Title: Alachua County Florida Supreme in Agriculture and Sock Raising
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 Material Information
Title: Alachua County Florida Supreme in Agriculture and Sock Raising
Physical Description: Book
Publication Date: 1917
Copyright Date: 1917
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004152
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6316

Full Text


Alachua
Count
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SUPREME
IN
AGRICULTURE
AND

RAISING
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SUPREME
IN
AGRICULTURE
AND
STOCK
RAISING
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ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA, IS A GOOD PLACE IN WHICH TO LIVE

All sorts of truck crops, farm products, chickens, hogs and cattle can be raised and marketed at a good profit


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PURE BRED ANGUS CATTLE
Another step toward the improvement of the native stock


COMMISSIONERS, ALACHUA COUNTY

W. E. BRYANT, Gainesville, Florida
J. T. PRICE, High Springs, Florida
G. H. GIBBONS, Archer, Florida
W. F. GAY, Trenton, Florida
J. H. DYESS, Campville, Florida


S. H. WIENGES, Clerk of Circuit Court, Alachua County
Gainesville, Florida


Alachua County won the First Premium of $500.00,
a Loving Cup and a Diploma for the Best County Ex-
hibit, at the Florida State Fair and Exposition in 1917.







Alachua County, Florida

Is Supreme in Agriculture and Stock Raising
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NATIVE CATTLE ARE CONSTANTLY BEING IMPROVED, WITH PAYING RESULTS


HIS booklet has been issued by the
County Commissioners of Alachua
County, Florida, with the idea of giv-
ing the reader accurate and trustworthy in-
formation as to the possibilities of this sec-
tion of the State. Special care has been
used in making conservative statements of
actual conditions and only such information
as can be confirmed and strengthened by
actual investigation, is given. It is the pur-
pose to give you as a prospective land owner
and settler a fair idea of what you may ex-
pect in living conditions if you decide to
make this county your home.
Alachua County is in the very heart of
Florida. Its western limits are forty miles
from the Gulf of Mexico, and its eastern
limits fifty miles from the Atlantic Ocean.
Gainesville, the county seat, is seventy miles
from Jacksonville, on the main line of the
Seaboard Air Line Railway and the Atlantic


Coast Line Railway. It also has a western
outlet for transportation over the Tampa
and Jacksonville Railway and the Georgia
Southern and Florida Railway.
The county is fifty miles wide east and
west by forty miles north and south, and
contains 1,283 square miles, or about 851,120
acres of land. It is one of the largest coun-
ties in the State and also one of the wealth-
iest and most populous.
It is in the forefront of agricultural de-
velopment; with natural conditions of soil
and climate, it has in the past decade devoted
its energies largely to staple farming and
livestock. Its farmers have long since put
aside the folly of speculative crops and their
accumulations of wealth have come steadily
and on a basis of permanency.
The increase in population of the past
few years has not been of the "boom" char-
acter. Those moving into this county will







ALACHUA


COUNTY,


FLOR IDA


HAY AND VELVET BEANS
Forage crops produce abundantly with little care


find neighbors of the steady, far-seeing class
who have chosen their homes and conditions
of life because of a desire to live under there
best of environments and where success is
within reach of the industrious.
Our purpose in issuing this booklet is to
secure your interest in Alachua County and
be the means of your making a personal in-
vestigation of its lands before you invest
your money. There are no land development
companies operating here to give you glow-
ing accounts of fabulous profits from a few
acres of land. You will find the land owned
by individuals, some of whom are willing to
sell at reasonable price. We want the man
to settle in our midst who has business judg-
ment enough to buy his land only after per-
sonal investigation and who has the ability
to make a success of what he buys. We want
the man who has made farming his business
and knows how to become a producer.


Contrary to the usual custom in the prep-
aration of information of various communi-
ties seeking the attention of the homeseeker
and investor, we have not given extended
statistics as to soil, rainfall and climate, but
simply cite the reader to the fact that at
Gainesville, the county seat of Alachua
County, the United States Agricultural Ex-
periment Station is located; it is evident
therefore that the site was chosen by the
government because the conditions of climate
and soil were the best.
A visit to this section will soon convince
the skeptical and it will be the especial priv-
ilege of the Board of County Commissioners
to fully corroborate the statement that the
lands of Alachua County afford unusual op-
portunities for farming and stock raising.
It is a well known and oft stated truism
that Florida has more growing days than
any other state in the Union. The farmer
has a decided advantage over those of other


