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Title: Tropical Wonderland Fort Lauderdale and Broward County Florida (469)
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 Material Information
Title: Tropical Wonderland Fort Lauderdale and Broward County Florida (469)
Physical Description: Book
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Bibliographic ID: UF00004148
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6583

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Back Cover
        Page 26
Full Text


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Fort


F ORT LAUDERDALE is the Gateway to the Ever-
glades. It is expanding as that El Dorado is devel-
oped, and is destined soon to become a city of fifty
thousand people. Situated on the banks of New River
just as Ancient Memphis was upon the Nile, it offers vir-
gin opportunities to be found in no other city in this Re-
public. It is a city where every day is summer and every
night is spring. The perpetual breezes from the Atlantic
Ocean soften the summer's sun, giving comfort the whole
year round. In the near future it will rival Palm Beach
and Miami as a winter resort. Already wealthy people
have come, have seen, and are conquered, causing them to
invest large sums of money in the development of new sub-


divisions. New River, the deepest river in the State, re-
ceives the waters of North New River and South Canals,
bringing them through our city in rippling waves to the
sea. Just two miles to the Atlantic Ocean, thousands are
attracted by the splendid bathing and come to enjoy the
most attractive beach south of Daytona. Forty-two miles
south of Palm Beach and twenty-six north of Miami, its
position is ideal. In no other town in Florida can as good
opportunities be found for investments. Just now the city
has the best outlook that it has ever enjoyed; and the
building is increasing all the time. We ask that you visit
our city; if you do, you will strike camp and help us chase
the tarpon. No toll bridge in Broward County.


(1) HIMMARSHEE. (2) SIGN AT DEPOT. (3) CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. (4) HIGHWAY SIGN. (5, 6, 7) RIVER SCENES. (8) COURT HOUSE. (9) BEACH


aun erdale

Slorida' s 'ropical Wonderland


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JJocation of Jort fauderdale

POWER to attract an increasing percentage of tour-
ists each year in any resort community depends chiefly
on the natural scenic and climatic advantages the
community may possess. The trend of popularity may
shift temporarily to the resort town which has theatres,
dance halls, merry-go-rounds and other places of recrea-
tion, but the attractiveness of a "fortunately located"
health-restoring community, where nature accomplished
most of the beautifying, will ultimately assert its influence.
Fort Lauderdale is just such a place.
David Wark Griffith, who produced the two film mas-
terpieces, "The Idol Dancer" and "The Love Flower," in
this section, utilizing the tropical appearance of Las Olas
Beach, a part of Fort Lauderdale, for his jungle scenes,
was highly pleased with the picture opportunities that he


encountered. When leaving with his company he said,
"Your New River, with its frequent mirror effects, is the
most beautiful I have ever seen and I have seen some
rivers."
This New River heads the long list of "advantages" that
create the charm about this semi-tropical town. It is a
wide, many-curved stream fed by a countless number of
Everglades overflows and by Lake Okeechobee and inci-
dentally furnishing a gateway for the farm products of a
vast region which would otherwise be inaccessible. That
is why Fort Lauderdale is often called "The Gateway to
the Everglades." The intertwining vines of the jungles
and the palm groves with lily-bordered settings reflect in
the smooth surface of New River along almost its entire
length, making a journey in one of the excursion boats a
source of constant delight.
This river is fathoms deep in some places and is listed
by the government as one of the deepest rivers for its


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length in the United States. Having such great depth,
the largest of pleasure yachts sail up to the center of town
from the ocean inlet and the East Coast Canal and refill
their tanks with pure water from standpipes provided at
the free docking places. Last winter many palatial boats
were anchored in this river, their owners having decided
in favor of this scenic spot over all others. Owing to its
extreme depth, it is a favorable rendezvous of the game
tarpon fish; many are caught within the city limits.
Fishing in the ocean, sound and adjacent fresh waters
has created more valuable advertising than most of the
other featured attractions of this town combined. Scores
of Isaac Waltons congregate in Fort Lauderdale during
the winter season and the displays of their catches keep
admiring crowds at the fishing docks. It is frankly ad-
iritted by other towns and cities in South Florida that this
place has the decided advantage both in size and quantity
of fish caught. The Anglers' Club includes men from
every better-known fishing center and they consider this


(1) SWAGGERTY GARAGE. (2) DIXIE GARAGE.


