• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Front Cover
 Back Cover






Group Title: instructive picture book, or, Lessons from the vegetable world
Title: The instructive picture book, or, Lessons from the vegetable world
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00004072/00001
 Material Information
Title: The instructive picture book, or, Lessons from the vegetable world
Alternate Title: Lessons from the vegetable world
Instructive picture book, or, Progressive lessons from the natural history of plants and animals
Physical Description: 22, <2> p., <62> leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 33 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Yonge, Charlotte Mary, 1823-1901
Edmonston & Douglas ( Publisher )
Publisher: Edmonston & Douglas
Place of Publication: Edinburgh
Publication Date: 1858
Copyright Date: 1858
 Subjects
Subject: Botany -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Fruit -- Pictorial works   ( lcsh )
Vegetables -- Pictorial works   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1858   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1858   ( local )
Printed boards (Binding) -- 1858   ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1858
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Printed boards (Binding)   ( rbbin )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Scotland -- Edinburgh
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by the author of "The heir of Redclyffe" and "The herb of the field" ; illustrated with 31 colored plates ; arranged by Robert M. Stark.
General Note: Authorship attributed by Halkett & Laing, III, 162.
General Note: Plates on double leaves, numbered I-XXXI.
General Note: Publisher's ads on paste-downs: p. 2 & 3 of cover.
General Note: Illustrations are hand-colored.
General Note: This book is a continuation of "The Instructive picture book, or, Progressive lessons from the natural history of plants and animals", even though not indicated on t.p., it is stated at the beginning of text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00004072
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA6815
notis - ALG5534
oclc - 47293637
alephbibnum - 002225262

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Cover
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Page 65
        Page 66
Full Text



























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a4 w' o ir, A t .fO ** 1 O1 IEI OF it- ) c IAY
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In preparation, in Super Royal 4to,

A NEW BOTANICAL WORK BY PROFESSOR BALFOUR AND DR. GREVILLE,
WITH CHROMO-LITHOGRAPHIC ILLUSTRATIONS,

THE


PLANT SCENERY OF THE WORLD,
A POPULAR INTRODUCTION TO

BOTANICAL GEOGRAPHY.
BY

JOHN HUTTON BALFOUR, A.M., M.D., F.R.SS.L.E.,
REGIUS KEEPER OF THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN, AND PROFESSOR OF BOTANY IN THE UNIVERSITY OE EDINBURGH
AND
ROBERT KAYE GREVILLE, LL.D., F.R.S.E.,
CORRESPONDING MEMBER OF THE NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, PARIS; OF THE ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES,
PHILADELPHIA, ETC. ETC. ETC.


THIS WORK is intended to be a POPULAR INTRODUCTION to BOTANICAL GEOGRAPHY.
It will contain Coloured Pictorial Illustrations in Chromo-Lithography of the
characteristic vegetation of the various quarters of the globe, along with Descriptive
Letterpress. The plants will be carefully selected and drawn, so as to secure bota-
nical accuracy, and display the marked physiognomic features of the flora of diffe-
rent countries. The letterpress will embrace a general view of the distribution of
plants over the globe, with descriptions of the general characters and uses of the
plants figured in the plates. The descriptions will be divested of technicalities as
much as possible, so as to render them interesting and intelligible to the unscientific
reader. The book will apear in Monthly Parts, each containing two plates carefully
coloured after nature, and four pages of letterpress; and notwithstanding the low-
ness of the price at which it will be published, it will be produced in the very best
style of the art. It will be issued in such a way that, when the work is completed,
the plates and descriptions may be arranged geographically.

This Valuable Work will be completed in about Thirty Parts, published
Monthly, price 2s. each, and may be procured from all Booksellers.

The first Part will be published in January 1858.


EDINBURGH: EDMONSTON AND DOUGLAS, 87 PRINCES STREET.


The Baldwin Library
RmB








THE


INSTRUCTIVE PICTURE BOOK.



