• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Main
 Purchasers in the Pittsburgh-Florida...
 Back Cover














Title: Florida Orange Grove Corporation Pittsburgh PA. ~ Ocala Florida
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004149/00001
 Material Information
Title: Florida Orange Grove Corporation Pittsburgh PA. ~ Ocala Florida
Physical Description: Book
Publisher: Florida Orange Groves Corporation
Place of Publication: Pittsburgh
Ocala
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004149
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Purchasers in the Pittsburgh-Florida fruit growers association owning one or more groves
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text



FLORIDA
I- OR ANGGROVE


I ittsbur Pa.< Ocal lorida




g i >








f Al_
i l )














Florida Orange Groves Corporation

of

Ocala, Marion County, Florida, and Pittsburgh, Penna.


CAPITAL STOCK $175,000.00






Officers

C. P. ANDERSON, President and Treasurer
F. H. McCURDY, First Vice-President and Sales Manager
F. B. SHEAFFER, Second Vice-President and Secretary
H. S. GARRETT, Third Vice-President
and Representative of Washington Branch
H. P. McCURDY, General Manager


'Directors


H. S. GARRETT
F. H. McCURDY
O. L. DOTY, JR.


H. P. McCURDY
C. P. ANDERSON
F. C. SHEAFFER


General Office: 805 Home Trust Building, Pittsburgh Penna.
Development Office: Ocala, Florida












Florida Orange Groves Corporation
(INCORPORATED)




MAIN OFFICES:

PITTSBURGH, PA, and OCALA, FLORIDA

805 Home Trust Building

PITTSBURGH, PA.


Telephone: 4655 Grant





Developing 600 Acres in 1 and 21/2

Acre Orange Groves, in the Famous

Marion county Orange Belt

near Ocala, Florida











F you are fortunate and secure a copy of this booklet, all
we ask is that you do not put it aside until you have read
it carefully as it contains absolute facts regarding a thor-
oughly good and honest proposition.
This is not a speculation. Far from it. Indeed it is not
even an experiment. It is the extension of a carefully developed
fully matured plan of operations which-even now as you read
these words-is providing a safe and prosperous future for nearly
five hundred other people in Pittsburgh and Washington.
The same plan, guided by the same men will provide such
a future for some two hundred more people of whom you may be
one if you have the vision to see and the courage to act promptly.
And so the purpose of this book is to show you how the citrus
land of sunny Florida will open the door to financial independ-
ence for you: how a small investment now-one which you can
well afford-will in a very few years provide an income which
will take care of you handsomely as long as you live.

A LITTLE RETROSPECT
No proposition is stronger than the men behind it. To
measure accurately the real worth of the Florida Orange Groves
Corporation, first look at the Men who guide its destinies.
What have they done? That is the surest indication of what
they will do. The acid test of Promise is the record of Past
Performance. Here it is-set down as briefly as may be.
Some six years ago a group of men-each one, incidentally,
successful in his own business and reputable in his own com-
munity-realizing the wonderful possibilities in the citrus fruit
industry, organized a close corporation known as the Pittsburgh-
Florida Fruit Growers' Association, of Avon Park Florida and
Pittsburgh, Penna.
This Company-owned, financed and controlled by these
men-set out to purchase and develop into groves some land
located in Florida.
The first purchase was a square mile of land in De Sota
county; this property known as Section 17, was laid out in five-
acre groves and sold. A little later the Company purchased
Lake Byrd-a beautiful body of fresh water lying half a mile
away from Section 17-together with considerable acreage
back of the lake shores.


Two










This acreage which was named Lakewood Villa, was sold out in
one-acre tracts. Still later the Company acquired the land
lying between Lakewood Villa and Section 17. This develop-
ment which was called Section 16 was divided into five-acre
tracts-and closed out within three months-a volume of sales
reaching the imposing total of $314,000.


Now mark this, please. The operations of the Pittsburgh-
Florida Fruit Growers' Association were successful-highly
successful-because they were characterized throughout by one
big fundamental principle-the principle of "The Square Deal."


When Developing a Grove Each Tree is Planted with the Greatest Care


The attitude of the Company was so straightforward, so upright,
so manifestly fair not only to its own interests but also to the
interests of those who invested in its propositions that many
people are interested in all three developments. To borrow a
well known slogan the Company is "Advertised by its loving
friends." Its most enthusiastic supporters are the people who
have invested in its propositions.

That is the record of the Pittsburgh-Florida Fruit Growers"
Association. And it is a record upon which any business enter-
prise may be proud to rest.


Three










AND NOW THE NEW COMPANY AND THE NEW
OPPORTUNITY
THE FLORIDA ORANGE GROVES CORPORATION

T HIS COMPANY is new in name only. The men who
compose it are the men who guided the Pittsburgh-
Florida Fruit Growers' Association together with a
number of the grove owners in the Pittsburgh-Florida develop-
ment.

Mark that significant fact, please. Here is a company
which, having reached the limit of its growth and seeking the
expansion which is the right of every carefully managed business
enterprise, secured its new associates from within the circle of
its own customers. Can you think of a stronger endorsement?
Can you conceive of more convincing evidence that the Com-
pany's methods are straight and upright and clean than the
fact that the men who know these methods best are willing to
back them with their money and their personal reputatuons?


15 Year Parson Brown Orange Grove-H. L. Borland-Owner


Four



























3 Year Old Grove-American Fruit Company, Located in the
Marion County Orange Belt

THIS IS YOUR OPPORTUNITY

THE NEW COMPANY has acquired 1100 acres of splen-
did citrus soil which has been divided into 1 and 21 acre
groves of which 200 or 500 acres are now on the market
The books are again opened. The opportunity which nearly
500 hundred men and women in Pittsburgh and Washington
have already grasped is now presented to you. What will you
do with it? Is it really worth while taking? Judge by what
citrus groves are doing now for other people-
The C. P. Anderson grove-only
three quarters of an acre-netted its
owner $878.50 in 1916.
The Mervin-one acre-grove pro-
duced-net-from $1,400 to $1,800
a year for the past four years.
Another-this one 212 acres belong-
ing to Dr. Lander containing 150
trees five to ten years old-cleared
$1411.34 in 1918.
Still another-the Butler five-acre
grove-returned $3,220 net over all
expenses in 1917.


Five























CAPITAL & SURPLUS $ 85,000.00
OCALA, FLORIDA
August 3rd, 1920.



Mr. C. P. Anderson, President,
*Florida Orange Grove Corp.,
Pittsburgh, Pa.

Dear Mr. Anderson:

I am glad to note from your recent communi-
cation that you are turning your large cattle and hog farm into
an orange proposition. Your farm is ideally located for the
growing of oranges,, as evidenced by several seedling trees
growing on the farm at this time, one of which I understand
will produce about ten boxes of oranges this year.

I have implicit faith in this county as an
orange section. In fact, it is regarded as the home of the
orange. My observation is that the orange growers of the
county are among our most prosperous citizens. I also believe
that this county holds the record for high price of oranges,
some having sold on the auction in New York the past season
for above $12.50 a box. This is due to the fact that the soil
is much stronger and produces a higher flavored orange than the
sandier soils which require considerable fertilizer,


Oranges ripen in this section earlier, a
large part of the crop being marketed around and before Thanks-
giving. The further fact that we are closer to the market saves
from 5$ to 20$ a box in freight rates over the oranges produced
farther down the state. We have a splendid railroad facili-
ties here, and the fact that one of our important roads skirts
your farm will allow you to have your own packing house in due
time, which is a big advantage over groves located off the
railroad.

The county now has some of the most valua-
ble orange groves in the state. The American Fruit Company, a
large northern fruit organization, has purchased the last year,
between a quarter and a half million dollars worth of orange
property in this county, and I feel sure that if you and Mr. Mo-
Curdy will employ the same tactics here in the orange belt that
you have successfully carried out at Avon Park in the grapefruit
belt, you will certainly make the same splendid success.

Our president, Mr. Monroe, and myself welcome you
to our section. Knowing as we do your business methods and
your desire to give value received, it will be our pleasure to
assist you in any way we can. We have an abiding faith in
the future of the orange industry in this county, and do not
hesitate to predict success for your company.

Yours very tr ,

Vice-President.


