 10% of cost.
Many grove owners will avail themselves of this provision,
because the Company management, with its experience
and with its ability to economically buy fertilizer, spraying
material and machinery and to effectively handle labor,
will probably do this work in a highly satisfactory manner
for much less than the grove owner himself would be able
to accomplish it.


A Community Brand
ONE powerful advantage contemplated from the grow-
ing and marketing of the fruit from this great tract by
one organization is the fact that the fruit being uniformly
fine, should be marketed advantageously under one brand.
The property should produce a million boxes annually. If
this fruit is carefully selected, packed and shipped, the
"AVALON BRAND" would soon be demanded even at an
advanced price, just as the "Blue Goose" and other brands











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are now highly esteemed and include much of the good
fruit of this section of the Lake region.

Brand
A 10-acre grove on the Lake Avalon tract, when in full


bearing, probably will return its owner
$5,000 net each year.


an average of


The following estimate was approved by Captain J. N.
Joiner, Superintendent of Planting and Care, Lake Avalon
Groves. Since the fruit from Lake Avalon Groves will be
made up of Pineapple and Valencia Oranges and Tanger-
ines, the price on the tree of $2.00 per box is 69 cents lower
than the average selling price covering the past 9 years, as
established at the Winter Garden Citrus Exchange.


Estimated Returns on 10-Acre Lake Avalon Grove


Grove
Age
1st Year......
2nd Year......
3rd Year......
4th Year......
5th Year......
6th Year......
7th Year......
8th Year......
9th Year......
10th Year......


Yield
in
Boxes
None


160
700
1,400
2,100
2,800
3,500
3,850


Average
Selling
Price Per
Box on Tree
$2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00


TOTAL.. 14,510


Gross
Returns
None


$ 320.00
1,400.00
2,800.00
4,200.00
5,600.00
7,000.00
7,700.00

$29,020.00


Production
Cost
Pd. by Co.
'I



$ 500.00
600.00
700.00
800.00
900.00
1,000.00

$4,500.00


Management
Fees 10% of
Production
Cost
None
4'



$ 50.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00

$450.00


Taxes
Pd. by Co.
it
t'


$100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
125.00
125.00


Total
Expense
None
it


$650.00
760.00
870.00
980.00
1,115.00
1,225.00


$650.00 $5,600.00 -


Net
Profit




$ 320.00
750.00
2,040.00
3,330.00
4,620.00
5,885.00
6,475.00

$23,420.00


AVALON GROVES, begun years ago as a project to grow
oranges on a large scale, has within the last two years
developed a recreation and social phase that is today at-
tracting as much attention as citrus production itself.
Under continued pressure from stockholders and grove


owners, the orange grove company deeded to the Lake
Avalon Country Club some 250 acres of land for golf
course, and 14 acres, including Lake Avalon Hill, as a
building site for the Lake Avalon Club Hotel.
Lake Avalon Country Club has been organized with


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prominent leading men of Orange County as its officers
and with 200 members selected from the most distinguished
residents of Orlando and Orange County.
The golf course runs southwest from a point close to the
western end of Lake Avalon some two miles over the high
hills of this section of the property. The course provides
18 holes with a total distance of 64 hundred yards. The
shot to the 18th hole is 75 yards across a neck of Lake
Avalon. The course is said to be one of the "sportiest" in
Florida, calling for the utmost of golfing skill.
The 14-acre Club Hotel site covers a high hill overlook-
ing the lake and most of the big property. On this site it
is planned to build this year a $125,000 club hotel.
Overlooking the fairways of the golf course 200 resi-
dence sites have been laid out. These, with the villa sites
about Lake Avalon, form the only home reservations that
have been made on the property.
The charter members of the Lake Avalon Country Club
become owners of the 200 home sites, the golf course itself,
the 14-acre Club Hotel site and the hotel itself. Each
charter member contributes $1,000 and becomes entitled
to his share of the profit as home sites are developed and
sold.
This membership is largely made up of home people.
A commodious and attractive Guest House has been
built on a nearby hill overlooking the Lake. This serves
to care for Lake Avalon guests until the Club-Hotel will
have been completed.