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ALACHUA


CO UNTY,


FLORIDA


REGISTERED JERSEY COWS AND HEIFERS
The Alachua County farmer is among the most progressive


sections in that his land can be kept con-
stantly productive by the rotation of crops.
While land further south ranges high in
price, good property may now be had in
Alachua County at from $10 to $50 per
acre, depending upon location and improve-
ment. As this section is developed as it is
destined to be, prices will advance. Your
opportunity is now.
One question that must naturally come to
the mind of the reader who has not traveled
in Florida and who does not know all the
conditions of its development, is: If land is


so cheap and so much of it is available in
Florida, can all they say about it be true?
There is an answer to this query that is
readily arrived at by the student of land con-
ditions in this State. Up to a few years ago
and even now in some sections, the land has
been held by large turpentine operators,
saw mill and other industries, whose business
it was to take from the land its trees and
natural deposits, and who cared little for the
use of the soil and putting back into it the
labor to improve it. These companies made
their money by utilizing what the land it-


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self through the years had produced
for them, and they have come in late
years to the place where they see the
exhaustion of these natural supplies,
thus these large acreages have lately
been put upon the market and the
farmer has his opportunity.
Following the advice of the govern-
ment experts the native farmer has
been led to the planting of forage
crops, the raising of livestock and in-
tensive farming for northern markets,
and his success has attracted the suc-
cessful farmer of other sections not en-
joying the same climatic conditions and
long growing season. This influx of
new life and improved farming ma-
chinery has demonstrated to the world
that the Florida farmer is destined to
take a place in the forefront of wealth
producers of this great country. Here
he can raise his garden crops, have his
peach, orange or pecan orchard, raise
his forage and pasture his cattle the
year round on land that can be had at
moderate cost, and if necessary upon
easy terms. A comparatively small
investment in land will give him the
needed acreage.
The school advantages of Alachua
County are exceptionally good and lib-
erally provided for. The University of
Florida, the State institution for the
higher education of young men, is lo-
cated at Gainesville, the county seat.
This college is one of the best equipped,
in buildings and faculty, in the United
States and offers technical training as
well as literary studies. It has a large
attendance and every advantage for the
thorough development of young men.
The public school system is closely al-
lied to it; the two combined affording
exceptional advantages along educa-
tional lines.


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The Seaboard Air Line Railway and the Atlantic Coast
Line Railway have a network of roads traversing the
county, giving to all sections ample transportation facilities
north, east, south and west. The Tampa and Jacksonville
Railway, running from Sampson City in Bradford County
to Fairfield in Marion County through Gainesville, also bids
fair to be a system of importance.
The U. S. Government has made a topographical sur-
vey of the Gainesville area only, but this survey is known to


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show the highest point in the county, which is 200 feet above
sea level. This point is in the San Felaska hammock.
Gainesville is 178 feet above the sea level, while the great
Payne's Prairie (or Alachua Lake), three miles south, is
only 60 feet above sea level. From Gainesville south, west
and northwest, the country is hilly, and greatly resembles
some portions of Kentucky. There are some swampy lands
in the county, but on account of their high sea level, they
can all be easily drained.


Churches of all denominations are
scattered over the county and have
been large factors in making this a dry
territory and keeping it free from the
moral disadvantages of the open saloon
and its attendant evils. For many
years this county has been without the
saloon and was one of the first in the
State to vote dry.
Alachua County is dotted with
many thriving business centers. In the
w western portion the towns of Bell,
Tren ton, and Newberry are within
easy access of the farmers of that sec-
tion; the last two named having their
own banking institutions. In the north-
ern section Alachua and High Springs,
both banking centers, and rapidly
growing;. To t e south o a 7esile
the county seat', Archer and Micanopy
are business and banking centers of
like' importance; with Hawthorn and
Waldo in the eastern portion of the
county. All of these towns back the
county seat, Gainesville, with its three
large banking institutions, farmers'
warehouses, grain elevator and peanut
oil mill, and large retail and wholesale
houses in all lines of business.
In planning the illustrations for
this brief survey of Alachua County we
have chosen the pictures somewhat at
random and with the realization that
they only faintly tell the real story of
our prosperous condition. We hope
they will interest you enough to secure
a visit from you and that if you are
thinking of moving to Florida, or if
you are seeking a better location in the
State, that you will be led to make a
personal investigation of this section.
We would rather surprise you in what
you find than to have you misled by
extravagant statement. The County


MA~[W dONi







ALACHUA


COUNTY,


FLORIDA


W41.