Six,










THE PLAN OF OPERATION


IT IS NOT NECESSARY for you to move to Florida to
procure the returns from one or more of these orange
groves. The Company not only sells the land to you. It
also develops it for you. That is the big underlying feature
which has made the operations of the Pittsburgh-Florida Fruit
Growers' Association and subsidiary Companies so eminently
satisfactory to its purchasers. You are assured of that. The
Company retains an interest in every grove for a period long
past the time when the trees are producing commercial and
profitable crops. And this interest-this responsibility of the
Company if you please-is tied up in such a way that it cannot
afford to neglect your grove even if it were so disposed.

The success of the Company is wrapped up in the success
of every individual purchaser. Under its remarkably fair
agreement, the Company prospers only as the grove owners
prosper. It cannot neglect your interests without neglecting
its own.


General View Borland Orange Grove, Marion County Near Ocala


Seven
































Kendig Grove in Marion County Orange Belt


When you purchase a grove you receive the Company's
agreement to cultivate your land, to plant thereon 60 Orange
Trees per acre, to fertilize the land and to spray and care for
these trees for a term of six years from date of planting-all at
no expense to you other than the purchase price.
When the trees are six years old they will have begun to
produce commercial crops. But even then the Company's
interest does not stop. For ten years longer the Company agrees
to care for your grove. It will Pick, Pack, Ship and Market
your fruit at exact cost plus 10% of your gross receipts. The
Company agrees to do this. That it will faithfully carry out its
agreement is assumed in two ways, the first of which is the fact
that the Company's own selfish interests are tied up in your
grove. Thus-Only 200 groves of these 1 and 22 acre groves are
for sale. The remaining 100 acres are retained by the Company
and the entire tract developed as one big unit. When the trees
are six years old and produce a commercial crop, the production
from the entire tract is pooled and marketed-the Company's 100
acres along with the individual groves-and the returns pro-


Eight










rated on a per acre basis from trees of same age. Hence, it is
the Company's interest to procure the largest possible returns
from the entire tract. If returns are poor the Company suffers
more than any single owner.
But even that is not all. The Company does more than
merely tell its purchasers what they may expect in the way of
square treatment. It also provides a means whereby they may
check up the Company's operations at stated intervals to assure
themselves, entirely irrespective of anything we might say,
that the Company is faithfully living up to its agreement in
spirit as well as in letter. This method of checking up the Com-
pany's operations has been named:

"THE COMMISSION PLAN"
THE first eighteen purchasers of groves will form a Board
of Commissioners. The Board meets each year and elects
three of the number to visit Florida and the development
at the expense of the Company, make a thorough investiga-
tion and report to the other purchasers exactly what they find.


Carney Grove-Two Year old Orange Tree-1/4 Box Fruit


Nine









WHAT A 21/2 ACRE ORANGE GROVE WILL COST
T HE PRICE of a 22 acre tract is $2500 of which the
purchaser pays $100.00 in cash and agrees to pay $100.00
every three months for a period of six years making a
total cash payment of $2500.00.
One acre costs $1250.00, $50.00 cash and $50.00 every three
months for six years.

WHAT YOU WILL GET OUT OF IT
NATURALLY you will ask what sort of returns you can
reasonably expect from $2500 invested in a 21 acre
orange grove. In answering that question we propose
to be very conservative. We propose to understate the situa-


Three Year Orange Tree-Borland Grove Near Ocala


Ten










tion rather than overstate it. And we propose to present
facts and figures showing what such groves are actually pro-
ducing rather than to base our expectations on mere claims.
In the first place there are 150 trees in a 212 acre grove.
The first commercial crop comes when the trees are six years
old. A six year old orange tree properly cared for will pro-
duce seven boxes of fruit and it will increase in productiveness
every year thereafter. Let us suppose your grove produces
five boxes per tree when it is six years old. That means a total
yield of 750 boxes.
What does that mean in money? Well the average price
for oranges in Florida in 1915 covering a five year period was
$2.50 a box according to the estimate of the Florida Citrus Ex-
change. In 1918, the average price paid was in the neighbor-
hood of $3.50 a box. But let us be conservative again. Let us
suppose you receive not $3.50-but only $2.50 a box. That
would mean a return from your first crop of $1875.00 which
would lave you a very handsome return on your investment.


Two Year Tree-Grove of American Fruit Company,
Carrying 1/2 Box Fruit


Eleven






























A Board of Commission Meets Once Each Year and
Elects Representatives to Visit Holdings in Florida


SOME OUTSTANDING EXAMPLES
LET US LOOK at what other people are actually doing.
Notice the cut on page 15 of an 16 year old tree with 15
boxes on it-one tree, mind you. Suppose your trees
when they are eleven years old do only half that well. Sup-
pose you receive for your fruit $2.50 a box-take your lead
pencil and figure what your 21 acre grove with 150 trees would
produce.
Carney Investment Company, Lake Weir, 200 acres,
shipped 40,000 to 60,000 boxes per season. East Lake Invest-
ment Company, Lake Weir, 40 to 50 acres, shipped from 15,000
to 20,000 boxes; Central Fruit Company, fifty acres, shipped
from 5,000 to 10,000 boxes. These groves are not considered
A No. 1.
There are from 25 to 30 cars shipped from Candler; 50 to
75 shipped from Ocala; 40 to 50 cars from Citra.
J. R. Williams has the largest acreage in this neighborhood,
having about 400 acres in large' and small trees.
The Sampson groves at Bordman, Florida, shipped from 30
to 50 cars. Jas. G. Glass, 70 acres, ships from 5,000 to 10,000
boxes. W. R. Brice, 20 acres, ships from 2500 to 4000 boxes.
Take these facts-these definite, proved facts-discount
them as much as you like-do your own figuring and estimate
for yourself the production you can reasonably expect from a


Twelve













2Y2 acre grove. Your own lead pencil will do its own arguing
if you will let it.
The town of Ocala-just a short distance from our property
-is surrounded by groves of all ages, the production and profits
from which will amply vindicate claims colored far more highly
than any in this book. A person has only to go to Florida; use
his own eyes and ask a few questions to convince himself that
the statements made in this book are away inside the boundaries
of extreme conservatism.
We have, indeed, no hesitancy whatever in saying that any
purchaser of one of these groves who cares to go to Florida on
his own initiative for the purpose of checking up on any state-
ment made in this book can have back every cent he has paid on
his purchase and the entire cost of his trip beside if he comes


p
li~r~as~LS~g~f~f:
pr,
"'r'.
3
r '11 "6
1: i ,
C.: ~
., .~y48g~ ~ .~ r~;, PB$ba~BhA~~b~h
,:5 : *'-';
4L~aa~= ~~~i
~.9 Ut i
r*Ilit~BAc~k~~
~.. 4r
,.
4 r.


Seedling Orange Tree on Our Farm now Bearing Ten Boxes of Fruit.


Thirteen










back dissatisfied with his bargain or if he finds we have over-
stated or misrepresented in the smallest particular.

We want only clean cut, upright men and women
associated with us. Every purchaser is known personally
either to the members of the Company or to some other pur-
chaser.

Just who are the men in active charge of this Company?

That is a very vital question and it requires a very
frank answer.

MR. C. P. ANDERSON, President and Treasurer-
A successful Pittsburgh business man for more than
thirty years. A resident of Avalon and Ben Avon, Pa.
-a gentleman whose record for probity and depend-
ability will stand closest investigation. Also Presi-
dent of the Pittsburgh-Florida Fruit Growers' Associa-
tion and Citrus Groves and By-Products Company.

FRED H. McCURDY, First Vice President and
General Sales Manager; Assistant Sales Manager
Citrus Groves and By-Products Company, also grove
owner Pittsburgh-Florida Company.

MR. H. P. McCURDY, General Manager-A salesman
of proved ability-eminently successful in the Pitts-
burgh-Florida operations; Vice President Citrus Groves
and By-Products Company.

F. B. SHEAFFER, Second Vice President and Secre-
tary-Grove owner in the Pittsburgh-Florida Fruit
Growers Association, Vice President Citrus Groves
and By-Products Company and Superintendent Home-
stead Steel Works.

H. S. GARRETT, Third Vice President; Assistant
General Manager Washington Steel and Ordnance
Company; Vice President Florida Citrus Development
Company, Washington, D. C.

For complete list of stockholders and grove owners see
page 27


Fourteen










You say you will plant my trees for me. Where do you get
your nursery stock?
Notice the picture on page 26 showing trees propa-
gated, tended and cared for by the Lake Nursery
Company of Leesburg, Florida, 30 miles from Ocala.
These trees are all clean, vermin-free, healthy and
budded from a "mother tree" of known productivity;
grown in same soil conditions as our farm. The short
haul insures better results as trees go in ground in a
fresher condition. All nursery stock planted by us
will be six year old roots and two year buds.