OR


LESSONS FROM THE VEGETABLE WORLD.



BY


THE AUTHOR OF "THE HEIR OF REDCLYFFE" AND "THE HERB OF THE FIELD."





ILLUSTRATED WITH 31 COLOURED PLATES. ARRANGED BY ROBERT M. STARK,

FELLOW OF THE BOTANICAL AND ROYAL PHYSICAL SOCIETIES, EDINBURGH, AUTHOR OF "A POPULAR HISTORY OF BRITISH MOSSES.'"









"It is a fallacy to regard memory as a vessel which receives and retains impartially what may happen to be poured
into it: it is only what has awakened a child's interest that it remembers tenaciously, and recollects quickly; and only those
impressions awaken a child's interest which are adapted to the stage and condition of its mind, which gratify, and excite while
they gratify, its appetite for knowledge. Now, can it be doubted that it is external objects which most attract and fix the
attention of children, and which are consequently most naturally, easily, and permanently remembered! This vast field,
partitioned as it has been among very many sciences, for which collectively we want an adequate title, and of which we
would now mention only one, though a very comprehensive division Natural History affords most ample materials through
the longest school course, for developing as well as storing the youthful understanding, and for arousing the young wonder and
sense of beauty." Dr. W. .B. Ilodgson, in Westminster Review, October 1853.


EDINBURGH:

EDMONSTON & DOUGLAS, 87 PRINCES STREET.


1858.








4


of a slender brown or red stem. The urn is drawn magni-
fied, by the side of the little moss plant (fig. d), tIat its curious
shape may be seen. When the seed is ripe; the top rises
up, and falls off, leaving the case open as here shewn, so
as to let the purses out but they are still guarded by the
little fringe of teeth in which ends the rim of their cup
and which are so wondrously and beautifully made that
they close up on the least touch of damp that might hurt
the treasured seed within. Moss grows in clusters and
cushions of the richest brightest green. Each tuft of vel-
vet moss is in reality afairp forest of tiny trees, each per-
fect, with the green leaves below the brown stem bearing
the graceful urn. Even the small round dot on the tiles of
a house is a whole wood in itself, and there must be mil-
lions of moss plants in the handfuls that are torn up to
dress out a bowl of flowers. What would our woods be
without their banks of elastic dry fresh moss, of that
delicate soft green sort (the PROLIFEROUS HYPNUM)
which has the graceful leaves so curving and so soft.
How dreary our decayed trees would be were they not
clothed by the HYPNUM of the plate; how much bright
green moors and bogs would lose without the creeping
Hypnum, always shewing a dangerous place; and the
dark, tall, dank swan's neck BRYUM.
It was the examination of a little piece of moss, so freshly
green, and so beautifully formed, that cheered the heart
of the great traveller Mungo Park, when he was ready to
sink down with hunger, thirst and fatigue in the African
desert, for the wondrous perfection of that tiny plant
brought to his mind the presence and the care of the Great
Creator, Whose Hand is over all His works.
FERNS are plants which at first sight seem to be all leaf and
no blossom. They love the hedge side, and the shelter of
the rock, or woody bank where they may freely raise
their delicate wavy foliage. They have a stiff strong
footstalk, whence spreads the leafy part called by the
learned the FROND, which usually bears the seed bearing
portions. In the POLYPODY (fig. e) you may see, on the
back of the leaves, some small dots; these are clusters
of cases, in which lie the purses, filled with minute seeds.
The purses, not to say the seeds, are so small that the eye
cannot discover them, and so it used to be an old saying
that those who gathered fern seed could walk invisible,
meaning that the one was as impossible as the other. The
polypody has these clusters in round dots, like little spots
of gold on the back of the prettily divided fronds, ranged
with perfect regularity. It may be found all over the
British Islands, growing on old trees, ruins, banks or rocks
and keeping its fresh bright green all the winter. The
beautiful feathery MALE FERN and delicate LADY FERN
have their dots much darker and far smaller. The long
undivided fronds of the polished HARTSTONGUE have
little brown lines, alternately long and short, on the back.
the BRACKEN or EAGLE FERN has the latter name,
because when the stem is cut through, there is a black
mark, which some call a Spread Eagle, while others say
it is King Charles in the Oak. It is the cover which most
abounds in parks, as a shelter for deer, and which turning
brown in autumn, gives the rich tinting to woods and
moorlands; the fructification is carried on, not in dots;
but under the edge of the frond which is turned over all
the way round like a hem. Bracken has a great deal of
potash in it, and is burnt in great quantities for the sake
of the ashes which are used in making soap; it is also
used for litter for pigs, and is the most profitable of Bri-
tish Ferns. But in other countries, Ferns are far more
important. In New-Zealand, they are eaten by the nati-
ves, and in hot climates, they grow to the size of trees.