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REGISTERED POLAND CHINA GILTS
(Averaging over 300 lbs. at 8 months)
Alachua County farmers realize the great commercial possibilities in hogs-especially of improved grades


Commissioners of Alachua County are not
land speculators. They are responsible for
the publication of the facts in this pamphlet.
Their addresses are given and if you should
visit the section in
which they reside
you will find them
ready and willing
to show you every ..
courtesy and to see
that you get only
reliable informa-
tion.
One of the most
successful county
fairs in Florida is
held in Gainesville, :
in November of
each year. The fair OATS MATURE


EARLY


grounds cover 44 acres of buildings, sheds
and race track. It is acknowledged to
be one of the finest livestock shows in
the State and is gaining in importance
every year.
Extract from
pamphlet prepared
by department of
agriculture of the
State of Florida,
relative to Alachua
County : "For
natural beauties,
fertility of soil, per-
fect drainage, a
light, dry and in-
vigorating atmos-
L phere, good water,
AND PAY WELL good society and


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ALACHUA


COUNTY,


F 1L OR I DDA


CABBAGE AND OTHER VEGETABLES FOR HOME OR NORTHERN MARKETS MATURE EARLY AND PROVE PROFITABLE


educational advantages, the county is not
excelled by any portion of the State, and the
healthfulness of the county is not excelled
by any portion of the United States.
"It is confidently believed that no county
in the State, nor elsewhere, can boast of a
greater variety of products than Alachua.
Wheat is the only cereal that cannot be
abundantly produced. Cotton, tobacco,
sugar cane, vegetables, grain and fruits can
be raised in the greatest profusion. So can
stock of all kinds be reared in great numbers.
"The advantages this county offers to
those who prefer the general farm life to
truck growing or raising an orange grove,
orchard or vineyard, are excelled by no part
of the United States. Any farmer in this
county can make his occupation self-sustain-


ing and independent of the fatal system of
credit, and the county challenges the State
as to the prosperous conditions of her
farmers.
"Alachua County has better schools than
any other county in the State.
"This county has the best buildings of
any county in Florida for school purposes.
"Alachua County contributes one-half of
the world's supply of spool cotton.
"Alachua County is not only the great-
est county in Florida, but is one of the
greatest counties in the United States. In
natural resources it abounds in almost every-
thing. In climate, it is recognized as a most
desirable place of abode, while as to de-
velopment it is going ahead in every avenue
of trade."


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A L A C H UA


COUNTY,


FLORIDA


UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT BUILDING 'HIGH SCHOOL GROUNDS
SCENES IN GAINESVILLE, THE COUNTY SEAT


The finest timber in the State, cypress,
pine and hardwood, originally covered the
lands in this county, but the larger part of
this timber has been cut and marketed. The
turpentine business and the mill business are
still important factors, however, and will
be so for many years. The hammock lands
are invariably covered with hardwood, oaks,
ash, hickory, maple, gum, magnolia, bay,
ironwood, elm, dogwood, etc.
Alachua County contains within her
borders practically every kind of soil that
is found in Florida, but the Norfolk sand,
Norfolk sandy loam, and Portsmouth sandy
loam are the principal types, and they repre-
sent the standard of excellence in this State.
The Norfolk sand is the type so generally
used along the Atlantic Seaboard for the rais-
ing of vegetables. All of these soils have a
clay sub-soil at varying depths, from a few
inches to three or four feet, which supported
timber, both pine and hardwood, of enor-
mous size.


SOIL SURVEY GAINESVILLE AREA, FLOR-
IDA.-Extracts from a bulletin issued by the
U. S. Department of Agriculture: "The Nor-
folk sand is the most extensive soil type
found in the Gainesville area. The elevation
of the Norfolk sand areas varies in different
parts of the area from 50 to 200 feet above
sea level. The country is everywhere roll-
ing and in some parts almost hilly. The
drainage of the Norfolk sand is good, and
the water supply for the use of growing
crops is well regulated. The power of this
soil to retain a uniform water supply is re-
markable. The soil is always moist imme-
diately beneath the surface, even after pro-
longed droughts, and crops seldom suffer
for lack of water. Another valuable feature
is that the soil moisture is readily delivered
to the growing crop, so that plants which
would perish with the same moisture con-
tent in almost any other soil may flourish on
this soil."


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ALACHUA


COUNTY,


FLORIDA


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A SCENE ON THE CAMPUS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE
Tuition at the University is free to all residents of the State


The Agricultural Experiment Station of
the U. S. Government, located at Gainesville
in connection with the University of Florida,
is doing grand work for the farmers of
Florida, by solving the problems they have


to contend with. Bulletins showing the re-
sults of their work are regularly issued,
farmers are invited to inspect the experi-
ments personally, and advice will be freely
given when asked for.


PHOSPHATE MINING IN ALACHUA COUNTY


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