vicinity "just as good if not better" for the sport than their
own fishing grounds.
About 40,000 crates of oranges, grapefruit and tanger-
ines are shipped north from this locality every season be-
sides the thousands of crates of fresh vegetables such as
tomatoes, lettuce, peppers, string beans, celery, Irish and
sweet potatoes, onions, etc.
Several new subdivisions have just been completed, lo-
cated on New River east of the town, namely, Idlewylde,
Rio Vista and Himarshee Park, which point the way to-
ward the creation of a residential section to rival towns
with double the population. Larger tracts near these de-
velopments will be soon platted, as this entire section has
all the qualities of desirability from a home-builder's view-
point.
But aside from all the man-created advantages, the
greatest drawing power of Fort Lauderdale is its fortu-
nate physical location which embodies all the semi-tropical
scenery and charm that a visitor expects to find in Florida.


(3) BROWARD COUNTY GARAGE. (4) FIRE DEPARTMENT. (5) FORT LAUDERDALE GARAGE & MACHINE CO.
(6) BROWARD SALES CO. (7) FILLING STATION.













Schools
B ROWARD COUNTY enjoys the distinction of having
all its schools consolidated into six centers located
at Deerfield, Pompano, Fort Lauderdale, Dania,
Davie, and Hallandale. The County School Board owns
and operates school busses that convey the children of out-
lying districts to these consolidated graded schools. All
buildings are modern and equipped in keeping with up-to-
date educational ideas. For the current year of 1921-22
the graded schools will run eight months.
We have one Intermediate and one Senior High School
in the county which make it possible for all students com-
pleting the grammar grades to be prepared for college.
Our Intermediate High School is located at Dania.
Three years of a regular accredited high-school course are
given here under the instruction of the best trained teach-
ers. This school will have one faculty member trained to
coach athletics.
Our Senior High School is at the County Seat, Fort
Lauderdale. This is an accredited high school commis-
sioned by the Southern Association of High Schools and
Colleges and offers a regular four years' course. In 1917
this high school won first place in the State High School
Track Meet and carried off the same honor again in 1921.


These high schools offer a nine months' course and will
open concurrently with high schools in the other cities of
the Lower East Coast.
Tourist children entering any of the schools of Broward
County will be given the same attention and opportunities
that are enjoyed by the children of permanent residents.
Naturally, the best results can be realized by keeping chil-
dren in regular attendance to the close of any given term.
But where this is impossible, tourist children may receive
credit for any given month of school work regularly at-
tended, provided (i) that they submit proper credentials
for entrance to their grade, and (2) that the work done
while in attendance meets the required standards.

ahe Jfaverley School
T HIS is a select, private day-school opened to meet a
need that has long been felt. Its object is to care
for the special cases whose requirements cannot be
met by the public schools. Children who must have in-
struction in the text-books of other parts of our country, or
who are in need of private tuition in particu? r branches,
will have their individual cases thoroughly examined, and
their particular wants supplied.


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PLAYGROUND FOR CHILDREN


MODERN SCHOOL BUILDING














Church Life in Jort (auderdale
A1 P LE provision is made in our city for the expression
A of the religious life. Seven churches are already
i provided with comfortable buildings for their wor-
ship. These are the Baptist, the Presbyterian, the Chris-
tian, the Methodist Episcopal, the Methodist Church
South, the Christian Scientist, and the Nazarene. The
Episcopal Church is erecting this summer a small but very
pretty building which will be ready for use in September,
while the Roman Catholic Church is planning to put up,
in the very near future, a structure that will be an orna-
ment to our city. Other religious bodies that are not yet
ready to build but have an active membership and regu-
lar services are the Seventh Day Adventists, the Spiritual-
ists, and the Theosophical Society. Lectures by prominent


leaders in religious work are a feature of our life, while
the various Guilds and Aid Societies, directed by prominent
women of our community, furnish a wonderful field for
every sort of activity. Sunday Schools and Young People's
Societies take care of the children, and provide leaders
for Fort Lauderdale's future.

Social and Civic Life
F ORT LAUDERDALE has not overlooked the social
and civic side of life. Leaders in the promotion of
civic work invite you to make suggestions, and help
put them into effect, for the beautifying of our city. Parks,
splendid school grounds, park space along either side of the
New River, are being added to with a view of making Fort
Lauderdale the "City Beautiful."


(1) SOUTHERN METHODIST. (2) NORTHERN METHODIST. (3) CHRISTIAN SCIENCE. (4) CHRISTIAN. (5) BAPTIST. (6) PRESBYTERIAN.
(7) EPISCOPAL.