A
16 w. Yea P p.ineappleOrange.1oxsSl
te-~ p.,.~p~", 9*. t



16 Year Pineapple OrangeTree. 1-5 Boxes Sold at $7.00 Per Box


Fifteen










In this connection, remember these gentlemen are not tyros
at this business. They are the self-same men who have guided
the operations of the Pittsburgh-Florida Fruit Growers' Asso-
ciation and subsidiary Companies to a point where one of the
commissioners who visited those developments in 1918 observed
"There is nothing now to prevent a great future for the Pitts-
burgh-Florida Fruit Growers' Association except some unpre-
cedented act of Nature.'
The point to that is simply that all the wisdom, all the
experience gained by the Pittsburgh-Florida Fruit Growers'
Association is now at the disposal of the Florida Orange Groves
Corporation in the persons of these gentlemen. Its destinies
could be in no safer hands. It is not a speculation. It is not
an experiment. It is a fine, straight-up-and-down business
opportunity.


Seedling Orange Tree on Farm


Sixteen
















































Kendig Orange Grove-70 Acres; 10,500 Boxes; Net $28900.00

NOW ACT!

Only 200 groves are for sale. There are no more. When
these are gone- and they are going fast-nothing short of dire
misfortune will induce a purchaser to let go. Copies of this
book are in the hands of other people besides yourself. And
you know such investments never go begging for lack of takers.



Seventeen









Avoid disappointment. In your own interests, in the
interest of your family and your future act now. File your
application today.
Our sales in Pittsburgh for sixty days have amounted to
half million dollars being over 200 groves, showing how our
plan meets public approval.
To accurately outline the citrus industry of Marion County
requires going back to the days of pioneering, and to a period
long before the boundary lines of the county were established.
The early writers of Florida history tell of the wild orange
groves located in central-south Florida; and soon after the
Territory of Florida was ceded by Spain and assumed her State-
hood, many planters from the Carolinas and Georgia came to
this section to grow island cotton-a product then in great de-
mand and highly profitable. In clearing these plantations for
cotton planting, it was necessary to destroy thousands of wild
orange trees. Most of this area of wild citrus trees was located
in Marion County, largely on the southern and western borders
of Orange Lake and along the valley of the Ocklawaha.
This brief history is merely given to establish the fact that
where the orange grows wild, it must, therefore, in its native
element, find conditions of soil most suited to its nature.
About the year 1870, the idea was advanced that these
wild orange groves could be developed into a paying enterprise;
and so the orange industry was inaugurated.
On the southern shore of Orange Lake, large tracts of land
were acquired by far-seeing individuals, and by grafting and
budding the wild orange, they shortly thereafter enjoyed the
realization that they had successfully started a business which
was to make Florida famous, and a pleasant occupation to
follow.
A small village in the northern portion of the county, and
bordering on the south shore of Orange Lake, was, during the
years 1892-3 and 4, the largest shipping point for citrus fruit
in the world, and from that point was shipped out about twenty
per cent of the entire crop of the State. During that period,
about one-tenth of the taxes collected in Marion County was
derived from assessments against the orange groves. From the
railroad station referred to, was shipped during the season of
1894, approximately one-half million boxes of fruit. Also,


Eighteen,


















































Borland Orange Grove-Fruit Ripe in December, Still on Tree
April 30, 1920
from the various groves of this lake region, were shipped enorm-
ous quantities of both sour and budded trees for groves being
set out at points farther south.
Marion County may truthfully claim the distinction of
introducing the most sought after orange grown for the markets
up to the present time. This refers to the "Pineapple" variety,



Nineteen
































Showing Method of Picking Fruit.


which is distinctly Marion County origin. This orange is
unsurpassed in color, smooth texture and shipping qualities.
During the past season fancy fruit dealers have bid as high as
$12.75 per box in the auction rooms of New York City in order
to obtain this variety of orange, proving conclusively its merit
and popularity.
The name "pineapple" is derived from the aroma of the
fruit, and not its flavor. Anyone familiar with this orange can
readily detect its presence in a packing house where there are
but a few mixed in with a house full of other varieties. The
soil in the Marion County region is peculiarly adapted to the
culture of this particular orange; and in no other place in the
state of Florida, can the deep orange red, and the quality of the
fruit be produced in successful competition.
The parent tree of the "pineapple" orange was one among
a few sweet or "china" orange trees growing around the home of
a cotton planter, Dr. James B. Owens, a few miles south of our
location. One of the first growers of oranges in that section,
Hon. P. P. Bishop, on a visit to this plantation, was struck with
the general appearance and quality of the fruit he noticed on the


Twenty











tree. He purchased from Dr. Owens the tops of nine trees of
his selection, the fruit of which was of especially smooth peel
"seedling orange." These tops were cut into bud wood and
then grafted in the wild orange trees in his grove at Citra. In
time, when these budded trees were brought to bearing, and the
fruit sent to the packing house, an odor was detected, very dif-
ferent from that of the ordinary orange, and not unlike that of
the pineapple; this variety of fruit was afterwards known as the
"Pineapple" orange.
Marion County may further point with pride to the "Par-
son Brown" orange, known to be the most perfect early orange
grown.


.1


.. .0411111 .~"

Borland Grove-Fruit on Trees April 30, 1920
Borland Grove-Fruit on Trees April 30, 1920


Twenty-one










This fine variety of orange was discovered within a few
miles of the line of Marion County and is largely the variety
grown in our section. Only a few months since, The American
Fruit Company, a $100,000,000 Corporation invested nearly
a half million dollars in groves of this variety, thereby showing
their faith in our location as a fruit growing section.
Does orange growing in Marion County pay? The follow-
ing is the result from one grove-the Kendig, or "Wissahickon,"
a fifty-acre tract located in the famous orange belt. Mr. John
Kendig of Philadelphia, came into possession of this property
in 1898. It was soon brought into bearing, and has yielded a
crop of fruit each year since. The aggregate number of boxes
gathered from this grove since it began to fruit is 99,860. It
may be safely asserted that the net proceeds per box to the
owner was $2.00 making around $200,000.00. The trees set in
this grove came from the famous Bishop-Hoyt Company grove
at Citra, and are of the "pine-apple" variety. All of the ealry
varieties are usually marketed before Christmas, when prices
are extremely high.
Our property, consisting of 1100 acres is ideally located
for citrus grove purpose, being only four miles from Ocala, the
County Seat of famous Marion County and but a short distance
from the macadam road leading to the large cities of Florida.


Ih the Borland, Grove 20 Miles north of Ocala


Twenty-two









Ocala is an up-to-date city of 8,000 people with good hotel
accommodations, schools, hospital, amusements, stores, etc.
an ideal place to locate permanently or to spend a winter vaca-
tion. A short distance from town, the Country Club has
established a very fine golf grounds and club house. Three
miles from town is to be found the wonderful Silver Springs
which form the head water of the Okalawhaha River; tourists
from all points of the United States visit these wonderful springs
and vew through glass bottomed boats the wonders to be seen
at the bottom of the water. The effect is equal to that to be
seen at the famous Cataline Islands, California.
Our Company owns 1100 acres of the finest type of fertile
soil which will be developed into citrus groves of 1 and 2/2
acres. The balance is heavily timbered. Each field of groves
will border the great woods which is an adequate protection
from winds and conserves moisture.
We have a very complete organization of men and machin-
ery, all under the supervision of a very competent foreman who
has spent many years in the growing and cultivation of orange
groves. In addition, each month we will have the citrus expert,
Professor Grossenbacher, of Apopka, Florida, visit our develop-
ment, confer with us and make recommendations for the care
and culture of the trees for the next period.
It will be the aim of our corporation to plant all groves
in 1921; as the land to be planted is cleared, the purchasers save
one year over the usual method for it requires a full year to clear
and plow, whereas this part of the work will be finished in 1921.
Our farm is one of the most beautiful and fertile to be found
anywhere, fenced, and cross fenced and having a series of barns
and tenant houses for the workmen, also a large home for the
Superintendent. This building will be changed into a club
house later on and used for the benefit of our purchasers, where
they may spend their vacations at a very nominal cost. During
the hunting season, abundant game can be found nearby-quail
wild doves and squirrel. The many lakes within a few miles
furnish material for the most enthusiastic sportsmen.