A boat-house with sail and motor boats is at the disposal
of guests at the present time.
A bridge and driveway has been constructed over
the narrow neck of the lake and broad roads have been
built about the lake itself
Lake Avalon Groves, when completed, will be served
by 65 miles of private roads surfaced with a superior qual-
ity of porous red clay, carrying enough sand to make the
material "pack" readily. This clay is not sticky or miry
in wet weather. It forms an ideal road surface and the
red color running between rows of green trees, adds an
additional picturesque quality.
The Club-Hotel crowning Lake Avalon hill overlooks
virtually the whole property. It is planned to ultimately
afford 100 or more commodious rooms with bath, ballroom,
lounge, dining rooms--all that luxury and comfort can
suggest for club members and guests.



Neither this nor any other story can give you a true
impression of the lake country of Florida, of Orlando,
Orange County and Lake Avalon Groves. You cannot,
from a printed page, gather the beauty of a winter's morn-
ing, when the sun shines down on miles of orange groves
with their dark-green foliage, when palms dot the land-
scape and flowers are everywhere. You must see the har-
vest of golden fruit to really appreciate the thrill that
comes with it and you must spin across Orange County
on one of its many paved highways to know the joys of


[221

















































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a perfect climate, a landscape made up of rolling hills, set
with lakes and dotted with clumps of pine and oak. You
must see the prosperity of these people to understand it
and you must come in contact with the men who have made
Orange County great to feel the spirit-the creative activ-
ity which they really represent.
If you have more money than you can spend, Orange


County offers an alluring playground. If you still would
lay aside a "nest egg" for later days, a 10-acre Lake Ava-
lon Grove will probably earn an income of $5,000 net each
year, when in full bearing. If you want to combine delight-
ful play with fascinating work, come to Lake Avalon
Groves, where golden sunshine, by Nature's alchemy, is
transmuted into golden fruit.




















iHome of senatorr Oler-reel t,
the right. \ice-pre-Ident of Ihe
Orlando Orunge (.rotse (ini-
pany


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Officers and Directors of the Group which owns and is now


developing Lake Avalon Groves Properties


JUDGE T. PICTON WARLOW
President ................... .Orlando, Fla.
Vice-President State Bank of Orlando
& Trust Company
Former Judge Criminal Court
Orange Grower

F. H. THING
Vice-President.............Kansas City, Mo.
Capitalist and Orange Grower

M. 0. OVERSTREET
Vice-President ..................Orlando, Fla.
Former State Senator
President, Overstreet Investment Co.
Orange Grower
J. P. HOLBROOK
Treasurer and Secretary..Orlando, Fla.
Director State Bank of Orlando
& Trust Company
President, J. P. Holbrook Co.

THOMAS F. LEE
General Sales Manager....Orlando, Fla.
L. R. PREWITT
Assistant Secretary
Secretary, J. P. Holbrook Co.
Orlando, Fla.
E. G. DUCKWORTH
Director ...... ......... .. Orlando, Fla.
Former Mayor of Orlando, Merchant,
Orange Grower
C. D. MILLER
Director ....... ....... Orlando, Fla.
Owner Wyoming Hotel
Director State Bank of Orlando
& Trust Company
President Lake Avalon Country Club


NIXON BUTT
Director ..................................Orlando, Fla.
Vice-President Orange Investment
Company

L. M. ROBERTSON
Director ..................................Orlando, Fla.
President Robertson Electrical
Supply Company

J. N. JOINER
Director....................W inter Garden, Fla.
President First National Bank of
Winter Garden, Orange Grower

WILLIAM H. ARTHUR
Chicago, Ills.
Attorney-at-Law
J. R. BAHNE
Sibley, Iowa
Publisher

CHARLES S. BATES
Exeter, N. H.
Shoe Manufacturer
W. H. Brokaw
Orlando, Fla.
Nurseryman and Orange Grower
C. G. BROWN
Orlando, Fla.
Owner of Men's Shop