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Woman's Club
T HIS organization stands for the highest and best in
civic life, and is active in any line of work which lifts
the people to a higher standard.
It is not necessary that one remain a stranger in the city,
unless by choice, for Fort Lauderdale extends a friendly
hospitality to all. In our homes the hostesses offer after-
noon tea, luncheons, cards, and issue invitations to various
kinds of beach parties. New River, with its wonderful
charms, lends itself to all sorts of fishing and boating enter-
tainments, many beautiful yachts from all parts of the
country bringing a delightful company of visitors. The
Broward Hotel dinner dances, always popular, evening
concerts, school entertainments, Chautauqua, furnish a
wide variety for pastime. State Clubs are formed, and
programs rendered by each, with picnic days spent at the
ocean. No time to be lonely.
The highest aim of the Fort Lauderdale WOMAN'S
CLUB has been, at all times, to work for and support every
movement that makes for a larger and better city, to so con-
duct every act and achievement of this organization that it
may be worthy, and an asset to the community.
Besides the usual progressive routine club work, the
WOMAN'S CLUB is hostess to our visitors at the monthly
teas, assisted by the different churches. Fine programs are
prepared and an opportunity afforded for delightful social
times.
Other events are constantly planned with some of the
best talent available, making the club rooms the center of
educational and social activities in the city.

olf and Country Club
ONE of the most popular places in Broward County
is the Fort Lauderdale Golf and Country Club
grounds, situated just south of the city on the Dixie
Highway. The course consists of nine holes. The first
tee is off the knoll down the hollows to the green 400 yards
away, then a 137-yard mashie on an elevated green, mak-
ing a sporty shot. Then a long iron shot, but be careful of
the woods on the right. A long one down the line, passing
many bunkers, after which comes another long one start-
ing back in the woods and into the open, to the sportiest
hole of all, a dog-leg, through a clump of woods, follow-
ing, another long one over a row of bunkers. A similar
one, only much longer, and after this, home with two


woods, a mashie and two putts, or maybe three, goodness
knows.
The course is 2,700 yards in length with clay tees and
grass greens. It is noted for its wonderful fairways, the
turf being like a floor of velvet. There are excellent grass
greens and the entire course is very well bunkered.
The club house, in full view of all autoists or Florida
East Coast Railway passengers going up or down the coast,
is equipped with lounging rooms, lockers for both ladies and
gentlemen, shower baths, etc., also secretary's room and
professional's shop. There are two professionals, a secre-
tary and a greens committee of three. Visitors are welcome
to play, and a small fee of $I.oo per day is charged. If
one so desires, season membership may be obtained for
$40.00.
The Fort Lauderdale Golf Coursecame into prominence
last winter when our own President of the United States


WOMAN'S CLUB


1IP- - ~ - ---














played the course and said that he liked it. Three days
later he returned and played it again. It was here that the
Chief Executive made his best score while in the State of
Florida. Senator Frelinghuysen, of New Jersey, who at
the time was host to his Excellency in Florida, also played
the course and was very complimentary in his remarks.
The Fort Lauderdale Course was built by the city, but
was given over to the Fort Lauderdale Golf and Country
Club for regulation and attention. We invite you to join
us in this sport.

Hunting and fishingg
ROBABLY no other city in South Florida is as fortu-
nately situated for hunting and fishing as is Fort
Lauderdale. Within the last two years hunters have
left this city in the early morning and within two hours'
time have bagged deer and turkey. Hunting parties are
frequently formed here during the hunting season and


trips are made into the Everglades, where deer, turkey,
quail and wild hogs abound. Competent guides are easy
to secure.

he Ainglers' Club
s one of the live organizations of the East Coast. Med-
als, cups and other prizes are given for the largest fish
caught during the season. The wonderful fish stories
told at their meetings are worth the price of admission.
The canals, rivers and streams are full of large-mouth
black bass, which take artificial bait readily.
The sound and ocean teem with every southern variety
of salt-water fish and the river is just alive with tarpon.
Even in the city limits one can see these monsters rolling
and splashing in the water. Good mangrove snapper and
sea bass fishing from the bridges and piers at all times. Row-
boats, canoes, motor boats with guides, rods, reels and fish-
ing tackle for salt water can be hired at moderate rates.