Twenty-three



























Harrington Hall, Ocala


The men interested in this corporation have endeavored to
incorporate in their plan every protection possible for your
investment arid in addition to arrange for your comfort and
pleasure when it is possible for you to visit our development to
see for yourself the wonderful possibilities of the orange business
in Marion County.
We will take pleasure in showing you the groves which are
to be found in close proximity to our farm-large, successful
operations making handsome returns, not only one year, but we
will prove by the statements of the owners of packing houses
that there is never a failure of crop in our locality and that each
year the crop is larger as the trees advance in age.
By the Company's plan and guaranteed in the contract
you do not look forward fearing extra charges for care of your
grove. The contract covers the regular payments-no extras
and up to the final payment. Then all work at cost plus 10%
of the selling price of your fruit, the Company's groves pooled
with yours thereby guaranteeing proper care. Could anything
be more fair and safe? In other words we must make money
for you to gain a profit.
For your protection and ours (for our interests are co-
operative and mutual) we have bought the best nursery stock
to be obtained, paying a very high price in order to get the best


Twenty-four









and largest stock. This means that the sixth year crop, your
fruit, will be the maximum number of boxes, as the trees we are
planting are six year roots with two year buds, large vigorous
trees, able to bear large crops by the sixth year.
The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad passes close to our prop-
erty and a switch has been established making the matter of
shipping a very easy problem. It should be remembered that
fruit shipped from Marion County carries a cheaper freight
rate ranging from 10 cents to 15 cents per box cheaper than
fruit shipped from central or Southern citrus belts and also that
we are within 24 to 36 hours closer to the markets which assures
the fruit arriving in a fresher and better condition.
Later our Company will build and operate a By-Product
plant for the manufacture of cull fruit into marmalades, pre-
serves, oils, etc., or dispose of this cull fruit under liberal contract
to the Citrus Groves and By-Products Company, thereby in-
suring our grove owners of an additional profit.

THE SALES PLAN
The groves will be divided into 212 acre units, sixty trees
to the acre. These 212 acre units will be sold for Twenty-five
Hundred (2500) Dollars each-One Hundred (100) Dollars
being the first payment and One Hundred (100) Dollars every
three months, making a cash payment in six years of Twenty-
five Hundred (2500) Dollars.
One acre grove costs $1250.00; $50.00 at signing contract
and $50.00 every three months for six years.


Post Office-Ocala


Court House-Ocala


Twenty-five









After you have carefully considered this plan, you will
readily see what a good opportunity this is for your friends to
become interested and secure a splendid investment by the
purchase of one of these groves for on a 22 acre grove will be
planted 150 trees. If in the sixth year they produce but five
boxes of fruit per tree or a total of 750 boxes, which should sell
at least for $2.50 per box, one of these groves would give a return
of $1875.00 on an investment of $2500.00. Every year follow-
ing, the trees will grow larger and produce larger crops, and of
course, larger returns


Three Year Old Orange Tree in Nursery of Lake Nursery Company


Twenty-six













The following is a list of the stockholders and at the organiza-

tion of this new Company, own one or more groves in the Pitts-

burgh-Florida Fruit Growers' Association and the Citrus Groves

and By-Products Company, two Companies that Messrs. C. P.

Anderson and H. P. McCurdy have so successfully brought to

completion during the past six years proving that our new

organization is not an experiment but based on experience.

The stockholders whose names appear below prove their con-

fidence in this proposition by their connection with the new

Company.


R. L. THOMPSON.....................2 Groves

F. B. SHEAFFER .................... 5 Groves

G. A. WALLACE .. ............3.... 3 Groves

WM. D. THOMPSON ..... ...
C. M. JOHNSTONE...................2 Groves

L. P. WEINMAN ...-..... ..2................. Groves

F. M. CARDWELL, SR......................1. Grove

F. W. GEDELMAN .................... 1 Grove

H. D. O'CONNOR....................... Groves

DR. H. G. DUNCAN............... 3 Groves
J. H. DUNCAN.................................. 2 Groves

CHAS. H. BROWN........................ 1 Grove
JOHN O. W ICKS .... ............................. 1 Grove
PETER LINN....... ......... 2 Groves
JAMES DEERY........ ......... 1 Grove
C. J. H. OSBORNE........................... 2 Groves
N. W. JOHNSTONE .......-....1......... .1 Grove
K. BILLINGS ............ ........ 1 Grove
W. E. FRANZ.. .........................3.... Groves

W L. WILLIAMS.-............. ............... 2 Groves
J. G. YOUNGSON......................... 2 Groves
A. PARKIN MILLER ................. Grove
C. SOUTH ....... 1 Grove
A. B. MacMULLEN ......... 2 Groves
R. W. SMITH................... ... 2 Groves
W M. B. NEISON........................... 2 Groves


Executive Department. Arbuthnot-
Stephenson Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
Superintendent, Carnegie Steel Co.
Homestead. Pa.
President, Penn Burner Go., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
Pittsburgh, Pa.
Construction Department, Carnegie
Steel Co.
President, Weinman Bros.. Wholesale
Shoe Dealers
Auditor, Republic Iron and Steel Co.,
Youngstown, Ohio
Auditing Department, Republic Iron
& Steel Co., Youngstown, Ohio
Engineering Department, Manufac-
turers Light and Heat Company
Braddock, Pa.
Construction Department Mesta Ma-
chine Co.
Purchasing Department. Penna. Co.
Attorney, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Duquesne, Pa.
Purchasing Department, Penna. Co.
Auditor, Connellsville, Pa.
Canton, Ohio
Pittsburgh, Pa.
Construction Department, American
Bridge Company, Freedom, Pa.
Bellevue. Pa.
Carnegie Steel Co.
Superintendent. Mesta Machine Co.
Pennsylvania Lines
Mesta Machine Co.
Sales Department, Reymer Bros.
Auditor, Dollar Savings and Trust Co.,
North Side, Pittsburgh.


Twenty-seven













Purchasers in the Pittsburgh-Florida Fruit Growers

Association owning one or more groves.


Purchasers in Section Seventeen.


THOMAS K. ANDERSON,
U. S. Post Office, Meadville, Pa.

A. L. ASHBY,
Legal Department, Westinghouse
Electric Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.

EDWIN M. BRICKELL, (2)
Avon Park, Florida.

CHAS. H. BROWN,
Purchasing Department, Penna. Co.,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
L. VAN LEER BROWN
Physician, Castle Shannon, Pa.

F. M. CARDWELL,
Republic Iron & Steel Co., Youngs-
town. Ohio.
HOMER G. DUNCAN, (2)
Physician, Braddock, Pa.
J. H. DUNCAN,
Swissvale, Pa.
R. C. DUNCAN,
Mt. Washington, Pittsburgh. Pa.
JAMES DEERY,
Purchasing Department, Penna. Co..
St. Louis, Mo.
J. E. GERMITT,
President Dermitt Printing Co., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
DR. R. J. DUNBAR,/
Avalon. Pa.
J. C. DRURY,
Investments. Youngstown, Ohio.
WM. ELSTE,
Grocer. Ben Avon, Pa.
J. D. FORD,
Crafton, Pa.
W. E. FRANZ,
American Bridge Co.. Ambridge, Pa.
GEO. F. FREED,
Pittsburgh Gage & Supply Co.. Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
MRS. D. C. FARRAR,
Dunkirk. N. Y.
H. S. GARRETT, (2)
Supt.. Washington Steel & Ordnance
Co. Washington, D. C.
F. W. GEDELMAN,
Republic Iron & Steel Co.. Youngs-
town, Ohio.
CHAS. H. GISIN, (2)
Heyl & Patterson Co., Pittsburgh. Pa.
D. J. GREINER,
Duff Manufacturing Co., Pittsburgh,
Pa.
JAMES A. GRAY,
Penna. Lines West, Pittsburgh. Pa.
CHAS. G. HEINEMAN,
Wholesale Produce, Pittsburgh. Pa.