Indeed it is plain that fern trees must once have grown
in Great Britain, for the shape of many of their large lea-
ves is to be found upon pieces of coal and this useful mineral
is believed to be masses of moss, ferns, trees and other
plants compressed closely together under some great
heat. These plants with their unseen blossoms have had
a strange share, in old times, in the formation of our world.

II. PHCENOGAMOUS-PLANTS or FLOWERING-
PLANTS.

All these are so formed as to follow certain rules in producing
their blossom and seed, and no one can look into a flower


without being the more surprised and delighted, the
more he examines, and also, it may be hoped, thank-
ful that so much has been done to delight our eyes and
our other senses by the beauty and sweetness of these
blossoms.
First there is what children call the
FLOWER, the blue, pink, or
white leaves. The proper name of
this is the COROLLA, and each
separate leaf of it is called a PE-
TAL. In the ROSE (fig.i) the co-
rolla is in five separate petals, in
the Auricula (fig. k) it is in one
single petal such as you could pull
out all at once. This corolla is fas-
tened, to keep it safe, into a green
cup, called the CALYX, or chalice,
which closed over it in the bud, and shut
it in safely from harm till it was time
for it to unfold. This calyx is the outer
curtain, the corolla is the more beau-
tiful smooth inner curtain of the dwel-
ling place within the flower. The calyx
is often rough or covered with spines, or
perhaps with hairs or with down, to
keep all safe and warm; the corolla is smooth, satiny, and
often beautifully coloured. And what are the parts so
choicely sheltered? See within, a number of long slender
threads each bearing a yellow case on the summit. These
threads are named STAMENS,
the thready part is the filament
the case which they bear is the
ANTHER. When ripe it is full
of fine yellow dust named POL-
LEN, the same which is gathe-
red by the Bees to make bee-
bread, but which has another
use in the flower. In the mid-
dle of the stamens is a green or
brown cushion sometimes ending
in a knob, like a pin's head, sometimes in a crown of
points, sometimes in little hooks. This is the CAR-
PEL or PISTIL which is to be-
come the case for the seed.
The top, whether pin's head or
crown, is named the STIGMA,
the slender thread the STYLE,
the cushion below, the GERM.
The office of the anthers is to
scatter their yellow dust on
the stigma; whence it passes down the style, and this
done, the corolla gradually fades away, while the germ
enlarges, and in time becomes the fruit. In the wild rose
(fig. i) the germ has swelled into the red fruit beside it,
which has five divisions, one for every division of the
carpel. In other plants, the carpel becomes a pod or~a
capsule, or a purse or a berry. There are
infinite varieties of fruits as there are of
forms of corolla and numbers of stamens,
but the great rule is, that no seed is pro-
duced without stamens and pistils. So-
metimes they grow in separate flowers
as in the OAK (fig. m) sometimes even in
separate trees sometimes there is no co-
rolla, sometimes no calyx, but stamens and carpels there
must be. The only flowers without them are those which
are called double, and these have their petals so multi-


plied as to leave no room for the useful parts, and there-
fore they can never produce any fruit.
These FLOWERING-PLANTS are again divided into two great
classes


I. ENDOGENS & II. EXOGENS.
(Inward Growers.) (Outward Growers.)

Endogens or inward growers shoot up from the Earth with a
single bud, of the full girth of the future stem. The outer
part of the stem is the hardest; it is often hollow within





















VEGETABLE SUBSTANCES.


Before the Earth was peopled with the Animals you
have learnt in your first picture book, it was made pleasant
for them by the growth of herbs and trees, to afford them
food and shelter. These green things, plant, shrub, and forest
tree, from the Vegetable Kingdom, and this book is to make
you better acquainted with some of our best and most useful
friends.
All Vegetables are formed of an immense number of cells and
vessels, divided by a thin transparent membrane, and filled
with juices of various colours, which, seen, through the
coating, give the tints of the different parts of the plant.
Although each cell is so small that they cannot be seen
with the naked eye, the microscope shews that they are
generally either round or oval, or six-sided, like cells in
a honeycomb; while the vessels are long cylinders, and
more like pipes or tubes. They have little openings from
one to another, and spaces between to serve for passages
for the sap and other juices.
The sap is, as it were, vegetable's blood; for it is their spring
of life and growth, and when it is not moving, they are
either dead or in a sort of sleep, neither growing nor bea-
ring fruit. And just as animal blood is fed by food, and
,kept in motion by the air that is breathed in; so the sap
is fed by moisture from the ground, and rendered healthy
by nourishment from the air.
The Roots, which fix the plant in its place, contain their mouths.
Each of the little fibres or branches of the root ends in
open cells, like a sponge, by which moisture is drawn up
from the ground, to circulate through the vessels in the
stem and branches, and push on the buds and blossoms.
If the roots are mouths, the leaves answer to lungs, for their
cells draw in the air, and give out again that portion of
it which is not needed for the support of the plant; and
they are covered with small holes for this purpose.
New plants are chiefly produced from seeds, and the blosso-
ming and fruit-bearing are the great summer business of
the Vegetable world, and are called the Fructification.
Microscopes have shewn us that the seeds bear packed
within them the tiny embryo of the future herb, shrub or
even tree, that is waiting to spring forth until it shall be
placed in the right soil, with as much warmth, moisture
and light as its own nature may require.


PLATE 1.

Vegetables have been divided into several great classes and
the first plate gives examples of each of these.

I. CRYPTOGAMOUS & II. PI-I(NOGAMOUS-PLANTS.
Flowerless. Flowering.
CRYPTOGAMOUS plants are those in which the process of
fructification is invisible to us.
PHCENOGAMOUS plants are those in which fructification or
blossoming and seeding is visible.

I. CRYPTOGAMOUS-PLANTS'.
The flowerless races are in tribes very unlike both to each
other or to the flowering plants, so that they are quite a
study apart, and perhaps the most mysterious and diffi-
cult part of botany.
LICHENS form the yellow, white or grey crust that paints
old bricks, or stones, or they hang like hoary hair from
the branches of trees, peep out like scallops of brown
leather from among the short grass on downs, or moors,
or sit like lumps of yellow jelly upon the old limbs of