(2, 3, 6, 7) PRESIDENT HARDING ON FORT LAUDERDALE GOLF LINKS














league Ball eamn
FORT LAUDERDALE is a member of the East Coast
Baseball League, in which games are played every
day by teams from Miami, Fort Pierce, West Palm
Beach and Fort Lauderdale. The teams are all salaried
and play the same class of ball as the State League. The
only reason the two leagues are separately formed is on ac-
count of the isolated position of the East Coast to cities
with those of the cities farther north. The East Coast
League represents the semi-tropical section of the State.
We do not believe another city in the United States the
size of Fort Lauderdale supports this class of baseball for
the pleasure of its visitors and its own citizenship. Believ-
ing at all times that clean sport is an important factor in
the development of its citizenship, Fort Lauderdale offers
not only golf grounds but city tennis courts and encourages
in every way the school sports such as basketball, baseball,


and track athletics.. In the last four years Fort Lauderdale
High School track team has won the State track meet held
at Gainesville, Florida, at which meet our team competed
against such larger city teams as Jacksonville and Tampa,
and the dual meet with Miami has been captured by our
boys four times out of the six meets held. Citizens will
contribute this year to obtain for the boys a special athletic
coach in order to give them the best advantages in their
training.

Horseshoe Club
T H E Fort Lauderdale Horseshoe Club was organized
during the season of 1920-21, and from the start the
membership increased daily until at present it in-
cludes men from all professions and about every State
in the Union.


THE ANGLERS' CLUB IS A LIVE ORGANIZATION













These men always have been and always will be fond of
the game, and as it is played here under the rules of the
National League of Horseshoe and Quoit Pitchers, they
find it difficult to refrain from playing long enough for
sleep and refreshments.
Great enthusiasm is manifested during exhibition and
tournament games, and the horseshoe courts are one of the
interesting places of the city, winter and summer.
Match games are played with nearby towns and the club
extends a welcome at all times to both resident and tourist.

-" rapshooting rhe Sport Alliuring
ERHAPS nowhere in Florida is there a better shoot-
ing range than the one leased by the Fort Lauderdale
Gun Club. Located two miles from the city on the
Dixie Highway, it is practically in your own yard when-


ever you want to take a try at the "elusive clays." A new
Western Automatic trap has been installed this summer
and you will find a bunch of good sportsmen waiting to
welcome you. Shoots are held on alternate Wednesday and
Saturday afternoons throughout the winter season, and by
communicating with the Secretary you can shoot any day.
Trophy shoots will be held at various times for your enter-
tainment and profit.

Hotels and Apartments
]NOTHING furnishes a more accurate index to the
financial condition of a city or more convincingly
proves its enterprise and spirit of progress than the
number of hotels of which it boasts and the quality of those
hostelries-their size, comfort and the "at-home" atmos-
phere necessary to the successful entertaining of guests.


TRAPSHOOTERS ON THE FIRING LINE













Fort Lauderdale is particularly fortunate in this regard.
Tourists and winter residents will find ample accommo-
dations in hotel and apartment houses. With the Hotel
Broward in the lead, which is one of the finest tourist ho-
tels in Florida, the Gilbert, New River, Palms, De Soto
and Keystone hotels, we are able to care for all classes from
the millionaire to the man of moderate means at rates more
reasonable than can be found elsewhere in Southern
Florida.


The Dresden and the Wallace Apartments are the two
leading apartment houses, each containing twelve nicely
furnished apartments and each apartment having private
bath, hot and cold water. The Smith Apartments also
has accommodations for a number of families and the new
Stufflebeim and Olifred Apartments will take care of four
families each. With numerous smaller apartments, bun-
galows and rooms in private homes, visitors can find a com-
fortable place to live, and the charges are very moderate.


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(1) GILBERT. (2) SMITH APARTMENTS. (3) DRESDEN APARTMENTS. (4) WALLACE APARTMENTS. (5) BROWARD. (6) PALMS. (7) SHIPPEY HOME.
(8) NEW RIVER. (9) LAS OLAS INN.