L. C. HEINEMAN,
Hill Top Y. M. C. A., Pittsburgh, Pa.

B. W. HASELTINE,
Carnegie Steel Co., Munhall, Pa.
GEORGE W. HORNER,
Construction Department, Carnegie
Steel Co., Munhall, Pa.
A. B. HALL,
Penna. Co.. Pittsburgh. Pa.
C. R. HUNTER,
Commonwealth Trust Co., Pittsburgh,
Pa.
J. BROOKS HUFF,
Construction Department, Heyl &
Patterson, Inc., Pittsburgh, Pa.
THOMAS M. HODGES,
United States Sanitary Co., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
MISS MARY E. HAYNE,
Cleveland, Ohio.
FRANK L. HAYNES,
Civil & Mining Engineer, Pikeville,
Ky.
C. M. JOHNSTONE, (2)
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
WILLIAMS JENKINS,
Treasurer J. H. Matthews Co., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
DR. G. C. KNEEDLER,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
L, L. KNOX,
President Slick-Knox Steel Co., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
MISS E. A. KAYSER,
Bellevue. Pa.
E. H. KNIGHT,
Parkersburg, W. Va.
HENRY G. LEFFERTS,
Auditor J. H. Matthews Co., Pitts-
burgh. Pa.
JOHN LEWIS,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
PETER LINN.
Hotel Proprietor, Duquesne, Pa.
J. L. McMILLEN,
New Castle Notion Co., New Castle,
Pa.
CUY F. MORRIS,
Secretary Alexander Bros. Co., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
W. P. MADDUX,
Roxabel, Ohio.
WM. B. NEISON,
Dollar Sav. & Trust Co., Pittsburgh
Pa.
E. J. MASON,
Construction Department. Heyl &
Patterson. Inc., Pittsburgh. Pa.


Twenty-eight












H. D. O'CONNOR,
Engineering Department, Manufac-
turers Light & heat Co., Pittsburgh,
Pa.

MISS ANNA M. O'MALLEY,
North Side, Pittsburgh. Pa.

W. J. OFFUTT, (2)
Mercantile Business, New Castle, Pa.
CHARLES M. PIERCE,
General Auditor, Republic Iron &
Steel, Youngstown, Ohio.
H. C. HECKERMAN,
Manufacturing Confectionery, Bed-
ford, Pa.
DR. W. J. K. SNYDER,
President, Avalon Bank, Avalon, Pa.
FRANK B. SHEAFFER, (2)
Supt., Homestead Steel Works, Mun-
hall, Pa.
WALTER P. SMART,
Attorney, Pittsburgh, Pa.
MISS CAROLINE SOUTH,
Pittsburgh. Pa.
C. A. TEMPLETON,
Butler, Pa.
R. L. THOMPSON,
Executive Department, Arbuthnot-
Stephenson Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
WALTER C. TRUST,
Traffic Department, Carnegie Steel
Co. Pittsburgh, Pa.


E. H. WICKS,
Attorney. Pittsburgh, Pa.
JAMES B. WEINMAN,
Weinman Bros., Leather Dealers,
Pittsburgh, Pa.

L. P. WEINMAN, (2)
Weinman Bros., Pittsburgh, Pa.

JOHN O. WICKS,
Attorney, Pittsburgh, Pa.

GEORGE J. WALKER,
Sales Department, Heyl & Patterson,
Inc., Pittsburgh. Pa.

JOHN W. WEST,
LaBelle Steel Works, Pittsburgh. Pa.

G. A. WALLACE,
Penn Burner & Mfg., Co., Pittsburgh,
Pa.

W. L. WILLIAMS,
Bellevue. Pa.

H. M. HURD,
Republic Iron & Steel Co.. Youngs-
town, Ohio.

MISS KATE R. KING,
Youngstown. Ohio.

J. SCOTT BUCHANAN, (2)
Pittsburgh, Pa.

KINNEAR, McCLOCKEY & BEST,
Attorneys, Pittsburgh, Pa.


Purchasers in Section Sixteen


W. M. ALRICH,
Insurance Agency, Pittsburgh, Pa.
A. C. ACKENHEIL,
Gillespie Hart Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
E. M. BRICKELL, (2)
Avon Park. Florida.
GEO. F. BAINBRIDGE,
Pittsburgh. Pa.
JOHN E. BRICK,
Shoe Manufacturer. Willimantic,
Conn.
CARL BEHRHORST,
Behrhorst & Son, Wholesale Grocer.
Pittsburgh, Pa.
CLARENCE BOTSFORD,
Auto Accessories. Homestead, Pa.
MRS. F. J. COLLINS, (2)
Youngstown, Ohio.
J. L. CUNNINGHAM,
Penna. R. R.. Pittsburgh, Pa.
J. W. CUNNINGHAM,
Dollar Say. & Trust Co., Pittsburgh,
Pa.
JAMES CAPPE,
Crucible Steel Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa.
ROBERT CLARK,
Forged Steel Wheel Co., Butler, Pa.
J. H. DUNCAN,
Mesta Machine Co., Homestead, Pa.


-DR. R. J. DUNBAR,
Avalon, Pa.
CHAS. W. DIERKEN,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
J. E. DAVIDSON, (2)
Tinning & Roofing. Farrell. Pa.
H. C. ENTRIKEN,
Baltimore, Md.
J C. EBERT,
Shoe Merchant, Pittsburgh. Pa.
CLARENCE C. ELSTE,
Grocer. Bellevue, Pa.
GEO. F. FREED,
Pittsburgh Gage & Supply Co., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
W. E. FOWLER,
Assistant Engineer, Montour Rail-
road, Coraopolis, Pa.
CLIFFORD C. FORBES,
Carnegie Steel Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
D. J. GREINER,
Duff Mfg.. Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
CHAS. H. GEILFUSS,
Assistant Secretary and Assistant
Treasurer Mfrs. Light & Heat Co.,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
DR. H. W. HECKEL,
Jenkins Arcade. Pittsburgh, Pa.
B. F. HOGE,
Pittsburgh, Pa.


Twenty-nine














BERTRAM HANNA,
Republic Iron & Steel Co., Youngs-
town, Ohio.
DR. ARTHUR F. P. HUSTON,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
MISS MARY J. HARRIS,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
EDGAR L. HILL,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall. Pa.
A. W. JONES,
Jones Engineering Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa.
R. W. JOHNSTON,
Trinity Court Studios, Pittsburgh, Pa.
JOHN JAMES,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
FRED. P. KETTERER,
Assistant Chief Dispatcher. P. & L. E.
Pittsburgh, Pa.
E. H. KNIGHT,
Parkersburg. W. Va.
ELMER KENNEWEG,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
F. W. and C. H. KELLER,
Shoe Merchants, Lock Haven, Pa.
WM. R. KING,
Wm. K. Stamets Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
C. E. KYLANDER,
Hill Top Y. M. C. A., Pittsburgh, Pa.
JOHN LEWIS,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
FRANCIS P. LOGAN,
U. S. Sanitary Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa.
PETER LINN,
Duquesne, Pa.
JAMES L. LOVE,
Kearney, N. J.
R. P. LOHM,
G. R. McAbee Powder Co., Pittsburgh,
Pa.
P. T. McCANCE,
Merchant Tailor, Pittsburgh, Pa.
A. B. MacMULLEN,
Mesta Machine Co., Homestead, Pa.
GUY T. MORRIS,
Alexander Bros., Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
A. PARKING MILLER,
Mesta Machine Co., Homestead, Pa.
S. L. McQUIGG,
Common Pleas Court, Pittsburgh, Pa.
REV. M. L. MacPHAIL,
Auburn, N. Y.
W. J. McGILL, JR.,
Druggist. Oakdale, Pa.
LINCOLN MacGREGOR,
Dormont, Pa.
WM. B. NEISON,
Dollar Say. & Trust Co., Pittsburgh,
Pa.


H. D. O'CONNOR, (2)
Mfrs. Light & Heat Co., Pittsburgh,
Pa.
W. 0. OSWALD,
Meat Dealer, Pittsburgh, Pa.
C. H. J. OSBORNE,
Indian Creek Railroad. Connellsville.
Pa.
REV. J. ALVIN ORR,
North Side, Pittsburgh. Pa.
R. B. PURMAN,
Mfrs. Light & Heat Co., Waynesburg,
Pa.
FREDERICK REINECKE,
Wholesale Produce, N. S., Pittsburgh.
Pa.
C. H. RINDFUSS,
Pgh. Screw & Bolt Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.