S. J. CAMPBELL
Detroit, Mich.
Vice-President Lee & Cady, Whole-
sale Grocers
JAMES D. COLE
Kansas City, Mo.
President Arkansas Fuel Company


M, J. DAETWYLER
Orlando, Fla.
President Superior Nurseries

R. E. DUCKWORTH
Orlando, Fla.
Real Estate

G. H. EDWARDS
Orlando, Fla.
Physician

CHARLES R. EMERICK
Orlando, Fla.
Restaurateur

JAMES FISTER
New York City
Publicity Manager Lackawanna
Railroad

L. H. GEDGE
Orlando, Fla
Capitalist

CHARLES G. GREELEY
Boston, Mass.
Banker

S. KENDRICK GUERNSEY
Orlando, Fla.
Ex-Secretary Chamber of Commerce,
Ex-President Rotary Club,
Capitalist
HENRY M. HALE
Fitchburg, Mass.
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company
R. M. HAVENS
Kansas City, Mo.
Capitalist


W. J. HIGGINS
Racine, Wis.
Hardware Merchant

THOMAS HOPKINS
Orlando, Fla
Banker

H. W. JENKS
Washington, D. C.
Hardware Merchant

E. D. KENYON
Orlando, Fla.
Contractor
Director First National Bank of
Orlando
JAMES A. KNOX
Orlando, Fla.
New York Life Insurance Company
ARTHUR F. LANDSTREET
Orlando, Fla.
Proprietor Fort Gatlin Hotel
A. P. MICHAELS
Orlando, Fla.
Manager Orlando Utilities
Commission
JOHN McCULLOCH
Orlando, Fla.
Capitalist

GEORGE D. McCUTCHEON
Winter Park, Fla.
President Willys-Overland
Atlantic Company
ARTHUR McKEAN
Orlando, Fla.
Attorney








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J. S. McEWAN J. C. TEGDER
Orlando, Fla. Orlando, Fla.
Director State Bank of Orlando Real Estate
& Trust Company


Surgeon


I. W. PHILLIPS
Orlando, Fla.
President Bank of Orange

H. D. PIPER
Boston, Mass.
Manufacturer of Leather Goods,
Orange Grower

W. E. FLOWER
Orlando, Fla.
Real Estate

JAMES R. ROUNDING
W. Roxbury, Mass.
Manufacturer

J. H. SADLER
Oakland, Fla.
President Bank of Oakland

B. G. SMITH
Oviedo, Fla.
President Bank of Oviedo,
Orange Grower

L. W. SMITH
Racine, Wis.
Real Estate

S. V. STRALEY
Orlando, Fla.
Capitalist and Orange Grower

C. G. SUTLIFF
Lockport, N. Y.
Capitalist


W. L. TILDEN
Orlando, Fla.
Director Bank of Orange,
County Solicitor

W. D. WAY
Insurance
Orlando, Fla.

S. Y. WAY
Orlando, Fla.
Owner San Juan Hotel
President Board of Education

N. P. YOWELL
Orlando, Fla.
President Yowell-Drew Company

MRS. IDA Y. BABCOCK
Lockport, N. Y.
MRS. HARRIET C. HOLDEN
Orlando, Fla.
MRS. KATE MAHOOD
Princeton, West Va.
MRS. GERTRtDE MINK
Winter Garden, Fla.
MISS LYDIA A. OLIVER
Kansas City, Mo.
L. S. PEDERSEN
Racine, Wis.
MRS. RUTH T. SMALL
Nashville, Tenn.
FRANK N. STENGLE
Daytona Beach, Fla.
MISS EVA L. YOUNG
Orlando, Fla.


from

Lake Avalon Groves


85
63
173
125
210
93
1772
1430
1264
1382
1162
1382
1162
1479
936
1381


miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
miles
miles


to Daytona
to DeLand
to Jacksonville
to St. Petersburg
to Palm Beach
to Tampa
to Minneapolis
to Boston
to Chicago
to Kansas City
to Chicago
to Kansas City
to New York
to Portland, Maine
to Washington, D. C.
to Buffalo, N. Y.















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REVISED TABLE


Grove
Age
1st Year ....
2nd Year .....
3rd Year ....-
4th Year......
5th Year...-..
6th Year....
7th Year-.....
8th Year.....-
9th Year......
10th Year.....-


TOTAL 14,670


Yield
in
Boxes
None



320
700
1,400
2,100
2,800
3,500
3,850


Average
Selling *
Price Per
Box on Tree
$2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00


Gross
Returns
None



$ 640.00
1,400.00
2,800.00
4,200.00
5,600.00
7,000.00
7,700.00

$29,340.00


Production
Cost
Pd. by Co.
it




$ 600.00
700.00
800.00
900.00
1,000.00

$4,000.00


Management
Fees 10% of
Production
Cost
None
it




$ 60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00

$400.00


Taxes
Pd. by Co.
it




$100.00
100.00
100.00
125.00
125.00

$550.00


Total
Expense
None

"



$760.00
870.00
980.00
1,115.00
1,225.00

$4,950.00


Net
Profit




$ 640.00
1,400.00
2,040.00
3,330.00
4,620.00
5,885.00
6,475.00

$24,390.00












CONTRACT FOR PURCHASE AND CARE OF

LAKE AVALON GROVES







THIS CONTRACT AND AGREEMENT, made and entered into this........day of.....................---

A. D. 19......., between ORLANDO ORANGE GROVES COMPANY, a corporation organized and

existing under and by virtue of the laws of the State of Florida, whose place of business is Orlando,

Florida, hereinafter called the Company, party of the first part, and.----...-----.............--.--





State of -------------....... --------- ........ ................. -- --- ---- -------------
State of ----- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------





hereinafter called the purchaser....., part ..... of the second part.

WITNESSETH, that if the said purchaser......shall first make the payments and perform the

covenants hereinafter mentioned on............part to be made and performed, the said Company here-

by covenants and agrees to convey and assure to the said Purchaser...... in fee simple, clear of all

incumbrances, by a good and sufficient warranty deed, Tract Number........................................... in

Section................................. of Township 23, South, Range 27 East, of the Orlando Orange Groves

Company's property, being and containing....................acres more or less, as shown by the plat filed

in Orange County records.

For the like consideration and on the like condition the company hereby further covenants and

agrees that upon the execution of this agreement, it will deposit in escrow in the STATE BANK OF

ORLANDO AND TRUST COMPANY, Orlando, Florida, a good and sufficient warranty deed con-

veying the property to the purchaser......in fee simple, and also a Title Guaranty Policy of Insurance

on the title of said property issued by the Fidelity Title and Loan Company, said deed to be deliv-

ered to the purchaser......at the time full payment shall have been made as hereinafter provided-

That the Company will clear at its sole expense, in a thorough manner, the above land and wilE

plant the same in a citrus grove containing approximately seventy (70) trees to the acre------..............



at as early a date after the execution of this agreement as is consistent with good.husbandry, and

will replace any trees that may die in the planting, and that it will cultivate, spray, fertilize and

otherwise care for the said property as planted in a first class manner, and in accordance with the

best methods, for five years from the date of planting.......................................... 19....










The Purchaser....agree...., in consideration of the said covenants of the Company, that.............

will pay the Com pany the sum of....... ............ .. ................ ................................... Dollars

for the said property, payable as follows:

.. ................................................................... .------------------------ Dollars

upon the execution and delivery of this agreement. .... ........................----- ---------





Dollars, payable in............-------------.. ......................----------------- installments of

....... ---..... --...-.........- ---.- ------------------- -...Dollars each, and



................................ .... Dollars, payable.................... ...........


after date hereof, all of which deferred payments shall be evidenced by the promissory notes of the
Purchaser....without interest until after maturity, except the said note for.......... ................
Dollars, which shall begin to bear interest at the rate of six (6%) per cent. per annum at the end of
five years after its date, said note to be secured by mortgage on above described property.
It is further mutually agreed, contracted and covenanted as follows:
That all fruit grown during the fourth and fifth years on the above land is to be the property
of the Purchaser so long as he is not in default in his payments under this contract. The Company
will market same at cost, plus a service charge of ten per cent., and the net proceeds applied upon
the said last paym ent of................ ..................... .................... .. ....................................... ......................
That the said land shall not hereafter be sold to a person of either African or Mongolian de-
scent, and that this restriction be placed in any deed by which said land may hereafter be conveyed
by either the Company or the Purchaser. The Purchaser further agrees not to sell or assign this
contract to any person of African or Mongolian descent. This covenant shall run with the land.
That the Purchaser shall not sell, assign or transfer this contract before the said land is fully
paid for without the written consent of the Company.
That in case of the failure of the Purchaser to make either or any of the payments above pro-
vided for, or any part thereof, or to perform any of the covenants on his part hereby made and en-
tered into, and the continuance of such default for thirty days, this contract shall at the option of
the Company, be forfeited and terminated, and thereupon all right, title or interest of the Pur-
chaser, either legal or equitable, in said land shall cease and determine, and the purchaser shall
forfeit all payments theretofore made by him on this contract; and such payments shall be retained
by the Company, not as a penalty, but as and for liquidated damages for the breach of contract, and
such retention shall be in full satisfaction and in liquidation of all damages by the Company sus-
tained. Failure to exercise this option at the time of any default shall not operate as a waiver of
the right to exercise such option at any time thereafter. It is agreed that a registered letter ad-
dressed to the Purchaser at the Postoffice first named above as the Purchaser's address, giving four-
teen days' notice of the exercise of such option shall be sufficient notice.
It is further understood and agreed that in all cases herein when the words "Purchaser" or
"He" are used, indicating the singular number, that the same shall be held to include two or more
as the case may be; and when two or more subscribe to this agreement, and when the pronouns
"He", "Him" or "His" are used, the same shall be held to include "They", "Them", "Her" or "It",
as the case may be.
It is mutually agreed that this instrument contains the entire contract of the parties hereto, and
the party of the first part makes no representations of warranties whatsoever, express or implied,
either in fact or in law; nor is the said party of the first part in any way bound by or liable for any
representations, agreements or statements, oral or written, not contained herein, made by any agent
or person in effecting a sale of the property herein described.











It is further agreed that if the purchaser dies any time after making the one-fourth cash pay-
ment and his contract is in good standing, the Company relieves his estate or heirs from further
cash payments and takes the net proceeds of the fruit returns of the grove to pay out the contract,
whereupon deed is delivered by the Bank to his heirs free and clear of all incumbrances.
It is further mutually agreed by and between the parties hereunto that the time of payment
shall be an essential part of this contract, and that all covenants and agreements herein contained
shall extend to and be obligatory upon the heirs, executors, administrators, successors and assigns
of the respective parties hereto equally with themselves.
That the Company shall retain possession of the property and shall pay all taxes thereon for a
period of five years from date of planting, ................................19.....
Throughout this agreement, time shall be of the essence thereof, and the Company is hereby
exempted from any and all liability from the acts of God or the public enemy.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, ORLANDO ORANGE GROVES COMPANY has caused these
presents to be executed in duplicate and its corporate seal to be hereunto affixed by its Secretary or
Treasurer, and the part...... of the second part ha ..... hereunto set ..............- hand...... and seal.....
the date and year first above written.

ORLANDO ORANGE GROVES COMPANY


By.............................. .........................
Witnesses as to the Company. Secretary-Treasurer.


Purchaser.


Witnesses as to the Purchaser.








PURCHASE CONTRACT


ORLANDO ORANGE GROVES CO.
LAKE AVALON GROVES


TO


Apopka Printing Company, Apopka, Florida









































































Prepared by
THOMAS F. LEE

Printed by
APOPKA PRINTING COMPANY, Inc.
Town of Apopka, Orange County




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