_














Data elating to Water Supply
Source of Supply-Wells drilled seventy feet deep in
limestone.
Bacteriology-Even the raw water as it comes from the
wells is perfectly safe from a sanitary standpoint as attested
by frequent bacteriological examinations. The treatment
given for other reasons is an additional safeguard.
Treatment-The raw water contains a considerable
quantity of iron. The city has installed a softening plant
of the intermittent type, where all water is treated.
Analysis-The following analysis was made April 4,
1921 ; the water used in the analysis was taken from service
pipe at random by a local industrial corporation without
previous notice to the Water Department: Grainsper
gallon
Silica .. .. .. 0.233
Oxides iron and aluminum 0.163
Carbonate of lime .. .... 2.886
Sulphate of lime .. .... 0.777
Carbonate of magnesia .. .... 0.194
Chloride of magnesia .. ... 0.674
Sodium and potassium sulphates trace
Sodium and potassium chlorides 13.131
Loss, etc. .... 0.093
Organic matter .. ..... 0.584


Capacity-Present capacity of softening plant is 300,000
gallons daily. The present daily average quantity pumped
into the mains is Ioo,ooo gallons.

" o 0 Jo anl
ELI EVING in the stability of our community and the
future growth of business in Fort Lauderdale, a
group of men who had made a success for them-
selves met and organized the Security State Bank, one of
the institutions born in Fort Lauderdale in 1920. The
bank enjoyed a splendid growth after opening for business
March I, 1920, and, although being the youngest bank
in the county, the organizers felt proud that its resources
should reach a quarter of a million dollars in the first year
of business. Then came the next step of progress, and de-
velopment of the bank.
Additional capital is invariably the means of increasing
the volume of any business. Realizing this, the directors
of the bank made application for an increase of capital
stock from' $25,000 to $50,000, which was immediately ap-
proved, and the stock was distributed in a way that would
mean growth for the bank. Then another step of prog-
ress came.


VIEWS OF MUNICIPAL WATERWORKS





































FIRST NATIONAL BANK FORT LAUDERDALE LUMBER COMPANY


Feeling that a bank identified with the Federal Reserve
System means quite a safeguard for depositors, the direc-
tors made application to the Comptroller of the Currency
at Washington for the conversion of the bank into the


First National Bank of Fort Lauderdale, which was imme-
diately approved and charter issued.
While other institutions in that line have grown and
prospered, it merely impresses upon one the fact that Fort


FORT LAUDERDALE STATE BANK


EVERGLADE ]LUMBER COMPANY

























YACHT BASIN


Lauderdale is a growing city and its residents and visitors
will receive the courtesy of prosperous banks as well as be
accommodated in every phase of modern banking.
The Fort Lauderdale State Bank is the oldest and
largest bank in Broward County, having been organized
in 1911. The bank was organized with the capital of $15,-
ooo, which was later increased to $25,000, and in 1920
the capital was doubled from the undivided profit account
and made $50,000. From a very small beginning in 1911,
the assets of the bank went over a million dollars in the
spring of 1921. This bank has always helped every worthy
cause in the development of Fort Lauderdale, and always
stands ready to give visitors every assistance possible while
in our city.

Cumber Tards
FORT LAUDERDALE justly prides itself on excep-
tional stocks of building material, as indicated by the
$250,000 new Broward Hotel or the modest cot-
tage, and facilities for distribution. These are evidenced
by the fact that the volume of business during the past five



AL .rnjM


years shows increase of more than 0oo per cent. Our yards
carry carload-lot stocks of every kind of building material,
and each yard operates its own sawmill, enabling quick de-
livery of heavy dimension stock. With our wonderful canal
system, river and Florida East Coast Railway we can sup-
ply the present and future settlers, including that vast em-
pire, the Everglades. Boats leave docks daily to Lake
Okeechobee. No other Florida East Coast City surpasses
our location with facilities to supply that wonderful em-
pire. Competent contractors and mechanics of all trades
are here to meet all demands which is evidenced by beau-
tiful homes and business blocks.
The plant of the Gate City Planing Mill is one of the
best equipped on the East Coast for making strictly high-
grade frames, sash, doors, cabinet work and interior trim.
It now occupies about 16,0oo feet of floor space as against
1,300 feet when it was started some seven years ago. The
machinery is all modern and electrically driven.
There is absolutely nothing in the line of first-class mill-
work, from window frames to the finest hard-wood trim,
which this mill cannot furnish.