C. P. READ,
Crafton, Pa.

C. E. STARK,
Traffic Department, American Bridge
Pittsburgh, Pa.

ROBERT W. SMITH,
Sales Department, Reymer Bros.,
Pittsburgh. Pa.
CHAS. A. STONER,
Dormont, Pa.
J. R. SELTZER,
Manufacturing Confectioner. Taren-
turn, Pa.
FRANK B. SHEAFFER,
Construction Department, Homestead
Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
M. H. SHAFER,
Manufacturers Agent, Connellsville.
Pa.
MISS CATHERINE SCHEEDER,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
C. F. SHANNON,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
DR. H. D. TAYLOR,
New Castle, Pa.
W. L. WILLIAMS,
Bellevue. Pa.
CHAS. R. WEINMANN,
Weinmann Bros., Pittsburgh, Pa.
E. H. WICKS,
Attorney, Pittsburgh, Pa.
FRANK C. WAPLES,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall. Pa.
MRS. ANNE O. WILSON,
Cedarville. Ohio.
G. A. WALLACE,
President Penn Burner & Mfg. Co.,
Pittsburgh, Pa.

JOHN G. YOUNGSON,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.


Thirty













Purchasers in Lakewood Villa.


W. P. ALLEN,
South Hills High School, Pittsburgh,
Pa.
E. R. BALDINGER,
Secretary, Dollar Saving & Trust Co.,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
MRS. SARAH BLOTTART,
North Side. Pittsburgh, Pa.
F. M. CARDWELL, JR.,
Republic Ironr & Steel Co., Youngs-
town, Ohio.
E. F. CLARK,
Salesman. Avalon, Pa.
J. C. DRURY,
Investments, Youngstown, Ohio.
CHAS. E. DOUGLAS,
East Liverpool, Ohio.
MISS ADNES B. DICKSON,
Bellevue. Pa.
H. E. DUNCAN,
B. & 0. R. R.. Braddock, Pa.
HARRY W. GLUNT,
Homestead Steel Works. Munhall, Pa.
MISS A. E. EDGIN,
North Side, Pittsburgh. Pa.
RAY C. FEEZEL,
American Bridge Co., Canton. Ohio.
CHAS. W. HUNT,
Republic Iron & Steel Co., Youngs-
town, Ohio.
W. P. MADDUX,
Roxabel, Ohio.
FRANK L. HAYNES,
Civil & Mining Engineer. Pikeville,
Ky.
W. E. FRANZ,
American Bridge Co.. Ambridge. Pa.
MISS ALICE McKEE KERR,
Swissvale, Pa.
A. B. MacMULLEN.
Mesta Machine Co., Homestead, Pa.

EDWIN E. LEHR,
Westinghouse Machine Co., Pitts-
burgh. Pa.
FRANCIS P. LOGAN,
U. S. Sanitary Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa.

D. C. MARTIN,
American Bridge Co., Pittsburgh. Pa.

S. W. LINK,
American Bridge Co., Ambridge. Pa.
CARL BEHRHORST,
Behrhorst & Son, Wholesale Grocers.
Pittsburgh, Pa.

A. F. HEINEMAN,
Pittsburgh. Pa.

MISS ANNA M. O'MALLEY,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.


ALBERT I. RITCHIE,
Borough Clerk. Homestead, Pa.
ROBERT W. SMITH,
Sales Department. Reymer Bros.,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
S. L. McQUIGG,
Common Pleas Court, Pittsburgh, Pa.
MISS CATHERINE SCHEEDER,
North Side. Pittsburgh. Pa.
CHAS. H. VAN HORNE,
Homestead. Pa.
C. E. STARK,
Traffic Department, American Bridge
Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
WM. THOMSON,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall. Pa.
G. A. WALLACE,
President Penn Burner & Mfg. Co..
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
JOHN BELL,
Ingram, Pa.
A. McKEE ELWELL,
North Side. Pittsburgh, Pa.
E. H. WICKS,
Attorney. Pittsburgh. Pa.
MISS AMELIA WEINMAN.
West Bridgewater. Pa.
DR. H. G. DUNCAN,
Braddock. Pa.
C. H. J. OSBORNE,
Auditor, Indian Creek Railroad.
Connellsville. Pa.

STONEY AMICK,
Civil & Mining Engineer, Pikeville.
Ky.
GEO. C. TINSLEY,
Youngstown, Ohio.

W. H. DAVIES,
Republic Iron & Steel Co.. Youngs-
town. Ohio.

KENNETH C. KERR,
Republic Iron & Steel Co., Youngs-
town. Ohio.
GEO. H. HAND,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall. Pa.
H. C. HEINEMAN,
A. L. Brahm Co.. Pittsburgh, Pa.

JOHN W. CUNNINGHAM,
Trust Officer. Dollar Saving & Trust
Co., Pittsburgh. Pa.

MISS NELLIE BEVINS,
Pikeville, Ky.
MRS. MAUD W. PARK,
Avon Park, Florida.
J. C. EBERT,
Shoe Merchant, Pittsburgh, Pa.


Thirty-one














Purchasers in the Citrus Groves & By-Products
Company, owning one or more groves.

FIRST UNIT


ERNEST R. BOUCHER,
Hoboken, Pa.
THOMAS BOYD,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
OTTO G. BIGLER,
Carnegie Steel Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
FRANK BOWMAN,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
GEORGE E. BYERS,
Vandergrift Dry Cleaning Co., Vander-
grift, Pa.
WM. J. BECKFIELD,
North Side Real Estate Co., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
FRED J. COLLINS,
Republic Iron & Steel Co., Youngs-
town, Pa.
CHARLES W. CREDE,
Post Office, North Side., Pittsburgh,
Pa.
ELY P. COLES,
Salesman, Geo. L. Neff Co., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
WM. F. CARNEY,
Whittaker, Pa.
C. N. CAMPBELL,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
SAMUEL W. DOUGALD,
Hill Top Y. M. C. A., Pittsburgh. Pa.
MISS CARLOTTA DUNCAN,
Avalon, Pa.
FRED DEMMEL,
Mesta Machine Co., Homestead, Pa.
MRS. CLYDE DUNCAN,
Braddock, Pa.
P. W. DAVIS,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
DR. CHAS. W. DITTMAN,
Homestead, Pa.
FRANK DIERKEN,
Homestead, Pa.
GEORGE S. ELLIOTT,
Real Estate, Willimantic. Conn.
VINCENT B. FISK,
Y. M. C. A., Wilmerding, Pa.
O. G. FERGUSON,
M. C. R. R., Pittsburgh, Pa.
L. C. FRENCH,
Investments, Boston, Mass.
EDW. F. FEIST,
Manufacturing Confectioner, Steuben-
ville, Ohio.
A. W. FLATH,
Wilmerding, Pa.

EDGAR GUEST,
Forged Steel Wheel Co., Butler, Pa.

ROBERT M. GRAY,
Atlantic Refining Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.


R. E. GARRETT,
Mesta Machine Co., Homestead, Pa.

J. A. GETTING,
Contractor, Braddock, Pa.
GEO. W. GEAHRY,
Vandergrift Dry Cleaning Co., Vander-
grift. Pa.
MRS. H. S. GARRETT,
Washington, D. C.
WM. R. HERON,
Crucible Steel Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
JAMES C. HERON,
Jones & Laughlin Steel Co., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
H. A. HERCHENROETHER,
Meat Dealer, N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa.
JOHN HESS,
Mesta Machine Co., Homestead, Pa.
MISS A. C. HUTCHINSON,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
BROOKS H. HANNA,
Fish & Poultry Dealer, Pittsburgh, Pa.
OLIVER A. JORDAN,
New-Field By-Products Co., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
EDWARD W. JORDAN,
Carnegie Steel Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
H. K. JOHNSON,
P. R. R., Swissvale, Pa.
H. L. JOHNSTON,
Mesta Machine Co., Homestead, Pa.
MRS. C. J. MARTIN,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
MRS. SARA C. JOHNSON,
Swissvale, Pa.
DILWORTH KENNEDY,
P. R. R., Chicago, Ill.
MRS. EDNA W. KUNZ,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.

E. H. KLINGENSMITH.
Hope Nat. Gas Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.

MAX M. KRAUS,
Mesta Machine Co., Homestead, Pa.
G. R. KLEIN,
Aluminum Co., of America, Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
E. A. KNOUSE,
Republic Iron & Steel Co., Youngs-
town, Ohio.
JOHN W. KAGARISE,
Edgar Thomson Sterl Works, Brad-
dock, Pa.
C. EDWARD LONG, (2)
Civil Engineer, Pittsburgh. Pa.