trees, or like those in the plate (fig. a) rise out of rotten
wood. They seem at first sight to have no parts at all,
but on examination even of the grey crust on the wall,
it may be found that one edge is slightly raised. Beneath
this, microscopes discover an infinite number of minute
purses, each filled with seeds too small to be seen or even to
be felt, but yet with life and growth within them. The
air is full of these invisible seeds, they fix themselves
wherever they can find a resting place, and the lichens
spring forth. They can live where everything else would
starve, heat and cold do not hurt them, and it is almost
impossible to keep them away. To us they seem the first
tokens of age or decay, but Infinite Wisdom has made
them also the first beginnings of vegetable life. Their
growth upon the bare rock or dry wood, forms mould
enough for the maintenance of other plants, a little lar-
ger, these again for others, till the whole dreary stony
mass, or old decaying tree becomes the seat of beautiful
and refreshing verdure and shelter. And thus the yellow
lung-wort on the ruin, and the hoary liver-wort on the
hollow oak shew us that we must not despise the day of
small things.
The FUNGUS TRIBE are near relations to the lichens, but
are usually larger. Their purses of invisible seeds are
within a fleshy covering, instead of being exposed to the
air like those of the Lichen. The handsomest and most
developed of the race are the AGARICS, to which belongs
the fungus in the plate (fig. b). Many of them are poi-
sonous and their principle office seems to be, like that
of the lichen, to form soil by their decay, as the fore-
runners of a higher class of plants.
ALGAE or SEA-WEEDS are the vegetation which clothes the
depths of the Sea, and serves for the support and shelter
of the creatures which inhabit the ocean. They are of
all sizes, from one which can hardly be seen, and grows
upon the gills of fish, up to enormous streamers longer
than the mightiest forest tree; but their seeds are in vi-
sible, aid the parts by which they produce them are
very different in various kinds. Sea weeds are generally
brown, if they grow in shallow water, green where it is a
little deeper, and pink, like the beautiful DELESSERIA in
the plate, (fig. e) when they grow far down in the sea, without
much light. The fructification of this pretty genus in car-
ried on in the winter, upon the rib down the middle of
the leaf, or frond. One of these beautiful pink leaves has
been found thirteen inches long and eight broad. They
are some times washed up on the Sea shore, with a few
other pink kinds, but the brown sorts are more often met
with. All children who have been by the sea-side will
remember the Sea gooseberries, or Bladder weed, with the
large lumps on them, which crackle and pop when they
are put into the fire. These are not fruit, but are bladders
of air to keep the plant floating on the water. The
Lion's Tail or Sea Tangle is likewise a great favourite;
it has a solid stem ending in a great number of broad
streamers which bear little clouds of purses full of seeds.
How happy little children are sweeping the sands with
the long brown streamers, the hard stalk fast clasped
in their hands; and others may delight in pulling out the
long round twisted Sea Laces, which grow to such an enor-
mous length that boats some times get entangled in
them; or the Sea Thongs which are flat instead of round,
and grow from little green buttons upon the rocks. Sea
weeds are chiefly useful when burnt; the ashes are called
KELP and are used in the making of soap and of glass.
MOSSES have leaves and stems and bear their seed purses in
a delicate little urn or helmet which shoots up at the top









TABULAR VIEW OF







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THE VEGETABLE KINGDOM.


i


fr


A. Orchis.
i Rose.
k. Auricula.
7. Clematis.
1. Oalk.


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Rose.
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Larger Convolvulus.
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AUTUMN_
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- FLOWERS. .



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KITCHEN VEGE TABLES


a Cabbage.
b Turnip.
r Brocoli.


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AND ROOTS.


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KITCHEN VEGETABLES


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AND ROOTS.


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4 Potato.


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KITCHEN VEGETABLES -


,- Artichoke.
,' I Rhubarb.


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PLANTS USEFULt IN ID)OMSTIC


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EC ONOMT'7 THE ARTS ,r.


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MIustard.
L avendter.
Canary.


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PILATS I USTFC IN DOMIESTIC-


ff.


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EC 0OMY, THE U TS $c.


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FORAGE OR


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e. Red Clover
f Saiitfoin.


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GRAINS .


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a Foxglove.


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TRHIITS .


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~TIIr S. XXIX
1.


dt.


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r .


Ch jerry.
Bramible.
Cranberry.
Barberry.


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r" ~'i I









NEW PARENTS ASSISTANT.


Ladely Published, small folio, with numerous Coloured Illustrations, Price 7 s. 6 d.,


THE INSTRUCTIVE PICTURE-BOOK;

OR

PROGRESSIVE LESSONS FROM THE ANIMAL WORLD
FOUR-FOOTED ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISHES, REPTILES.
TO WHICH ARE PREFIXED
TEN PLATES OF MISCELLANEOUS OBJECTS.
EDITED BY
ADAM WHITE,
ASSISTANT, ZOOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT, BRITISH MUSEUM; AND AUTHOR OF "A POPULAR HISTORY OF MAMMALIA'.


Opinions of the press:


"Edinburgh Advertiser".
Of all the informing picture-books for children we have seen, and
that is not a few, this is the best; it fulfils its name and object; it is a
real picture-book, and it is in the best sense instructive. We may say
of it, as was said in our hearing the other day by an excited horsedea-
ler, who was staring with infinite delight at Rosa Bonheur's "Horse
Fair,"- "Gude!" says he, "its mair than gude -its true,-it micht
for that pairt hae been dune by a horse himself She (Rosa Bonheur)
ken's a' about it." So this book, which Messrs Edmonston and Douglas
have got ready for our small people, might have been done by one of
themselves by a wise child, who knew what children like, and un-
derstand, and want. Many, indeed most, of our modern picture-books
for children are too fine, too artistical, have too much in them, are in
fact for us grown-up children, who have got sentimental and poetic
and dull, and learned the trick of looking before and after. What a
child wants is immediateness, truth, strong colours, definite forms; and
as for distance, or a pathetic sunset, with a look, as Ruskin would say;
into the infinite, a child cares nothing for that; what has he or she to
do with the distant, the pathetic, or the infinite our dear little Geor-
gey Porgey, or Nelly Pelly? Therefore it is that Harrison Weir and
his class, with great genius and knowledge, and some love, fail to strike
the young eye, and fill the young memory.
Now these pictures we have commended, are as simple and plain
and to the point, as childhood itself. Look at that glorious Kingfisher
- will Georgey Porgey ever forget that emblazoned and bitter-eyed
bird ? Will he not on the instant recognize it when he sees him,
"Like mailed angel on a battle day,"
some sunny Saturday in the leafy month of June, as he sits on a stone
in the Whitadder, whither he (Georgey,) has gone a fishing, we
might go over all the beasts and birds, aye and the ladles, and wine-
bottles, filled with "the pure blood of the grape" the fiddles and
pincers, and all the object-lessons all have the same truth and strength,
and unforgetableness, and are in no wise encumbered by what children
know and eare nothing about, in the shape of fine effects and senti-
ment and above all, hints of improvement in the moral line, hints
which these youngsters make a point of never taking. We have tried
them with children, and the best of all criticisms were the looks, and
the exclamations, and the recognition, the brightness, hilarity, and
general horrah! state of mind of the party.
But the pictures ars not all the book- and our enterprising towns-
men need not exclaim as did Rogers over his illustrated poems. "The
book would have been dished if it had not been for the plates." the
letter-press is admirable, almost too good for such small print and big
pages, it also, might have been written by a wise child, or by Bishop
Stanley, it is so plain and homely, and funny, and telling, and happy-
hearted, and so full of the very best and most thorough science in
this respect it is quite pleasant and curious to examine it Mr White
is a thorough-bred naturalist, and speaks the truth of nature in the
love of it, and of her. His power of concealing and yet indicating this
deeper and older knowledge, shows this. He gives, us the small end
of the wedge, the rest is behind widening and deepening and will
be found out by our youngsters by and bye, and all in good time. There-
fore it is, that his descriptions are childlike and never childish, a sort
of affront by the way, which is very common in books condescended
upon by old conceited fogies, for the benefit of the youthful mind, and
an affront which children always detect and resent. Take "the Mole,"
for instance (p. 7): -
"The Mole A wonderful beast,.altogether fitted for living in the
ground &c.
How capitally the words "a wonderful beast" make them open
their young eyes the only fact we miss about our old friend the
moudiwort is the reason for its hair having no one way of laying, and
thus his velvet pile is not hurt by his being obliged to run backwards,
his road, unlike that to Downing Street, not admitting of his turning
his back upon himself or his friends, and he having often to retrograde
like as, but much more safely and gentlemanlikely than my Lord Mar-


quis of Breadalbane. Then there is "the Dormouse", "The Magpie-
a chattering long-tailed bird," "the Mole-Cricket," &c., and even "the
Toad," who is a "famous" (what a child's word!) "enemy of worms."
Nothing can be better than the Saxon renderings of the Latin words.
Bu we must shut up the book, and ourselves. Let Paterfamilias buy
the book instanter, and make his nursery and himself at once merry
and wise. The letter-press is so singularly good, that we would really
like to see it handsomely printed by itself.
The "Scotsman".
This is the first volume of a series of "progressive lessons from the
natural history of animals and plants," edited by Mr Adam White, of
the British Museum, and by Mr R. M. Stark, of Edinburgh. In some
respects it is a model picture-book for children. The plates are large
and well coloured, clear, distinct, characteristic, and not too fine. It
is a pity, however, that the letterpress should be separated from the
plates. That it will be careful and correct, the names of its authors
guarantee, and it is written in a pleasing style. The book is not one
of those scrap-books now common, formed by collecting the illustrations
of all kinds used by the publisher to embellish his books, in which no
one picture has the slightest connection with any other, and of which,
consequently, children, great and small, tire very speedily. Nicely
coloured drawings of common household objects, such as are sure to
delight little ones by showing them how clever they are in recognizing
familiar things, form a vestibule leading to more enduring pleasures.
They are followed by representations of animal life in its various forms,
equally attractive externally, while a reference, to the letterpress in ex-
planation of them shows you the plan of arrangement, which embraces
instruction concerning the great divisions and principal classes of the
animal kingdom. Thus, after a child has exhausted the book as a
collection of pictures, he may be interested in its contents by learning
the history and habits of the living creatures represented. Just as we
admire and wonder at the Chinese carved ivory balls, where each is
more surprising than the one preceding, so here world within world
unfolds itself from the larger animals down to the curious little polypi.
It makes us wish to have an intelligent child beside us in order to par-
ticipate in the delight it cannot but afford. On showing it to a little
deaf mute the other day, his pleasure was unmistakable first, at
finding so many things he knew, and afterwards at finding so many
to inquire about with eager look and gesture. It was a testimony to
the worth of the book in its pictorial aspect, and a proof of the success
with which it unites instruction with pleasure.
Among the ten miscellaneous plates that precede the regular se-
ries, we observe a beautiful representation Plate No. 9 of the
interior of Trinity College Church, which we commend to the attentive
consideration of all intelligent children in Edinburgh, in the hope that
by a knowledge of its beauty they may be inspired with the desire for
its restoration, and in their day and generation aid in the struggle for
that purpose which promises to be prolonged till at least the end of the
century.
The "Athenaeum".
"Here is a famous picture-book, with real animals, nicely coloured
for little people, and big ones also if they please. There are thirty
folio plates, containing the different mammalia, birds, reptiles, and fish-
es, the molluscous, radiated, carnivorous, and granivorous animals.
There is also plenty of information for the young students, very plea-
santly conveyed, and given on very good authority. We dare say this
volume will be as great a favourite in the parlour as it will be in the
nursery." -
The "Spectator".
The figures are of a good size, particularly clear and defined, and
drawn with a fair share of character and intelligence as well as breadth,
the colouring also is marked and positive; so that the facts which it is
desired to make known to the juvenile student of the book, are strongly
impressed, and without being weakened by over detail. The letter press
is careful and readable and contains a good deal of information.




__ I I
L, I 11/ W W jT77MW%4vvj I I g - - : I
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