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Boatways and pairr F/or&
T HERE are several first-class boatways in the heart of
the city, the best equipped boat-building establish-
ments along the coast. Yachts, houseboats and ves-
sels of every description are completely overhauled, re-
paired and painted.
Just above the railroad bridge, marine repairs of every
description-engines, boilers, tanks and any machine work
-are given prompt attention day or night. Skillful me-
chanics are employed, and the charges are moderate.
One of the most up-to-date covered yacht basins in the
world is now under construction, and is now ready to ac-
commodate several score of large and small vessels. This
basin is in fresh running water (pure enough to drink).
No barnacles or salt-water worms or borers can live in it.
If your boat is infected with these pests, they cannot live
if stored in this water. It has become the habit to leave
boats for a few weeks to entirely kill all such growth. This
basin has dry dock for 250-foot boats, dry storage, storage
for sails and hamper. The terms are most reasonable and
the concern most reliable.


fort Jf7auderdale's ("ep Inlet
OUNDINGS have been made and work is now un-
der way to make a cut 400 feet wide and II feet
deep at mean low tide from New River Sound to
the Atlantic Ocean. There will be stone jetties on both
sides and the new Fishing and Promenade Pier will be
built on the jetties. This deep waterway will open up
the way from the lake to the Atlantic ports for all kinds
of freight, fruit and vegetables, and is destined to make
Broward County one of the most important counties in the
State. Fort Lauderdale, with its deep water right up to
the city, will become one of the ports of call for coastwise
vessels. No one can prophesy what this will mean to this
entire section of country in the very near future.
/A Boon to rachtsmen
TH E inland waterway from New York to Key West
runs through the East Coast Canal. From the
North, when you pass through Las Olas Boulevard
bridge, bear south to the Coast Guard Station, or House of
Refuge. When abreast of the high coconut palm, bear
due west, follow the markers to Lake Mabel Inlet show-
ing the Anglers' Club "Welcome" sign, and continue west.
You are in the wonderful New River and one mile and a


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MR - P PM T ---i T. M;

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VISITORS' DOCK NO. 1 FREIGHT AND PASSENGER DOCK
VISITORS' DOCK NO. 2. PRESIDENT HARDING ARRIVING ON YACHT "KLYO." VISITING YACHTS AT CITY DOCKS.














half from the city, with deep water all the way. The city
provides visitors docks with standpipes for filling tanks,
free of charge, with pure water. A cordial welcome is ex-
tended to all who care to avail themselves of this privilege.

Stores of jort fauderdale
T HE policies of the retail stores of any community
are developed by the desires of their patrons. The
people of Fort Lauderdale are a cosmopolitan peo-
ple, accustomed to service and varied in their desires. The
stores of Fort Lauderdale accepting the responsibility of
having in stock at all times the goods that their patrons
have a right to expect, have developed retail establishments
that would be a credit to cities many times the size of Fort
Lauderdale. There are department stores, whose window
trims, merchandise displays and furnishings are as modern
as you will find in the larger cities. The hardware and
furniture stores carry stocks large and varied enough to


satisfy all normal desires, so that it is not necessary for
the home-builder to send away for home-building or home-
furnishing material. Besides these there is a modern va-
riety store, drug stores, confectionery and cold drink stores,
a modern and up-to-the-minute jewelry store, book stores
and grocery stores, and meat markets, garages and filling
stations.
The newcomer will find the merchants of Fort Lauder-
dale making a daily earnest effort to eliminate all weakness
of service and to add every facility and method that will
make shopping more comfortable and satisfying to every
customer.

Band Concerts
D URING the winter season the Fort Lauderdale City
Band, under the leadership of one of the best band-
masters in Florida, will render appropriate selec-
tions at the band and promenade concert twice each week.
This concert is on the banks of the beautiful river and the


(1) BRYAN BLOCK. (2) FLIPPEN HARDWARE STORE. (3) TELEPHONE EXCHANGE AND CRIM'S. (4) H. G. WHEELER. (5) D. T. HART & CO.
(7) OLIVER BROS. (8) ANDREWS AVENUE. (9) LEHRMAN'S.


1919211



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Beautiful 'ejidences in Fort fJauderdale


(1) BURNHAM. (2) CALDER. (3) STILWELL. (4) R. E. DYE. (5) WEIDLING. (6) ALEXANDER. (7) REVESMONTE. (8) DRIGGERS.
(9) KOHLHOUSEN. (10) STRANAHAN. (11) MARSHALL.








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What could be more desirable than a Winter Home in Fort IJauderdale?


(1) LOOKING FROM IDLEWYLD. (2) STANFORD. (3) DYE. (4) HILLS. (5) REED BRYAN. (6) ALDERMAN. (8) BROOK. (9) LINK. (10) SNYDER.
(11) HOWELL. (12) BROWN. (13) SCOTT. (14) HEIMBERGER. (15) BURNHAM. (16) AUSHERMAN. (17) SPERRY.



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drives on both sides of same are lined with autos for many
blocks. Hundreds of people come into town on these even-
ings to enjoy the music. The pleasure it gives to the people
cannot be overestimated.
Auto and aYCotorists' Camp
OR the one who prefers to cruise along the highways
with no destination in mind and who has the wan-
derlust spirit thoroughly in his system and who on
approaching some town on his way feels that he must put
his toe on the accelerator and beat it through, this is no
place. Our Auto Camp Ground, owned by the city, will
compel him to stick around and, if he does, he will "stay
for keeps." It is arranged on sensible sanitary principles
and every comfort and convenience for your welfare pro-
vided. You will be welcome to all we can afford, and we
know you will be happy and pleased with the surroundings.
A small fee is charged for this privilege. See the keeper on
the grounds.


Excellent Driveway s
O NE of the first things to impress the tourist when
he arrives in South Florida, especially if he is trav-
eling by auto, is the hard-surfaced, oiled roads.
The smooth, pavement-like roads from the north line of
Palm Beach County to Florida City, some forty miles
south of Miami, is a never-ending delight to the autoist.
Las Olas Boulevard, connecting Fort Lauderdale with
Las Olas Beach, is an oiled road of two miles in length. It
is the intention of the citizens of Fort Lauderdale to make
of this boulevard a double driveway, each drive being a
paved road twenty-five feet wide, with a twenty-foot park-
way between, on which all manner of tropical trees and
shrubs will be cultivated.
At Las Olas Beach a number of miles of oiled roads and
streets have been constructed on which the autoist can ride
along palm-bordered drives skirting the sound where David
Wark Griffith "shot" the scenes for his great picture, "The


(1) COLEE HAMMOCK. (2) NEW RIVER SHORE DRIVE. (3) TO TARPON BEND. (4) BY LAS OLAS SOUND. (5) CITY PARK AT BEACH.
(6) U. S. COAST GUARD STATION. (8) COUNTY LINE.













Idol Dancer," or among fascinating tangles of tropical trees
and shrubs. These drives connect with a boulevard along
the Atlantic Ocean.
Other very popular drives for the past few years are the
roads into the Everglades, touching Davie, the first town
to be established in the 'Glades. These roads complete
loops by way of Davie, Dania, Hallandale and Fort Lau-
derdale, giving the tourist as good an opportunity to see
the Everglades and the development being done in that
wonderful section as a fifty-mile drive into the interior.
rAgriculture
BROWARD COUNTY has three distinct types of soil,
affording a wide range in agricultural activity. Par-
alleling the Dixie Highway on both sides are large
areas of marl lands, than which no type of soil in the South
will be found more productive.
During the winter months one sees here thousands of
acres of tomatoes, beans, peppers, cabbage, eggplant and


other truck crops. These crops are often followed by corn
and other staples during the summer. Several hundred
acres of this marl land has recently been planted to citrus,
and the trees are showing marvelous growth and fruit.
These marl lands are wonderfully adapted to specialized
or general farming.
Our sand area is adapted to all crops as are usually
found on such soil, as well as to a great variety of tropical
fruits, including avocadoes, mangoes and guavas. Coco-
nuts and bananas are produced in abundance. It is in this
area that most of the wonderful citrus groves are found.

ylorida Citrus Ex change
SUBEXCHANGE of the Florida Citrus Exchange
was organized in Broward County during this sum-
mer. The machinery has been installed and indi-
cations are that 40,000 boxes of oranges and grapefruit will
be shipped during the 1921-1922 season. Many hundreds


VEGETABLES DO WELL ON BROWARD COUNTY SOIL.







FO RT LAJ D E -44Z
Qadewcay to t/e fverrglade,>


of acres will come into bearing next year and thousands of
new acreage have been set to citrus in the past four or five
years, since it has been proven conditions here are very
favorable for such production.

Vegetables
As the winter season advances and our friends in the
North are longing for the touch of green on their
tables, Broward County is all ahum, striving to re-
lieve that awful longing. Daily we are sending to them
carloads of tomatoes, peppers, beans, cukes, cabbage and
other fresh vegetables. Fort Lauderdale with her five
loading tracks, affords a busy scene as auto trucks from
nearby fields and bargeloads of produce come from the
Everglades and the Lake country via the drainage canal
and New River, to be rushed to our snowbound friends.


Citrus Production
W HILE there are many fine groves in this county,
twenty-five to thirty years old, the citrus develop-
ment is really in its infancy. The success of the
existing plantings has stimulated the planting of many
hundred acres of new groves during the past eighteen
months, some enterprises involving quite large acreages.
The recent organization of a co-operative association of
growers has added a decided stimulus to the citrus industry
of Broward County. They own their packing house and
sell their fruit through the Florida Citrus Exchange.
SPoultry
N recent years poultry has been eminently profitable.
The County Commissioners have maintained a Home
Demonstrator Agent, who was a poultry specialist and
under whose direction the growers have, by culling and
selection, made their efforts surprisingly profitable. Some


LAUDERDALE FROM CITY TO OCEAN


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larger in height, spread and trunk measurement than were
the State trees at the age of ten years, or twice as old. The
State bulletin giving their measurements said their trees
were planted in 'the average good citrus soil for citrus
growing in this State.'
"Since the first year after planting I have not used fer-
tilizer (except possibly some four or five tons of hardwood
ashes and a like amount of ground phosphate rock during
seven years the grove has been in existence, the cost being
trifling), nor have I cultivated the grove by plowing, har-
rowing or in any other manner, but have allowed the grass
and weeds to grow, mowing it from three to five times a
year.
"Since the third year after planting I have had excel-
lent drainage by a system of field ditches every other tree
row. Since then at no time has the ground ever shown
either an excess or a deficiency of moisture; the trees being
beautifully green both winter and summer; never showing
the lack of either food or moisture, and there being a splen-


did bloom each year. Many people visiting the grove de-
clare it to be one of the best in the State.
"Last March I planted both grapes and blackberries,
but not in quantity for commercial purposes. They are
both doing magnificently well so far as the few months'
growth shows, but the experiment is neither far enough
along nor were the quantities sufficient to make it a real
test as to their commercial production. It is my opinion,
however, based on the way they have come thus far, that
their commercial production, with proper markets, would
be an unqualified success. I have another place on the
east side of the farm lately acquired, on which blackberries
for home use had been planted by the former owner. He
left the place three or four years ago, since which time
they have had absolutely no care, have remained unpruned
and half-smothered in weeds and grass, and yet this sum-
mer were loaded with a tremendous crop of as fine black-
berries as one could wish to eat. I believe both soil and
moisture conditions here to be ideal for their production.
C. A. WALSH."


AT FORT LAUDERDALE. (1) NEW RIVER DRIVE. (2) PALM DRIVE. (3) DIXIE HIGHWAY. (4) LAS OLAS SOUND. (5) COCO AVENUE.
(6) COCO AVENUE (7) DIXIE HIGHWAY.













The wonderful drive from Davie to Fort Lauderdale,
along the New River Canal and over the bridges through
the citrus and farm lands, is one long to be remembered.
One is startled by a covey of quail running across the road
or the whiz of a wild turkey, and here and there a glimpse
of the canal through the foliage is often a most interesting
sight. If one should alight and quietly peep over the bank,
he will most likely be rewarded by seeing a large alligator
basking in the sunshine. Then there are several hard rock
roads leading east to that main artery of the East Coast,
the Dixie Highway, with its wonderful growth of Aus-
tralian pines making a covered archway of glorious shade
almost the entire length of Broward County.

Seminole Indians
rT ERY little is known of the Seminole Indian by the
Majority of the people of the United States. Ameri-
can Indians suggest feathers, war paint, tomahawks,
etc. But here is a.village of real Indians who are peaceful
and law-abiding and who live by hunting alligators for
their hides, and otter, raccoons and other fur-bearing ani-
mals. Their costume or dress is made up of many colored
strips of cloth sewn together and made up with tucks and
pleats, making a wonderful mass of variegated colors. The
women wear strings of colored beads, often weighing sev-
eral pounds, tightly wound around their necks, making
them walk in a very upright manner. They have masses
of wonderful blue-black wavy hair and wear no shoes or
moccasins. They are very modest in their bearing anL'
have a quiet dignity that is very impressive. The village,
located about five minutes west of town, is an interesting
Place to visit.


14)HE information contained
& in this booklet has been
compiled by the Fort Lauder-
dale Chamber of Commerce and
is authentic in every detail.


(Signed) COM. A. H. BROOK
Chairman
Publicity Committee
WILLIAM KOHLHOUSEN
J. D. SHERWIN


SSEMINOLE INDIAN FAMILY.
Printed by The Rec rd Compa Augustine, Florida


7




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