A. E. LASHER,
Republic Iron & Steel Co., Youngs-
town, Ohio.


Thirty-two
















R. P. LOHM,
G. R. McAbee Powder Co., Pittsburgh,
Pa.

HARRY McMUNN,
P. R. R.. Pittsburgh, Pa.
DR. C. E. McKEE.
Pittsburgh, Pa.
JOHN F. McCABE,
MacBern Scrap Iron Co., Glassport,
Pa.
ARCHIBALD McNELTY,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
HARRY P. McCLINTOCK,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
ARCHIE McGILL,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
ALBERT H. McKEEVER,
Lincoln Place, Pa.
JOHN McGILL,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
Pittsburgh, Pa.
W. H. McDONNELL,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
HENRY MUELLER,
United Engineering & Foundry Co.,
ANDREW W. MARCUS,
Marcus Bros., Art Glass Dealers,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
DARRELL R. MAY,
Armstrong Cork Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
ROY W. MAY,
American Sheet & Tin Plate Co., Pitts-
burgh. Pa.
R. A. MacDOWELL,
Secretary Y. M. C. A., Headquarters,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
E. RALPH MATTHEWS,
Washington Steel & Ordnance Co.,
Washington, D. C.
PHILIP MARTIN,
Washington Steel P Ordnance Co.,
Washington. D. C.
PHILIP W. MOWLL,
Washington, D. C.
J. M. NICHOL,
Manufacturers Agent, Pittsburgh, Pa.
H. C. OLIVER, (2)
P. R. R., Indianaopolis, Ind.

MRS. ELIZABETH OLSEN, (2)
Pittsburgh, Pa.
SAMUEL P. PORTER,
Pressed Steel Car Co., McKees Rocks.
Pa.
JOHN W. PETERSON,
American Bridge Co., Canton, Ohio.
GEORGE D. PHILLIPS,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
JOHN H. B. PHILLIPS, (2)
Insurance, Pittsburgh, Pa.
THOMAS W. REESE,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.


ALBERT D. ROGERS,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
FRED REINECKE,
Wholesale Produce, N. S., Pittsburgh,
Pa.

WALTER W. RATHBUN,
Ohio Fuel Supply Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
P. H. RIDDLE,
Washington, D. C.
HAAKON STYRI, (2)
Metalurgical Engineer, Philadelphia,
Pa.
S. H. STEVENS,
Y. M. C. A., Wilmerding, Pa.
ALFRED J. SEUBERT,
P. R.., Pittsburgh, Pa.
HENRY SCHMIDT,
Mesta Machine Co., Homestead. Pa.
J. HENRY STIER, (2)
Meat Dealer, N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa.
NICHOLAS N. SCHAFF, (2)
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
D. P. SMITH,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
FRANK S. SOSMAN,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
DR. CHESTER D. SWOPE, (2)
Washington, D. C.
NORMAN P. SMITH,
Washington, D. C.
CHARLES C. STUART, (2)
Brentwood, Md.
W. BURTON SPIRE,
Druggist, Mt. Rainier, Md.
MORGAN W. SHUITT,
Mining Engineer, Gilbert, W. Va.
JOHN L. THOMPSON,
D. K. Murdock & Co.. N. S., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
WILLIAM A. THOMAS,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
DR. H. D. TAYLOR,
New Castle, Pa.
DR. R. M. WALLACE, (2)
Pittsburgh. Pa.

G. A. WEBER,
McGinniss-Smith Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.

MISS EMMA P. WIELAND,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.

NORMAN E. WYLIE,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.

H. T. WYNN,
Wynn & Starr Co., Trafford, Pa.

GEORGE H. WILSON,
Monongahela Trust Co., Homestead,
Pa.

R. L. WEAVER,
Homestead, Pa.


Twenty-three











Purchasers in the Citrus Groves & By-Products Company,
owning one or more groves

SECOND UNIT
MISS NELLIE NIMON, R. W. SHUMWAY,
-Huntington; W. Va. Civil Engineer, Pikeville. Ky.
WILLIAM McGILL (2) ALEXANDER D. ROSE, (2)
Girard, Ohio. Rose Tool & Supply Co., Pittsburgh,
Pa.
MISS ANNA M. O'MALLEY, STEPHEN F. ROSE, (2)
North Side, Pittsburgh. Pa. Pittsburgh, Pa.
FREDERICK BISHOP, JR., (2) THOMAS EDSTROM,
Arbuthnot-Stephenson Co., Pitts- Pittsburgh, Pa.
burgh, Pa. ROY JAMERSON,
FLOYD PINKERTON, A. L. Brahm Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
Pittsburgh, Pa.
Pittsburgh Pa. JOHN SCHWEININGER,
M. S. VANDERVORT, Bellevue, Pa.
Monongahela Nat. Bank, Pittsburgh,
Pa. H. E. NEWTON,
Lutz & Schramm Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.
H. OLIVER KENNEDY,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa. JOHN R. EVANS,
Wilkinsburg. Pa.
E. G. FINK,
Union National Bank, Pittsburgh, Pa. FRANK BAINBRIDGE,
P. R. R., Conemaugh, Pa.
WM. DEAN,
North Side. Pittsburgh, Pa. LAWRENCE KIRBY,
Akron, Ohio.
A. W. STARK,
Dormont, Pittsburgh, Pa. J. H. BROWN,
Akron, Ohio.
C. J. RANDOLPH,
Y. M. C. A., Brownsville. Pa. MISS REBECCA SWOPE,
Washington, D. C.
A. P. ENKE,
Crouch Electric Appliance Co.. Hams- GEORGE C. MEYER,
stead, Pa. Domont. Pittsburgh, Pa.
R. W. JOHNSTON, DR. JAMES F. EISENHART, (4)
Trinity Court Studios, Pittsburgh, Pa. Nrorth Side. Pittsburgh, Pa.
DANIEL SCHLARP, SAMUEL PERKINS,
Meat Market. Mt. Oliver, Pittsburgh. Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
Pa. FRED ZAUGG, (2)
DR. ALBERT E. OLSEN, Munhall, Pa.
Pawtucket. R. I. RICHARD BARTHOL,
EDWARD A. DAUM, Munhall, Pa.
North Side Community House. Pitts- MISS GRACE SWOPE,
burgh. Pa. Toledo, Ohio.
WALTER MOORE,Pa. THEODORE GUENTHER, (2)
Homestead, Pa. Pittsburgh. Pa.
HARRY D. LINTZ,
Homestead. Pa. JOHN HOEHN, (2)
Pittsburgh, Pa.
LOUIS C. LENZ, (2)
Auto Supplies, N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. DR. A. T. RATLIFF, (2)
Pikeville. Ky.
G. J. HECKEL, (2)
Druggist, N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. ARTHUR MELLOTT,
Munhall, Pa.
D. A. KUHNS, (2)
Greensburg, Pa. PERCY TAGGART,
Avalon, Pa.
DR. A. E. HAZEL,
Pittsburgh, Pa. JOHN WECKESER,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
THOMAS D. GILLESPIE, (2)
Wilson-Snyder Mfg. Co., Pittsburgh, CHARLES L. BUTTERFIELD,
Pa. North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
WM. MEADE, MRS. FANNIE APPLEBY,
Y. M. C. A., Sharpsburg, Pa. Uniontown, Pa.
F. P. HILLYARD, JR., (2) A. E. HUNT,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa. Homestead Steel WorksMunhall,Pa.


Thirty-four













WM. F. STANTON,
Munhall, Pa.
MRS. E. L. PETERSON,
North Side. Pittsburgh, Pa.
J. M. EAKMAN,
Munhall Public Schools, Munhall, Pa.
S. J. MONTOOTH,
P. R. R., Wilkinsburg, Pa.
NATHANIEL L. CROW,
Munhall, Pa.
WM. M. MENK,
Homestead Steel Works. Munhall. Pa.
NOLAN H. EICHER,
New Field By-Products Co.. Burgetts-
town, Pa: .
WESLEY S. FOX, (2)
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
ARCHIBALD MARSHALL, (2)
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
FRANK T. McCLURE' (2)
Pittsburgh Public Schools. Pittsburgh,
Pa.
ALLEN C. MILLER,
Union National Bank. Pittsburgh, Pa.
G. H. ZIMMER,
P. R. R., Pittsburgh, Pa.
ABRAM LLOYD, (2)
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
S. RALPH MORGAN,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
G. G. GUBSON,
Braddock, Pa.
MISS GLADYS GETTING,
Braddock, Pa.
MISS MARY SWOPE,
Washington, D. C.
J. J.BERNERT,
Insurance, Steubenville, Ohio.
JOHN MAGEE,
Steubenville, Ohio.
WALTER E. ANDERSON,
Steubenville. Ohio.
DR. H. T. PATTON,
Pittsburgh, Pa.

DR. DeWITT HALL,
Pittsburgh, Pa.

H. S. PAGE, (2)
Solomon Iron & Steel Co.. Pittsburgh,
Pa.

PIERRE LIESCH,
Aspinwall, Pa.

BERT E. FIX, (2)
Sharpsburg, Pa.

S. N. HUTCHINSON, (2)
Sharpsburg, Pa.

F. M. SLATER, (2)
Sharpsburg, Pa.

ARTHUR L. MILLER,
Vanadium Metals Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.

BYRON W. STEWART,
Allegheny General Hospital, Pitts-
burgh, Pa.


MISS S. STELLA GRAHAM,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
MRS. EMILY D. RICHARDS,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
MISS ANNE MoCUTCHEON,
Washington, D. C.
MR. ERNEST FALKER,
Pittsburgh. Pa.
JAMES McCALLUM,
Munhall, Pa.
O. K. DEPP, (2)
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
C. D. CLANEY,
Crucible Steel Co., Pittsburgh. Pa.
J. S. BAUGHMAN,
Guffey-Gillespie Oil Co.. Pittsburgh,
Pa.
HARRY WATSON,
Homeville, Pa.
W. L. EICHER,
New Field By-Products Coal Co.,
Burgettstown, Pa.
ALBERT H. BROWN,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
HUGH J. CLEARY,
Pittsburgh Coal Co.. Library, Pa.
JOHN F. EDMUNDS,
Anchor Packing Co., Pittsburgh. Pa.
JOHN STEVENS, (2)
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
JESSE BARKER,
Homestead, Pa.
CHARLES O. TAYLOR,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
ALEXANDER L HILL,
Homestead Steel Works. Munhall, Pa.
JOSEPH TOPPER,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
ROBERT H. SIGLEY,
Munhall. Pa.
E. J. McDONNELL,
Blaw-Knox Co., Pittsburgh. Pa.
H. B. McNUTT,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
G. C. ULMER,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
DR. B. H. OLSEN,
Pawtucket, R. I.
MRS. C. N. OLSEN,
Pawtucket, R. I.

EDW. J. KESTNER, (2)
Pittsburgh, Pa.

NORMAN H. RIEGER,
Uniontown, Pa.

WM. D. HACKER,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall. Pa.

JOHN F. DITTMAN,
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall. Pa.

BEN MOYER,
Munhall, Pa.

MISS ELLA BULMER,
Munhall, Pa.


Thirty-five












D. A. AMMERMAN,
Homestead, Pa.
FRANK L. CARLYSLE,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
J. B. COEN, (2)
J. B. Coen Brick Works, Homestead,
Pa.
MRS. J. B. COEN, (2)
Homestead, Pa.
MISS EMMA SCHEIDEMAN,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
MELVERN WILLIAMS, (2)
Homestead Steel Works, Munhall, Pa.
HOWARD MOYER,
Munhall, Pa.
CHARLES GILES,
Munhall. Pa.
MRS. M. E. BARR,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.


MISS MARIE G. MILMOE,
Edgewood Acres, Pa.
MISS MARGARET SMITH,
North Side, Pittsburgh, Pa.
FRANK S. TURNER,
Munhall, Pa.
LOUIS MARLOFF, JR., (2)
Bellevue, Pa.
MRS. JANE LAW,
Pittsburgh, Pa.
MISS JESSIE ADAMS,
West View, Pa.

MISS LUELLA M. SAWHILL,
Avalon, Pa.
MISS MABEL R. BENNETT,
Avalon, Pa.
MISS BUELA B. FRANCIS,
Avalon, Pa.


Following is a List of the purchasers in the Eastern
Company known as the Forida Citrus Development Co.

of Washington, D. C.


H. P. AMOS,
Washington, D. C.
AD-ON-A-TIRE CO.,
Washington, D. C.
ROBERT C. CLARKE,
Relay, Md.
ROBERT H. CLARK,
Washington, D. C.
JOHN H. CLARK,
Washington, D. C.
EDWARD L. CARLETON,
Washington, D. C.
WILBERT P. COOKE,
Washington, D. C.
MELVINA R. ENGLAND,
Washington, D. C.
J. PAUL GARBER,
Washington, D. C.
J. A. D. GARBER,
Washington, D. C.
JOHN A. GARBER,
Washington, D. C.
JAMES M. HALL,
Hyattsville, Md.
J. MILLARD HALL,
Hyattsville, Md.
ESTHER V. HALL,
Hyattsville, Md.
RUTH L. HALL,
Hyattsville, Md.
E. F. HAAR.
Washington, D. C.


LLOYD E. HOLSINGER,
Ridgeley, Md.
EMORY J. IRELAND,
Chevy Chase. D. C.
HUBERT R. JOHNSON,
Washington, D. C.
ROBERT R. JOHNSON,
Washington, D. C.
JOHN R. JACOBS,
Martinsburg, W. Va.
CHARLES D. KENNEY,
Washington, D. C.
WILLIAM G. LYNCH,
Baltimore, Md.

WILLIAM A. LYNCH,
Washington, D. C.

F. F. LEITH,
Cleveland Park, D. C.

FRANCES McQUINLAN,
Washington, D. C.
J. P. MOFFATT,
Washington, D. C.
W. E. MOORE,
Baltimore, Md.
J. ALONZO MERRITT,
Baltimore. Md.

RICHARD T. MERRITT,
Baltimore, Md.

ALVAH R. MERRITT,
Baltimore, Md.


Thirty-six














F. A. MINOR,
Martinsburg, W. Va.

LAURA NORRIS,
Washington. D. C.

CHARLES D. PERRY,
Martinsburg, W. Va.

CHARLES W. RAY,
Washington, D. C.

JAMES E. & SARA G. RAUPE,
Washington, D. C.

S. BERNARD RUSK,
Washington. D. C.

W. B. REED,
Washington, D. C.
MARION R. RODGERS,
Washington. D. C.

F. IRWIN RAY,
Washington, D. C.
H. L. SHAULL,
Martinsburg, W. Va.

BENJAMIN I. SPARKS,
Baltimore, Md.

JESSE E. STUMPH,
Washington, D. C.

FREDERICK W. SELLHAUSEN,
Washington. D. C.

FRANK SHACKLETT,
Hagerstown, Md.

G. M. STENGEL,
Baltimore, Md.

J. E. THRASHER,
Martinsburg, W. Va.

T. B. TODD, JR.,
Baltimore, Md.

JOSEPH B. THOMAS,
Washington, D. C.

FRED P. TROTT,
Washington, D. C.
CAROLINE M. WALTER,
Washington, D. C.
WILLIAM H. WENGER,
Washington, D. C.
BEN. T. WEBSTER,
Washington, D. C.


ALBERT S. HOGE,
Washington, D. C.

W. M. WINE,
Woodside, Delaware.

E. L. PEFFER,
Washington, D. C.

E. R. SHEPARD,
Washington, D. C.

HARRY L. LIGHT,
Washington, D. C.

CHiISTINE SPRINGER.
Washington. D. C.

MRS. JULIUS H. WOLPE,
Washington, D. C.

R. A. HALES,
Washington, D. C.

JULIUS H. WOLPE,
Washington, D. C.

G. W. STONE,
Chevy Chase, Md.

B. C. SHACKLETT,
Washington, D. C.

GEORGE W. SHACKLETT,
Front Royal, Va.

CORINNE L. SHACKLETT,
Washington, D. C.

DR. CHARLES A. WHISLER,
Denton, Md.
EDNA E. SHACKLETT,
Washington, D. C.

FRANK SHACKLETT.
Hagerstown, Md.

M. T. MOOMAW,
Chevy Chase, Md.

FRANCIS M. WEEDON,
Washington, D. C.

HARRY J. HACH.
Louisville, Ky.

J. L. HUTCHINGSON,
Washington, D. C.

WILLIAM H. WARNER,
Washington, D. C.


Thirty-seven








;LL L L, JL.iL



;II \I



- II




















.- O F .- -. 1









-, ,,MAP ', FLORIDA -

IJ .ENT> ,,;i L \ IIO\ J [.
S-:
AL D AA H


















S, ' ,:l
040: I, i



:-z -











S------------------------------------- \. :,
OC L.,L ND IL4 IO N OL T -
R.41LRO.1D5 AND HIG;HW11




c t2




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs